Creative Practice As Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Well-Being

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: School of Health Sciences

Abstract

This highly collaborative study aims to examine how creative practice in the arts and humanities can promote the kinds of connectedness and reciprocity that support 'mutual recovery' in terms of mental health and well-being. The idea of 'mutual recovery' extends more inclusively out of the increasingly influential notion of 'recovery' in mental health care which refers to the possibility of achieving a meaningful, more resilient and self-reliant life irrespective of mental health 'symptoms' or disabilities. Typically, however, recovery-based initiatives tend to focus exclusively on people identified as having mental health needs (service users) and overlook how hard-pressed informal carers and health, social care and adult education personnel working in this field may also need to 'recover' or be 'recovered' in terms of their own mental health and well-being. Our central hypothesis is that creative practice could be a powerful tool for bringing together this diverse range of social actors and communities of practice, to establish and connect them in a mutual or reciprocal fashion to enhance mental health and well-being. Such an approach is congruent with 'the new wave of mutuality' identified by Murray (2012), marked by 'renewed interest in co-operation' (p.1), enhancing connections and sharing between distinct or separate groups of people or institutions and 'different ways of involving users, communities and workers' (p.7).

Arts and expressive therapies are well-established in mental health services and creative practice (e.g. in visual arts, music, drama, storytelling and so on) has demonstrable potential for a role in advancing mutual recovery in this context. Research has already demonstrated the importance of the arts for 'recovery orientated mental health services', how they provide ways of breaking down social barriers, of expressing and understanding experiences and emotions, and of helping to rebuild identities and communities.

With a growing burden of mental ill-health combined with rising costs for the delivery of services, it is timely to investigate how people with mental health needs, informal carers and health, social care and adult education personnel can take new opportunities to build mutually appreciative and substantively connected communities - resilient communities of mutual hope, trust, compassion, equality and solidarity.

This five-year study will add a new dimension to existing AHRC-funded health humanities projects. Its substantive arts and humanities led programme of work packages incorporate a social sciences evaluative layer that seeks to advance transformative impacts in policy, provision and practice. Acting as a 'beacon', it will link researchers in the arts and humanities, social and health sciences and third and statutory sector organisations supporting people with mental health needs, in order to generate new forms of social and cultural connectedness that can facilitate mental health recovery. Consistent with the Connected Communities ethos, central themes in this research are the contribution of shared community values and participation to this mutual recovery agenda and the ways in which self-reliance and resilience can be 'co-produced' to support mental health and well-being in community settings. Hence, this ambitious, multidisciplinary research programme will address the AHRC Connected Communities vision through establishing new connections between academic and partner communities in order to enhance research participation, prosperity, sustainability, and health & well-being.

Planned Impact

This project has a potentially wide impact on public engagement and academic research. The principal beneficiaries of these impacts may be divided into three key groups:

1. Policy-makers: The project is designed to bring together diverse communities of arts and humanities and social and health sciences scholars, service user and carer representatives, and health, social care and education personnel, to respond to contemporary anxieties about mental health in the UK. As such, it is anticipated that research findings generated by the project will stimulate and inform mental health and social care debate, particularly as it relates to the development of policies that advance: a. less-centralised resources for responding to the mental health and well-being agenda; b. more co-operative, open and permeable interfaces between diverse social actors and communities of practice in the field of mental health. Linked to this it will contribute to debate and provide important evidence regarding the heightened priority put upon public mental health promotion and addressing the social causes of mental health problems in England (i.e. concerns with mental health inequalities) and the fact that currently this remains inadequately reflected in statutory approaches to mental health service provision.

2. Health, social care and education providers: The project will also be of interest to health, social care, education, and community arts organizations involved in mental health work and the promotion of more connected and self-caring communities. The interdisciplinary approach and methodology of the project aligns it with the emerging field of health humanities, in this case through a combination of visual arts, performing arts, literature/narrative, philosophy, history, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, psychology, psychiatry, social care, nursing, and public health. In particular, it will afford knowledge dissemination benefits with regard to the ways in which these fields animate one another. It is hoped that the research findings may ultimately inform organisational culture and practices within both NHS and private health, social care, education and community-based initiatives and, potentially, suggest increased effectiveness of public health services and/or reduced costs of NHS patient care.

3. Members of the public: We envisage potential social benefits for people with mental health difficulties, informal carers and the general public more broadly, these emanating primarily from the impact of the research on public awareness and understanding of issues pertaining to mutuality and creativity in mental health recovery. The research will produce outputs which will be public resources and the project will provide opportunities for public engagement about this important issue, educating individuals (who may also be potential users of mental health provisioning) about the investment taking place to support work in this area. It is envisaged that the project will generate public contribution to debate about ways to tackle societal challenges in the area of mental health and wellbeing, and ways of achieving more egalitarian and inclusive connections between and within communities in the field of mental health. We aim to inform attitudes to and/or beliefs about the feasibility of creative practice as mutual recovery being a possible solution to the failure of biomedical and psychiatric approaches to date to improve the mental health of the nation and to empower communities and individuals to deploy greater agency in their own mental health and well-being.

In addition, it is hoped that the project will produce important social benefits in enhancing public, policy and practitioner understandings of new approaches to connecting communities for mental health and well-being and in effecting positive changes in mental health policy and in organisational, practitioner and public attitudes and behaviour.

Publications

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Argyle E (2015) Creative practice in a group setting in Mental Health and Social Inclusion

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Argyle, E (2015) A Potter's Day: Clay Transformations in Ceramic Review

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Ascenso S (2018) Promoting well-being through group drumming with mental health service users and their carers. in International journal of qualitative studies on health and well-being

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Ascenso S (2018) Promoting well-being through group drumming with mental health service users and their carers in International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Health and Well-being

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Atanasova D (2018) Representations of mental health and arts participation in the national and local British press, 2007-2015 in Health: an interdisciplinary journal for the social study of health, Illness and medicine

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Atanasova, D. Representations of mental health and arts participation in the national and local British press, 2007-2015. in Health: an interdisciplinary journal for the social study of health, illness and medicine.

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Barker A (2016) Recovery is no laughing matter - or is it? in Mental Health and Social Inclusion

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Barker And Joyes On Behaf Of Jordan Et Al. (2014) Conference Video

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Brown B (2018) Genealogies of recovery: The framing of therapeutic ambitions. in Nursing philosophy : an international journal for healthcare professionals

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Brown B (2018) Genealogies of recovery: The framing of therapeutic ambitions. in Nursing philosophy : an international journal for healthcare professionals

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Brown B (2018) The social capitals of recovery in mental health. in Health (London, England : 1997)

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Brown BJ (2016) Mutuality in health care: review, concept analysis and ways forward. in Journal of clinical nursing

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Callahan, K. (2017) The use of music in mutual recovery: A qualitative pilot study in Journal of Applied Arts and Health

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Crawford P (2015) Health Humanities

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Crawford P (2013) Creative practice as mutual recovery in mental health in Mental Health Review Journal

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Crawford P (2015) Health humanities: we're here to collaborate, not to compete in The Guardian Higher Education

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Crawford, P (2018) The arts are a shadow health service - here's why in The Conversation

 
Title Art Elicitation with New Mothers. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 24 mins. Output from The Birth Project. 
Description Broadcast quality film: Arts Elicitation with New Mothers. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 35 mins. Professor Susan Hogan Executive Producer. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This resource will be made available to those training birth professionals as well as those working with new mothers in other ways (such as therapists or health visitors). We will be working on its distribution as part of our impact strategy. A lower resolution version of the film will be made available via the project website. 
URL http://www.derby.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/research/centres-groups/birth-project/
 
Title Birth Professionals Make Art. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 30 mins. Output from The Birth Project. 
Description Broadcast Quality Film: Birth Professionals Make Art. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 30 mins. Professor Susan Hogan Executive Producer. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This resource will be made available to those training birth professionals as well as those working with new mothers in other ways (such as therapists or health visitors). We will be working on its distribution as part of our impact strategy. A lower resolution version of the film will be made available via the project website. 
URL http://www.derby.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/research/centres-groups/birth-project/
 
Title Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery. Visual Methodologies. 20 mins. Output from The Birth Project. 
Description Broadcast Quality Film: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery. Visual Methodologies. 2013. Professor Hogan Executive Producer (including writing the script). Sheffield Vision. 20 mins. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact We will be working on its distribution as part of our impact strategy. 
URL http://www.derby.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/research/centres-groups/birth-project/
 
Title Digital Showcase 
Description This digital showcase for the programme has been created in association with Mental Health Foundation, London, UK 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact It is possibly a little early to say as this was only launched in April 2018 but this showcase has been disseminated to a large, diverse populations in policy, academic, creative practice and clinical practice communities. 
URL http://cpmr.mentalhealth.org.uk
 
Title Dissimilar Reflections 
Description About the exhibition Staring at the Sea by Mark Taylor The work for this exhibition reflects my interest in the transcendental nature of the sea. Human culture and society are inexorably connected to the sea as the sea offers sustenance, hope and renewal. However, it also offers fear, uncertainty and incredible destructive power. Like many others I find myself drawn to the sea through what seems like a primal urge coupled with a fascination at the spectacle. The work I present here focuses on the calming influence of the sea and my personal connection with it. From a young age I have had to learn to cope with high levels of anxiety and bouts of clinical depression. This has to a large extent shaped my approach to personal work which often manifests itself as a form of therapy. In this instance, staring at the sea is something that becomes a meditative and contemplative experience. I enjoy the open space and the minimal aspect. The subtle interplay of light and colour between the Sea, sky and horizon offers an ever-changing aesthetic. The photographs in this exhibition are an attempt to reflect this. I take photographs here and there and then I spend hours patiently sieving through and find commonalities and connections, then classify them into to subject areas. This series is a combination of past work with additional new work made particularly for this show. There is a paradox of permanency and the ephemeral in windows/reflections . Eyes may be 'the window of the soul' but to me photographing windows/reflections is 'soothing of the soul' and more effective than medication for depression. Through a Glass Darkly by Tony Fisher The work I am showing is concerning windows: reflections/mirroring what they physically look like, what can be seen through them or what we can be seen from them and how the elements interact with them. Some of the photographs show decay and deprivation, some express hope and a new beginning and others just show absurdity and a sense of fun. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The launch of the exhibition is attended by mental health service users, art students and mental health professionals and researchers creating a space to promote social inclusion and reduce social isolation among service users. 
URL http://www.institutemh.org.uk/x-about-us-x/art-at-the-institute
 
Title Dreams: hurts, hopes and happiness 
Description This a mental health arts competition organised at the Institute of Mental Health, The University of Nottingham and City Arts. We all dream. We have day dreams and night dreams. Sometimes mental illness can feel like a waking nightmare, especially psychosis. Art can help us see through our dreams. Art can show our hurts, our hopes and our happiness. Dreams can express the boundaries between the hidden and the obvious, the conscious and the unconscious. The 7th Institute of Mental Health Open exhibition, run in partnership with City Arts, is an opportunity for everyone interested in the overlap between Mental Health and the Arts to submit their art work. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Mental Health awareness 
URL http://www.city-arts.org.uk/call-entries-exhibition-addressing-dreams-mental-health/
 
Title Film about WEA's creative arts provision 
Description A film providing a visual illustration of the creative provision of the Workers' Educational Association in the West Midlands. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Workers' Educational Association have reported on the value of the film for supporting their provision and on how its production has led to other development work. In an email to the film makers just following the event, Howard Croft, Projects Development Manager for the organisation in West Midlands Region commented: "Thank you for turning my somewhat ambiguous brief into a really useful film. It is a great achievement in the time available and I would happily use the film for promotional purposes, and recommend your work within (and beyond) WEA West Midlands Region." Furthermore, Howard Croft, stated in an email to Dr Lydia Lewis on 25th September 2015: "The Workers' Educational Association (WEA), West Midlands is very grateful for the support of the Connected Communities project in funding the production of still images and film montage to raise the profile and outcomes of our creative arts adult education provision within the region.We have a bank of around 80 high resolution images capturing students' work relating to Scrapbooking, Painting and Drawing, Sewing and Textiles and Jewellery making. These images have already been used in a variety of contexts. For example, inclusion in WEA West Midlands learner case studies, projects newsletter, regional website and will be used within the forthcoming Annual Review Report 2014/15. The film capturing students in their community setting, and the articles created as a result of their learning experience, has also been used on the regional website as a 'good news' story. We have contracted Sheffield Vision (who produced the photos and film) again recently for some work on our 'Exploring the Impact of WW1 in Herefordshire' project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. In addition, the Connected Communities project - along with provision in other WEA regions - has inspired a follow on project application by the WEA to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation's 'More and Better Fund'." 
URL https://vimeo.com/130999148
 
Title Film: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery 
Description Introduction to Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Viewed online in relation to Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Well-Being, Directed Gaylan Nazhad. 
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/pages/view/creative-practice-mutual-recovery/
 
Title Labour Intensive (Theatrical Performance). Output from The Birth Project. 
Description An original play by Third Angel Theatre Company 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This is work which was perforated at Derby Theatre to a live audience. 
URL https://www.facebook.com/DerbyUniHealth/posts/752249838222734
 
Title Library of photographic images of WEA's creative provision 
Description Over 100 photos illustrating the creative provision of the Workers' Educational Association in the West Midlands. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Workers' Educational Association have reported on the value of the images for purposes of publicity and promotion. The images will also be used to support an impact case study published on the web site of the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement (Bristol). Howard Croft, Projects Development Manager for the organisation in West Midlands Region stated in an email to Dr Lydia Lewis on 25th September 2015: "The Workers' Educational Association (WEA), West Midlands is very grateful for the support of the Connected Communities project in funding the production of still images and film montage to raise the profile and outcomes of our creative arts adult education provision within the region.We have a bank of around 80 high resolution images capturing students' work relating to Scrapbooking, Painting and Drawing, Sewing and Textiles and Jewellery making. These images have already been used in a variety of contexts. For example, inclusion in WEA West Midlands learner case studies, projects newsletter, regional website and will be used within the forthcoming Annual Review Report 2014/15. The film capturing students in their community setting, and the articles created as a result of their learning experience, has also been used on the regional website as a 'good news' story. We have contracted Sheffield Vision (who produced the photos and film) again recently for some work on our 'Exploring the Impact of WW1 in Herefordshire' project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. In addition, the Connected Communities project - along with provision in other WEA regions - has inspired a follow on project application by the WEA to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation's 'More and Better Fund'. " 
URL http://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/case-studies/mutual-recovery-through-creative-connection
 
Title Making Music for Mental Health: Kyoto Japan Community Drumming Group 
Description Based on the Making Music for Mental Health project, there is currently a group drumming programme offered in Kyoto, Japan. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Members of the community, including older adults, have the opportunity to participate in a group drumming programme. 
 
