Understanding signalling pathways mutated in inherited disorders

Lead Research Organisation: University of Dundee

Abstract

My laboratory focuses on unravelling the role of protein post-translational modifications implicated genetically in several human diseases. We currently focus on understanding signalling pathways associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders, hypertension and cancer.
The aim of our research is to work out how phosphorylation or ubiquitylation pathway components pathways are organised, how they recognise signals, how the signal moves down the pathway to elicit physiological responses and to comprehend what goes wrong in human disease. Our laboratory employs state of the art biochemical and molecular technologies required to dissect signal transduction pathways.
To help elaborate chemical inhibitors that specifically disrupt the signalling components that we are working with, we collaborate with the pharmaceutical companies supporting the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) and chemical biologists such as Nathanael Gray (University of Harvard). These tool compounds greatly aid with deciphering the physiological roles that signalling pathways play and establish to what extent inhibiting specific signalling networks suppresses disease.
On all of our projects we aim to collaborate with leading clinicians to ensure that our research is addressing the most important clinical issues and where possible access patient derived cells or tissues to learn more about how disruptions of pathways are linked to disease. I hope that our research and findings will facilitate other scientists’ work in devising new strategies to treat disease.

Technical Summary

Signal transduction is a key process within cells that enables communication between disparate targets to be translated into a physiological response. Often, when such communication is disrupted, aberrant signalling can promote disease development.
Protein phosphorylation and ubiquitylation are two key post-translational modifications that have been implicated a number of different human diseases, involving a litany of target proteins. My laboratory is focused on understanding signalling pathways associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders (LRRK2, Fbxo7, PINK1, Parkin, TTBK2), hyperstension (WNK1, WNK4, SPAK, OSR1, Cullin3 and KLHL3) and cancer (PDK1, Akt, SGK, mTOR, LKB1, ARK5/NUAK1 and AMPK).
We have devoted a significant effort to dissecting the regulation and function of signal transduction components that have recently been found to be mutated in Parkinson’s disease (PINK1, Parkin, LRRK2 and FBXO7) and Spinocerebellar Ataxia, Type 11 (TTBK2). Our data strongly indicates that LRRK2 regulates a protein kinase kinase or phosphatase that targets two phosphorylated residues on LRRK2 (Ser910 and Ser935) that control 14-3-3 binding. The hunt is on to identify these and/or other LRRK2 substrates and then work out how this is linked to Parkinson’s disease.
Gordon’s hypertension syndrome is caused by mutations that increase expression of WNK1 protein kinase as well as specific missense mutations lying within a non-catalytic region of the WNK4 protein kinase. Our findings indicated that mutations in WNK1 and WNK4, induce hypertension by activating the SPAK/OSR1 kinases leading to the stimulation of NCC ion co-transporter activity and kidney salt retention. In ongoing work, we are working to elucidate the roles of Cullin3 and Kelch-like3 E3 ligase and how mutations related to Gordon’s hypertension fit into this pathway. We are also trying to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which the WNK signalling pathway senses chloride levels that play a critical role in regulating its activity.
Finally reduction of the apoptotic pathway has been implicated with misregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Several PDK1-mTOR pathway inhibitors are currently being evaluated in anti-cancer clinical trials. Our laboratory has been heavily involved in investigating and defining the roles of the PDK1 and a priority for our group will be to understand which cancers are most effectively treated with specific signalling inhibitors. We are also focused in undertsanding the roles of a group of SGK family of protein kinases that our research indicates will play a critical role in cancer and defining the sensitivity of cancers to certain kinase inhibitors that are being evaluated in the clinic.
Overall the aim of our research is to work out how these pathways are organised, how they recognise signals, how the signal moves down the pathway to elicit physiological responses and to comprehend what goes wrong in human disease. I hope that these findings will enable researchers to play the engineer in devising new strategies to treat disease.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50

publication icon
Cohen P (2013) Kinase drug discovery--what's next in the field? in ACS chemical biology

 
Description A systematic investigation into the pathogenesis and course of Paskinson's syndrome
Amount £300,000 (GBP)
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States of America
Start 01/2010 
End 01/2015
 
Description CASE studentship - role of the PDK1-SGK pathway in cancer with Astra Zeneca/BBSRC
Amount £97,420 (GBP)
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 10/2010 
End 09/2014
 
Description COLLABORATIVE WORK WITH MJFF • FEDERICO DIEZ TRAVEL
Amount £9,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 09/2016 
End 10/2016
 
Description Collaborative study on the WNK pathway
Amount £51,200 (GBP)
Funding ID 811346 
Organisation Yale University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United States of America
Start 07/2015 
End 06/2016
 
Description Equipment Grant
Amount £270,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 4050480398 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 04/2015 
End 04/2015
 
Description Equipment Grant
Amount £1,244,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 4050376233 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 04/2015 
End 04/2015
 
Description Equipment Grant
Amount £205,000 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2013 
End 03/2014
 
Description Equipment Grant for our mid career investigators
Amount £54,000 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 03/2013 
End 03/2014
 
Description Exploiting Ser910/935 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding to develop biomarkers for LRRK2 activity
Amount £120,431 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2010 
End 01/2012
 
Description Generation of Phospho-Ser65 Parkin and Phospho-Thr257 PINK1 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and characterisation of Total PINK1 rabbit and mouse monoclonal antibodies
Amount $18,552 (USD)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 05/2012 
End 04/2013
 
Description Inhibitors of LRRK2 Protein Kinase
Amount £139,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 07/2013 
End 06/2014
 
Description Kinase Profiling Services
Amount £1,582,000 (GBP)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 03/2013 
End 02/2018
 
Description LEAPS Award to identify LRRK2 substrates
Amount $1,500,000 (USD)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 02/2012 
End 01/2015
 
Description MJFF Leaps Grant
Amount £790,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 08/2015 
End 07/2018
 
Description Network of Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (COEN)
Amount
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 10/2016 
End 10/2018
 
Description PhD Studentship
Amount £146,000 (GBP)
Organisation Parkinson's UK 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2011 
End 01/2015
 
Description PhD Studentship
Amount £146,000 (GBP)
Organisation Parkinson's UK 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2011 
End 01/2015
 
Description PhD iCASE studentship with AZ
Amount £110,000 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/N504221/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 10/2015 
End 09/2019
 
Description Project Grant
Amount $260,000 (USD)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 02/2013 
End 01/2015
 
Description Project Grant
Amount £56,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2012 
End 01/2013
 
Description Project Grant
Amount £161,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2011 
End 01/2013
 
Description Project Grant
Amount £56,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2012 
End 01/2013
 
Description Project Grant:
Amount £161,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2011 
End 01/2013
 
Description Understanding LRRK2 2 year project grant to fund postdoc in lab
Amount £130,000 (GBP)
Organisation Michael J Fox Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States of America
Start 01/2010 
End 01/2012
 
Description Wellcome Trust Collaborative Projects (Modulation of renal NaCl transporter via angiotensin II-WNK4-SPAK signalling pathway)
Amount £230,172 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 01/2010 
End 01/2013
 
Description Aaron M 
Organisation University of Manitoba
Department Department of Immunology
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provision of TAPP1 and TAPP2 knock-in mice
Collaborator Contribution Studying impact of TAPP1 and TAPP2 mutations in B cell signalling responses
Impact Jayachandran, N., Landego, I., Hou, S., Alessi, D. R. and Marshall, A. J. (2016). B-cell-intrinsic function of TAPP adaptors in controlling germinal center responses and autoantibody production in mice. Eur J Immunol Landego, I., Jayachandran, N., Wullschleger, S., Zhang, T. T., Gibson, I. W., Miller, A., Alessi, D. R. and Marshall, A. J. (2012). Interaction of TAPP adapter proteins with phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate regulates B-cell activation and autoantibody production. Eur J Immunol 42, pp. 2760-2770
Start Year 2011
 
Description Andrew W 
Organisation University of Alabama at Birmingham
Department Department of Neurology
Country United States of America 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution developing antibodies to LRRK2
Collaborator Contribution developing antibodies to LRRK2
Impact on going
Start Year 2012
 
