MRC Centre for Genomics and Global Health

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics

Abstract

A major obstacle to the control of infectious disease is that pathogens and disease vectors are continually evolving. Epidemic disease outbreaks are one manifestation of this process. Another consequence is the progressive shift of endemic diseases towards forms that are more difficult to control. Increasing levels of resistance to drugs, vaccines and insecticides are threatening to destabilise and in some cases to ruin international efforts to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality caused by malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, pneumococcus and other endemic diseases.

A fundamental dilemma in controlling endemic disease is that the whole purpose is to attack an established pathogen or vector population by all means possible, including large-scale public health interventions, but this strategy may backfire by creating a new evolutionary landscape that causes more virulent or resistant forms to emerge. There are many examples of control efforts that have reduced disease burden for a short period of time but have eventually led to the emergence of resistant pathogen strains and the rebound of disease in a less controllable form.

Pathogens do not recognise geographical boundaries, so it is essential that collaborating groups around the world can efficiently build, share and analyse large and complex datasets. This presents several challenges. Systems to integrate data across labs and field study sites working on the same disease are often lacking. Moreover, clinical and epidemiological researchers may lack the tools and training needed to make use of large-scale genome variation data, while genetics and genomics experts can lack the tools and data structures needed to make use of large-scale clinical and epidemiological data.

There is an urgent need for scientists who appreciate the challenge and have the necessary skill set to tackle this challenge.
The starting point for genomic surveillance is for researchers around the world to work together to identify common forms of variation in the global population. Parasites and insect vectors have large complex genomes that require advanced sequencing technologies and analytical methods. The Centre will develop statistical and population genetic methods to solve these analytical problems.

Capacity building is needed to enable researchers in resource-poor countries to participate and to develop leadership in this effort. The Centre will help to build data-sharing networks to characterise global patterns of genome variation.

Our translational goal is to provide web based tools to help disease control programmes.to plan and monitor the progress of their interventions. This requires changes in pathogen and vector populations to be captured at high spatial resolution and in near real time. The Centre will develop tools to enable groups in the field to do research on genetic micro-epidemiology.

To maximise the value of genome variation and population genetic data it needs to be integrated with other sources of information, such as epidemiological and ecological data, in an accessible format. The Centre will develop methods for collecting data from multiple sources to construct integrated maps of the different factors that determine disease transmission and the spread of resistance.

The Centre sets out to be an international centre of excellence in the field of genomic surveillance of infectious disease and identification of effective ways to use these new technologies to improve global health.

Technical Summary

Our approach is based on new sequencing technologies that are transforming the practice of microbiology in western countries. These technologies could potentially have a great impact on the control of parasitic, vector-borne and other endemic diseases of the developing world, but to realise this potential it is necessary to address some challenging scientific and practical problems:

[1] Parasites and insect vectors have much larger and more complex genomes than viruses and bacteria, and require more advanced sequencing technologies and analytical methods. High rates of genetic recombination and complex life-cycles create additional challenges. The Centre will develop statistical and population genetic methods to solve these analytical problems.

[2] The starting point for genomic surveillance is for researchers around the world to work together to identify common forms of variation in the global population. Capacity building is needed to enable researchers in resource-poor countries to participate and to develop leadership in this effort. The Centre will help to build data-sharing networks to characterise global patterns of genome variation.

[3] Our translational goal is to provide tools to help disease control programmes.to plan and monitor the progress of their interventions. This requires evolutionary changes in pathogen and vector populations to be captured at high spatial resolution and in near real time. The Centre will develop tools to enable groups in the field to do research on genetic micro-epidemiology.

[4] To maximise the value of genome variation and population genetic data it needs to be integrated with other sources of information, such as epidemiological and ecological data, in an accessible format. The Centre will develop methods for collecting data from multiple sources to construct integrated maps of the different factors that determine disease transmission and the spread of resistance.

