Child language brokering: Spaces of belonging and mediators of cultural knowledge

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Childhood, Families and Health

Abstract

Young interpreters are almost invisible within UK society but make a deeply important contribution family life, local communities and institutions. The work of young interpreters is very common but highly undervalued and unrecognised (Antonini, 2010). Child language brokers (CLBs) interpret or translate between family members/peers and officials (usually adults) who do not speak the home language. They are referred to as language brokers because the role often requires them to act as negotiators or intermediaries of cultural values, norms and knowledge, and positions them across different spaces of belonging. In other words, they literally "Translate Cultures". The aim of this project is to provide new understandings of how cultural knowledge and identities of belonging are narrated by the child language brokers.

Findings from the PIs previous work have indicated that child language brokers feel a great deal of pride in interpreting for family and peers but do not feel recognised, valued or fully understood outside of this immediate sphere of experience. This project will render their work visible in two novel ways: by researching how cultural knowledge and identities are mediated by language brokering and by producing a documentary film and web exhibition to enhance awareness of the valuable contribution made by young language brokers.

It will do this by using interdisciplinary methodologies combining digital film, ethnographic observations, voice recorded diaries, written diaries and art work e.g. self-portraiture. These combined methodologies have never been used in research with child language brokers and will provide unchartered insight into brokers' identities of belonging and contributors of cultural knowledge. As previously mentioned, a key output will be a documentary film that will bring together a set of non-linear arts activities in a summarising format that speaks to enhancing the awareness of a largely invisible group of young people. The film content will be led by the young people but is likely to include audio/video from the observational ethnography (with respondent's permission), video of a series of arts event activities with commentary about those activities by the young people themselves. Event activities include, but not exclusively so, script writing, suitcase method, and 'self in space' portraiture. Finally, these materials will be co-creatively curated with some of the participating young people into a web exhibition. This in itself is a part of the narrative journey.

The project draws on a range of expertise including the Young Interpreter Network and Routes into Language, who will assist in recruiting respondents. Alan Fentiman (film maker and web designer) has extensive experience working with vulnerable young people through film. Claire Robins runs arts workshops with young people and curates participatory museum exhibitions. Advisory group expertise includes specialist knowledge of children's identities, ethnography, child language brokering and bilingualism (Oxford Brookes University, Open University, University College London, IOE), participatory arts and museum studies (Media, Culture and Communication, IOE), and policy advice (Language Centre Cambridge/Speak to the Future). There will be three full team meetings and two network meetings that will involve the research team, interpreter/language specialists, policy advisors, film/photography makers, and some more 'mature' young interpreters. There will a web exhibition launch and conference event involving the young people, their parents, academics, language networks and policy advisors. We will ask a range of professional networks to show the film and web exhibition on their online sites/TV networks.

Planned Impact

This project will raise awareness of child language brokers and in turn encourage the valuing of language use and bilingualism within society. In light of current lack of information, this project has the potential to influence key institutions like schools and healthcare, local authorities and their attention to multiple language use in policy and practice, and community organisations and groups. Children have been translating for family and friends throughout history, but perhaps because children have sometimes been overlooked in some areas of research, or maybe because of the stigma and intolerance associated with being a migrant to a new country, these young people have been largely ignored in academic, policy, education, and the arts. Despite language being a central feature of the literate arts, children as language brokers have not been part of artistic endeavours. Findings and outputs will bring this very important area of study into new arenas.

Children who language broker for their parents have reported feeling isolated, stressed, depressed and sometimes judged or 'spotlight' by others when carrying out their brokering. Carrying out this research gives value to young people for the work they do, strengthens their sense of positive identity, and alleviates stress by showing that they are valued, visible, and important. This project will optimise the connections with policy advisors (via Bernardette Holmes), language networks (YIN & RiL), schools/colleges (TeachersTV/Teachers Media), health sector networks (HealthSector TV) and using social media to promote activities.

