ATLAS Upgrade 2012

Lead Research Organisation: University of Glasgow
Department Name: School of Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

Refer to ATLAS-UK upgrade proposal to PPRP: "UPGRADING THE ATLAS EXPERIMENT FOR THE LUMINOSITY FRONTIER AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER" PPRP meeting, September 2012

Planned Impact

Refer to ATLAS-UK upgrade proposal to PPRP: "UPGRADING THE ATLAS EXPERIMENT FOR THE LUMINOSITY FRONTIER AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER" PPRP meeting, September 2012

Publications

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Allport P (2014) Development of planar pixel modules for the ATLAS high luminosity LHC tracker upgrade in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Collaboration T (2014) A neural network clustering algorithm for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector in Journal of Instrumentation

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Milovanovic M (2014) Silicon sensors with various pixel geometries adapted for a common readout ASIC in Journal of Instrumentation

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Peric I (2014) High-voltage pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrade in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Unno Y (2014) Development of n + -in-p large-area silicon microstrip sensors for very high radiation environments - ATLAS12 design and initial results in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

 
Description The ATLAS Upgrade project is developing upgrades to the current ATLAS experiment to allow it to take full advantage of the increased luminosity that will be available when the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is upgraded. The improvements to ATLAS will allow it to measure the properties of the proton-proton collisions and measure the properties of the Higgs boson and search for signatures of new physics processes such as supersymmetry or extra dimensions.
The UK contribution to the upgrade builds on the UK expertise that built elements of the current ATLAS experiment. The UK made key contributions though construction of the silicon strip tracking system, the level 1 calorimeter trigger, the high level trigger and computing & software.
This work is ongoing with the target of upgrading elements ATLAS in 2020 and upgrading further elements in 2025 in line with the LHC upgrade schedule.
The silicon tracking system essentially takes a very high resolution photograph of the products of the collisions of two protons at the Large Hadron Collider. Using this information, scientists can understand the underlying physics and the interactions between fundamental particles. The upgrade project is developing advanced silicon sensors and their associated readout electronics, and mechanical and electrical aspects of the system.
The L1 calorimeter trigger takes information from the calorimeter and using FPGAs makes a rapid decision within around 2 microseconds as to whether the information from the calorimeter is consistent with an interesting physics object: electron, photon or jet or is noise. If it is an interesting physics object, the experiment is "triggered" and the data and the readout chain is validated. If the trigger fails to make the correct decision then either good data is lost or bad data is collected. The upgrade of the L1 calorimeter trigger must make similar decisions but in a much more complex environment. This requires more data from the calorimeter and more complex algorithms to be used to make decisions. This requires handling high data rates with mulitlayer PCBs capable of routing data at 10Gbps and upgrading FPGAs.
The L1 Track trigger uses the information from the tracker to rapidly reconstruct tracks using associative memories. This information can then combined with the L1 calorimeter trigger to make rapid decisions about whether to readout an event or to reject it. This is a new development within ATLAS as previously that tracker information was not used in the L1 trigger system. It provides an additional factor of 5 when rejecting fake events.
The High Level Trigger is similar to the L1 calorimeter trigger. The decisions are taken in a computing farm within a few milliseconds. The high level trigger must be able to cope with an increased input rate of between a factor of 4-10 but not significantly increase the output of the data onto disk for analysis. In addition to having to improve the algorithms, they must be developed using computing architectures and software paradigms.
The computing and software of ATLAS must adapt as the detector configuration changes e.g. addition of new elements or changing of elements, and must also take advantage of new computing and software architectures and commercial platforms. This requires upgrading the reconstruction software to produce the physics objects on which the final analysis is based as well as introducing new architectures such as multi-threading.
Exploitation Route The results of the research are published in peer reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.
Sensor systems could be exploited in security and health, as well as areas of research e.g. synchrotron science
Sectors Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Energy,Healthcare,Security and Diplomacy

 
Description ATLAS Upgrade collaboration 
Organisation European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)
Department ATLAS Collaboration
Country Switzerland, Swiss Confederation 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The UK participates in the following upgrade projects: Tracker, L1 calorimeter trigger, L1 track trigger, High Level Trigger and Computing & Software Within the the tracker the UK has made significant contributions to the development of radiation hard sensors, readout electronics, module assembly and construction of local and global mechanical supports. UK physicists hold a number of international leadership roles within the Tracker Upgrade Collaboration, including the project leader. Within the L1 calorimeter trigger, the UK is responsible for the design, construction and commissioning of the eFEX and ROD boards. The UK is one of the main proponents of the L1 Track Trigger programme and is providing studies of the impact on the physics, designing the data flow and implementing within the strip readout. The UK provides expertise and leadership in a number of areas within the High Level Trigger, covering muon and electron signatures and global and tracking software. Within Computing & Software the UK provides expertise in developing the simulation and tracking software for high multiplicity environments and taking advantages of new computing architectures.
Collaborator Contribution The international ATLAS Upgrade programme consists of contributions from about 174 institutions (the UK is 15 of the 174). Our partners bring funding that makes the large undertaking of upgrading the ATLAS experiment possible. Our partners provide complementary expertise to the UK and take responsibility for other areas of the project.
Impact ~600 scientific papers and reports from 2010-present. The project brings together experts in many disciplines: Physics, mechanical engineering, electronic engineering, computing & software