Description Andy C 
Organisation Redx Pharma Plc
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provision of reagents technolgy and advice to better study SGK biology in cancer
Collaborator Contribution Use of our expertise and technology and reagents to identify improved inhibitors of the SGK protein kinase
Impact .
Start Year 2015
 
Description Catherine W 
Organisation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Country United States of America 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution .
Collaborator Contribution .
Impact Wang, L., Fan, J., Zhang, C., Francis, J.M., Georghiou, G., Hergert, S., Li, S., Gambe, R., Zhou, C.W., Yang, C., Xiao, S., Cin, P.D., Bowden, M., Kotliar, D., Shukla, S., Brown, J.R. Neuberg, D., Alessi, D. R., Kharchenko, P.V., Livak, K.J. and Wu, C. (2017) Integrated single cell genetic and transcriptional analysis suggests novel private drivers of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Genome Research In the Press
Start Year 2015
 
Description Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (CoEN) award in partnership with the MRC in the UK and DZNE in Germany 
Organisation Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres
Department German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution My Colleague Miratul Muqit and I have recently been awarded a prestiogious Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (CoEN) award in partnership with the MRC in the UK and DZNE in Germany. We will collaborate with the group of Thomas Gasser at the DZNE to identify new pathways by which PINK1 and LRRK2 regulate Parkinson's disease. We have just been awarded the grant my laboratory will coordinate this and working with Miratul Muqit we will undertake much of the biochemical analysis needed
Collaborator Contribution Thomas Gasser's group will undertake much of the genetic analysis required for this project
Impact Grant just starting
Start Year 2016
 
Description Christian P 
Organisation University of Kiel
Department Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking kinase assays to assess effects of novel light sensitive kinase inhibitors
Collaborator Contribution development of novel light sensitive kinase inhibitors
Impact Horbert, R., Pinchuk, B., Davies, P., Alessi, D. and Peifer, C. (2015). Photoactivatable Prodrugs of Antimelanoma Agent Vemurafenib. ACS Chem Biol 10, pp. 2099-2107
Start Year 2015
 
Description D Saur 
Organisation Technical University of Munich
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution advice and reagents and techical support
Collaborator Contribution analysed effect of kinase inhibitors and mutations in various models of human tumours
Impact Schonhuber, N., Seidler, B., Schuck, K., Veltkamp, C., Schachtler, C., Zukowska, M., Eser, S., Feyerabend, T. B., Paul, M. C., Eser, P., Klein, S., Lowy, A. M., Banerjee, R., Yang, F., Lee, C. L., Moding, E. J., Kirsch, D. G., Scheideler, A., Alessi, D. R., Varela, I., Bradley, A., Kind, A., Schnieke, A. E., Rodewald, H. R., Rad, R., Schmid, R. M., Schneider, G. and Saur, D. (2014). A next-generation dual-recombinase system for time- and host-specific targeting of pancreatic cancer. Nat Med 20, pp. 1340-1347 Eser, S., et al including Alessi, D. R. and Saur, D. (2013). Selective Requirement of PI3K/PDK1 Signaling for Kras Oncogene-Driven Pancreatic Cell Plasticity and Cancer. Cancer Cell 23, pp. 406-420
Start Year 2012
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation AstraZeneca
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation AstraZeneca
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Boehringer Ingelheim
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Boehringer Ingelheim
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Johnson & Johnson
Department Janssen Pharmaceutica
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Johnson & Johnson
Department Janssen Pharmaceutica
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Merck
Department Merck Serono
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Merck
Department Merck Serono
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Pfizer Inc
Country United States of America 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT 
Organisation Pfizer Ltd
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution All the Programme Leaders in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit have participated in a major collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry since 1998, termed The Division of Signal Transduction Therapy. From July 2003 to July 2008, the participating pharmaceutical companies were AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co, Merck-Serono and Pfizer. The collaboration was renewed for a further four years in July 2008 with five of these companies (Merck and Co leaving the consortium at this time). This collaboration was renewed for an unprecedented fourth time in July 2013 for a further four years with six pharmaceutical companies (AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Janessen Pharmaceutica), Merck-Serono and Pfizer. Each of the six companies pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease. For more information see http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/overview/DSTT.php
Collaborator Contribution Benefits from DSTT collaboration The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration. 1. It provides an obvious translational outlet to enable our PIs to exploit their research findings. For example, any PI within the MRC-PPU can rapidly let all six pharmaceutical companies know about any new potential exciting research finding that they have made or any drug target that they have identified or validated. This can lead to major collaborations and stimulate one or more of the pharmaceutical companies to initiate a new drug discovery programme. 2. The research support received from this collaboration is invested in the PPU PIs research programmes and provides additional support to several of our Unit's Scientific service teams including our protein production teams, antibody generation team and cloning team. 3. We obtain key reagents including novel inhibitors, genetically modified cell or mice models from our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaborators. 4. The pharmaceutical companies we collaborate with provide us with important knowledge on the most critical research issues of the day for their drug development programmes. This feedback and industry perspective is extremely useful and helps maximise our overall competitiveness. It ensures that the drug discovery research programmes of the PPU PIs are focussed on addressing the most important questions for better understanding and treating disease. 5. The DSTT collaboration greatly benefits our students and postdocs by providing experience in working with industry via their direct involvement in collaborative experiments with pharmaceutical companies. This provides them with a unique insight into the high quality cutting edge research that is taking place within pharmaceutical companies and gives them an awareness of potential careers in industry. This is particularly important given that one of our main priorities is to train tomorrow's industrial researchers and ensure that the future workforce has the high quality scientific and research support skills that the UK economy will be dependent on.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
 
Description DSTT renewal 2016 
Organisation Boehringer Ingelheim
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline and Merck-Serono - each company pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease.
Collaborator Contribution The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
Start Year 2016
 
Description DSTT renewal 2016 
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline and Merck-Serono - each company pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease.
Collaborator Contribution The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
Start Year 2016
 
Description DSTT renewal 2016 
Organisation Merck
Department Merck Serono
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Boehringer-Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline and Merck-Serono - each company pays £600000 per annum over the four year period. The aim of the collaboration is to help the pharmaceutical companies accelerate the development of drugs that inhibit protein and lipid kinases and phosphatases with therapeutic potential for the treatment of disease.
Collaborator Contribution The MRC-PPU benefits in many ways as a result of the DSTT research collaboration.
Impact During the collaboration, the Unit has helped to launch and/or accelerate many drug discovery programmes, some of which have entered human clinical trials. The collaboration led the Unit to develop the technology of protein kinase profiling which has developed into an industry worth over £100 million per annum. It also led to the creation of the European Division of Upstate Incorporated in Dundee which currently employs about 50 people. The Unit's first publication on protein kinase profiling was named in 2009 by the Institute for Scientific Information, Philadelphia as Europe's most cited paper in the field of Cel Biology from 1996-2007, with over 2,200 citations. During the collaboration, the Unit has filed 36 patents and 30 licenses have been taken up by the pharmaceutical industry. The DSTT is widely regarded as a model of how academia and industry should interact for which it received a Queen's Anniversary Award for Higher Education which was presented by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at Buckingham Palace in February 2006. GlaxoSmithKline have announced that their BRAF protein kinase inhibitor Dabrafenib (Tafinlar), has been approved by both the European Commission and the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma associated with the BRAF V600E mutation. Unresectable melanoma is that which cannot be removed by surgery, while metastatic melanoma is that which has spread to other parts of the body. The new drug was developed employing BRAF enzymes generated by researchers in the Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT) in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Exploiting MALDITOFF DUB assay 
Organisation Genentech
Country United States of America 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have developed an new assay to assess the potency and specificity of inhibitors of a family of enzyme termed deubiquitylases. There is increasing interest in the pharmaceutical industry to target these enzymes and we are now seeking to collaborate with companies with an interest in this area in order to exploit the technology we have developed and to search for further more long term collaborative opportunities
Collaborator Contribution We have made our technology available to genentech for a pilot project that has gone very well and will lead to a major publication shortly. We are discussing further collaborations
Impact none as yet but a publication is expected
Start Year 2014
 