Title Making Music for Mental Health: Lugano, Switzerland Nursing Home Drumming Group 
Description Based on the Making Music for Mental Health project, there is currently a group drumming programme offered in Lugano, Switzerland. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Members of the community, including older adults, have the opportunity to participate in a group drumming programme. 
 
Title Making Music for Mental Health: Richmond Adult Community Centre (RACC) Drumming Group 
Description Based on the Making Music for Mental Health project, there is now a regular group drumming programme offered at RACC. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Members of the community, including mental health service users, now have access to a regular group drumming class. 
 
Title Mothers Make Art. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 41 mins. Output from The Birth Project. 
Description Broadcast Quality Film: Mothers Make Art. 2015. Sheffield Vision. 40 mins. Professor Susan Hogan Executive Producer. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This resource will be made available to those training birth professionals as well as those working with new mothers in other ways (such as therapists or health visitors). We will be working on its distribution as part of our impact strategy. A lower resolution version of the film will be made available via the project website. 
URL http://www.derby.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/research/centres-groups/birth-project/
 
Title Religion and Mental Health 
Description About Melvyn Melvyn began his education studying A 'level Art and Design with Art History and Media Studies at Clarendon College (Nottingham), from 1983 to 1985. From there he enrolled upon a one year Foundation Course at Trent Polytechnic from to of 1986 and went on to gain a place ar St. Martin's School of Art in London that same year. Unfortunately, due to illness, Melvyn had to quit his studies. In May, 1987 he was put on a six month section order under the Mental Health Act. There began a series of admissions into hospital and he was diagnosed with Schizo-affective disorder. Melvyn has stayed out of hospital for the past 20 years, and gained much insight into the ways of the mind; in illness and in health. For the past 15 years he has created artwork from his studio space on Carrington St in Nottingham and continues to be influenced by the affairs of Mankind - his folly and his wisdom, the World at war and the World at peace. About the artwork "As an artist, I'm particularly interested in the affairs of Mankind; its religion, its politics, its World -as it is and, maybe, as it should be. I believe in one God, but many cultures, creeds, races and religions. I believe that God can transcend our differences, by focusing on our common humanity and needs as people -a world in union in a cosmopolitan pluralistic multi-faceted civilisation. There is a thread of interested in the theological that runs through my work, and a concern for the well-being of all people of the World through different cultures, belief systems, religions and the oneness expressed therein. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The launch of this exhibition was accompanied by a round table about religion and mental health. During this round table attendees from different religions (Muslin, Catholics, Buddhist) including Humanists and Atheists discuss and reflected about the influence of religion in mental health and vice versa. 
URL http://www.institutemh.org.uk/x-about-us-x/art-at-the-institute
 
Title Roots 
Description This was an artistic exhibition organised at the Institute of Mental Health. The purpose of this exhibition was to share the artists' work and inspire others to try art as a means of helping them through difficult times by finding ways to express their emotions and be in the "here and now". 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Outcomes of "Roots" Exhibition. Artist statement: People have expressly stated how inspired they have been by the art and staff at IMH have stopped and thanked me stating that the light and life the artwork has brought into the building has been inspiring. Many people have stated that they have felt emotional connections to the artworks. Contributions to others and the community: Provided a talk with a group of MA students of Trauma and used the displayed artwork as a talking point for growth and resilience through trauma. Followed up with an individual student interview to assist with dissertation studies Held live discussion with BBC Radio Nottingham (Alan Clifford show) Developed links with the Nottingham Peace Project and planned provision of and gained council funding to lead "expression through art" workshops for young people in Basford (2018) Roots Exhibition Book - my story of Trauma, Resilience and Growth with accompanying paintings 1. Charitable financial benefits: Sales of paintings have raised £800 to provide a Remembrance Bench for Joel Cooke and £300 for Young Minds Trust. A total of £1,100 sales was made between the 10th October 2017 and 5th of January 2018. 2. New friendships and New opportunities: I have had a number of people ask me to show them how I paint different styles and I am starting small workshops at home on the 10th Jan 2018 I am contributing to Prof Stephen Regel's Stories and Narratives Project (2018) I am working with Su Ansell (De Montford University) on producing a short film about resilience, change and growth (2018) 3. Personal Growth, Empowerment, Health and Well-Being: The exhibition has encouraged me to get out and about, meet new people, socialise and converse. Exposure to the environment, particularly travelling on buses was my goal for my trauma treatment. I now have no fear of travelling on buses or passing through Nottingham. My confidence and communication skills are much improved. When I began planning g the exhibition with Elvira I had to take my daughter with me as I struggled with conversation skills. That is no longer the case. I am sure Elvira has noted the differences since we first met. My family and friends often comment on the progress I have made in overcoming my fear of public places and people. I intend to continue to raise funds for charity, raise awareness of how we can rebuild our resilience and growth through art expression. I will continue to inspire others by sharing my story and art. 
URL http://www.institutemh.org.uk/x-about-us-x/art-at-the-institute
 
Title Rumba 
Description Flamenco Dance 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Dance performed at MAD15, a carnival organised at the Institute of Mental Health by Making Waves, 
URL http://www.makingwaves.org/news/carnival-mad15/
 
Title Solea por buleria 
Description Flamenco dance performance at MAD 2015, a carnival organised at the Institute of Mental Health to bring awareness about stigma and social isolation for those suffering mental health distress. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Mental health awareness 
 
Title The Birth Project Showcase. Exhibition of Original Artworks. Output from The Birth Project. 
Description An exhibition of artworks exploring the transition to motherhood, both by mothers and birthing professionals. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This was a well-attended event and included an important discussion between birthing professions and the women they serve (around the art works). 
URL https://www.facebook.com/DerbyUniHealth/posts/752249838222734
 
Description What were the most significant achievements from the award?
The Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery (CPMR) programme, proved influential for policy and practice development relevant to social and cultural aspects of mental health and wellbeing. Using methods and skills from science, social science and arts and humanities, its chief findings were that diverse and shared creative practices can: a) help people recover mental health and wellbeing together - 'mutual recovery'; and b) increase social connectedness within and between groups for people with experience of mental difficulties, informal or family carers and health, social care, education and arts practitioners. The programme attracted several prestigious awards and nominations, including the 2016 Arts and Health Award from the Royal Society for Public Health and a digital showcase in association with Mental Health Foundation was launched in April 2018 at cpmr.mentalhealth.org.uk.
There were multiple, high profile and diverse impacts that resulted from the programme's activities in the UK and overseas, delivering accessible creative products available to the public in films, plays, fiction, events, symposia, websites and exhibitions.
Importantly, the CPMR programme attracted multiple positive comments from both the public and project participants. These comments are made available in the final showcase report in association with Mental Health Foundation, UK.
To date, the CPMR programme has directly informed: training courses for medics, psychiatrists, medical students, midwives, Health Visitors, therapists, teachers in adult community education/ schools/ high schools; the work of community care and health care organisations at a regional and national level. It has also led to ongoing arts initiatives in community centres.

To what extent were the award objectives met?
Expectations and key objectives have been met and exceeded with the programme's successful completion of the 10 core projects funded by the award and an additional 4 projects developed over five years including extending the international platform in the US and China to include Spain.

The CPMR programme found compelling and substantial quantitative and qualitative evidence for the benefits of diverse shared creative practices in generating 'mutual recovery' of mental health and well-being both within and between different groups of people in different social and professional roles.

Chief benefits for participants included: 1. enhanced connectivity; 2. improved mental health and well-being. However, we did find that: whilst benefiting many participants, clay modelling did not suit everybody; in the adult community education context, some arts participants preferred either to work alone or without an explicit focus on improving wellbeing; ; the extent to which online storytelling can promote mutuality remains uncertain; professional roles sometimes limited or acted as a barrier to their participation in shared creative practice; people with severe mental disorders may struggle to remain engaged without direct mental health professional support.
Exploitation Route The programme's findings have been comprehensively published in peer-reviewed publications in relevant journals, books, conferences, exhibitions and workshops with a linked archive at www.healthhumanities.org. The programme has driven new and evolving research with more than £3m additional funding. The programme contributes ongoing non-academic community and clinical initiatives for advancing mental health and wellbeing. The final digital showcase report from the Mental Health Foundation will be completed in April 2018 and circulated to all relevant stakeholders in academic and non-academic contexts. Importantly, this will be made available to Government and policymakers in health, social care, education, arts and culture as well as UK Research and Innovation, and through established links with Institute of Mental Health, partner NHS Trusts, Institute of Psychiatry, NIHR, Department of Health, NIH/ OppNet (US), our international platform in US, China, Spain and health ministries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. The report will also be disseminated via the AHRC-funded International Health Humanities Network and targeted media through Bulletin (previously Academic Bulletin). Core researchers from the programme has been affiliated with the Institute of Mental Health and Health Humanities Research Priority Area at the University of Nottingham to advance further collaborations.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://cpmr.mentalhealth.org.uk
 