The Young Interpreter Network (YIN) will also disseminate to its partner schools/colleges and organisations. We can build on the success of YINs Guardian Public Service Award to enhance the awareness of language broker activities through the documentary film and web exhibition. This includes taking these outputs to other local authorities and raising awarenss around the country. Writing for the Times Educational Supplement and Guardian Education will broaden the coverage to both a wide range of professionals, academics and lay people. We will disseminate via key Twitter feeds and other social media (e.g. @TCRU1973; @YIscheme, @Routesintolanguage, @AHRCpress and so on). We will use outcomes to contribute to the existing package of guidance developed by YIN to help train young interpreters and the PI (Crafter), who developed guidance from a previous project for using language brokers in schools.

The project will develop knowledge and outputs that will enhance the activities of Routes into Language (RiL) whose widening participation activities are crucial for promoting language use, giving value to young people's activities, cultural awareness days and ambassadorial programmes. Routes into Language is a regional consortia covering the whole of England and Wales. We will disseminate via their web pages, at individual events, via Twitter and social media. The PI will give talks at events such as the ambassadors progression presentation, career days and cultural awareness days.

The web exhibition, reports, presentations and academic publications will highlight the vital role that child language brokers play across many spaces and contexts. We know these young people's activities are largely invisible in the public consciousness and institutional settings. These research activities and the ensuing outputs will make those who do this activity feel recognised and valued.
 
Title A Young Interpreters journey: A short film 
Description This is the first edit of a short film which was shown at three exhibitions associated with the project. The film draws on podcasts developed by the young people who took part in the study. A new edit of the film is forthcoming and will be shared with English as an Additional Language networks 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This first wave of impacts are most strongly associated with the exhibition attendance. This includes two school exhibitions where approximately 100 people came and saw the work. It also included a showing at the Bloomsbury Festival where nearly 370 people from the general public came to see the exhibition. A more extensive engagement strategy will occur when there is a new edit of the film. 
URL https://youtu.be/OvljhyuM4Us
 
Title Narrating language brokering stories through sculpture 
Description Young child language brokers took part in a series of sculpture workshops led by freelance artist and teaching assistant, Pia Jaime. Inspired by Ex-Votos-religious offerings that take the form of texts, paintings and symbols-she developed plaster hands the young people could paint and engrave with symbols and imagery related to their identity as language brokers. As they did so, they discussed their lives, often focusing on stories from before they had come to the UK. More formally, they also told us the narratives of their sculptures. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The hand sculptures and short films narrating the stories about the outputs were exhibited in three exhibitions (2 in schools and 1 for the Bloomsbury Festival). There are future plans for the photographs of these endeavours to be put in an online exhibition as part of our project website. 
 
Title The story of being a language broker 
Description During our project the young people engaged in a drawing workshop was led by a cultural psychologist with a background in using art for family therapy. Nine young people joined the workshop and were asked to think about a specific occasion on which they had had to translate and to try to express how they felt about it. Afterwards they were asked to write down the story that described their drawing. The group then put their drawings together, deciding themselves what order the collection should follow, which facilitated a group discussion about how their stories and experiences were similar or different. The drawings were then redesigned by an artist illustrator into a comic style and shown at three exhibitions. Subsequently, the comic has been made into an ebook 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The comic was well-received at three exhibitions: 2 took place in schools (visited by around 100 people) and 1 took place at the Bloomsbury Festival with approximately 370 people attending. In the coming year the online version of this book will be embedded in our project website where it will be highlighted in our social media compaign 
URL https://issuu.com/sarahcrafter/docs/the_story_of_being_a_language_broke
 
Title UCL Research Images as Art/Art Images of Research Competition 
Description In collaboration with Hampshire Borough Council we were part of a workshop day with Young Interpreters from local schools. The children celebrated their 'young interpreter journey' through creating 'fashion' items with newspapers. One little boy, our 'Pensive Lion' made a Lion's head. This photo won the running-up prize in the UCL Research as Image/Image as Research competition and was taken by David Bishop from UCL Health Creatives 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The photograph has subsequently been used as a 'featured research' on the University College London Institute of Education website. Hampshire Borough Council also tweeted about the success. 
URL http://www.grad.ucl.ac.uk/comp/2015-2016/research/
 
Description This project utilised a combination of social science research methods and arts-based methods to collect data about child language brokers' experiences of mediating cultural knowledge and identity belonging across contexts.