Description Genentech 
Organisation Genetech, Inc
Country United States of America 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution consultation on Parkinson's disease projects
Collaborator Contribution consultation on Parkinson's disease projects
Impact None yet
Start Year 2012
 
Description Geoffrey W 
Organisation Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Country United States of America 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Setting up a new assay to monitor binding of Rab proteins and LRRK2
Collaborator Contribution Provision of technology for measuring binding of proteeins within cells by fluorescence approaches
Impact .
Start Year 2016
 
Description Gerardo G 
Organisation National Autonomous University of Mexico
Country Mexico, United Mexican States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking biochemical analysis of WNK signalling pathways as well as provision of advice, reagents and technology
Collaborator Contribution Performing physiological measuremnts of WNK signalling pathway in mice
Impact Melo, Z., de los Heros, P., Cruz-Rangel, S., Vazquez, N., Bobadilla, N. A., Pasantes-Morales, H., Alessi, D. R., Mercado, A. and Gamba, G. (2013). N-terminal serine dephosphorylation is required for KCC3 cotransporter full activation by cell swelling. J Biol Chem 288, pp. 31468-31476 Castaneda-Bueno, M., Cervantes-Perez, L. G., Vazquez, N., Uribe, N., Kantesaria, S., Morla, L., Bobadilla, N. A., Doucet, A., Alessi, D. R. and Gamba, G. (2012). Activation of the renal Na+:Cl- cotransporter by angiotensin II is a WNK4-dependent process. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109, pp. 7929-7934 Rafiqi, F. H., Zuber, A. M., Glover, M., Richardson, C., Fleming, S., Jovanovic, S., Jovanovic, A., O'Shaughnessy, K. M. and Alessi, D. R. (2010). Role of the WNK-activated SPAK kinase in regulating blood pressure. EMBO Mol Med 2, pp. 63-75 San-Cristobal, P., Pacheco-Alvarez, D., Richardson, C., Ring, A. M., Vazquez, N., Rafiqi, F. H., Chari, D., Kahle, K. T., Leng, Q., Bobadilla, N. A., Hebert, S. C., Alessi, D. R., Lifton, R. P. and Gamba, G. (2009). Angiotensin II signaling increases activity of the renal Na-Cl cotransporter through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106, pp. 4384-9
Start Year 2008
 
Description Heather M 
Organisation Mayo Clinic
Country United States of America 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution developing antibodies to LRRK2
Collaborator Contribution developing antibodies to LRRK2
Impact on going
Start Year 2012
 
Description J Baselga 
Organisation Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking functional studies on the SGK1 and SGK3 protein kinases in the field of cancer research
Collaborator Contribution Undertaking xenograph analysis of effects of Akt and SGK inhibitors on tumour development
Impact Bago, R., Sommer, E., Castel, P., Crafter, C., Bailey, F. P., Shpiro, N., Baselga, J., Cross, D., Eyers, P. A. and Alessi, D. R. (2016). The hVps34-SGK3 pathway alleviates sustained PI3K/Akt inhibition by stimulating mTORC1 and tumour growth. EMBO J 35, pp. 1902-1922 Castel, P., Ellis, H., Bago, R., Toska, E., Razavi, P., Carmona, F. J., Kannan, S., Verma, C. S., Dickler, M., Chandarlapaty, S., Brogi, E., Alessi, D. R., Baselga, J. and Scaltriti, M. (2016). PDK1-SGK1 Signaling Sustains AKT-Independent mTORC1 Activation and Confers Resistance to PI3Kalpha Inhibition. Cancer Cell 30, pp. 229-242
Start Year 2015
 
Description Jason B 
Organisation Ubiquigent
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provision of reagents technolgy and advice to help ubiquigent provide services and reagents to its customers
Collaborator Contribution Ubiqigent sells our reagents to customers and also uses our advice reagents and expertise to help provide its customers with improved services
Impact .
Start Year 2010
 
Description Jeremy N 
Organisation Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center
Country United States of America 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Collaborator Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2016
 
Description Jessie rinehart Phosphorylation technology 
Organisation Yale University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Jessie Rinehart and his colleagues have developed new technology to express recombinant proteins that can be stoichiometrically phosphorylated at any residues
Collaborator Contribution We are putting this technology to use to tackle some important problems that our Unit is working on
Impact No papers yet-but this should yield some papers and perhaps additional funding opportunities in the future
Start Year 2013
 
Description Jon E 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking mutational analysis to help study crystal structures of the SGK3 protein kinase
Collaborator Contribution Crystallisation of the SGK3 protein kinase
Impact .
Start Year 2015
 
Description Kevin O 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution provided genetically modified mice, reagents, technology and advice
Collaborator Contribution Undertook blood pressure measuremnts in mice and other physiological experiments
Impact Zhang, J., Siew, K., Macartney, T., O'Shaughnessy, K. M. and Alessi, D. R. (2015). Critical role of the SPAK protein kinase CCT domain in controlling blood pressure. Hum Mol Genet 24, pp. 4545-4558 Rafiqi, F. H., Zuber, A. M., Glover, M., Richardson, C., Fleming, S., Jovanovic, S., Jovanovic, A., O'Shaughnessy, K. M. and Alessi, D. R. (2010). Role of the WNK-activated SPAK kinase in regulating blood pressure. EMBO Mol Med 2, pp. 63-75
Start Year 2009
 
Description Kevin O'Shaughnessy 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Measured blood pressure and ion levels in non-WNK-activatable SPAK knock-in mice
Collaborator Contribution Kevin O'Shaughnessy's group helped measure blood pressure as well as ion levels in the blood and urine in the wild type and SPAK knock-in mice. They also microdissected kidney tubules and immunoblotted these for SPAK as well as various other proteins using antibodies that we generated.
Impact A major paper describing this work has just been published Rafiqi, F.H., Zuber, A.M., Glover, M., Richardson, C., Fleming, S., Jovanovic, S., Jovanovic, A., O'Shaughnessy, K.M., and Alessi, D.R. (2010) Role of the WNK-activated SPAK kinase in regulating blood pressure. EMBO Molecular Medicine 2, 63-75. This paper proves our hypothesis that inhibitors of SPAK and OSR1 should be well tolerated and can be used to lower blood pressure. Based on this MRCT have now started a major programme to develop drugs that inhibit SPAK/OSR1 for the treatment of blood pressure
Start Year 2009
 
Description Kris K 
Organisation Yale University
Department School of Medicine
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking biochemical analysis of WNK signalling pathways as well as provision of advice, reagents and technology
Collaborator Contribution Performing physiological measuremnts of WNK signalling pathway in mice
Impact Zhang, J., Gao, G., Begum, G., Wang, J., Khanna, A. R., Shmukler, B. E., Daubner, G. M., de Los Heros, P., Davies, P., Varghese, J., Bhuiyan, M. I., Duan, J., Zhang, J., Duran, D., Alper, S. L., Sun, D., Elledge, S. J., Alessi, D. R. and Kahle, K. T. (2016). Functional kinomics establishes a critical node of volume-sensitive cation-Cl- cotransporter regulation in the mammalian brain. Sci Rep 6, pp. 35986 Alessi, D. R., Zhang, J., Khanna, A., Hochdorfer, T., Shang, Y. and Kahle, K. T. (2014). The WNK-SPAK/OSR1 pathway: Master regulator of cation-chloride cotransporters. Sci Signal 7, pp. re3 de Los Heros, P., Alessi, D. R., Gourlay, R., Campbell, D. G., Deak, M., Macartney, T. J., Kahle, K. T. and Zhang, J. (2014). The WNK-regulated SPAK/OSR1 kinases directly phosphorylate and inhibit the K+-Cl- co-transporters. Biochem J 458, pp. 559-573 San-Cristobal, P., Pacheco-Alvarez, D., Richardson, C., Ring, A. M., Vazquez, N., Rafiqi, F. H., Chari, D., Kahle, K. T., Leng, Q., Bobadilla, N. A., Hebert, S. C., Alessi, D. R., Lifton, R. P. and Gamba, G. (2009). Angiotensin II signaling increases activity of the renal Na-Cl cotransporter through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106, pp. 4384-9
Start Year 2011
 