Description Through expansion of the original, funded projects to include 4 new projects, the CPMR programme achieved a very rich set of impacts during the 5-year study. It has impacted on policy, new funding, resources and practices. There have been multiple web-based, written, spoken word, visual (film) and performing arts engagement about the CPMR findings with communities in academia, social, health and education sectors, community arts, community organisations, service user-led organisations, service users, informal carers and the wider public. The following list provides a selection of these impacts: 1. The Making Music for Mental Health Project team were awarded the 2016 Arts & Health Award by the Royal Society for Public Health. 2. Innovation Award Nomination at AHRC Research in Film Awards 2017, BAFTA, 9 November 2017 for 'Mothers Make Contemporary Art' from The Birth Project. 3. CPMR featured in the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Well-being Inquiry Report Creative Health: The Arts for Health and Well-being July 2017. 4. Professor Hogan presented evidence to the All-Party-Parliamentary Group on Arts Health and Well-being. 5. Professor Crawford provided the Secretary of State for Education with a policy briefing on mutual recovery of mental health in schools, promoting student involvement in co-designing service approach (2015). 6. Professor Crawford provided the Economic Secretary with a policy briefing on developing a carer-centred NHS that advances mutual recovery of carers and cared for populations (2014). 7. Dr Lydia Lewis was a panel member advising on the evaluation of the Department for Education Community Learning Mental Health Research Project, a major nationwide adult community learning programme, funded through the £20 million DfE initiative announced in the 2014 Autumn Statement - see https://mhfe.org.uk/clmh-pilots/ 8. CPMR featured in the AHRC report, Exploring Mental Health and Well-being (2017). 9. CPMR cited and referenced in Geoffrey Crossick & Patrycja Karzynska (2016) Understanding the value of arts & culture: The AHRC Cultural Value Project. AHRC: London. 10. Dr Lydia Lewis was nominated for the position of WEA Ambassador in 2015 in recognition of her research and development work in the Mutuality, Well-being and Mental Health Recovery Project. 11. A commissioned play, Labour Intensive, performed at Derby Theatre and attended by members of the general public, then reworked as Partus, on tour during 2017, reaching large audiences who might not usually engage in looking at research findings. 12. The subsequent but related AHRC-funded Dementia Arts and Well-being Network (PI: Crawford) adopted a 'mutual recovery' approach and was mentioned in 'What would life be - without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music by Sally Bowell and Sally Marie Bamford for, The Uttley Foundation and The International Longevity Centre - UK (ILC-UK), p.45. 13. Multiple symposia/ dissemination events, for example, at The Circle, Sheffield, The Enterprise Centre, Derby, and the Quad, Derby; additional partnerships; websites and webpages for projects. 14. Multiple positive participant and partner testimonies (see forthcoming digital showcase with Mental Health Foundation in April 2018). 15. A suite of films resulted from The Birth Project and have been presented at major events and are available free online as a training and teaching resource; these are already being used in the training of health visitors, midwives and therapists; and resulted in plenary film viewings at the following: Paris-Sorbonne University, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales; The 5th International Health Humanities Conference; Keele University, School of Psychology; Northern Arts Therapies Conference, York; The Interdisciplinary Centre of the Social Sciences (ICOSS), Sheffield; Faith & Feminism Symposium, Derby; Talking Bodies - Identity, Sexuality & Representation at the University of Chester. 16. The Birth Project was invited to hold an exhibition space at the Medsin Global Health Conference 2017, in London. The audience was predominantly medical students who showed a keen interest in the overall research and the project films. 17. Making Music for Mental Health Project has also: led to ongoing drumming provision for mental health service users and their carers at community centres in London; informed drumming and singing interventions offered through the Art for Ages project, funded by the Swiss charity Gebert Rüf Stiftung from 2015-17; led to the development of new research initiatives with: a) CW+, the charity run in partnership with the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Trust, for which the charity has funded one PhD studentship (2016-18), and b) Imperial College London in conducting a public health study into the health, economic and social impacts of arts engagement, which has been funded by the AHRC (2017-20). 18. The Clay Transformations Project created three short films which track the development of the clay transformations project 19. Excerpts of the Clay Transformations Project videos have recently been incorporated into the Institute of Mental Health tenth anniversary film which will be shown internationally. The project's website and linked Facebook page has developed a similarly international audience with followers from the UK, Greece, Ireland, Italy, France, UAE, Turkey, USA, Canada and Poland: https://www.facebook.com/claytransformations/ 20. Two Clay Transformations exhibitions were mounted after the completion of the workshops at The Institute of Mental Health and the Apsidal Gallery at Rufford Country Park. The latter was part of the globally renowned Earth and Fire International Ceramics Fair. Many former participants of the CT clay workshops attended the exhibitions. 21. The Comedy and Mutual Recovery Project informed a new conceptual framework for understanding the transactions of humour in mutually beneficial encounters in planned environments, which has been called 'the 3Hs: Hope, Home and Humour', and this has informed a new policy initiative for working in prisons (Winship, et al 2016). 22. 'Mutual recovery' featured in Addictions Now, a key forum in the substance misuse field: https://www.drugaddictionnow.com/2017/02/27/branches-addiction-recovery-intervention-approaches/ 23. CPMR programme and specifically, Yoga in Children's Homes Project, featured on a BBC Radio Nottingham broadcast as part of their Mental Health series. Several listeners contacted Dr Elvira Perez via email to express their gratitude for bringing this important topic in the public opinion and their willingness to contribute to the annual art exhibition organised by Perez and Winship at the Institute of Mental Health. 24. The Mutuality, Well-being and Mental Health Recovery Project had significant positive impact for the third sector organisations who collaborated in the research in: a) supporting and informing the development of practice and provision; b) directly influencing WEA health education provision and evaluation strategy; c) professional development for project team members from the WEA and Suresearch Mental Health Network who were involved in all aspects of the research process; d) inspiring and informing further work; and e) valuing and supporting participants. As part of the project, a film and image library depicting the WEA's creative arts provision was produced. As well as being used in the research outputs, public engagement with research activities and teaching, these have been used by the WEA to raise the profile and outcomes of their creative arts adult education provision, for example in WEA West Midlands learner case studies, their projects newsletter, regional website, Annual Review Report 2014/15 and on the regional website as a 'good news' story. The project has led to further research and development work for the WEA, including the making of another film and a follow-on project application by the WEA to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation's 'More and Better Fund'. In this project, there were also benefits for participants arising from infusing mutuality into the research methodology. These included opportunities during focus groups / interviews for mutual support and recognition (including recognition of creative work and talents), to reflect on and possibly re-evaluate their experiences, and to discuss these with others in similar situations. The study was chosen as a National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE) case study providing insights into what makes community-university partnerships work (Martikke, 2014; see also Martikke et al., 2015 pp. 106-107). In addition, it was the basis for Dr Lewis' contribution to a study of 'Learning and legacy in the Connected Communities Programme' by researchers at the NCCPE, similarly concerned with how to conduct and sustain high quality research collaborations between academics and civil society (Face and Enbright, 2016). 25. There were benefits for participants arising from infusing mutuality into the research methodology. These included opportunities during interviews to reflect on and possibly re-evaluate their experiences and to discuss these with others in similar situations. 26. Led to further research and development work for the WEA, including the making of another film and a follow on project application by the WEA to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation's 'More and Better Fund'. 27. The Musical Jamming Project (MJP) in the US led to significant educational innovation and influence in training US medics, proposed changes in the focus and mission of key organisations and bodies in the US and creative outputs: a) The project team at Harvard have taught the concepts of mutual recovery at Lake Wales High School, a large charter secondary school in Lake Wales, Florida for socio-economically challenged children, in the psychopathology course at Harvard Medical School's Health, Science and Technology Joint Medical Training Program with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the American University of Antigua, the Association for Academic Psychiatry, the International Association for Performance Science in Iceland; b) Dr Eugene Beresin MD (project lead), as the chief medical spokesperson for the US national organization, Students Against Destructive Decisions, proposed Mutual Recovery as a topic for the required first and second year curricula at Harvard Medical School; c) Dr Schlozman MD (team member) spoke on the potential of mutual recovery as a topic for further investigation in the United States in a plenary address for the 2016 Association for Academic Psychiatry Annual Meeting in San Juan, PR; d) Dr Beresin proposed Mutual Recovery for adoption in working on three task forces: The Harvard Medical School Well-being and Mental Health Task Force; The Partners Health Care Graduate Medical Education Task Force on Well-being; and the Frigiletto Committee of the Massachusetts General Hospital Well-being Task Force for faculty physicians; e) Dr Schlozman MD is collaborating with Ovrture, a virtual reality company based in Los Angeles, to create a virtual experience of portions of his novel that will replicate the difficult roles of patients and clinicians. Although these recreations are fictional, they are very much and deliberately based on principles of mutual recovery. 28. The Mutual Recovery in Community Depression for Older Adults Project at Fudan University in China converted their findings for public consumption in Mandarin (translated Happiness and Well-being), published by the Department of Public Health, Fudan University and Fudong District, 2014. This included case profiles with 10 personal statements on the benefits of creative practices. In addition, a handbook, Happy Lifestyle and Well-being Guide, was created for public use. The work also led to the completion of two Masters student dissertations. The Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery approach been rolled out across six substantial communities in Shanghai (Longhua community, Xuhui district; Xinhua community, Changning district; Kongjiang community, Yangpu district; Zhangjiang community, Pudong district; Langxia community, Jinsan district; Xinchuang community, Minhang district). 29. The Creative Art Gallery Workshops Project in Spain has led to continued collaboration between the Faculty of Psychology at Seville University, the Contemporary Art Centre of Andalusia and FAISEM to participation from community groups, professionals and service users in creative practices in non-clinical contexts to reduce public stigma and improve their psychological well-being (mutual recovery). References Facer, K. & Enbright, B. 2016. Creating Living Knowledge: The Connected Communities Programme, Community-university Relationships and the Participatory Turn in the Production of Knowledge, Bristol, University of Bristol/AHRC Connected Communities. Available: https://connected-communities.org/index.php/project_resources/creating-living-knowledge-report/ Martikke, S. 2014. Mutual Recovery Through Creative Connection: National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Case Study. Bristol: National Co-Ordinating Centre for Public Engagement. See pdf attached. Martikke, S., Church, A. & Hart. 2015. Greater Than the Sum of its Parts: What Works in Sustaining Community-University Partnerships, GMCVO. Available: https://www.gmcvo.org.uk/greater-sum-its-parts-what-works-sustaining-community-university-partnerships
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Briefing on 'Informal Carer-Centre NHS' to Economic Secretary
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Attended a personal meeting at Portcullis House at the request of the Government's Economic Secretary, Nicky Morgan MP, to discuss my original policy briefing entitled 'An informal-carer centred NHS' which drew on the current grant focus of 'mutual recovery'. The briefing paper on this was well-received and submitted to the Government's Policy Unit. The Policy Unit supported the policy direction and the briefing was submitted to Number 10 for review and consideration. While the current Government felt unable to instigate another major change in service configuration as outlined in the document, the focus on the informal carer has no doubt influenced subsequent policy announcements and a renewed focus on carers and their resources.
 
Description Citation in WEA product sheets for the NHS
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Citation in the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing Inquiry Report Creative Health: The Arts for Health and Wellbeing July 2017.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact UK: Making music for mental health This team led by Professor Aaron Williamon and based at the Royal College of Music, examined how group drumming can facilitate mental health recovery among adults with experience of mental and emotional distress based on a series of drumming interventions led by professional and student musicians. Making Music for Mental Health showed that10 weeks of group drumming led to significant improvements in anxiety (by 20%), depression (by 38%), social resilience (by 23%), and wellbeing (by 16%). These findings were maintained at 3 months' follow-up, with drumming seen to facilitate positive emotions, a sense of accomplishment, enhanced self-awareness, and social connections. In addition, by measuring saliva samples, drumming also showed improvements that is comparable with results from studies involving anti-depressant medication and psychotherapies. This positive research finding has resulted in The project team being awarded the Arts & Health Award by the Royal Society for Public Health On-going drumming provision for patients with mental health problems and their carers at community centres in London Drumming and singing interventions offered through the Art for Ages project, funded by the Swiss charity Gebert Rüf Stiftung New research initiatives with CW+, the charity run in partnership with the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Trust in London and Further research at Imperial College London into the health, economic and social impacts of arts engagement UK. The Birth Project This team, led by Professor Susan Hogan, investigated the role that arts and humanities might play in the care of mothers planning and then expecting babies, especially where trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and secondary traumatic stress disorder (STSD), is involved. This 'birth project showed Arts workshops can increase mums and mums to be awareness, understanding and validation of their birth experiences Mediate stress Increase confidence and self-esteem Helping mothers in the transition to new motherhood Assist health professionals in thinking richly and 'holistically' about their practice This positive research finding has resulted in Members of the team contributing to the All-Party-Parliamentary Group for government on Arts Health and Wellbeing An exhibition at Medsin Global Health Conference 2017 A commissioned play, "Labour Intensive", was then performed at a Derby Theatre and then reworked as Partus, a touring play, reaching large audiences Multiple films, available free online, as a training and teaching resources which is already being used in the training of health visitors, midwives and therapists. The unique aspects of using the arts are evident in the women's testimony, as in the following comments: "Helped me enormously work through my own issues" "I have been able to explore birth trauma, trauma and loss in pregnancy and early motherhood. I have been able to work through these areas". "Lifting the lid on my grief (a little lift of the lid) and the start of the ways of how to express it." "Please, please, please can we have more? Please can we explore the process of mothering children growing up and letting go?" "It has been life giving I have engaged and benefitted from meeting, talking and making art with other mothers." UK. Participatory creative arts in adult community learning This team, led by Dr Lydia Lewis, worked with mental health service users/patients/ survivors and demonstrated Creative arts communities can help with social participation and relationship-building, which are important to the wellbeing of patients, carers, volunteers and those working in health care. Improved social interaction, especially important for those isolated due to mental health issues or with restricted opportunities for socialising due to other long-term health problems, caring responsibilities or older age. Improved wellbeing for everyone involved, including shared achievement and enjoyment. There were five main areas in which the project had significant positive impact for the third sector (charity) organisations The project supported and informed the development of adult community learning courses by charities which are on going The charities gained useful insights regarding adult learners' motivations for coming on courses and what they want from these improving their ongoing courses and educational packages. The project resulted in a film and image library depicting the charities creative arts provision, and then led to further research and another film production Provided valued experience, learning and professional development opportunities for members of the Charities. The project recruited two members of Suresearch (Service Users in Research and Education) as project team members, which supported the wider work of these individuals as service user representatives and researchers and one of the team's members was made a WEA (charity) Ambassador. Impacts overseas have also been shown in the US, China and Spain. America. Creative practice as mutual recovery in US This team, led by Professor Gene Beresin and based at the Harvard Medical School, in America, explored the possibilities of shared music making between health practitioners and patients, looking for benefits to both the patient with severe mental health disorders and clinician, called mutual recovery. The research showed: Mutual recovery could become a central ingredient to rescuing the badly overburdened and often unsatisfying health care experience in the US. Patients felt measurably better, enjoyed both clinical work as well as the work spent creating music, and experienced significant improvement. These positive research findings resulted in Engagement with leading psychiatrists at Harvard about the approach to patient and clinician health called mutual recovery. Incorporation of the concept of 'mutual recovery' in courses at Harvard Medical School, including the four-year course, "The Developing Physician", as well as an introductory course in psychiatry for the Harvard Medical School/MIT collaborative Medical Education program (the Health, Sciences and Technology program at Harvard and MIT). China. Creative practice as mutual recovery in China This team, led by Professor Fu Hua in collaboration with the Department of Public Health, Fudan University (China's leading body on public health) conducted research on creative practices as mutual recovery among elderly depressed people and their carers in Fudong community, Shanghai. The research showed Mutual recovery approaches among people with depression and their carers promotes health satisfaction and sleep. A handbook, Happy Lifestyle and Wellbeing Guide, was created for public use. These positive research findings resulted in The creative practice as mutual recovery approach being rolled out across six substantial communities in Shanghai, influencing the health and well being of patients and those caring for them professionally and personally. Spain. Creative workshops for people with severe mental disorders (SMI) This team led by Dr Javier Saavedra and based at Seville University in Spain assessed the impact of creative workshop participation on the psychological wellbeing, social connectivity and experience of people with severe mental illness, as well as the healthcare professionals that accompany them. The research showed Significant increases of psychological well being and social acceptance after workshop participation. Creative activity made it possible for mental health service users and professional carers to increase the quantity and quality of their social contacts. These positive research findings resulted in Continued collaboration between Seville University, the Contemporary Art Centre of Andalusia and others, using creative practice to reduce public stigma and improve psychological well-being of patients and carers / practitioners demonstrating on-going mutual recovery.
URL http://www.artshealthandwellbeing.org.uk/appg-inquiry/Publications/Creative_Health_Inquiry_Report_20...
 
Description Early Intervention and Education
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact Originated and was appointed to direct The Early Citizen initiative for advancing mental health and well-being as a key part of Graham Allen MP's work as Government Lead for Early Intervention and Nottingham as the first Early Intervention City. This involves being in charge of developing multiple partnership working to achieve the best early start for children in the whole city, supported by Nottingham City Council. This work led to submission of a briefing document to the Secretary of State for Education proposing a co-designed and co-produced children and young people's initiative in schools to advance their own and community mental health and well-being. This children and young people solution-focused approach was well-received and the Secretary of State welcomes a more policy briefing to be submitted on this by February 2015. This policy document will be jointly produced by the Institute of Mental Health Nottingham and Centre for Mental Health London.
 