Planned Impact

The Centre aims to have broad ranging influence
Improved methods and technologies for research:
The Centre will bring together existing expertise in large-scale epidemiology, genomic medicine, bioinformatics, and computer science to create an internationally leading centre of excellence for the analysis of large, complex, data sets for research into genome science, clinical and epidemiological research and the integration of these. The work of the Centre has the potential to extend the boundaries of these individual disciplines but, the greatest impact is likely to be achieved by close collaboration and working between disparate disciplines (e.g. computer science and epidemiology to develop new analytical tools for clinical, geographical and genetic science to better conduct and understand surveillance of malaria parasite diversity). The Centre will act as a focal point for fostering collaborative engagement with both national and international partners.

New advances in science: The expertise, methods and systems developed will provide big advances in the ability to understand disease mechanisms and will yield significant benefits for areas such as infectious disease surveillance & management, and the translation of genomics into routine medical practice. We intend to make our data, methods & tools widely available for scientific researchers.

Capacity building: The Centre sees training as a key part of its remit. Clinical and epidemiological researchers may lack the tools and training needed to make use of large-scale genome variation data, while genetics and genomics experts can lack the tools and data structures needed to make use of large-scale clinical and epidemiological data. We are working to overcome these challenges by establishing community standards for data sharing, and by developing web applications and statistical methods for analysis of large genomic and epidemiological datasets. This will be achieved by collaborative working across different disciplines and training individuals to lead integrated programmes of work in this area.

The Centre is supporting an African led research initiative, the Plasmodium Diversity Network, by providing financial support, training and management guidance. The Centre will work with them of the governance, financial and programme management structure required to establish such a network as well as providing training in data analysis for specific areas of their research goals. Members of the PDN will be expected to provide support internally and in addition, provide training to local investigators at their home institutions.

While not seeking financial support for studentships the Centre benefits from the training programmes available at the University of Oxford and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and will be part of the new MRC Big Data Training Academy. The academy is being established under the University of Oxford Big Data Institute and will provide an extensive portfolio of training and development opportunities suitable for scientists at all stages of their career and readily accessible to external researchers. The Centre will take advantage of these available resources to establish a framework for PhD students (supported through other mechanisms) and scientists working in relevant areas.

Organisations

Publications

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publication icon
Anopheles Gambiae 1000 Genomes Consortium (2017) Genetic diversity of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. in Nature

 
Description WHO - Expert Group on drug resistance Pf in Greater Mekong subregion
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description WHO/GMP Expert Group on Pf. HRP2/3 deletions
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL http://www.who.int/malaria/mpac/mpac-sept2016-hrp2-consultation-short-report-session7.pdf?ua=1
 
Description Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award
Amount £3,989,275 (GBP)
Funding ID 204911/Z/16/Z 
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 04/2017 
End 09/2020
 
Description Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Malaria Programme
Amount £10,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2016 
End 09/2021
 