Description Kristopher Kahle Collaboration on ion cotransporters 
Organisation Harvard University
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration is helping us understand the function of ion cotransporters that are regulated by the WNK siganlling patwhay
Collaborator Contribution They are providing expertise in this area of physiological research to support our work
Impact we are just submitting a research paper
Start Year 2012
 
Description MJFF LEAPS Collaboration to identify LRRK2 substrates 
Organisation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Country United States of America 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution The purpose of this application was to identify a critical substrate of the LRRK2 Parkinson's kinase. My group coordinated the project and performed many of the key experiments. This was a very successful project that lead to the identification of Rthe first physiological substrates of LRRK2. The paper describing this result is currently under submission
Collaborator Contribution Matthias Mann group (Max Plank) undertook the critical mass spectrometer analysis that lead to the identification of the new LRRK2 substrate. GSK provided many of the key reagents and models that were needed for this project and were enormously supportive
Impact We have obtained over £1 million in new funding from the MJFF as well as a prestigious Network of Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (CoEN) award in partnership with the MRC in the UK and DZNE in Germany to continue this research
Start Year 2012
 
Description MJFF LEAPS Collaboration to identify LRRK2 substrates 
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The purpose of this application was to identify a critical substrate of the LRRK2 Parkinson's kinase. My group coordinated the project and performed many of the key experiments. This was a very successful project that lead to the identification of Rthe first physiological substrates of LRRK2. The paper describing this result is currently under submission
Collaborator Contribution Matthias Mann group (Max Plank) undertook the critical mass spectrometer analysis that lead to the identification of the new LRRK2 substrate. GSK provided many of the key reagents and models that were needed for this project and were enormously supportive
Impact We have obtained over £1 million in new funding from the MJFF as well as a prestigious Network of Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (CoEN) award in partnership with the MRC in the UK and DZNE in Germany to continue this research
Start Year 2012
 
Description MJFF LEAPS Collaboration to identify LRRK2 substrates 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Martinsried
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The purpose of this application was to identify a critical substrate of the LRRK2 Parkinson's kinase. My group coordinated the project and performed many of the key experiments. This was a very successful project that lead to the identification of Rthe first physiological substrates of LRRK2. The paper describing this result is currently under submission
Collaborator Contribution Matthias Mann group (Max Plank) undertook the critical mass spectrometer analysis that lead to the identification of the new LRRK2 substrate. GSK provided many of the key reagents and models that were needed for this project and were enormously supportive
Impact We have obtained over £1 million in new funding from the MJFF as well as a prestigious Network of Centres of Excellence in Neurodegeneration (CoEN) award in partnership with the MRC in the UK and DZNE in Germany to continue this research
Start Year 2012
 
Description MRC HGU 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Human Genetics Unit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution advice and reagents and techical support
Collaborator Contribution They undertook the bulk of the experimentation
Impact .
Start Year 2010
 
Description MRC Harwell 
Organisation MRC Harwell
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Engage in discussion about mouse lines
Collaborator Contribution Supply of mouse lines to investigate PD mutations and the Rab pathway
Impact On going
Start Year 2015
 
Description Merck & Co 
Organisation Merck
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution LRRK2 inhibitor testing
Collaborator Contribution LRRK2 inhibitor design
Impact Provided MLi-2 for this publication Ito, G., Katsemonova, K., Tonelli, F., Lis, P., Baptista, M. A., Shpiro, N., Duddy, G., Wilson, S., Ho, P. W., Ho, S. L., Reith, A. D. and Alessi, D. R. (2016). Phos-tag analysis of Rab10 phosphorylation by LRRK2: a powerful assay for assessing kinase function and inhibitors. Biochem J 473, pp. 2671-2685
Start Year 2013
 
Description Michael S 
Organisation University of Ottawa
Department Brain and Mind Research Institute
Country Canada 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution drug targets to LRRK2
Collaborator Contribution drug targets to LRRK2
Impact on going
Start Year 2016
 
Description Mike C 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department MRC Centre for Inflammation Research
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Undertook key experiments on TTBK2 kinase and advice and reagents and techical support
Collaborator Contribution Undertook detailed synapse function studies and generation of primary neurons
Impact Zhang, N., Gordon, S. L., Fritsch, M. J., Esoof, N., Campbell, D. G., Gourlay, R., Velupillai, S., Macartney, T., Peggie, M., van Aalten, D. M., Cousin, M. A. and Alessi, D. R. (2015). Phosphorylation of Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2A at Thr84 by Casein Kinase 1 Family Kinases Controls the Specific Retrieval of Synaptotagmin-1. J Neurosci 35, pp. 2492-2507
Start Year 2013
 
Description Nanotools 
Organisation nanoTools Antikörpertechnik
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution testing antinbodies to various Parkinson disease (PD) targets
Collaborator Contribution design antibodies to various PD related targets
Impact Ongoing
Start Year 2015
 
Description Nathanael Gray Chemical Biology 
Organisation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Department Department of Cancer Biology
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We undertake the biological characterization of tool compounds that the Gray lab generates that target the enzymes we are working with
Collaborator Contribution We have thus far developed some state of the art new inhibitors that can be used to dissect biological roles of the Parkinson's disease LRRK2 protein kinase
Impact We have thus far co-authored 7 research papers and obtained two major Michael J Fox Foundation grant award to understand how mutations in LRRK2 cause Parkinson's disease
Start Year 2010
 
Description Neil B 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Nuffield Department of Medicine
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking mutational analysis to help study crystal structures of the WNK protein kinase
Collaborator Contribution Crystallisation of the WNK protein kinase
Impact Schumacher, F. R., Sorrell, F. J., Alessi, D. R., Bullock, A. N. and Kurz, T. (2014). Structural and biochemical characterization of the KLHL3-WNK kinase interaction important in blood pressure regulation. Biochem J 460, pp. 237-246
Start Year 2013
 
Description Nic D 
Organisation University of Sydney
Country Australia, Commonwealth of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Collaborator Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2016
 
Description PI of the "Mouse Models to Accelerate Drug Discovery: A UK-China Network 
Organisation MRC Harwell
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI of the "Mouse Models to Accelerate Drug Discovery: A UK-China Network" MRC International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. The aim of this is to generate and phenotype in detail over 100 genes that are involved in regulating ubiquitin biology and have been implicated in human disease.
Collaborator Contribution .
Impact .
Start Year 2012
 
Description Paul K F 
Organisation Avacta Group
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provision of reagents technolgy and advice to generate new affimers to better study protein phosphorylation
Collaborator Contribution Use of our expertise and technology and reagents to develop novel affimers
Impact .
Start Year 2016
 
Description Role of LRRK2 phosphorylating Rab GTPase in Parkinson's 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Martinsried
Country Germany, Federal Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was the PI of a major MJFF collaboration that lead to the discovery that LRRK2 Parkinson's kinase's phosphorylates and inhibits multiple Rab GTPases. This was very exciting as this was the first physiological substrate for LRRK2 to be identified. Our laboratory coordinated the project and laed on many of the key experiments in this project
Collaborator Contribution The group of Matthias Mann undertook all the mass spectrometer experiments in this project and Susan Pfeffer's laboratory is undertaking the cell biology analysis
Impact Grant Income that funds research of two postdoctoral researchers in my lab
Start Year 2015
 
Description Role of LRRK2 phosphorylating Rab GTPase in Parkinson's 
Organisation Stanford University
Department Department of Biochemistry
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I was the PI of a major MJFF collaboration that lead to the discovery that LRRK2 Parkinson's kinase's phosphorylates and inhibits multiple Rab GTPases. This was very exciting as this was the first physiological substrate for LRRK2 to be identified. Our laboratory coordinated the project and laed on many of the key experiments in this project
Collaborator Contribution The group of Matthias Mann undertook all the mass spectrometer experiments in this project and Susan Pfeffer's laboratory is undertaking the cell biology analysis
Impact Grant Income that funds research of two postdoctoral researchers in my lab
Start Year 2015
 