Description Impact regarding professional development for WEA staff member
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Lydia Lewis instigated training in liaison with the WEA, with five staff members taking part. Lydia led the writing of the report of the MWIA conducted and this gave experience to WEA staff members in contributing to such a publication and completing an evaluation exercise. Lydia Lewis instigated training in Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment (MWIA) in liaison with the WEA, who had expressed an interest in this, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and the Public Health Observatory in Birmingham. Five WEA staff members took part, with additional participants being drawn from other third and public sector organisations. The training involved conducting an assessment of a women's health course in Stoke-on-Trent which formed part of a programme called CHEST - Community Education in Stoke-on-Trent. A half day workshop was conducted with course participants and this gave experience to WEA staff members in co-facilitating such an event. Lydia Lewis led the reporting and this gave experience to WEA staff members in contributing to a research publication and completing an evaluation exercise.
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Influence on WEA strategy and provision
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Early on in the project, Lydia Lewis, Clare White and some other WEA staff members took part in training in Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment (MWIA), an approach which informed the methodology of the wider Mutual Recovery study. The WEA's feedback from the exercise demonstrates how it also informed the development of the organisation's health education provision: "The Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment was a useful process for us in assessing the impact an additional course had for our students. It gave us a structure to collect evidence about aspects like how involved students felt and what impact course activities had on their lives. We found that increasing the number of sessions to two a week made it a bigger part of learners' lives and we have found an improvement in attendance and retention. It also gave us feedback to act upon in terms of course timings which we addressed the following term. () We enjoyed working as part of a team and particularly appreciated the time that was spent drawing together the findings from this focus group and our wider data with local public health data from a number of sources. This kind of wider review is something that we rarely have the opportunity to do mid-project and helps us to put the work and learning on the ground into a wider context." Clare White, WEA Project Manager, Staffordshire & Stoke-on-Trent (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 2nd December 2013) Re: MWIA report "Many thanks for sending me a copy of this. It is really interesting reading and relevant to me as I have responsibility for developing community learning provision in Stoke-on-Trent. I had hoped that there would be more 'cross-pollination' from the CHEST project into the community provision and your report highlights the need to establish more opportunities for progression as a means of further benefiting these learning groups. I am pleased that you will continue your links with the WEA through the Rugeley Study Centre." Jan Willows, WEA Programme Area Manager Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 10th October 2013)
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Influenced the establishment of a Big Lottery funded Leicester Aging Together Mental Health and Wellbeing research project
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact In the Workers' Educational Association East Midlands region, the research (Lewis et al. 2016) supported initiation of the Mental Health and Wellbeing research project which is an offshoot of Leicester Aging Together, a Lottery funded project with Leicester NHS Partnership Trust, De Montfort University and community organisations to gauge how people cope in older age.
URL https://www.leicesterageingtogether.org.uk/
 
Description Influencing a regional pilot for the DfE's national Community Learning Mental Health Project
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact The research (Lewis et al. 2016) was used to support a successful bid by the Workers Educational Association (East Midlands) to host the regional pilot for the DfE Community Learning Mental Health nationwide programme. They used creative arts in their programme offer and the research was quoted in the bid and used as a lever for funding. The WEA had learned elements of the processes and outcomes involved in terms of using creative arts to promote mental health and wellbeing. References: Lewis, L., Spandler, H., Tew, J. and Ecclestone K. with Howard Croft (2016), Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery: Exploring the roles of creative arts adult community learning & participatory arts initiatives. FINAL RESEARCH REPORT. University of Wolverhampton, April. Lewis, L., Ecclestone, K., Spandler, H. and Tew, J. (2016), Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery: Exploring the roles of creative arts adult community learning & participatory arts initiatives. Research Briefing, University of Wolverhampton.
URL https://mhfe.org.uk/clmh-pilots/
 
Description Invited evidence submission on music from CPMR programme to House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Committee Inquiry 2018.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description Invited member, Mental Health Review Topic Group on Patient Dignity and Safety. Department of Health and Social Care.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Independent Review of the Mental Health Act: Topic Group output to the Review Chair Topic Group title: Patient Dignity and Safety Topic Groups chair: Dr. Amy Pollard Conducted at the Department of Health and Social Care Made 6 major recommendations for enhancing patient dignity and safety within the Mental Health Act. Evidence from the Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery programme was included in the submission: Saavedra, J., Arias, S., Crawford, P. & Pérez, E. (2017) Impact of creative workshops for people with severe mental illness: Art as a means of recovery. Arts and Health. Accepted 06/09/2017. In press. DOI: 10.1080/17533015.2017.1381130
URL https://mentalhealthcollective.org.uk/dignity-and-respect-undermha/
 
Description Invited submission of CPMR programme to House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Committee Inquiry into the social impact of participation in culture and sport.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/digital-culture-media-an...
 
Description National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Public Engagement Case Study
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/case-studies/mutual-recovery-through-creative-connection
 
Description Panel member advising on evaluation of the Department for Education Community Learning Mental Health Research Project, a major nationwide adult community learning programme, funded through the £20 million DfE initiative announced in the 2014 Autumn Statement
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/community-learning-mental-health-research-project
 
Description Participation in a study of community-university relationships: Facer, K. and Enright, B. (2016), Creating Living KNowledge, University of Bristol.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://connected-communities.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Creating-Living-Knowledge.Final_.pdf
 
Description Professional development for WEA project team members
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact WEA Project Manager Clare White described professional development opportunities from her role in the project team relating to learning about research techniques and reconnecting with social theory. The following extract is drawn from a National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement case study based on the project: The research is carried out by Lydia, together with a trained researcher who identifies as a survivor of a mental health issues and services. Clare's main role is as an intermediator between the learners, the tutors and the researchers, ensuring that everyone has the information they need. Clare also co-facilitated and observed focus groups to assist learners with these, at the same time learning about research techniques. Participating in the steering group meetings has enabled Clare to reconnect to the theory behind much of what the WEA does and how it links to debates in feminism, sociology and politics. From: Martikke, Susanne (2014), Mutual Recovery through Creative Connection: National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Public Engagement Case Study (link below). On contributing to the final research report for the CPMR project, Howard Croft, WEA Projects Development Manager, commented, "This activity has been a good development opportunity for me and I have enjoyed working with you on it!" (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 5th Nov. 2015).
URL https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/case-studies/mutual-recovery-through-creative-connection
 
Description Professional development for members of Suresearch Mental Health Network
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Two members of Suresearch Mental Health Network, a network of mental health service users, survivors, carers, academics and allies based at the University of Birmingham, became team members for the Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery project led by Dr Lydia Lewis: Mr Tony Devaney acted as a service user consultant, paid through project funds, and Dr Janet Wallcraft was a part-time research associate, funded by the University of Wolverhampton. For Mr Devaney, opportunities for professional development during the project included contributing to publications, writing for publication (Institute of Mental Health (Nottingham) blog) and contributing to project team meetings. For Dr Wallcraft, there was opportunity to engage with a new field of research (creative arts) and, through participant observation in the field, to (re-)engage with and learn more about creating art and poetry.
URL http://www.suresearch.org.uk
 
Description Professor Hogan: Royal Society for Public Health Steering Group of SIG for Arts, Health and Wellbeing Research (which is also proposed as serving an advisory function for the All Party Parliamentary Group Inquiry on Arts Health and Wellbeing).
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Professor Susan Hogan invited to give evidence at the All Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing. Evidence, Research in Arts, Health and Wellbeing Meeting. Inquiry led by Lord Howarth. Wellcome Trust 13.09.2016.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact The report has yet to be published at this time.
URL http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm/cmallparty/160203/arts-health-and-wellbeing.htm
 
Description Project presented to clinicians in Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust's magazine, 'Positive' about integrated healthcare, June Issue 2018
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in clinical reviews
URL https://www.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/newsletters
 
Description RCUK Cross-Council Mental Health Workshop
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Invited to discuss mental health funding policy.
 
Description Use of research output in Doctoral training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact A research presentation, Mutuality in the Research Encounter: Some reflections on the ethico-politics of conducting interviews, produced for a CPMR seminar on the theme of methodologies, has been drawn upon for Doctoral training on two courses at the University of Wolverhampton: the taught Doctorate in Education (EdD) (multiple cohorts of students) and the Professional Doctorate in Health and Wellbeing.
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Use of research report to inform a PhD study
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Following perusal of project briefings (available on the project web site), the full length research report, Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery: Exploring the roles of creative arts adult community learning and participatory arts initiatives (Lewis et al, 2016), was requested by a Doctoral researcher at UCL Institute of Education, London. Upon receipt of the report she commented, "It looks very informative and potentially extremely helpful for my work" (E-mail to Dr Lydia Lewis, 15th Nov 2016). Dr Lewis was subsequently invited to be an external examiner for the PhD candidate.
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Using research findings to inform teacher training
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Research findings were used in teaching on a PGCE for post-compulsory education course at the University of Wolverhampton (Policy, Politics and Practice module). They informed discussion and debate on policy and practice in the area of mental health in post-compulsory education.
 
Description feature in report of study into community-university partnerships: Martikke, S., Church, A. and Hart, A. (2015), Greater than the sum of its parts: What works in sustaining community-university partnerships, GMCVO, pp. 106-7.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.gmcvo.org.uk/greater-sum-its-parts-what-works-sustaining-community-university-partnershi...
 
Description Biomedica Research Centre fuding
Amount £24,322 (GBP)
Organisation University of Leicester 
Department NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
Sector Hospitals
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 01/2019
 
Description Collaborative award
Amount £5,800 (GBP)
Organisation Foundation for the Sociology of Health and Illness 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 09/2016
 
Description ESRC/ Cross Council Network Plus Awards
Amount £1,014,880 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/S002588/1 
Organisation Joint Health Systems Research Initiative MRC/ESRC 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 11/2021
 
Description Grants for the Arts in collaboration with YMCA "Interconnected"
Amount £150,000 (GBP)
Funding ID GFTA-00002852 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 04/2017
 
Description HEARTS. The Health, Economic and Social impact of ARTS engagement: a Public Health Study
Amount £809,096 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P005888/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 07/2020
 
Description Health Humanities: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery. Connected Communities Festival.
Amount £6,800 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2015 
End 03/2015
 
Description Large grant responsive mode
Amount £677,065 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/R00014X/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 04/2021
 
Description MRC & AHRC Partnership Awards
Amount £177,344 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/R006148/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 10/2019
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Arnold Bentley New Initiatives Fund
Amount £3,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2014 
End 12/2014
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Arts Research Grant
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation Chelsea and Westminster Health Charity 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2014 
End 05/2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Arts for Ages
Amount SFr. 294,000 (CHF)
Organisation Gebert Rüf Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Switzerland
Start 06/2015 
End 06/2017
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: CW+ PhD studentship
Amount £75,000 (GBP)
Organisation CW+ 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 09/2018
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Music and Motherhood
Amount £199,916 (GBP)
Organisation Arts Council England 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2015 
End 03/2017
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Research Fellowship in Social Sciences (Daisy Fancourt)
Amount £241,889 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 07/2020
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Royal College of Music Staffing Enhancement Grant
Amount £55,616 (GBP)
Organisation Royal College of Music (RCM) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2013 
End 05/2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Tenovus Cancer Choirs
Amount £250,000 (GBP)
Organisation Tenovus 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 04/2018
 
Description Managed Innovation Network
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Organisation Institute of Mental Health 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
 
Description Research Networking
Amount £29,986 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N00650X/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 09/2017
 
Description Showcase grant
Amount £5,515 (GBP)
Organisation Connected Communities 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2013 
End 10/2013
 
Description University of Nottingham, Health Humanities RPA grant, 'What is home?'
Amount £3,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2016 
End 06/2017
 
Description survivor researcher to join project team
Amount £11,421 (GBP)
Organisation University of Wolverhampton 
Department School of Education
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2013 
End 10/2014
 
Title Collective ethnography 
Description The team is embracing collective ethnography as method, which is a relatively little used method in the social sciences. This novelty, therefore, generates an exciting epistemological element to the research. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact One publication re. the research method itself will be an outcome. 
 