Vignette interviews
The vignette interview is the primary data collection technique which foregrounds our project. Vignettes are short stories or scenarios about a fictional character experiencing a phenomenon in context (Crafter et al. 2015). Four vignettes were all adapted from real experiences of language brokers found in the literature. All four vignettes involve some kind of different situation which the language broker must negotiate or manage through their language brokering. In two of the scenarios the character is attempting to language broker different forms of cultural knowledge.

Thirty young people took part in this element of the study and the interviews produced a rich level of data. There were four overarching themes that emerged from the vignette interviews: (i) positionalities, (ii) communication strategies and skills, (iii) 'Translating and me', and (iv) cultural knowledge, resources and sensitivities.

(i) Positionalities

This theme reflects instances where the young people sampled discussed how they, and significant others in their lives, are positioned in relation to the practice of language brokering. For example, some of the young people talked about 'language brokering as a family practice', which involved instances where the young person and their parents are described as coming together in partnership, or engaging in joint family care work through language brokering. In some instances, it was reported that this could potentially alter the dynamics of the parent-child relationship, wherein the child would take a very 'adult-like' approach to the brokering situation.

Our sample discussed a variety of different ways of 'positioning the parent' in the vignette story, and in relation to their own experience. On the one hand, the parent was positioned as being competent and responsible because it was understood they wanted the best for the family and were therefore willing to get into difficult conversations to achieve this goal. In this instance, there was a distinction made between a parent lacking in competency and a parent who could not speak the local language. There were also instances when the parent in either the vignette, or in real life, were positioned as 'embarrassing', 'emotional' or 'incompetent'. For example, at times, parents pushed the child complain or discuss difficult issues to a greater extent than the young people felt comfortable doing. They might also wish to disagree with a parent in some situations but felt wrong or 'ashamed' of arguing about an issue in front of a stranger.

The other key stakeholder discussed by the young people was the 'positioning of the institutional/professional other'. By necessity, language brokering often involves a three-way conversation between the child, their parent and a professional/manager/practitioner adult. There were numerous incidences where young people described adults as being supportive or kind during their language brokering. Some adults went out of their way to enable the communication to be easier. However, one of the vignette stories involved an adult character being 'difficult and rude' to the child language broker. This facilitated a number of examples from the young people where they were spoken to in a rude way. In relation to the vignette characters, this rudeness was sometimes attributed to racism.

Finally, the other positionality of relevance was the 'positioning of the self and the vignette character'. The young people smoothly transitioned between talking about the character and talking about their own experiences. These transitions could be hard to disentangle but fell into some broad themes or patterns. The first was about age, and how the child status of the language broker made them either invisible or powerless. Particularly when advocating for parents, children were conscious that their status put them at a disadvantage. On the other hand, there were instances when they thought the adult involved would be impressed by the ways language brokers help their families. 'Affect' or emotion, played a significant role in the young people's discussions about the vignette character and their own experiences. They described feeling 'proud', 'embarrassed', 'ashamed', 'sympathetic' [for the parent], 'awkward'. They felt that some situations involved 'anger' but that the role of the broker was to 'stay calm'. Some described humorous situations, where telephone calls had gone wrong and they had laughed about it with parents. Equally, some described a 'weight of responsibility' that reflected being in the middle of adult conversations. There was a small minority whose talk involved a 'fear' of others outside of their own community.