Description Role of LRRK2[R1441G] mutations in Parkinson's 
Organisation University of Hong Kong
Department Li Ka Shing School of Medicine
Country Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The group of Prof Ho have generated an LRRK2[R1441G] knock-in mouse that mimics one of the major disease causing mutations in human Parkinson's patients. We have initiated a major collaboration to discover how this mutation induces phosphorylation of Rab isoforms by LRRK2 and work out how this is linked to development of Parkinson's disease.
Collaborator Contribution Providing LRRK2[R1441G] knock-in mouse and helping with some of the experiments
Impact none as yet-but we should have some interesting data that should be published in 2016
Start Year 2015
 
Description Shinichi U 
Organisation Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Department Department of Neurology and Neurological Science
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking biochemical analysis of WNK signalling pathways as well as provision of advice, reagents and technology
Collaborator Contribution Performing physiological measuremnts of WNK signalling pathway in mice
Impact Nishida, H., Sohara, E., Nomura, N., Chiga, M., Alessi, D. R., Rai, T., Sasaki, S. and Uchida, S. (2012). Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Pathway Activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC Phosphorylation Cascade in Hyperinsulinemic db/db Mice. Hypertension 60, pp. 981-990 Oi, K., Sohara, E., Rai, T., Misawa, M., Chiga, M., Alessi, D. R., Sasaki, S. and Uchida, S. (2012). A minor role of WNK3 in regulating phosphorylation of renal NKCC2 and NCC co-transporters in vivo. Biol Open 1, pp. 120-127 Susa, K., Kita, S., Iwamoto, T., Yang, S. S., Lin, S. H., Ohta, A., Sohara, E., Rai, T., Sasaki, S., Alessi, D. R. and Uchida, S. (2012). Effect of heterozygous deletion of WNK1 on the WNK-OSR1/ SPAK-NCC/NKCC1/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney and blood vessels. Clin Exp Nephrol 16, pp. 530-538 Chiga, M., Rafiqi, F. H., Alessi, D. R., Sohara, E., Ohta, A., Rai, T., Sasaki, S. and Uchida, S. (2011). Phenotypes of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II caused by the WNK4 D561A missense mutation are dependent on the WNK-OSR1/SPAK kinase cascade. J Cell Sci 124, pp. 1391-1395
Start Year 2011
 
Description Suzanne P 
Organisation Stanford University
Department School of Medicine
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Collaborator Contribution collaborating equally on investigating Rabs as biomarkers for PD
Impact on going
Start Year 2015
 
Description Timothy G 
Organisation University of Pittsburgh
Department Pittsburgh Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Country United States of America 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Provisions of Regeants, technology and experimental support to measure the impact that rotenone has on LRRK2 protein kinase activity
Collaborator Contribution Undertaking assays to measure LRRK2 and Rab phosphorylation using reagents provided by us
Impact ,
Start Year 2016
 
Description We initiated a major Collaboration with Nathanael Gray at the Dana Farber Cancer insititute to develop LRRK2 inibitors 
Organisation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Department Department of Cancer Biology
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We were able to help Nathanael Gray develop a potent LRRK2 inhibitor and we undertook all the in vivo testing of this inhibitor to demonstrate that it specifically inhibited LRRK2 in vivo
Collaborator Contribution I as well as my colleagues at the MRC-PPU have many additional collaborations with Nathaneal Gray who is an amazing chemical biologist. The work he is doing has the possibility to greatly aid our research. We are even now trying to recruit him to Dundee!
Impact Grant application 2011-2013 Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) Project Grant, (Joint with Nathanael Gray [Main Applicant]), Dundee MRC-PPU share US$254,400 Plus the following 2 papers 181. Deng, X., Dzamko, N., Prescott, A.R., Davies, P., Liu, Q., Yang, Q., Lee, J.D., Patricelli, M.P., Nomanbhoy, T.K., Alessi, D.R. and Gray, N.S. (2011) Characterization of a selective inhibitor of the Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2. Nature Chemical Biology 7, 203-205. Zhang, T., Inesta-Vaquera, F., Niepel, M., Zhang, J., Ficarro, S., Machleidt, T., Xie, T., Marto, J.A., NKim, N., Sim, T., Laughlin, J.D., Park, H., LoGrasso, P. V., Patricelli, M., Nomanbhoy, T.K., Sorger, P/K., Alessi, D.R. and Gray, N.S. (2011) Discovery of potent and selective covalent inhibitors of JNK. Chemistry & Biology In the Press
Start Year 2009
 
Description We initiated a major Collaboration with Nathanael Gray at the Dana Farber Cancer insititute to develop LRRK2 inibitors 
Organisation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Department Department of Cancer Biology
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We were able to help Nathanael Gray develop a potent LRRK2 inhibitor and we undertook all the in vivo testing of this inhibitor to demonstrate that it specifically inhibited LRRK2 in vivo
Collaborator Contribution I as well as my colleagues at the MRC-PPU have many additional collaborations with Nathaneal Gray who is an amazing chemical biologist. The work he is doing has the possibility to greatly aid our research. We are even now trying to recruit him to Dundee!
Impact Grant application 2011-2013 Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) Project Grant, (Joint with Nathanael Gray [Main Applicant]), Dundee MRC-PPU share US$254,400 Plus the following 2 papers 181. Deng, X., Dzamko, N., Prescott, A.R., Davies, P., Liu, Q., Yang, Q., Lee, J.D., Patricelli, M.P., Nomanbhoy, T.K., Alessi, D.R. and Gray, N.S. (2011) Characterization of a selective inhibitor of the Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2. Nature Chemical Biology 7, 203-205. Zhang, T., Inesta-Vaquera, F., Niepel, M., Zhang, J., Ficarro, S., Machleidt, T., Xie, T., Marto, J.A., NKim, N., Sim, T., Laughlin, J.D., Park, H., LoGrasso, P. V., Patricelli, M., Nomanbhoy, T.K., Sorger, P/K., Alessi, D.R. and Gray, N.S. (2011) Discovery of potent and selective covalent inhibitors of JNK. Chemistry & Biology In the Press
Start Year 2009
 
Description Youcef M 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking assays to study inhibitors of the WNK signalling pathway as well as advice, reagents and technology
Collaborator Contribution Generation of novel kinase inhibitors that tartget components of the WNK signalling pathway
Impact .
Start Year 2015
 
Description Another Partner for LRRK2: Will This Relationship Endure? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Comment and perspective on the significance of a paper describing a new LRRK2 protein interactor to researchers (Martin, et al. Ribosomal Protein s15 Phosphorylation Mediates LRRK2 Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's Disease. Cell. 2014 Apr 10;157(2))


Dr. Alessi's comments provide perspective regarding novel findings on the kinase LRRK2 and their impact in the Parkinson's disease research field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/another-partner-lrrk2-will-relationship-endure
 
Description Cafe Science Presentation by Miratul Muqit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Cafe Science attracts a diverse range of speakers in all branches of science addressing audiences of around 100 members of the public. Miratul Parkinson's disease and recent research advances

Miratul's talk was publicised in the Dundee Courier and Evening telegrapgh
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Discussion with influential Scottish GP 21/12/2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 21 Dec 2015
I spent 2.5 hours talking to Dr James Colville Laird and his daughter Alisa Laird about the importance of protein phosphorylation and ubiquitylation in medical research. I also showed them round the MRC-PPU and School of Life Sciences research facilities. Dr Laird who is one of Scotland's most well know general practitioner and has greatly contributed to develop emergency medicine training for rural health professionals practice for accident and emergency


Too early to say
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Dundee Science Festival 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As a part of the one of the events organized by the MRC-PPU - The Wonders of the Brain: Big and Small! - visitors were encouraged to partake in a trivia challenge, all as they journeyed through the exhibit where they learned about the brain, viewed models from different species, and evaluated example MRIs and illustrations that highlighted changes that occur during disease. The games that were a part of this exhibit were also a great hit as children matched neurotransmitter 'vesicles' with the proper receptor, made neurons out pipe-cleaner, made their very own thinking caps and 'trained their brain' using memory and motor games.