Description Collaboration with Studio Upstairs 
Organisation Studio Upstairs
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Studio Upstairs provided one of the field sites for the research. Field work involved taking part in the creative arts activities of the organisation, supporting members, taking part in forum meetings, conducting interviews with staff and members, reporting research findings to the organisation, providing honoraria for art supplies and payment for use of meeting room. The researchers provided the organisation with an interim evaluative report of findings from the organisation's provision to support its work. Final research outputs synthesising findings from all participating organisations were also fed back to the organisation.
Collaborator Contribution Providing sites for field work, helping to organise field work and with the feeding back of findings to members (e.g. at forum meetings), liaising with and supporting researchers, discussing interim findings with researchers, providing feed back on research findings.
Impact Outputs: Interim research report, final research reports and briefings, journal article (under submission), project web site. Comments from participants on the interim research reports which detailed findings from each organisation separately not only validated findings but also indicated how the research had been helpful in providing group members with a feedback channel to their respective organisations as well as feelings of affirmation: Hope you are well. Just briefly read your Interim Report - all 32 pages of it - and am pleased that you managed to include everything. Well done. You must have put a lot of work into it and time. Anyway, thank you for representing the members' views really well. Studio Upstairs participant (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 31st July 2014) The interim report for Studio Upstairs was well received by other members of the organisation too with feedback indicating it was found supportive to its work: I have read the report and have sent it to the trustees and to the Bristol studio team as it is an excellent piece of work! Zlatinka Hristova, CEO Studio Upstairs (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 24th February 2015)
Start Year 2013
 
Description Collaboraton with CoolTan Arts 
Organisation CoolTan Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution CoolTan Arts provided one of the field sites for the research. The researchers provided the organisation with an interim evaluative report of findings from the organisation's provision to support its work. Final research outputs synthesising findings from all participating organisations were also fed back to the organisation.
Collaborator Contribution Providing a field site, liaising with and supporting researchers, providing feed back on research findings.
Impact Outputs: Interim research report, final research reports and briefings, journal article (under submission), project web site, . Outcomes: Feedback from the CEO of CoolTan Arts, Michelle Baharier described the value of having researchers external to the organisation undertake a piece of in-depth evaluative research on their provision. Commenting on the interim report provided to the organisation (which reported solely on findings from the CoolTan provision studied) she stated that she would be keeping it on file for future use and, "Hope we do some of this in the future" (e-mail to Lydia Lewis, 14th April 2015). In addition, comments from participants on the interim research reports which detailed findings from each organisation separately not only validated findings but also indicated how the research had been helpful in providing group members with a feedback channel to their respective organisations as well as feelings of affirmation: I had a coffee to wake me up and I read through your paper. I found it amazing how our sometimes casual conversation could actually be attributed to findings of various academics, and to make these connections can only come from lots of study and knowledge. I particularly agreed with your conclusions, that organisations such as Cooltan Arts are much needed, but are underfunded. Also that Cooltan Arts is only 'one part' of a larger jigsaw of services that are all very important, and much needed for people suffering some kind of mental distress. But that 'one part' of services that Cooltan Arts provide is an important factor in my life that helps to keep me well. I know from the many conversations that I have had with other participants that attend Cooltan Arts, that many of them feel the same way, and that Cooltan Arts helps to keep them well. I hope that ultimately that your paper will encourage people to help keep organisations such as Cooltan Arts open. CoolTan Arts participant and volunteer (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 6th March, 2015) Comments were also received about the experience of having researchers taking part in the creative arts groups. One participant reflected: It was nice having Jan in our poetry group and she learned that she is a good poet herself. I do hope we have inspired her to carry on writing poetry. CoolTan participant and volunteer (E-mail to Lydia Lewis, 4th March 2015)
Start Year 2013
 
Description DanceXchange, Birmingham 
Organisation DanceXchange
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution DanceXchange and Dr Jordan are working together to host the capoeira study.
Collaborator Contribution Reduced venue hire rate.
Impact Yes, multi-disciplinary, as Dr Jordan is a social scientist and DanceXchange is a business.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Aeirtec Laboratories 
Organisation Aeirtec
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Designing, securing funding and running a research study looking at inflammatory immune response and group music making.
Collaborator Contribution Labwork analysing the saliva samples collected during the study, additional lab training for one of the researchers on the project and advice on study design and sample collection.
Impact Approximately 1000 saliva samples analysed/under analysis. The initial collaboration has led to continued collaboration and funding for another project with cancer patients.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health: Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust 
Organisation Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Providing drumming workshops that can be accessed by patients at Chelsea and Westminster hospital.
Collaborator Contribution Ability to recruit participants from Chelsea and Westminster hospital for the project.
Impact Approximately 30 participants have been recruited from the hospital, and website publicity can be found at cwhc.org.uk.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Partnership with WEA 
Organisation Workers' Educational Association
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Lead in conducting the research
Collaborator Contribution Providing fieldwork sites, facilitating access, co-conducting fieldwork, input into writing up and impact generation, consultancy, facilitating the making of a short film and image library. The WEA provided in-kind contributions to the research.
Impact Outputs: A working paper, a journal article (under submission), MWIA report, a poster and briefing paper, interim research reports, final research reports and briefings, project web site, film and image library depicting the WEA's creative arts provision. National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement case study: Martikke, Susanne (2014), Mutual Recovery through Creative Connection: National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Public Engagement Case Study. Available: https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/case-studies/mutual-recovery-through-creative-connectionersity partnerships: Outcomes: - Citation in a report of a study into community-university partnerships: Martikke, S., Church, A. and Hart, A. (2015), Greater than the sum of its parts: What works in sustaining community-university partnerships, GMCVO, pp. 106-7. Available: https://www.gmcvo.org.uk/greater-sum-its-parts-what-works-sustaining-community-university-partnerships - Professional development opportunities for WEA staff members; training for WEA members and Dr Lydia Lewis in Mental Wellbeing Impact Assessment (MWIA). - Impact on practice and provision: MWIA conducted on a WEA women's health course informed its development; Wider project provided the WEA with the opportunity to reflect on practice and to evaluate and evidence the impact of the charity's educational provision. This is described in the case study about the project referenced above, which was based on a joint interview with Clare White, WEA Project Manager and Lydia Lewis. The following extracts are drawn from this: For the WEA, the main motivation to collaborate with Lydia in the study was the opportunity to take a step back and reflect on everyday practice, as well as the prospect of having evidence of the impact of the training the organisation delivers in communities. Lydia's approach of spending time with the students through an entire course inspired Clare White's (WEA) confidence that the research would be in-depth enough to generate some valuable insights. The research has also tried to find mechanisms to add value to what people are doing on the courses. For example, instead of providing honoraria to individuals for participating in the research, some money was put into a pot to buy arts and crafts materials for the groups. For WEA, being part of the project has meant that it has been properly funded to bring learners together to reflect. Although funders sometimes allocate small amounts for evaluation, this is usually too small to do anything meaningful. At the same time, the cost usually does not cover the administrative cost of pulling workshops together. The research funding of the partnership, on the other hand, is fully costed. It is also a long-term project, something else that is a rare luxury in the voluntary sector. From: Martikke, Susanne (2014), Mutual Recovery through Creative Connection: National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Public Engagement Case Study. The WEA also gained valuable insights from participants' feedback about taking part in the research. This is discussed in the report of the study into community-university partnerships referenced above: The questions service users asked the community partner organisation about the research project and its usefulness also shed light on service users' motivations for using the service the organisation provides. This, in turn benefited the organisation: () Community partner: Yeah, we've had a little bit of feedback which we wouldn't necessarily get through the paperwork, around people wondering why we're asking them about health and wellbeing questions, or it's got nothing to do with my mental health, you know. Actually, having the space to have those discussions is quite useful in terms of development and thinking about the motivation of why people come and what they want from the courses, it's quite useful. From: Martikke, S., Church, A. and Hart, A. (2015), Greater than the sum of its parts: What works in sustaining community-university partnerships, GMCVO, pp. 106-7. The film and image library have also been used by the WEA for a variety of purposes (see feedback relating to these items under 'Creative and artistic products' from Howard Croft, WEA Projects Development manager). Valuing and supporting WEA adult learners In the case study referred to above, Clare White discusses the apparent benefits for participants of taking part in group discussions or focus groups for the study: Last but not least, the study aims to make communities that are currently invisible and unrecognised for their contribution visible, as well as reflecting on their own experience. Feedback suggested that in some cases focus groups proved to be more beneficial for adult learners than one-on-one interviews, because they helped people realise that they are not alone with their problems. From: Martikke, Susanne (2014), Mutual Recovery through Creative Connection: National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement Public Engagement Case Study. Available: https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/case-studies/mutual-recovery-through-creative-connection This point is also evidenced in the report from the study into community-university partnerships referred to above which featured the research. The extract below indicates as well how taking part in focus groups could sometimes supportive to the development of participants' creative identities: A conversation during a joint interview with CUP partners who are collaborating on a research project about adult education suggests that co-production has wider benefits including for service users, partner organisations, as well as helping partners to come up with a more valid approach to research. The quote below illustrates that service users benefited from co-production by realizing that they as a group have shared concerns and experiences. () "Community partner: Yeah, and the peer model, the focus group sessions we did, I'm sure they sort of come to this conclusion anyway, but I think what they find helpful is realising that other people are in a similar situation, so a focus group rather than a kind of individual interview which they might, you know, obviously you have a dialogue with the interviewer which makes you think, but I think a lot of them sort of expressed the views that probably make them realise they're not alone, saying like they didn't feel like coming and it's been helpful and actually acknowledging each other's work and the talent they feel each other have got is a good extra, rather than simply being the tutor sitting in front of everyone, people supporting each other. So that's something that wouldn't necessarily come out [otherwise], because again they're only tiny courses, they're only an hour and a half and if you want to get your head down and do art , that can be the only thing that you don't necessarily think about. Academic partner: That's right, yeah, and realising you're not alone and also that your experiences are part of a kind of wider socio political sort of issue as well. () Coming up with a more valid research approach, as in the example above, is one benefit of co-production but co-production can also help with the practical side of actually carrying out research in a practice context. From: Martikke, S., Church, A. and Hart, A. (2015), Greater than the sum of its parts: What works in sustaining community-university partnerships, GMCVO, pp. 106-7. Inspiring and informing further work The making of the film and image library described above, as well as the wider study, led to further research and development work for the WEA. (See item under 'Artistic and Creative Products' for further details.)
Start Year 2010
 
Description Two members of Suresearch recruited as project team members 
Organisation Suresearch
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Two members of Suresearch (Service Users in Research and Education) based at the University of Birmingham were recruited as project team members - Tony Devaney as a consultant (who was also involved in developing the project) and Dr Janet Wallcraft as a survivor researcher. Both were paid positions with Dr Wallcraft's position being funded by the UoW for one day a week for the duration of the project. In turn Dr Lydia Lewis became an invited member of Suresearch. The collaboration involved Dr Lewis supporting the two survivor researchers in their contributions to the project and attending Suresearch meetings (when possible). There is a future plan to present findings from the research to a Suresearch meeting.
Collaborator Contribution Consultancy at project team meetings and feed back on interim reports; conducting literature reviews and field work, contributing to publications, commenting on reports, taking part in team meetings, taking part in public engagement events.
Impact The collaboration supported a further collaboration with another service user-led organisation in the research, CoolTan Arts and helped ensure field work was conducted sensitively, to the benefit of the organisations involved and that findings were reported in a way that was meaningful to user communities.
Start Year 2011
 
Description '"Hand in Hand": Some Thoughts on Storytelling, Health and Dealing with a Post-Truth World' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an invited keynote as part for the International Conference on Storytelling for Health, Swansea held in May 2017. The audience was a mixture of academics, health practitioners, policymakers, storytelling practitioners. The paper discussed the issue of the relationship between storytelling and science in a post-truth context. There was much debate and questions afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 'Ah, what it is to be human!' Talk at TED conference, Cambridge University 13/2/2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 'Ah, what it is to be human!' (Xavier O. Monasterio):
Transcending boundaries between the arts and sciences in the health humanities.

Making the material concept of human beings (2-3 mins):
The renaissance and the development of anatomy. Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius
The origins of humanism: Machiavelli, Erasmus
Demystifying and disenchanting the human world (2 mins):
The English civil war and the development of the age of reason
The 19th century: Building modern intellectual life (3 mins)
Increasing separation of the arts and sciences
Diseased minds - Henry Maudsley and the rise of 'psychiatric Darwinism'
The 20th century (3 mins)
Rise of biomedical approaches to 'mental disorder'
The development of 'two cultures' in the arts and sciences
Early beginnings of the medical humanities
The 21st century: Transcending the arts/sciences divide with the humanities in health. (~5 mins
Putting human agency back into the recovery process
Mutual recovery through creative practice
Some illustrations of our AHRC funded project - costume, sculpture, music.
Reformulating the distinction between practitioners and clients in health care.
Rethinking the processes involved in so-called 'mental disorder'.
How experience 'gets under the skin' and changes our material nature.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMnkgB1FeWw&index=8&list=PLsRNoUx8w3rOXOmtPaLv3frdF1WfURiyM
 
Description 'From Objet Trouvé to Objet Surpris or Objet Entendu: Fragmentary Narratives, Digital Technology and Mutual Recovery', Storytelling: Global Reflections on Narrative (6th Global Conference), Dubrovnik, Croatia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This paper was presented at the 6th Global Storytelling Conference in Dubrovnik. There was much discussion afterwards and I have expanded my international network accordingly.

Since the presentation, I have been approached by a potential collaborator in Australia around using storytelling as an intervention within the area of youth suicide. We are beginning to build a team to develop a project around this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 'The Objet Surpris or Overheard Object: Fragmentary Narratives, Digital Technology and Mutual Recovery', 'Dangerous Currents: Risk and Regulation at the Interface of Medicine and the Arts', Conference of the Association of Medical Humanities, Dartington H 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact This paper was presented at the annual conference of the Association for Medical Humanities. Much discussion followed, both inside and outside the conference and networks across the Medical and Health Humanities have been extended.

Discussions have begun with contacts from the conference concerning future possible collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://amh.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/AMH-Conference-Brochure-3.pdf
 
Description 'The social capitals of mental health' presentation at Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium Derby University 27-28 November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a presentation to an international group of conference attendees comprising practitioners, performers, academics as well as students, to disseminate the work on the grant and introduce new projects and activities. An audience of around 50 attended my presentation, yielding questions and follow up activity relating to this project and the follow-on AH/R006148/1 project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.derby.ac.uk/newsevents/events/archive/events-archive/health-humanities--arts-in-health-i...
 