(ii) Communication strategies and skills


Discussions about communication strategies and language skills and competencies are not unusual in interviews with child language brokers (Crafter, Cline & Prokopiou, 2017). The young people reflected on their own concerns about their 'language competency' and whether they were 'getting things right'. These were also concerns they projected onto the vignette character. In addition, they discussed what we have termed 'situational competence', such as using a technology to look up words during language brokering situations or turning to body language and gesture to fill-in gaps in understanding. Our young people also demonstrated how adept they were at capitalizing on their cultural knowledge about 'societal norms and etiquette' or ways on behaving in public. In one example, one of our respondents who was still learning English asked for milk in a supermarket in a very direct way ["do you know where the milk is?"]. This was interpreted by the shop person as being rude and she was told off.

(iii) Translating and me

For our sample, language brokering formed a regular and integrated part of their everyday lives. It was not surprising then, that their interviews included a range of descriptions about the 'who, what, where' of everyday translating. These stories did not just include descriptions of situations and contexts where brokering took place, with whom, and about what. It also included stories that described the journey towards becoming a translator following migration to the UK. Language brokering was described as a 'normal' practice which we titled 'translating as every day, every day as translating'. Many of those we interviewed made links between 'pre and-post migration expectations' and talked about the characters expectations for what life in London would be like. Our language brokers were made very conscious of differences in how institutions dealt with, say, housing and welfare needs.

(iv) Cultural knowledge, resources and sensitivities

Our vignette characters were placed in a range of different settings and contexts, such as the doctors, the school playground, a supermarket and a housing office. It is not surprising then, that our respondents also drew on knowledge about cultures in a variety of different ways. There were discussions about the role of food in culture, different cultural representations about smacking, stories about friendships and visiting other people's houses. Arguably, the act of language brokering had provided many of our sample with a rich understanding of both the similarities and differences between their home culture and host cultures. In some situations, they told us they would use this knowledge to alter the meaning or content of conversations.
Exploitation Route One of the aims of our study was to build the capacity of child language brokers as a valued and recognised activity through visual outputs. With this in mind we created a short animation, using the voice of our language brokers, to act as a stimulus for talking about the positive and negative aspects of brokering (https://youtu.be/OvljhyuM4Us). We are also in the process of finalising a short film aimed at adults and professionals working with young people. We also used exhibitions of the young people's art work to raise visibility both in schools and with the general public. Another aim, of our study was to provide new understandings of how cultural knowledge and identity is mediated through language brokering. We have much to speak to in relation to this aim, but we believe are most valuable contribution to knowledge lies in examining how young people deal with difficult or conflicting situations. This issue is at the heart of much tension between the protection of children on the one hand, and children's agency on the other. Our findings suggest that young people used a variety of strategies for dealing with conflict and tensions. We believe this finding can be used to empower young people to take control of their language brokering practices through the development of training materials.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare

URL https://languagebrokeringidentities.com
 
Description This project involved a combination of social science methods and arts-based methodologies. With young people who act as language brokers we ran three arts-based workshops and delivered two exhibitions in the respective schools where the workshops took place and one exhibition as part of the Bloomsbury Festival. Digital outpus: Since our last submission we have completed and uploaded a short animation, voiced by our young language brokers, which describes the experience of migrating to a new country and becoming a language broker (https://youtu.be/OvljhyuM4Us). We are close to a final edit of a film aimed a professionals. The art workshops: One art workshop took place at a girls school in Clapham and was led by a freelance artist/educator, Pia Jaime. Inspired by sculptures called Ex-Votos, the girls who took part in the workshop made plastercast hands to act as symbolic portraits of their identity as young translators. She worked with the young people to produce sculptures, using rubber gloves as plaster casts, which the students appropriated using images, words and carving techniques. Another art workshop was run by Evangelia Prokopiou and took place in a school in Dagenham. Evangelia is a cultural psychologist with a therapeutic background, so this workshop used drawing to examine a specific moment or emotion related to translating and interpreting. The young people's drawing, text and narratives about the situations were drawn together into an online book. The online book was designed by Kremena Dimitrova. The Radio magazine show workshop: Part of the film shown at the exhibitions is 'voiced' by our young people who took part in the Radio magazine workshop facilitated by Eastside Educational Trust. Led by Michael Vidon, the workshop provided themes around which the young people explored 'language' such as family, age, personal space, and boundaries. The young people developed their own podcasts in groups, each detailing issues relating to their young translating and identity that are important to them. This workshop took place at the Bloomsbury Theatre here at UCL. Young people from both schools came together for this workshop. The Exhibitions: The exhibitions took place in July 2016 (school) and October 2016 (Bloomsbury Festival). The exhibitions involved showing all elements of the outputs from the workshops discussed above. In one school the workshop took place in the school library and in the other school it took place under a marquee tent in the playground. The young people, the wider school community and parents were invited to attend. The Bloomsbury Festival exhibition was in the Art Museum in UCL. We collated qualitative responses from teachers, pupils and parents who attended the exhibitions. We received verbal and email feedback from teachers. For example, one EAL teacher wrote to us and said: "Thank you so much for everything. I am not sure how will you (Sarah and Humera) measure the success of it, but for the feedback I am having in the corridors, it was great! Some teachers are even talking about the need to open up a space for a more active dialogue and exchange. I was impressed also but all the work I haven't seen ,I can't wait to hear the radio show or see more illustrations, they were so revealing. You must feel terribly proud. Thank you so much for letting me be a part of it." Another said: "Today I got a buzz because I felt so good about the exhibition. It was a great end of a very demanding year. Thank you for organising all this and for all of your hard work to make this happen." Following the completion of the hands workshop the same teacher also emailed us and said: "Dear Sarah and Humera, today the workshop went really well and everybody has almost finished their hands. We are really happy with the results. Pia has done a great job and the girls were really proud and happy. There was a magical atmosphere and I hope that we can keep the momentum. This gave me inspirations for future projects, because it was great to see how everybody was growing in being able to express themselves under the guidance and care of Pia. Thank you again for allowing us to be part of your great project. It has been a real journey of revelation for me and for the girls and for the department." A selection of comments written on the giant feedback wall/cloth. Some directly address the exhibition whilst others speak to the content. They come from a mixture of teachers, EAL coordinators and pupils: "I loved learning about your translators and watching the film" (Pupil) "Fantastic work! Very impressive! You should all be proud. A Thomas, All Saints School" (EAL coordinator) "I've loved looking at the different hands. I didn't realise the range of language spoken at La Retraite, and the amount of people that are young translators for families and friends" (pupil) "This exhibition is inspirational and shows how important languages are to communication" (pupil) "I had a fund experience when I joined this workshop. I learned that you have to be yourself in front of everyone" [her mother visited the exhibition and wrote] "I enjoyed being in this exhibition and I am a happy and proud mother" The young people's engagement in the workshops: Many of the workshops took place in the young people's own or they went to considerable measures (travelling distances or taking time out from their studies) to be part of the project. We were both surprised and deeply heartened by the commitment and level of enthusiasm that they engaged in the workshops. The exhibition has generated some changes within the schools that we worked in: 1) The English teacher in one of the schools has asked to show the film and some of the artifacts from the exhibition to her classes in order to have a lesson around identity with them. 2) The SENCO team of teachers in one of the schools are keen to work further with the artist and do a similar art workshop with children with special educational needs. They felt that the workshops and the exhibition really highlighted the work of CLBs and wanted to do the same for children with SEN.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Education
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description UCL Beacon Bursary for Public Engagement
Amount £1,956 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2016 
End 07/2016
 