The MRC PPU hosted 2 large events at the 2014 Dundee Science Festival and engaged the public -- from young children, to parents and grandparents. Through trivia and direct interaction, the public learned about the impact of MRC PPU research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Forthill Primary School Visit - June, 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Scientists and support staff from the MRC PPU recently enjoyed a visit with a P3 class at Forthill Primary for a fun morning of hands on experiments. Overall, the morning proved to be a big hit and provided a fun introduction to hands-on general science experiments for the P3 children.


There was plenty of loud vocal appreciation from the children and assurances from many that scientist is now their primary career choice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Helped organise a Visit to our Unit of ~40 parkinson's patients + family 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Workshop Facilitator
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact ~40 patients and family attended a Q&A session on our Parkinson's disease research that was then followed by a visit of our research facilities. This was part of the MRC centenary celebration events

We obtained very positive feedback
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/news_and_seminars/mrc_unit_news.php
 
Description Interviews to mark the 50th PMC DSTT meeting with our pahramceutical company collaborators 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact helped publicize our DSTT pharmaceutical company collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/news_and_seminars/mrc_unit_news.php
 
Description Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interviewed on Wave101 radiostation following this press release

Press Release
Scientists have developed a new method of measuring the activity of disease-causing mutations in the LRRK2 gene, a major cause of inherited Parkinson's disease.

The team believes this breakthrough, which is published in the Biochemical Journal, could help pave the way for future development of a clinical test that could facilitate evaluation of drugs to target this form of the condition.

"It's important to better understand how disruption in LRRK2 biology causes Parkinson's disease and whether a drug that targeted the LRRK2 enzyme would offer therapeutic benefit," said lead study author Professor Dario Alessi from the University of Dundee.

Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson's disease (~1% total cases). The most common disease-causing mutation in this gene increases the activity of the LRRK2 protein (enzyme) three-fold, which implies that the increase in activity of the protein may contribute towards the symptoms of the disease in these patients. It also suggests that drugs that reduce the activity of the LRRK2 protein (LRRK2 inhibitors) may help treat patients with this form of inherited Parkinson's disease.

"Current drug treatments only deal with symptoms of the condition, such as tremors, but do not affect the progression of Parkinson's disease. An important question is whether a LRRK2 therapy might have potential to slow progression of the condition, which no other current therapy is able to do," commented Alessi.

When the LRRK2 protein is active, it stops another cellular protein called Rab10 from fulfilling its function in the body. There are many proteins in the Rab family, and a number of them have been shown to be low in number or deactivated in different forms of Parkinson's disease. The new method, which was developed using a mouse model, was established by a collaboration of researchers from the University of Dundee, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, GSK and the University of Hong Kong. It analyses how much of the Rab10 protein has been deactivated - a process where phosphate groups are added to the Rab10 molecules by the LRRK2 protein - as a measure of heightened LRRK2 protein activity.

"The prediction is that elevation of LRRK2 activity leads to Parkinson's disease, and this is now testable using our assay," said Alessi. "The expectation is that if a sub-group of patients can be identified with elevated LRRK2 activity, these individuals might benefit most from LRRK2 inhibitors."

This new experimental assay is straightforward, only requires small amounts of sample material and is suitable for adapting to analyse large samples, in contrast to current mass spectrometry technology that is more complex and cumbersome and requires larger sample sizes.

While acknowledging that more work is needed, the researchers believe this breakthrough could help with future drug developments for patients with this form of Parkinson's disease.

"I am hopeful that the new technology elaborated on in our study will greatly aide future work on defining the role that LRRK2 plays in Parkinson's disease. I am also particularly excited about the potential of the methodology we have elaborated, especially if it could be exploited to assess LRRK2 activity in Parkinson's patients and accelerate development and evaluation of LRRK2 drug candidates," Alessi explained.

The next steps for the researchers are to develop further tests to better detect and measure Rab protein deactivation and correlate elevated Rab10 deactivation with Parkinson's disease in samples from human patients. They believe that measuring the level of Rab10 deactivation, for example in human blood samples, could allow researchers to test the efficacy of new drug candidates.

"The identification earlier this year, by Alessi and colleagues, of Rab proteins as substrates of LRRK2 was a crucial step in unraveling the role of LRRK2 in the neurodegeneration underlying Parkinson's disease," commented Professor Aideen Sullivan from University College Cork, an expert in Parkinson's disease and Editor in Chief of the new Portland Press journal Neuronal Signaling.

"This new study has capitalized on their previous work by developing a method that can measure Rab10 deactivation in small samples, giving an indication of LRRK2 activity," she added. "If this method can be applied to human samples, it will be a significant step toward earlier and more definitive diagnosis of Parkinson's, a disease of steadily increasing prevalence that currently affects over 10 million people worldwide."

A commentary by Dr Patrick Eyers, University of Liverpool, accompanying the research paper will be published later this month in the same journal.

Commenting on the research Eyers said: "It is exciting to see how rapidly the LRRK2 field is developing. The methodology described in this paper expands the tools available to assess the effects of LRRK2-targeted drugs in Parkinson's disease models, and also potentially in samples derived from Parkinson's patients with activating mutations in LRRK2."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Lay member talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact In November 2016 giving a public talk to the Lay members of Parkinson's UK in Leeds that is entitled "Decoding the LRRK2 Parkinson's Gene"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description MRC-PPU Collaboration with Baldragon Academy 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The Medical Research Council's Protein Phosphorylation Ubiquitylation Unit (MRCPPU), part of The University of Dundee, has prioritized public engagement in an effort to engage the general public and ensure that the research activities and breakthroughs are communicated to the community. Of equal importance in these communication efforts is educational outreach to students within the Dundee community.

Thus, during session 2014 -2015 and 2015-2016 school year, the MRC-PPU will partner with a local secondary school -- Baldragon Academy (BA). Teachers in BA's Science Department will collaborate with scientists at the MRC-PPU in an educational outreach effort (see Appendix 1). The purpose of this project is to increase interest and engagement in science and related careers. It will be starting in August 2014 with the S1 pupils.

Scientists from the unit will be working with the pupils on a monthly basis at the school during their science classes and will be providing them with opportunities to take part in various science experiments and demonstrations (aligned with Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence). The scientists are leaders in their field of research and as such come from all over the world. They are currently based in Dundee."


Thus far, student have been very enthusiastic about the labs and very receptive to the volunteers. They have asked a multitude of quesitons and have even asked volunteers back to visit.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description MRC-PPU Collaboration with Baldragon Academy 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The Medical Research Council's Protein Phosphorylation Ubiquitylation Unit (MRCPPU), part of The University of Dundee, has prioritized public engagement in an effort to engage the general public and ensure that the research activities and breakthroughs are communicated to the community. Of equal importance in these communication efforts is educational outreach to students within the Dundee community.

Thus, during session 2014 -2015 and 2015-2016 school year, the MRC-PPU will partner with a local secondary school -- Baldragon Academy (BA). Teachers in BA's Science Department will collaborate with scientists at the MRC-PPU in an educational outreach effort (see Appendix 1). The purpose of this project is to increase interest and engagement in science and related careers. It will be starting in August 2014 with the S1 pupils.

Scientists from the unit will be working with the pupils on a monthly basis at the school during their science classes and will be providing them with opportunities to take part in various science experiments and demonstrations (aligned with Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence). The scientists are leaders in their field of research and as such come from all over the world. They are currently based in Dundee.

Thus far, student have been very enthusiastic about the labs and very receptive to the volunteers. They have asked a multitude of questions and have even asked volunteers back to visit. We have also had numerous students of different ages from the school ask to participate in work experience activities to learn more about the Unit and science in general.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting with Trustees of a Charitable Trust 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact I met with the Trustees of the J MacDonald Menzies charitable trust (Sandy MacDonald, Victoria Allan and Caroline Dive). The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the Parkinson's disease research that we are doing in the unit and the progress that one of the students Kristin Balk who they are supporting is making
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Mythbusters Case Study for Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Writer from ABPI contacted Dr. Alessi to learn more about the DSTT model so that she might utilize it as an example of a successful collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and a university. This is for a myth busters campaign the ABPI putting together exploring the common myths around the pharmaceutical industry. The myth she wished to use this case study for is: Universities create valuable discoveries and then we (the pharmaceutical industry) swoop in and take all the credit.