Description 1st-3rd.05.2014 Connected Communities Festival in Cardiff. Poster presentation titled: Yoga as mutual recovery: Clinical and Social Implications for Looked-After Children (LAC) and their careers 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 5th International Health Humanities Conference, Seville University, Spain, 15-17 September 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a report on findings investigating how museums can advance for wellbeing and social inclusion in recovery for severe mental illness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/index
 
Description 5th International Health Humanities Conference, Seville University, Spain, 15-17 September. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk about initial findings from an investigation into creative practice as mutual recovery explored within forensic mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/index
 
Description 6th International Health Humanities Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We want the resources to be used in training health professionals:

"I've forwarded all the info and videos of the Birth Project to my own midwife, Minna Presswood here in Finland.
Tears came to her eyes, when I described The Better Mother poem ready by Lucie Dowling.

Very best, and thank you for sharing this wonderful, inspiring work that you are doing.

Warmly,
Lisa

-----------------------------------
Lisa Erdman
Doctoral Candidate, Department of Art
Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture
P.O. Box 31000
FIN-00076 Aalto
Finland
p. +358449715315
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/2017healthhumanitiescfp/!
 
Description Apr 16 Northern Arts Therapies Conference. Middlethorpe Hall. Plenary speaker. Mothers Make Art. 23-24.4.16. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The arts are still not widely used as ante-natal and post-natal support, so this and requests for access to the films was encouraging.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Apr 18 Northern Art Therapy Conference. Plenary Speaker. Middlethorpe Hall, York. The Birth Project. 28-29.4. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Pleased to have a plenary opportunity to reach practitioners to share the research findings and teaching resources.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://ydmpc.co.uk/north-east-arts-therapies-group/
 
Description Arts Informed Visual Methods 23.10.14. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Arts Informed Visual Methods for Information Research & Education. Workshop with Jenna Hartel. University of Sheffield, Information School.
Was able to share methodological reflections with other researchers and information technologists.


Debate and information exchange
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Aug 18 7th International Health Humanities Conference. Keynote speaker. Changing Society: Community, Wellbeing and Transformation. The Birth Project and Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery 2-4 Aug 18. Southampton, England. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Was given the opportunity for a keynote address and also a plenary film screening. This was a mixed audience of carers, professional practitioners, charities, people with mental health issues, activists, academics and others.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://goodmentalhealth.org.uk/hhc2018/
 
Description Birth and Death Symposium (Salford) 19.11.13. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 1. Film Viewing of Visual Research Methods: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery. Professor Susan Hogan. Film 2013.
2. Paula McCloskey (RA) gave a talk on The Birth Project.
3. Susan Hogan and Paula McCloskey discussed The Birth Project with the symposium delegates. Primary Beneficiaries: delegates include midwives, artists, students.


1. Recruiting participants
2. Challenging thinking on issues of midwifery practice
3. Promotion of arts in public health concept to deligates
4. Further dissemination of film resource (other URL listed); combined several thousand viewings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjPN2akVp-A
 
Description CaSMa blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The CaSMa blog disseminates and publicize work and events designed to address the ethical challenges around social media.
To date, the blog has attracted more than 5,000 views and over 400 subscribers. During the last year, the CaSMa blog has posted more than 70 blogs, received many comments from followers (n>39) and several requests for guest posts (e.g. World Wide Web Foundation (webfoundation.org).
The blog is a valuable tool to publicize events, showcase current research projects and inform the public about current topics on social media research as well as provide a platform for the public to engage and communicate with the CaSMa team. For example, after the last public engagement event organised at Nottingham Contemporary, one of the attendees posted:

'Hello, I attended the most recent event. The event was organised masterfully and conducted with the utmost dignity and professionalism yet remained safe, supportive, engaging and thought provoking, it was "real".

At the end of the debate I posed the question, "is the emerging phenomenon of digital interaction a window into Jung's collective unconscious." This could be refined into a debate/exploration of virtual social groups and crowd consensus or dissension on the internet and perhaps their effects on the physical world.

please email me if you for further thoughts.'

Evidence that the CaSMa blog is reaching policy makers is evident from two occasions:
On December 7th 2015, following a blog post regarding the House of Lords inquiry into online platforms we were contacted:
Dear Dr Koene,
I just noticed your short blog on the Lords inquiry into online platforms, particularly commenting on the question relating to algorithms.
Would you care to respond to our inquiry, on that one question? You clearly have a lot of expertise in this area. A page or two would be sufficient and would certainly enrich the debate.
The only issue is that we will stop accepting submissions on the 10th of this month.
Nevertheless, given that you have already more or less written it
Best,
Kilian
Kilian Bourke
Policy Analyst
EU Internal Market Sub-Committee
Committee Office, House of Lords

On January 5th 2016, following blog posts on the draft Investigative Powers Bill we were contacted:
Dear Ansgar,
I work with the team leading on the Investigatory Powers Bill in the Home Office.
I hope you don't mind my approach, but we saw that you'd produced an analysis of the IP Bill on the CaSMa project blog site, and wondered if you might be interested in an informal discussion with officials working on the Bill. This could either be in London, or via phone if that were more convenient.
If you are interested in setting something up please do get in touch.
Best regards
Rebecca

Rebecca Underhill
National Security Directorate
Home Office
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
URL http://casma.wp.horizon.ac.uk/
 
Description Centre for Gender Research, Sheffield University, ICOSS. Plenary speaker. Gendered Methods Event. Exploring the Transition to Motherhood Using Visual Methods. 30.06.15. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Centre for Gender Research, Sheffield University, ICOSS. Plenary speaker. Gendered Methods Event. Exploring the Transition to Motherhood Using Visual Methods. 30.06.15. This event focused on research methodology in relation to gender in research processes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presenter and panel member, Seriously Funny Business (evening chaired by Lucy Porter) on comedy and mental health
Lakeside Theatre
University of Nottingham
May 5.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.lakesidearts.org.uk/theatre/event/3207/seriously-funny-business-hosted-by-lucy-porter.ht...
 
Description Conference paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lewis, L. and Spandler, H. (2017), Mutual creativity and learning in a mental health participatory arts setting, presentation to the Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium, University of Derby, 27-28th November.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Conference paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hope, Homeliness and Humour [with Williams, I].
European Federation of Therapeutic Communities Conference
Dublin
Sept 20
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Connected Communities Festival -- Cardiff July 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Poster presentation by Jon Allard on the Digital Dialogues work package. Additional funding acquired to support participation.

Good response and feedback from delegates. Good networking across Connceted Communities community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Contribution to conference 'The role of the humanities in improving the lives of those who suffer from mental health problems' 5/3/2015 Cambridge UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Prof. Brian Brown is Professor of Health Communication in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences at De Montfort University. He will provide a background concerning the health humanities and the approach taken at Nottingham University. He will also describe some aspects of ongoing research exploring how the role of mutual involvement in creative activity - sculpture, photography, music, storytelling - can enhance the well-being of all parties involved.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Contribution to expert discussion panel about the nature of the medical humanities at the Association for Medical Humanities conference, Greenwich, UK, July 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A debate about the nature of the medical humanities in which I described the work associated with the current AHRC project and described the work we have done on promoting a broader concept of 'health humanities', as well as some of the sub-projects undertaken as part of the larger programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust - Monthly Psychiatrist CPD Event - November 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact Presentation by Professor Alan Bleakley and Dr Jon Allard (both Falmouth University) on project to healthcare professionals in the region.

Generated interest and helped recruit people to the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description ECARTE (European Consortium for Arts Therapies). Making Meaning and Contesting Clichéd Visual Representations of Motherhood: Towards Greater Diversity. 16.19.9. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact ECARTE (European Consortium for Arts Therapies). Making Meaning and Contesting Clichéd Visual Representations of Motherhood: Towards Greater Diversity. 16.19.9.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ecarte.info/conference/
 
Description EPALE blog post 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Article posted on the Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe blog. (EPALE has around 17,000 members internationally.) Link to blog post was also circulated to project and consortium team members.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://ec.europa.eu/epale/en/blog/research-project-examines-creative-practice-mutuality-and-mental-...
 
Description ESRC Assessor College. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact National Centre for Research Methods (Economic & Social Research Council): call for Methodological Innovation Projects. Stream: Methods which Exploit Potential Synergies at the Boundaries of the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. ESRC Assessor College.


Preparation for this grant and the research for the methodologies film enabled Dr Susan Hogan to act with confidence as an assessor for the National Centre for Research Methods.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Exhibition Stand at Medsin Global Health Conference 2017 on Gender Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Birth Project was invited to hold an exhibition space at the Medsin Global Health Conference 2017. The theme of this conference was gender health. The exhibition stand had a project poster, copies of the interim report and flyers. The project materials directed individuals to the project website where the films can be viewed. The audience were mostly Medical students who had or were to complete gynecology and obstetrics modules.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Experiential workshop at the National Trust building The Workhouse in Southwell as part of the book launch 'Voices from the Workhouse'. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact This invitation came from the National Trust and it is linked to the research project 'What is home?'. The aim of this experiential workshop is to reflect on the notions of home, the history of the The Workhouse and how to improve the visiting experience of future visitors. The workshop was also aimed to engage with an audience that rarely engages in embodied practices such as yoga or flamenco during a weekend retreat. The workshop was a success and many participants reported being interested in contributing or participating in future related events. This activity also links with previous work done by Horizon in this building aiming to improve the visitors experience by introducing interactive elements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/theworkhouse
 
Description Experiential workshop by the National Trust at The Workhouse 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Experiential workshop by the National Trust at The Workhouse to launch the book 'Voices from the Workhouse'. Southwell, 18th March, 2017. I have been invited again to provide a similar experiential workshop
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Feb 11 2014: Aberdeen University School of Medicine: Presentation and workshop to faculty 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact seminar presentation to faculty audience of academics and health professionals, by Prof Alan Bleakley (Falmouth Uni)

Good discussion amongst delegates
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Flamenco-Yoga as creative practice for mutual recovery. Experiential workshop presented at the 5th International Health Humanities Conference, Seville, 15-17 September [page 76] 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop was run twice during the conference. No formal feedback was collected after or during the workshop but the first author captured anecdotal feedback and received numerous invitations to deliver the workshop again in different settings. To date, the first author has run the workshop several times among children and young people and is planing a systematic evaluation to understand the effects that creative practices as mutual recovery can have among s clinical and non-clinical populations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/
 
Description Gem FM radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was interviewed by Gem FM about the work I did bringing yoga into children homes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker to the East Midlands 2018 Registrar Conference (Art of Public Health & Pets & Human Health). 3rd-4th Sept. Derbyshire, England. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Asked to speak to trainee doctors about The Birth Project. I gave a presentation and also flagged-up the project resources and their potential use for training purposes. Several of the trainee doctors knew of people who would benefit from immediate use of the resources, so I made sure they had the links.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited speaker, 'BIRTH SHOCK: Induction day', University of Derby, 19 September. Paper: Creative Practice 'as Mutual Recovery'. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Early presentation of the programme of work in Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery

Situated the study on birth shock in the wider context of the whole programme for researchers and participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited speaker, 'Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Well-Being' at McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy IHSP Seminars. Institut des politiques sociales et de la santé de l'Université McGill, Ca 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Social workers, social scientists, mental health practitioners, postgraduate and undergraduate students attended my talk.

Attendees reported their interest in disseminating ideas about 'mutual recovery' through creative practice to their respective health and social carew teams. Academics in the audience considered the approach taken to be novel and thought-provoking, not least in breaking down traditional boundaries around who are or need to be the recipients of mental health care or mental health and well-being activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited speaker, 'Innovation and Stimulus', Executive Leadership Council, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Trent Vineyard Nottingham, 11 June. Paper: 'Social Futures in Mental Health.' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 200 mental health/ social care practitioners and services users were presented with an overview of how creative practice as mutual recovery and other social interventions can enhance mental health and well-being. The audience were further engaged by distribution of key literature on a colour postcard, with contact details. Discussions were forthcoming with key practitioners during the event and also with public patient involvement leads.

Service users attending the event communicated their positive appreciation of introducing a stronger focus on shared creativity in the arts and humanities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited speaker, 'Mental Health Humanities: Social and Creative Futures' at Research and Development Seminar, York Retreat, York. 22 July. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A small group of 20 public, patients and practitioners where the notion of recovery through the arts and humanities was outlined and discussion generated on how creative practices can assist recovery from mental health problems.

Practitioners reported that they would consider shared creative activities at York retreat as a means of advancing the recovery of their whole community rather than pursuing therapising of patients only.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited speaker, Getting Creatively Maladjusted at Nottingham Contemporary Gallery, Making Waves and Nottingham Contemporary, July 8th. Paper: 'The Mutual Recovery Project' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A small group of mental health service users and activists working for change in how mental health services operate and challenging public perceptions of people with mental health problems as passive or non-contributory showed a lot of interest in how they shared issues with practitioners and informal carers. In particular, they remarked on how shared activity across the divides of practitioners and service users could help in breaking down barriers and misunderstandings.

This talk resulted in two of the leading figures in Open Dialogue in Nottingham for advancing the rights of people with mental health problems joining Professor Crawford's Centre for Social Futures at the Institute of Mental Health and subsequently creating a new Integrated Research Group in the centre called Open Futures. Open Futures has gone on to lead numerous public awareness raising events, not least MAD16 to launch Mental Health Awareness Week at the Institute of Mental Health which brought practitioners, researchers and service users together in a carnival celebration of mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited speaker, Public and Patient Involvement Forum, Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham, 6 March. Paper: 'Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery.' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Informing a small group of public and patient involvement members from the Institute of Mental Health on the new programme of work and discussion of how this may benefit them.

Two members of this group have become key allies in advancing the programme of creative practice as mutual recovery, attending meetings and seminars in this theme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited speaker, School of Health Sciences, University of Southampton. Paper: 'Health Humanities and Compassionate Design of Care'. 16 July. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lively discussion among a mixed audience of health and social care practitioners and managers and also the public on how the arts and humanities can advance more compassionate environments in hospitals and clinical sites, not least shared or community-crossing engagement in creative practices.