Description Hampshire Borough Council Ethnic Minority Traveller Achievement Services: Young Interpreter Scheme 
Organisation Hampshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The EMTAS Young Interpreter Scheme and the research team have collaborated in a workshop day which was attended by 125 young interpreters from schools in-and-around Basingstoke, UK. The research team led an arts-based workshop using mono-printing to explore young interpreter identities.
Collaborator Contribution In addition to proving us with contacts to local schools and young people, our partners regularly feature updates about our research work in their EMTAS network newsletter.
Impact As a result of this output the research team were able to submit one of the photographs taken during the workshop to an exhibition competition. The competition was for UCL 'Research as image/Image as Research' and the won a runners-up prize.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Routes into Language 
Organisation University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We worked with Routes into Language in the initial setup of the project. They helped us gain access to local schools and colleges. We also met to discuss some potential arts-based activities.
Collaborator Contribution We worked with Routes into Language in the initial setup of the project. They helped us gain access to local schools and colleges. We also met to discuss some potential arts-based activities.
Impact The research team gained access to three schools in the Greater London area. They also took forward ideas about developing role-play workshops for participants.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bloomsbury Exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Using the outputs from our arts-based workshops with child language brokers, our project was part of the Bloomsbury Festival in 2016. We exhibited drawings, sculpture, film and podcasts to raise the awareness and visibility of language brokering as a practice. Our exhibition took place in the Art Museum and University College London. The Event exceeded our expectations with over 370 members visitors from across a wide range of ages and diversities.

Our exhibits sparked many conversations with members of the public and there were several volunteers on hand to answer questions about the research, the practice of language brokering and the exhibit pieces.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://bloomsburyfestival.org.uk
 
Description Exhibition in school 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This exhibitions took place on the 14th in a school in South London and involved showing all elements of the outputs from arts-based workshops with the child language brokers. In this school the workshop took place in the school library and attracted pupils, teachers, Senior Leadership, parents and the Mayor of Lambeth. The exhibition was attended by the pupils who took part in the research and pupils in the wider school community.

We evaluated the success of the exhibition in two ways:

Participants wrote their comments on a large cloth
We received verbal and email feedback from teachers.

For example, one EAL teacher wrote to us and said:

"Thank you so much for everything. I am not sure how will you (Sarah and Humera) measure the success of it, but for the feedback I am having in the corridors, it was great! Some teachers are even talking about the need to open up a space for a more active dialogue and exchange. I was impressed also but all the work I haven't seen ,I can't wait to hear the radio show or see more illustrations, they were so revealing. You must feel terribly proud. Thank you so much for letting me be a part of it."

Another said:

"Today I got a buzz because I felt so good about the exhibition. It was a great end of a very demanding year.
Thank you for organising all this and for all of your hard work to make this happen."

Following the completion of the hands workshop the same teacher also emailed us and said:

"Dear Sarah and Humera,

today the workshop went really well and everybody has almost finished their hands. We are really happy with the results. Pia has done a great job and the girls were really proud and happy. There was a magical atmosphere and I hope that we can keep the momentum.

This gave me inspirations for future projects, because it was great to see how everybody was growing in being able to express themselves under the guidance and care of Pia.

Thank you again for allowing us to be part of your great project. It has been a real journey of revelation for me and for the girls and for the department."

A selection of comments written on the giant feedback wall/cloth. Some directly address the exhibition whilst others speak to the content. They come from a mixture of teachers, EAL coordinators and pupils:

"I loved learning about your translators and watching the film" (Pupil)
"Fantastic work! Very impressive! You should all be proud. A Thomas, All Saints School" (EAL coordinator)
"I've loved looking at the different hands. I didn't realise the range of language spoken at [name of the school], and the amount of people that are young translators for families and friends" (pupil)
"This exhibition is inspirational and shows how important languages are to communication" (pupil)
"I had a fund experience when I joined this workshop. I learned that you have to be yourself in front of everyone" [her mother visited the exhibition and wrote] "I enjoyed being in this exhibition and I am a happy and proud mother"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.facebook.com/ioelondonofficial/posts/663406417145892
 