Highlighting the DSTT model provided ABPI with a concrete example of the positive impact public/private partnerships between academia and industry can have for moving therapeutics forward.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Open Letter - Scottish Referendum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A group of eminent Scottish medical experts have warned that independence would seriously damage research funding for Scotland's universities and medical schools.

The open letter from 14 experts, including senior staff from all five of the country's main medical schools, said they had grave concerns that Scotland's world-leading biomedical and life sciences research would suffer if Scotland sleepwalks into leaving the UK.

The letter, coordinated by Sir David Carter, a former chief medical officer in Scotland, said Scottish universities did disproportionately well out of the UK's research funding system and from the UK's charitable and medical foundation grants.

Dr. Alessi's signature and viewpoints, while his own, brought to light in the general public, the potential deleterious impact a 'Yes' vote would have had upon Scottish scientific research funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/may/23/scottish-independence-research-funding-medical-exper...
 
Description Parkinson's Fundraising Musical Concert - 22/11/15 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact MRC PPU investigators (Drs. Sammler, Muqit and Das) attended on behalf of the Unit. Dr. Sammler spoke about the Unit's research and engaged with patients.

This was a light-hearted musical event whose goal was truly for attendees to enjoy their time, all with the purpose of raising funds for Parkinson's research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Parkinson's Open Day 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact As part of the MRC's week of Centenary Celebrations, the MRC-PPU held an Open Day on Parkinson's disease to showcase cutting research being undertaken at the Unit that one day may lead to new treatments for this devastating condition. Highlights included discussions about current targets implicated in PD and the potential for disease modification, as well as an explanation of the the drug development process.


Visitors were very enthusiastic and asked many questions during the talks as well as during the lab tours. As this was the first time for many, they appreciated learning about the breadth of research -- from basic science to therapeutic development -- that is being undertaken at The University of Dundee.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Parkinson's Open Day 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Given the positive feedback from a previous event, the MRC-PPU held an Open Day on Parkinson's disease to showcase cutting research being undertaken at the Unit that one day may lead to new treatments for this devastating condition. Highlights included discussions about current targets implicated in PD and the potential for disease modification, as well as an explanation of the the drug development process.


Visitors were very enthusiastic and asked many questions during the talks as well as during the lab tours. As this was the first time for many, they appreciated learning about the breadth of research -- from basic science to therapeutic development -- that is being undertaken at The University of Dundee.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Parkinson's UK Patient Group Visit - 28/2/15 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Dr. Alessi gave a public engagement talk on Saturday morning (28th Feb 2015) to a group of ~30 Parkinson's patients and their families. This is the Edinburgh Branch of Parkinson's UK and the group called the ERIG (Edinburgh Research Interest Group).

Professor Alessi gave an hour talk on the importance of research in Parkinson's disease emphasising what your Unit was doing and why he thought that this was very important. The talk lasted about an hour and he spent about 90 min talking to the members of the group. The talk was held at the SCRM building at the University of Edinburgh Little France. Patients asked numerous questions about the current state of disease modifying treatments for Parkinson's disease
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Parkinson's disease test could be near after Dundee scientists make breakthrough 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article published in
The Sun, The Mirror, The Herald and The Courier

Web edits
Parkinson's disease could be slowed by new drugs (Web)
MSN UK - 30/07/2016
Parkinson's disease test could be near after Dundee scientists make breakthrough (Web)
Daily Mail - 29/07/2016
Is a test for Parkinson's in sight? Breakthrough sheds light on faulty gene behind inherited condition with hopes drugs could target symptoms sooner (Web)
Daily Mail - 29/07/2016
Genetic Breakthrough Could Produce Drugs To Slow Down Parkinson?s Disease (Web)
Yahoo! UK and Ireland - 29/07/2016
Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease (Web)
Biocompare - 29/07/2016
Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease (Web)
EurekAlert - 29/07/2016
Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease Biochemical Society 12m (Web)
EurekAlert - 29/07/2016
Is a exam for Parkinson's in sight? Breakthrough sheds light on inadequate gene behind hereditary condition with hopes drugs could aim symptoms sooner (Web)
HealthMediciNet.com - 29/07/2016
Parkinson's disease test could be near after Dundee scientists make breakthrough (Web)
HealthMediciNet.com - 29/07/2016
Is a test for Parkinson's in sight? Breakthrough sheds light on faulty gene behind inherited condition with hopes drugs could target symptoms sooner (Web)
HealthMediciNet.com - 29/07/2016
Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson?s disease (Web)
HealthMediciNet.com - 29/07/2016
Lab method sheds light on how genetic mutations cause inherited Parkinson's disease (Web)
Medical Xpress - 29/07/2016
Parkinson's could be slowed by new drugs if research on gene-tracking pays off (Web)
Mirror.co.uk - 29/07/2016
Is a test for Parkinson's in sight? Breakthrough sheds light on faulty gene behind inherited condition with hopes drugs could target symptoms sooner (Web)
NewsReality.com - 29/07/2016
Parkinson's disease test could be near after Dundee scientists make breakthrough (Web)
NewsReality.com - 29/07/2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3714406/Is-test-Parkinson-s-sight-Breakthrough-sheds-light...
 
Description Parkinson's donor visit to the MRCPPU 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Nicola Heser and her son Andrew recently visited the MRCPPU laboratories to learn about the research being carried out by the groups of Miratul Muqit and Dario Alessi to better understand the causes of Parkinson's disease. In particular they heard about the role of the PINK1 and LRRK2 kinases respectively including recent work from their labs pinpointing their regulation of a family of small second messenger molecules known as Rab GTPases. This discovery represents the first 'hub' molecule that can be regulated by different Parkinson's genes. It is also likely to lead to new methods to monitor the activity of these kinases that will facilitate the development of drugs targeting these important enzymes in patients with Parkinson's.

Nicola who herself has been diagnosed with Parkinson's and is under the care of Miratul at Ninewells Hospital then donated a cheque arising from a collection raised at her mother's 80th birthday to support research into the disease.

Miratul said "we are extremely grateful to Nicola's mother and all the family for this generous donation which will be extremely important for our research studies into Parkinson's at the MRC unit".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/news_and_seminars/mrc_unit_news.php?year=2016&month=August#n577
 
Description Participating in Attending CDKl5 LouLou foundation conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Attending CDKl5 LouLou foundation conference in London to talk with patient families, clinicians, Pharma representatives and researchers to help search for a treatment for CDKL5 deficiency disorder
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.curecdkl5.org/
 
Description Presented the Betsy Sinclair Memorial Lecture of Diabetes UK, Edinburgh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is a special lecture held annually in Edinburgh that is organised by Diabetes UK

Had a lot of positive feedback from audience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2009
 
Description Press Announcement DSTT funding renewal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact press release and an interview for Radio Wave 102

Award-winning academia-Industry collaboration attracts £7 million to accelerate drug discovery

The University of Dundee has announced renewed funding of more than £7million from three of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies to support its Division of Signal Transduction Therapy (DSTT).

Pharmaceutical giants Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline and Merck will provide support of £7.2 million until 2020, enabling scientists at Dundee to continue their fundamental research in multiple therapeutic areas, including cancer, arthritis, lupus, hypertension and Parkinson's disease. This new round of funding secures 38 posts at Dundee for the next four years.

The DSTT comprises 22 research teams at the School of Life Sciences at the University, 12 of which are based within the Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit (MRC-PPU).

Founded in 1998, expanded in 2003 and renewed in 2008 and 2012, the DSTT is the world's longest running collaboration between academic research laboratories and the pharmaceutical industry. The latest renewal means the consortium has attracted £58 million in funding since its inception. It is widely regarded as a model for how academia and industry can interact productively for which it was awarded a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in 2006.