The event led to local plans led by Sandy Walker in the School of Health Sciences to create a new health humanities research group at Southampton University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Jan 18 Royal Society for Public Health. Health & Wellbeing Webinar Series. Arts and Mental Health: The Similarities and Differences Between Arts Therapies and Arts Practices. 9.1.18. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Delighted to be invited to give a a webinar by the Royal Society for Public Health and was able to discuss CPMR and The Birth Project in the Q & A.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.rsph.org.uk/event/arts-and-mental-health--the-similarities-and-differences-between-arts-...
 
Description July17 Motherlines: Mothering, Motherhood, and Mothers in and Through the Generations: Theory, Narrative, Representation, Practice, and Experience. Hosted by the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community and Involvement and UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway, 6-9th. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact July17 Motherlines: Mothering, Motherhood, and Mothers in and Through the Generations: Theory, Narrative, Representation, Practice, and Experience. Hosted by the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community and Involvement and UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway, 6-9th. Plenary film viewing of Mother's Make Art. I was very pleased to show one of our resources to the entire conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://motherhoodinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/IreleandConferenceProgram.pdf
 
Description Jun 4 2014: Exeter University medical school: presentation to faculty 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact faculty presentation to academics and health practitioners

Good discussion and networking. Profile raising for project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description June 18 International Visual Sociology Conference (IVSA). University of Evry-Val d'Essonne, UFR de Sciences Sociales et Gestion, France. Mothers Make Art. Paper and film screening. 25-28th June 2018. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Gave a paper and screened one of the project films. Was given a table from which to distribute resources. Some of the attendees thought they could use the films for sociology courses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://visualsociology.org/?cat=200
 
Description Keynote Address Sharpening The View of Art Therapy in the 21st Century. Symposium, The Cantonial Psychiatric Clinic, Will, Switzerland. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Susan Hogan was Keynote Speaker. Paper: Visions for the Future of Art Therapy: Innovations in Theory, Methodology and Research.
Followed by a Workshop. 19-20 Sept. 2014.


Presentation to the first International Symposium held in Switzerland which comprised psychiatrists, art psychotherapists and other arts in health practitioners. This was an excellent opportunity to share our research findings thus far and to discuss the use of the arts in health and support via the arts for new mothers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description MWIA training 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact MWIA training: co-organiser and participant. Members of the third sector organisation I am working with (WEA) took part and the training involving conducting MWIAs of adult learning courses (fieldwork, population profiling and reporting). I led the assessment of a women's health course (part of a health education programme), working as part of a team. It has helped build my research partnership and has led to requests from the WEA for further collaboration on research and evaluation work.

After conducting the MWIA the manager of the health education programme invited me to evaluate another aspect of the programme and to collaborate on future qualitative research on the programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.westmidlands.wea.org.uk/stokehealth
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health video 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The video showcases the Making Music for Mental Health project and its key findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at AESOP Arts in Health Conference and Showcase (London, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The presentation shared key findings from Making Music for Mental Health with an audience of health commissioners and practitioners, leading to on-going contacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at Goldsmith's University of London (London, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings from phase 1 and stimulated discussion, engaging fellow psychology researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at Music and Science Centre, University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings from phase 1 and stimulated discussion, engaging fellow psychology researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at The Music Psychology Group, Uppsala University (Uppsala, Sweden) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings from phase 1 and stimulated discussion, engaging fellow psychology researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the American Pyschosomatic Society conference (Savannah, USA) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings from phase 1 and stimulated discussion, engaging clinicians and fellow psychology and biology researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery First Annual Seminar (Nottingham, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Approximately 40 researchers and health/arts practitioners attended the first annual seminar of the Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery project and were informed about ongoing research in music and mental health.

Further discussion and requests for information and participation arose from the event. Ongoing collaborations were strengthened and future collaborations were initiated.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Edinburgh International Culture Summit (Edinburgh, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The 3rd Edinburgh International Culture Summit brought together Culture Ministers, artists, thinkers and arts leaders from around the world to share ideas, expertise and best practice, with a view to inspiring positive change in cultural policy and investment. The theme of Summit 2016, 'Culture: Building Resilient Communities', reflects the Summit's strong belief in the vital role that culture plays in the life of any successful community. Prof Williamon presented a workshop titled 'Beyond the notes: Making music for health and wellbeing', which disseminated key findings from the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the European Society for the Cognitive Science of Music conference (Manchester, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings from phase 2 and stimulated discussion, engaging fellow psychology researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Executive Masters in Applied Positive Psychology (Lisbon, Portgual) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Dissemination of research results and prolific discussion afterwards. The knowledge exchange informed on-going projects within the masters group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the International Association for Music and Medicine Conference (Toronto, Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation showcased the work in progress on Making Music for Mental Health, and sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

The presentation shared preliminary findings from Making Music for Mental Health with an international audience, establishing the new methodological approach and documenting the emerging beneficial impact of music on mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the International Symposium on Performance Science (Kyoto, Japan) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The symposium included three papers based on key findings from Making Music for Mental Health, documenting the impact of group drumming on mental health service users, carers, and musicians.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Kensington and Chelsea Festival of Science (London, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings to the public, and situated them within other research on arts and health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Lectorate Lifelong Learning in Music (Groningen, The Netherlands) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation showcased Making Music for Mental Health's key findings and resulting discussions contributed to on-going partnerships.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the QUAD Derby Connected Communities (Derby, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dissemination of research results and prolific discussion with stakeholders. Dissemination of knowledge to workers "on the ground" of community work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the Royal College of Music's Music and Ideas (London, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The talk disseminated key findings from the project and situated them within wider research and social contexts, and led to requests for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, at the launch of the Centre for Social Futures (Nottingham, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 150 health professionals, researchers and policy makers attended the launch of the Centre for Social Futures and were informed about ongoing research in music and mental health.

Further discussion and requests for information and participation arose from the event. Ongoing collaborations were strengthened and future collaborations were initiated.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, in the Centre for Performance Science grand challenge video 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The video introduces a grand challenge in Performance Science: Music, Health and Wellbeing. The video makes the project's key findings freely available online, and situates these within the other work on music, health and wellbeing within the Centre for Performance Science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, keynote at Arts and Humanities for Improving Social Inclusion, Education and Health: 5th International Health Humanities Conference (Seville, Spain) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The keynote presentation disseminated key findings from the project and established new collaborations and partnerships.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Making Music for Mental Health, keynote at Building Experience and Meaning in Music Education: The 19th Pedagogical Forum for the Performing Arts (Belgrade, Serbia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The keynote presentation disseminated key findings from the project and established new collaborations and partnerships.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Maternal Subjectivities. Psychology/Psychoanalysis, Literature & the Arts. Case Internazionale Delle Donne, Roma. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact International Premier Film Showing of The Birth Project Art Elicitation Group Story.

Women's activists and an assortment of others, artists, academics, public sector workers interested in equality.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.academia.edu/12573183/MIRCI_ROME_CONFERENCE_BOOKLET_2015
 
Description May 16 The Creative Researcher. Keele University, School of Psychology. Visual Methods in Participatory Frameworks. Keynote speaker. 7-8.05.16. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was VERY PLEASED that E Snook, who trains Health Visitors thinks she can use the films we have produced to train Health Visitors. I shall follow-up with her further about disseminating the material among trainings.
The secondary outcome was changed attitudes and behaviours expressed regarding the transition to motherhood.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://search.keele.ac.uk/s/search.html?query=Hogan&collection=website-meta&form=simple
 
Description May 16 Working in an International Research Consortium. University of Derby, Annual Research Conference. Buxton campus. 20. 05.2016. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Although the research findings were discussed, the presentation attempted to demystify collaborative research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description May 18 Motherhood Initiative for Research & Community Involvement (MIRCI). Matricentric Feminism. To What Extent are Hospital Practices, that are Iatrogenic, Implicated in Post-natal Distress? (paper) and film viewing: Mothers Make Art. 2-4 May. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This is a specialist conference, so the hope it that the findings will be propagated via scholars and activists. Also practitioners do also attend and showed interest in the project resources.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://institut-du-genre.fr/fr/actualites-du-genre/appels-a-contribution/article/cfp-matricentric-fe...
 
Description Mental Health Foundation seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Lunchtime seminar at the Mental Health Foundation, London to disseminate findings. Around 14 people attended from across the organisation. A presentation of the research and its main findings was followed by distribution of project briefings and USB sticks preloaded with outputs from the CPMR programme. After the presentation, audience members picked up on key points of critical, policy-related debate for this area of work (arts and mental health). Feedback received included: "Thank you very much for coming in last week to present your research - the team found it very insightful." (E-mail from Ruth Simmonds, Project Officer, 21st May 2018).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/
 
Description Mental Health series at BBC Radio Nottingham 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact During this radio program was interviewed about the research I do to promote creative practices as mutual recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Motherhood & Culture. International & Interdisciplinary Conference. Maynooth University, Co. Kildare, Ireland. 17.06.15. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Motherhood & Visual Culture: Mothers Make Art.

This presentation was to an academic audience but also included women who ran local organisations and artists. I have tried to target events which are aimed at interdisciplinary audiences, rather than aimed just at academics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/motherhood-culture-conference
 
Description Mothers, Mothering And Motherhood Conference. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Mothers, Mothering And Motherhood From Ancient To Contemporary Times Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI). Athens, Greece. Hellenic Education & Research Center (HERC) May 23-24, 2014. Talk given by Professor Susan Hogan: Exploring Birthing Identities: Transitions to Motherhood.

Attended by about 60 specialists on childbirth from several disciplines


Requests for further information; enhanced understanding of the use of the arts for health with new mothers. Dissemination of information about The Birth Project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Mutual Recovery Event. 31.05.14 A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Meeting of the two sets of workshop participants of The Birth Project with a project exhibition (also attended by Mental Health Foundation representative).


The day was filmed so the impact will be the production of two short films aimed for trainee midwives, obstetric nurses, doulas, medical trainees, therapists and any other practitioners interested in exploring women's experience of childbirth.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Mutual Recovery Seminar 27.06.14 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact This was primarily cross-fertilisation between the different arms of the Consortium


Stimulation of Early Career Researchers and sharing of best practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Nov 17 American Art Therapy Association. Art Therapy: Traversing Landscapes of Heart & Mind. Nov 8-12, Albuquerque, U.S. What Does Feminism have to do with Art Therapy? Envisioning New Paradigms of Care. Panel proposal and paper. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was pleased to have a panel proposal accepted which allowed me to situate the findings in relation to other relevance research, thus increasing its impact. Resources for training also shared at multiple networking events which form part of the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://arttherapy.org
 
Description Nov 17 Arts and Health & Health Humanities. International Symposium. Keynote speaker. The Birth Project. Enterprise Centre, Derby. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Symposium celebrating CPMR and including a plenary on The Birth Project, as well as round-table talks. I was also able to share the project resources also.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.artsandhealth.ie/2017/09/13/call-for-abstracts-health-humanities-arts-in-health-internati...
 
Description Oct 16 International Workshop Visual Participatory Methods: Perspectives in Ethnographic Research, Plenary Presentation. Paris-Sorbonne University, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Paris. 17.10. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This was a discussion of the methodology in particular with it's emphasis on mutual recovery events and exploration of visual methods which created much debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.visualanthropology.net/?p=1074
 
Description Online article in CareTalk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact How low can we go? CareTalk Issue 17, November, 15.
Article situating applied arts and humanities solutions in compassion-challenged healthcare services.

Ongoing requests for speaking and writing on compassion in healthcare in the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.caretalk.co.uk/magazine/issue27/
 
Description Online article in The Consultant 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Article 'Mental healthcare, mindsets and making the most of what we have', foregrounding creative practice as mutual recovery. Published in The Consultant 22, Autumn, 44-7.

Too early to say
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Oral presentation of Doctoral work (CPMR_FMH) at the Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium (Derby) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Approximately 30 people attended the presentation on the Doctoral work, which is exploring Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery within Forensic Mental Health. This was an opportunity to share the preliminary findings from the observational element of the research and receive feedback from audience members. Two vignettes were shared with the audience to highlight the preliminary themes. Discussions explored methodological development of ideas (e.g., terms used within this research, possibility of using 'spontaneous creative practice' instead of timetabled). Power relations and 'levelling' of boundaries were discussed with audience members, this related to another project within the CPMR consortium. The outcomes of the activity have informed further developments of the research scope which was obtained through public engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Poster Presentation at 1st Annual UK Maternal Mental Health Alliance Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster of The Birth Project was presented at the 1st Annual UK Maternal Mental Health Alliance Conference, London. Researcher discussed the project and findings with researchers and practitioners within the field. Project booklets were provided to interested audience members. Leaflets of potential third sector organisations were sourced for further impact work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://maternalmentalhealthalliance.org/event/1st-annual-uk-maternal-mental-health-alliance-confere...
 