Description Lunch hour lecture for academics, practitioners and general public 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In this presentation Humera Iqbal presented at the UCL Lunch Hour Lecture a talk titled 'Language Brokers not Stock Brokers: Young People as Traders of Culture'. It was attended by 70 people and on the back of this talk, the team have been invited to present to Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIOL) by the Chair of the Business, Professions and Government Division (BPG)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/news-events/events-pub/nov-2017/language-brokers
 
Description Practitioner workshop (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop 'Multilingual children and language brokering' was delivered in collaboration with Lisa Armstrong from the charity Mothertongue and Sarah Crafter (PI). The workshops contributed to a day of events titled 'The importance of the Native Language - Practitioner Day: ESRC Festival of Social Science' at Birkbeck University in London. The interactive workshop sparked questions about roles, responsibilities and ethical concerns of engaging children in the use of language brokering. The delegates were shown a series of short films based on language brokering and asked to discuss the main issues raised
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://languageattrition.org/natlg/
 
Description School Exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This exhibitions took place on the 13th in a school in East London and involved showing all elements of the outputs from arts-based workshops with the child language brokers. In this school the workshop took place in the school library and attracted pupils, teachers, Senior Leadership and a local network of English as an Additional Language coordinators. The exhibition was attended by the pupils who took part in the research and pupils in the wider school community.

The exhibition has generated some changes within the schools that we worked in:
1) The English teacher in one of the schools has asked to show the film and some of the artifacts from the exhibition to her classes in order to have a lesson around identity with them.
2) The SENCO team of teachers in one of the schools are keen to work further with the artist and do a similar art workshop with children with special educational needs. They felt that the workshops and the exhibition really highlighted the work of CLBs and wanted to do the same for children with SEN.

The young people's engagement in the workshops:
Many of the workshops took place in the young people's own or they went to considerable measures (travelling distances or taking time out from their studies) to be part of the project. We were both surprised and deeply heartened by the commitment and level of enthusiasm that they engaged in the workshops.

The exhibition outputs:
Although the exhibitions brought the work of the young people to the wider school community it was very satisfying seeing the pride of the young people whose outputs were shown

School responses to the exhibition:
We had very positive feedback from Senior Leadership team who in many instances were understanding the role of their own young translators in school for the first time. We also had positive feedback from EAL coordinators from other schools

The success of the art workshops, meant that we wanted to take the exhibition to a wider audience, so we applied for a small amount of funding to take part in the Bloomsbury Festival. We were successful and this took take place on October 22nd 2016.

Lastly, we were invited to take part in an international workshop based at UCL on 'convivial tools for research'. Here we will presented a paper on using arts based methods in research (based on our experiences using funding from beacon bursary). This workshop allowed us to foster new academic links as well as produce an article in an edited journal. It would not have been possible to do this without the help of the bursary.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/news-events/news-pub/august-2016/tcru-exhibition-many-voices-many-languages...
 
Description School Workshop: Migration Museum Project (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This workshop was delivered to 61 secondary school children at the Migration Museum Project as part of an ESRC Knowledge Exchange Dialogues Scheme led by Erel, U., Mohan, G., & Keith, M. We drew on our data about child language brokers to undertake activities with the young people to raise awareness and exchange dialogue about the practice. We subsequently wrote a blog about the experience for your Migration Museum Project website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.migrationmuseum.org/being-a-young-interpreter/
 
Description Young Interpreter Conference - A Young Interpreters Journey 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 125 pupils from numerous schools in Basingstoke came together for a Young Interpreters (YIs) workshop day. The research team led one of the arts-based workshops with a small group of YIs where the children undertook mono printing. The event was also filmed and photographs were taken. The children were visited by people from the local borough council.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/eal-bilingual/Pu5Ub4Sl6ZY