Professor Dario Alessi, Director of the MRC-PPU, said, "I am absolutely thrilled that we have been able to renew this remarkable 18-year flagship collaboration with our pharmaceutical partners. This alliance has never been more important as our Dundee-based researchers are making such tremendous progress in better understanding human diseases such as Parkinson's, immune conditions and cancer.

"The DSTT collaboration provides a unique platform through which our Dundee investigators and pharmaceutical companies can work together in order to launch and accelerate the early stage development of new drugs. It also provides our students and postdocs an opportunity to gain vital experience working closely with pharmaceutical companies that stimulates some of them to embark on a lifelong career of drug discovery to develop better treatments or even cures for human disease."

The DSTT works to help identify new drug targets and then accelerate the early phase development of improved treatments for major global diseases. It was founded by Professor Sir Philip Cohen and Professor Sir Pete Downes, the current Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University. In July 2012, Professor Dario Alessi assumed the Directorship of the DSTT with Sir Philip and Professor Doreen Cantrell acting at Deputy Directors.

The DSTT helps the participating pharmaceutical companies to develop improved drugs that target major 'controller' proteins in the body, focusing on enzymes called kinases and components of the ubiquitin system.

The ubiquitin system is an emerging area of drug discovery in which Dundee has developed world-leading strengths, including the first method of screening for potential drugs against enzymes in the ubiquitin system in a more physiological way. The University is one of the world's largest centres for the study of kinases and the ubiquitin system, with some 200 scientific and support staff working in this area.
Dr Malcolm Skingle, Director of academic liaison at GSK, said, "At GSK, we believe that collaboration is key to helping convert groundbreaking science in to medicines. Working with experts outside our own labs enables us to benefit from each other's skills and experience, as well as sharing risk - which makes all partners well placed to pursue the most promising avenues of research.

"We're delighted to be renewing our long-lasting alliance with Dundee, which exemplifies this collaborative approach. Working alongside scientists from Dundee, we're making inroads in our understanding of a broad range of chronic diseases, and we believe that by continuing our work together we'll be able to accelerate the translation of this knowledge in to new treatments for patients."

Dr Clive Wood, Corporate SVP of Discovery Research at Boehringer Ingelheim, said, "We have been delighted to be a member of the consortium and work with the outstanding scientific teams in Dundee. We have gained early insights that have helped to spark in-house discussions, ideation for new therapeutic concepts and generate better understanding of new cellular mechanisms of disease. We look forward to our future work together. "
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Press release Biochemical Journal Paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A press release for the following paper
Ito, G., Katsemonova, K., Tonelli, F., Lis, P., Baptista, M. A., Shpiro, N., Duddy, G., Wilson, S., Ho, P. W., Ho, S. L., Reith, A. D. and Alessi, D. R. (2016).
Phos-tag analysis of Rab10 phosphorylation by LRRK2: a powerful assay for assessing kinase function and inhibitors.
Biochem J 473, pp. 2671-2685

was picked up by the following media outlets

Daily Mail http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3714406/Is-test-Parkinson-s-sight-Breakthrough-sheds-light-faulty-gene-inherited-condition-hopes-drugs-target-symptoms-sooner.html

This is Money http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/health/article-3714406/Is-test-Parkinson-s-sight-Breakthrough-sheds-light-faulty-gene-inherited-condition-hopes-drugs-target-symptoms-sooner.html

Science Daily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160729092511.htm

EcoDiario.es http://ecodiario.eleconomista.es/salud/noticias/7739723/08/16/Un-nuevo-metodo-de-laboratorio-arroja-luz-sobre-como-las-mutaciones-geneticas-causan-Parkinson-hereditario.html#

The Daily Mirror http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/parkinsons-could-slowed-new-drugs-8524277

News Medical http://www.news-medical.net/news/20160729/Novel-method-sheds-light-on-how-disruption-in-LRRK2-gene-causes-inherited-Parkinsons-disease.aspx

infosalus.com http://www.infosalus.com/salud-investigacion/noticia-nueva-luz-mutaciones-geneticas-causan-parkinson-hereditario-20160801081433.html

The Sun in print (see mp+ platform)
Today Topics http://www.todaytopics.com/lab-method-sheds-light-on-how-genetic-mutations-cause-inherited-parkinsons-disease/50968/

Medical News Today http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/312036.php

Parkinson's News Today http://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2016/08/02/new-assay-analyzing-parkinsons-enzyme-activity-might-aid-drug-development/

Drug Target Review http://www.drugtargetreview.com/13343/content-type/industry-news/study-inherited-parkinsons/

Parkinson's UK http://www.parkinsons.org.uk/news/2-august-2016/research-finds-way-measure-parkinsons-gene-mutation

Blog - Margie's journal http://margiesjournal2.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/is-test-for-parkinsons-in-sight_60.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public Lecture by Miratul Muqit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact A talk describing recent research progress in parkinson's disease with around 50 patients and their relatives as the audience

Miratul got lots of positive feedback from organisers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Request for Comment About The Scottish Referendum - Blakeway Productions 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Journalist working for Blakeway Productions spoke with Dr. Alessi in an off the record capacity and for background research. as they are producing a television current affairs programme for Channel 4, focussing on the Scottish Independence Referendum. They were examining the political campaigns on both sides of the debate and the way in which that debate is being conducted. Additionally, they were keen to speak with Dr. Alessi regarding the open letter that was published in May, 2014 about concerns around research in an independent Scotland.


Dr. Alessi's signature and viewpoints, while his own, brought to light in the general public, the potential deleterious impact a 'Yes' vote would have had upon Scottish scientific research funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Review of publication for an online scientific forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Comment and perspetive on importance of LRRK2 paper to PD research (Skibinski, et al. 2014; J.Neurosci 34(2):418-433)

This summary lends a scientific perspective pertaining to the specific publication, to the research community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.alzforum.org/papers/mutant-lrrk2-toxicity-neurons-depends-lrrk2-levels-and-synuclein-not-...
 
Description School Visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Post doc in lab helps out at local secondary school, 10 days a year, in giving a Science lesson
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description TV Interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Paper Presentation
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Gave various interviews to Radio and TV on a Parkinson's Disease paper that we had published

Helped disseminate our findings to Parkinson's patients
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description TV and Radio Interviews publicising renewal of our MRC core funding of 24 M 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interviews

This helped publicize our Units activities
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.ppu.mrc.ac.uk/news_and_seminars/mrc_unit_news.php
 
Description Talk to Edinburgh Parkinson's research group (Miratul Muqit) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A presentation of Parkinson's disease and recent research progress including work undertaken by Parkinson's UK supported research in our laboratory.

Miratul's talk has been uploaded for general public access see-
http://www.edinburghparkinsons.org/branch_news.php
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description To be or not to be Independent, that is the Question! (Lab Times) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact the potential impact the referendum could have for research in Scotland. This is not intended to defend either side, but simply a look at what it could mean for the Scottish scientific community.
I believe you jointly signed an open letter expressing your concerns over the Yes vote. I was wondering if you would be able to comment on this matter, particularly in terms of funding available and areas of potential growth for Scotland?


Dr. Alessi's signature and viewpoints, while his own, brought to light in the general public, the potential deleterious impact a 'Yes' vote would have had upon Scottish scientific research funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.labtimes.org/editorial/e_523.lasso
 
Description University of Dundee Open Doors Day 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The goal of Open Doors Day is to inform the public, especially locally in Dundee, about the kinds of research being carried out at the University. This involved volunteers speaking with visitors -- young and old -- as well as engaging children with games mean to teach as well as have fun.

All visitors were enthusiastically engaged in this event and visited each of the PPU stands focused on both Neurodegeneration and Cancer.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Visit by Labor MP Alistair Darling and MSP Jenny Marra 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/parliamentarians
Results and Impact Given the importance of medical science research at The University of Dundee, Alistair Darling, MP and the 'Better Together' campaign visited the DSTT to better understand its pivotal role in industry/academic collaborations.


Highlighing the DSTT model provided Mr. Darling with a concrete example of the positive impact public/private partnerships between academia and industry can have for moving therapeutics forward.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014