Description Poster Presentation at Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium (Derby) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Birth Project poster was presented at the Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium (Derby, November 2017). Project leaflets were also provided in conference packs advertising the project and learning resources (films). The conference delegates included international researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Poster presentation at 7th International Health Humanities Conference, Southampton, 2nd-4th August 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of poster and briefings at IHHN international conference entitled 'Changing Society: Community Wellbeing and Transformation - How Health Humanities Can Change the World'. Poster title: Breaking down boundaries? Exploring shared art-making in a mental health participatory arts setting, Lydia Lewis, University of Wolverhampton and Helen Spandler, University of central Lancashire. Purpose was to engage with arts and humanities practitioners, the third sector, other researchers and postgraduates. The poster received a great deal of interest and briefings were well taken up.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at University of Wolverhampton Institute of Education Research Day, 21st June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation entitled 'Breaking down boundaries? Exploring shared art-making in a mental health participatory arts setting' reached a diverse, multi-disciplinary audience of mainly postgraduate students, including one from overseas. It sparked discussion about methodological and ethical considerations when conducting ethnographic research and about personal disclosure by professionals working in therapeutic contexts. Audience members were keen to take briefings and USB sticks containing information about the wider CPMR programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation of Doctoral work at the 5th International Health Humanities Conference (Seville, September 2016) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Approximately 30 people attended the presentation on the Doctoral work, which is exploring Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery within Forensic Mental Health. This was an opportunity to share the preliminary findings of the observational element of the research and receive feedback from audience members. Discussions explored the boundaries of the themes presented (e.g. negative features of humour including the relationship between patients), it's relation to pop culture (Nursing and comedy), and methodological developments (the terminology used within the research). The outcomes of the activity have informed further developments of the research scope which was obtained through public engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/blog/view/0/72
 
Description Presentation to the Health Humanities and Arts in Health International Symposium, University of Derby, 27-28th November. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation, Lewis, L. and Spandler, H. (2017), Mutual creativity and learning in a mental health participatory arts setting, generated interest from practitioners and members of third sector organisations who requested further information about the study and were issued with research briefings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Presentations to PGCE (Post Compulsory Education) groups 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentations about the research entitled 'How Should we Respond to the Mental Health and Wellbeing Agenda in Adult Community Learning? Exploring the Role of Creative Practices' delivered to two groups of around 30 students on a teacher training course for post-compulsory education at the University of Wolverhampton. The talk raised debate about professional practice in relation to students experiencing mental health issues and stimulated critical discussion concerning approaches to the mental health and wellbeing agenda in adult community learning. The research also provided examples that were used in a subsequent lecture to the groups on 'The politics, ethics and uses of social research'. This stimulated questions about the ethical approaches the students were taking in their own research projects and about the ethics of social research in general, including in relation to matters of epistemic responsibility.
.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Project web site: Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery: Exploring the roles of creative arts adult community learning and participatory arts initiatives 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Web site for the project, Mutuality, Wellbeing and Mental Health Recovery: Exploring the roles of creative arts adult community learning and participatory arts initiatives: www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
The web site has generated a range of requests for more information about the project, for members of the project team to become involved with other creative arts projects and for the full project report.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.wlv.ac.uk/connectedcommunities
 
Description Radio Broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio Interview: Mark Dennison Breakfast Show, BBC Radio Nottingham, 9.50am, 21 May 2013. On mental health, creative practice and mutual recovery, health humanities.

Public awareness and understanding of issues related to mental health, the role of arts and humanities in enhancing health and well-being
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Radio broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Radio interview of add-on project related to health humanities. Alan Clifford, BBC Radio Nottingham (Guest Frances Finn), 1720, 4 December 2013

Public information giving on health humanities and creative practice as mutual recovery
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Raising Awareness of Mental Health in Higher Education 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This was a talk demonstrating the value of creative practices for mutual recovery relevant to supporting the mental health needs of populations in higher education, not least students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/healthsciences/events/raising-awareness-of-mental-health-in-higher-educa...
 
Description Rinzing art exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact This is an photography exhibition launched at the Institute of Mental that explores mental health and wellbeing through street photography.The exhibition was launch at Eating Disorders week to bring awareness on male eating disorders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Seminar on the Arts in Maternity Services at Universidad Autonoma de Madrid 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact I was in Madrid to examine a PhD thesis and at the same time had the opportunity to engage in a specialist seminar on the arts in maternity services; a number of those present wished to use the project resources in their teaching or convey project information to others.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.uam.es/Profesorado/Arteterapia_Maternidad_E/1446769923253.htm?language=es&pid=1234889827...
 
Description Sept 18 Festival of Mind, Sheffield University. Imagination & Wellbeing Conference. Plenary speaker. Theatre Deli, Sheffield. 27.9. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Highlighted the project resources to a mixed audience which included partitioners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://sheffield.carpe-diem.events/calendar/7562993-imagination-and-wellbeing-conference-at-theatre...
 
Description Sept. 16 The 5th International Health Humanities Conference. Keynote speaker & panel chair (three panels). University of Sevilla, Spain. 15-17.9. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 1. Requests for access to the films for educational and training processes.
2. Possible further research collaboration.
3. Changed attitudes and behaviours reported.
4. Possible exchange programme with Canadian institution TBC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es
 
Description Sept17 ECArTE - European Consortium for Arts Therapies in Education. Gender Issues in International Research: Feminism as Practice (panel proposal accepted). 13-16th. Akademia Ignatianum, Krakow, Poland. Iatrogenic Oppression Explored via the Arts (paper). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was very pleased to get a panel proposal accepted so that we could situated the project findings with other relevant research. Multiple requests for access to the films.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ecarte.info
 
Description Sept17 Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham. Research into Recovery and Wellbeing Conference. The Birth Project (paper). 18-20th. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation (paper).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.researchintorecovery.com/ronr2019
 
Description Sharing of The Birth Project resources with Art Therapists in London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Birth Project films "Mother's Make Art" and "Birth Professionals Make Art" was shared with a group of Art Therapists at a workshop in London. A likert scale was applied to 20 therapists exploring impact (change in attitudes and practice). The Art Therapists reported a change in attitudes and how they will change their practice as a result of this session, including offering therapy to new mothers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Sharing of The Birth Project resources with Health Visitor students at University of Derby 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Birth Project rationale and project film "Mother's Make Art" was shared with a group of Health Visitor students at the University of Derby. A likert scale was applied to approx 30 students exploring impact (change in attitudes and practice). Students reported a change in attitudes and how they will change their practice as a result of this session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Sharing of The Birth Project resources with midwifery students at University of Bangor 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Birth Project rationale and project film "Mother's Make Art" was shared with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students at the University of Bangor. Awaiting to receive feedback.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Sharing of The Birth Project resources with midwifery students at University of Bedfordshire 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Birth Project rationale and project film "Mother's Make Art" was shared with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students at the University of Bedfordshire. A likert scale was applied to approx 100+ students exploring impact (change in attitudes and practice). Students reported a change in attitudes and how they will change their practice as a result of this session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Sharing of The Birth Project resources with training healthcare professionals at Kings College London. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Birth Project resources have been implemented in the course for second year medical students at Kings College London. A likert scale was applied to 110 students exploring impact (change in attitudes and practice). Students reported a change in attitudes and how they will change their practice as a result of this session. Feedback included "I have much more of an understanding of just how traumatic hospital births can be, and one of the mothers mentioned not knowing the names of their doctors and the people who were doing things to her body which will make me much more intent on introducing myself and making sure patients know who I am.". The University is continuing to share the project resources with their medical students, impact data is being continued to be collected via an online survey.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description SoFU Launch Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham. 06.12.13. A Birth Project Output for SoFu. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This event was attended by a range of people from service users to MPs.


There was a film viewing and talk by Dr Susan Hogan.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Talk and workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact (2016)
Clay workshop: Therapeutic Communities and mutual recovery
TCTC Windsor Conference
Cumberland Lodge
Windsor
Oct 18
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talking Bodies - Identity, Sexuality and Representation International Conference, Chester University. PLENARY. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact I was able to show Mothers Make Art to the entire conference as a keynote and then to stimulate event. The conference was attended by activists and academics.


Several people asked for the link with a view to using the film as a resource and I agreed that the conference organisers could disseminate the information via their mailing list.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The Genealogy of Mutual Recovery talk at Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Well-Being conference at the QUAD, Derby June 22nd 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Genealogy of Mutual Recovery is a project which aims to enable us to gain some critical purchase on the notion of mutual recovery. The idea of genealogy in the humanities and social sciences is that in order to understand concepts and practices one needs to understand their history, how they were devised and for what purpose, and understand the struggles and debates which led to them taking their present form.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description The Sally Pepper Show (Radio) 04.12.2014. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We were disseminating information about The Birth Project and further recruitment, but also addressing important issues around women's experience of childbirth. Dr Susan Hogan spoke.


participant involvement/changing audience perceptions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description The humanities in mind: Recent developments in the health humanities in the UK keynote delivered at the Wonkwang Mindhumanities Conference Jeonju, Korea 13/4/2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The humanities in mind:
Recent developments in the health humanities in the UK

Brian Brown

"Medicine has advanced more in the last century than in all of previous history" (Altman, 2012)

It isn't too difficult to think of examples of medical advance that support Altman's statement. Laboratory and clinical techniques have allowed health professionals to operate on parts of the body that would have seemed impossible to their forbears. Medicine has pushed back against infectious diseases, infant and maternal mortality and systemic ill health so we can look forward to longer lives with more quality adjusted life years than at any previous time in history. As a counterpoint to technological advance, in the last 40 or so years the medical humanities movement has been remarkably successful. Many universities throughout the world, especially where medicine is taught, have medical humanities departments and offer courses, conduct research and host conferences. However, it is timely and appropriate to address the increasing and broadening demand from other professions to become involved, and to accommodate new sectors of the healthcare workforce and the public. There are important cohorts of personnel in health care, as well as many ancillary workers, informal carers and patients themselves who have been largely left out of the medical humanities so far. There are many nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, practitioners of creative therapies, health care assistants, social workers and many others who have at one time or another drawn upon the creative disciplines, the humanities and the arts. In this speech I shall examine some of the activities which colleagues and I have undertaken in the UK as part of our Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery project, to illustrate these trends. I shall also explore some of the emerging evidence, from our projects and several others to show how the body - for example the immune system and patterns of brain activation - can be seen to respond to creative, artistic or humanities-focussed interventions. The humanities and arts are therefore enabling us to rethink age-old questions about the relationship between the mind and the body.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Theatre Production Currently on Tour 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact CREDITS: Partus began life as the show Labour Intensive which was commissioned by the University of Derby as part of The Birth Project, a two year research project looking at how various art forms can explore the experiences of birth and mutual recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://thirdangel.co.uk/shows-projects/partus
 
Description Transforming healthcare with the humanities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview posted by Emma Thorne.

Increased information requests about health humanities and Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery Programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/researchexchange/2013/07/09/transforming-healthcare-with-the-humanitie...
 
Description University of Newcastle Visual Insights Conference 26.06.14. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Paper given by Professor Susan Hogan: Birthing Identities: Visual Explorations.


Requests for further information/debate
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Visit to Sheffield branch of the Association of Radical Midwives 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The group of healthcare professionals (midwives) met in Sheffield, approximately 7 attendees watched The Birth Project film (birth professionals film), applied Likert to explore impact (change in practice). The likert scale was amended in light of discussions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Visual Research Methods: Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery Film 2013. Circulation via social media. A Birth Project Output. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 19.08.13 the film made it onto the most viewed trending papers page which is sent to all of academic.edu
http://blog.academia.edu/post/58437335766/trending-papers-on-academia-edu Primary Beneficiaries: Academic community

The film has been circulated to a potential audience of over 100,000 with many organisations interested in visual methods or the art in health targeted, such as International Visual Sociology Association (IVSA) FACEBOOK group and The International Art Therapy and Arts in Health FACEBOOK group. We estimate that the tim has been circulated to over fifty relevant organisations.

We are not tracking the film's adoption as a resource, but the following was confirmed:

Film 2013. Adopted as course viewing for a Visual Sociology course by Dr Jerry Krase Brooklyn College Cuny, Sociology 3802, meets Fridays 11:00 am- 1:45 pm in room (computer lab) 3611j. Primary Beneficiaries: sociological students taking course
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
URL https://www.academia.edu/4214240/Visual_Research_Methods_Creative_Practice_as_Mutual_Recovery._Profe...
 
Description Webpages and archive on Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact These webpages afford an overview of the Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery programme and the beginnings of an archive of its work as part of a five-year study. To best afford connectivity, the webpages are enfolded within the larger and established website for the IHHN at www.healthhumanities.org


The webpages have assisted with early communications of the programme but is still in progress at this early stage of research investigation and prior to substantial research findings reporting.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/
 
Description Website and archive: www.healthhumanities.org 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is the leading website and archives for the field of health humanities worldwide. In addition to its large membership, international advisory board, it comprises impact narratives, workshop information and podcasts, a blog, a link to Nottingham Health Humanities, where the field of health humanities have been originated with Professor Paul Crawford as the world's first professor of Health Humanities, related projects and activities, such as Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery.

This website has led the international movement of health humanities. It is the leading site for informations in this field. It has excellent metrics of use.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org
 
Description Working with Women's Community Groups event (Liverpool) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gained further insight into the views of third sector organisations regarding involvement in research. Generated interest in current project through distribution of flyers and briefings.

My participation in the event led to the involvement of a member of the third sector host organisation being further involved in my current Connected Communities project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop on creative adult community learning and the mental health and wellbeing agenda 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Session was co-produced with community partners and included a film about creative adult community learning (ACL) provision, produced in partnership with the Workers' Educational Association. Presentation was followed by critical discussion about the implications of the research findings for responding to the mental health and wellbeing agenda in ACL policy and practice.

The session spurred enthusiastic feedback from community and academic delegates, two of whom requested copies of the presentation and related outputs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/7
 
Description Yoga as mutual recovery: Clinical and Social Implications for Looked-After Children (LAC) and their careers. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Type Of Presentation poster presentation
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Carers as well as residents from three children homes in the East midlands region engaged in a yoga course designed to assess social inclusion as well as well-being under the framework of 'mutual recovery'.

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Yoga in children homes 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Many yoga related sites cite this study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/news/pressreleases/2016/december/yoga-can-have-social-benefits-for-child...