Title Panoptes 
Description Panoptes is an open source software framework for collaborative visual exploration of large scale genome variation data and associated metadata in a web browser. It can be used to browse large, hybrid data sets in a coherent and user friendly way, and offers interactive visual analytics tools to assist the exploration. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Example deployment: http://www.malariagen.net/apps/pf3k 
URL https://github.com/cggh/panoptes
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Centre Muraz
Country Burkina Faso 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Institute for Endemic Diseases IEND
Country Sudan, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Mahidol University
Country Thailand, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Unit, The Gambia
Country Gambia, Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMRR)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
Country Papua New Guinea, Independent State of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Pasteur Institute Dakar
Country Senegal, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Pasteur Institute, Paris
Country France, French Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Sapienza University of Rome
Department Parasitology Sapienza
Country Italy, Italian Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Stockholm University
Country Sweden, Kingdom of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Bamako
Department Malaria Research and Training Centre (MRTC) Bamako
Country Mali, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Buea
Country Cameroon, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Colombo
Department Department of Parasitology
Country Sri Lanka, Democratic Socialist Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Malawi
Country Malawi, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Maryland
Department Centre for Vaccine Development (CVD)
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Michigan
Country United States of America 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Oxford University Clinical Research Unit Vietnam (OUCRU)
Country Vietnam, Socialist Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network (MalariaGEN) 
Organisation Wellcome Trust
Department KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme
Country Kenya, Republic of 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution I direct the MalariaGEN Resource Centre (http://www.malariagen.net/). CGGH supports Resource Centre activities, particularly statistics, software engineering, and ethics.
Collaborator Contribution MalariaGEN - the Malaria Genomic Epidemiology Network - is a community of more than 100 researchers in 30 countries, working together on projects that require sharing and integration of large amounts of data. MalariaGEN brings together the work of many different partner studies, each of which is led by an independent investigator and has its own scientific objectives. MalariaGEN adds value to partner studies by providing access to genotyping and sequencing technologies, and by providing a framework for sharing and integrating data in consortial and community projects. MalariaGEN provides training and support in genetic data analysis for researchers at partner institutions in malaria-endemic countries. We do this through a data bursary scheme and through an active programme of scientific meetings and training workshops. These activities are supported by the MalariaGEN Resource Centre which has a team of experts in statistics, population genetics and bioinformatics at the Sanger Institute, Oxford University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Mahidol University in Bangkok. There are many practical and ethical challenges involved in sharing data across a global network comprising investigators and institutions with great disparities in funding and infrastructure. The MalariaGEN community has been working to develop transparent procedures for ethics and governance. We have a governance committee and an independent data access committee, and network policies have been defined for data sharing and data access.
Impact See www.malariagen.net. Outputs are given in more detail in G0600718B. They include the development of the major global repository of samples and data for genomic epidemiology studies of malaria; and large-scale GWAS and genome sequencing data generation for host, parasite and vector. Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Addis Ababa University
Department Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology
Country Ethiopia, Federal Democratic Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Congo National Institute of Biomedical Research (Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale)
Country Congo, Democratic Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Cote D'Ivoire's National Institute of Public Health
Department Malaria Research and Control Centre
Country Cote d'Ivoire, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Unit, The Gambia
Country Gambia, Republic of the 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Department NIMR Mbeya Research Centre (Formerly known as; Mbeya Medical Research Programme, MMPR)
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Navrongo Health Research Centre (NHRC)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMRR)
Country Ghana, Republic of 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Pasteur Institute of Madagascar
Country Madagascar, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation University of Bamako
Department Malaria Research and Training Centre (MRTC) Bamako
Country Mali, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation University of Buea
Department Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Country Cameroon, Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa 
Organisation Université des Sciences de la Santé, Gabon
Country Gabon, Gabonese Republic 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CGGH has provided small starter grants to PDNA, in part by MRC Centenary Award, as part of our mission to support the training and capacity development of early career African scientists. CGGH continues to support PDNA is various ways including supporting training and providing mentor ship.
Collaborator Contribution The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) is a partnership of African scientists working together to determine the diversity of the malaria parasite in sub-Saharan Africa and by using this data, inform malaria control policy. PDNA members are leading research programmes in their own contexts and are part of the training and capacity development of early career African scientists.
Impact Since established there are two PDNA led publications and £5m grant funding through the Wellcome Trust Developing Excellence in Leadership, Training and Science Initiative.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute 
Organisation The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution As head of the Malaria Programme and the Global Health Strategy Group at the Sanger Institute, I'm engaged in all levels of work - scientific, strategic and operational.
Collaborator Contribution The Sanger Institute provides infrastructure, resources and expertise in large-scale genome sequencing, genome-wide SNP typing, informatics and functional genomics.
Impact Examples relevant to this grant: 1. The world's largest repository of DNA samples and clinical data for genetic studies of host-parasite interactions in malaria 2. Publication of the first genome-wide association study of human disease susceptibility in Africa 3. A large multicentre case-control study of severe malaria, representing the largest ongoing genome-wide association study of an infectious disease. In December 2011 we completed genotyping of >1 million SNPs on >20,000 individuals from 10 different populations.
Start Year 2006
 
Description Admixture into and within sub-Saharan Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press release for eLife publication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.malariagen.net/news-events/press-release/scientists-reveal-sub-saharan-africa-legacy-pas...
 
Description Genetic markers associated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine failure in Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cambodia: a genotype-phenotype association study 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press release for Lancet Infectious Diseases publication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.malariagen.net/news-events/press-release/genetic-marker-found-resistance-malaria-treatme...
 
Description Genomic analysis of local variation and recent evolution in Plasmodium vivax 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press release for Nature Genetics publication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.malariagen.net/news-events/press-release/monitoring-malaria-parasite-reveals-evolving-dr...