Wood Engraving and the Future of Word-Image Narratives: The Dalziel Family, 1839-1893

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sussex
Department Name: Sch of English

Abstract

The Dalziel Brothers were the largest 19th-century wood engraving firm in Britain, and their archive of 54,000 prints in 49 albums is a phenomenal resource for a well loved aspect of Victorian culture. It includes the printmakers' proofs of the illustrations to Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865, fig. 1), as well as the Pre-Raphaelite illustrations to Tennyson's 'Mariana' and 'The Lady of Shalott' (1857, fig. 2), objects of immense importance to visual and literary culture. Despite their huge achievements, there has never been a full-length study of the Dalziels. Instead, scholars tend to focus on the designers of the images, artists who made the preparatory pencil drawings before the blocks were engraved: for the illustrations mentioned above, John Tenniel, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and John Everett Millais. This project investigates the Dalziels and their radically collaborative methods of commissioning and engraving works of art. It asks who the Dalziels were, examining the little acknowledged contributions of women family-members and anonymous employees.
The Dalziels had great cultural power at a key moment in history, as Britain's largest publishers of printed images - everything from Dickens and Trollope illustrations to scientific images of molluscs and calf foetuses (fig. 7), and adverts for soap or cocoa. This was a time when wood engraving was the ubiquitous technique. Invented in the early 19th century, wood engraving was different from the earlier woodcut; cut on boxwood (an extremely hard wood), and using the endgrain rather than plank, it was capable of much finer detail, so that it could compete technically with copper and steel engravings. It was also far cheaper to print. Like no other visual medium then known, wood engraving was capable of extraordinary detail combined with cheap mass production (for most of the century photography was too expensive for widespread use). My project investigates the role of the Dalziels at the head of this industry, and the nature of their cultural influence.
My primary research material is the Dalziel Archive. Held in the British Museum, this vital but scarcely used resource has proof impressions of all Dalziel images, collected in albums from 1839 to 1893. As engravers' proofs, they were printed with care, often finer than published impressions. The albums are astonishing for the visual qualities, not only of the famous highlights mentioned above, but of many stunning prints never before exhibited. For example, the archive includes an arresting illustration, 'Rizpah' (1857, fig. 3), engraved by the Dalziels after Tenniel. It shows a bereaved mother from the Old Testament, her haggard face brilliantly lit, who stares bleakly at at the viewer from a gothic landscape. Exhibiting and interpreting images like this for the first time since they were produced, I will offer a much-needed account of wood engraving that explores its techniques and aesthetic. I will also make a new intervention in our theoretical understanding of how text and illustrations relate to one another.
This two-year project invests in my career development, as well as in this important new research area. It will enable me to develop vital skills as a research leader, managing an interdisciplinary project with multiple collaborators for the first time. I will publish a monograph exploring the Dalziel family, and the way book illustrations were read and used in the 19th century and beyond. I will curate a display in the British Museum which explores the same themes. A conference will allow for shared research, bringing together different intellectual perspectives. An illustrated, online catalogue, to be published on the British Museum's website, will make the Dalziels' work accessible for this first time. Finally, I will lead a series of open critical and creative workshops that will introduce the Dalziels to new audiences and promote new ways of responding to their art.

Planned Impact

Outside academia, the people I anticipate will primarily benefit from the research are: museum curators, visual artists, creative writers, and readers of 19th-century literature. Secondary groups who will benefit include school teachers, pupils, and museum visitors, especially those interested in printmaking and Victorian culture.
Museum staff will benefit because the research proposes a new way of working with and understanding their collection. My monograph will be an essential reference work for staff working with the Dalziel Archive. The online catalogue produced as part of the research will be a vital tool for museum staff who wish to increase accessibility to this important collection. In collaborating with curators to produce a museum display on the Dalziels, I will be promoting an unknown aspect of their collection and adding to the exhibiting culture of the musuem. My literary expertise will be of particular value within the museum; it is essential to understanding the Dalziel Archive, which is currently housed in an environment strongly aligned to the discipline of art history.
Visual artists, and in particular contemporary designers and printmakers, will benefit from the way the project thinks through the history of artisanship, and opens access to an important historic collection. Artisans today, thinking about their own status as creators negotiating in a capitalist society, will benefit from this recovery of the history of the Dalziels and their employees. The Dalziels' albums were made as tools for working artists, and by running a workshop on how they can be re-used today, I hope to re-ignite their relevance for our own visual culture. I will reach this group through a targeted workshop (run with Nancy Campbell, editor of Printmaking Today), and through the museum display, online catalogue and blog.
Creative writers, especially those interested in historical fiction, will benefit from the chance to work with an unparalleled collection of visual art from the 19th century, with everything from mundane diagrams of Victorian taps and fitness training postures, to little known fairytales or high literary illustration. The Dalziel Archive particularly lends itself to writing since so much of it is untraced illustration, that was specifically designed to accompany texts that are now unknown. For example, the numerous pictorial capital letters that are dispersed throughout the collection (e.g. fig. 10) will mostly never be re-connected with their original publications, and in that disassociation they become free to be used by creative writers today. I will work with novelist Rebecca Stott (UEA) to run a workshop specifically for writers, whom I will also reach through my blog and museum display.
Local reading groups will benefit from the opportunity to think about new ways of reading loved Victorian novels and poetry. The Dalziel Archive offers a completely new way of thinking about writers such as Dickens, Trollope, Tennyson and Carroll. I will run a workshop with Luisa Calè (Birkbeck) who is an expert on book history and embodied reading practices, and we will explore how 19th-century illustrations and albums take apart and re-make Victorian texts. Again, this is supported by the blog, catalogue and display.
More widely the project could benefit others such as local teachers and pupils, especially since the archive includes an excellent collection of children's literature. I will contact schools to invite them to use the exhibition and blog. Beyond this, the project's activities address other interested groups, such as physical and virtual museum visitors. Gallery 90, where my display will be held, attracts between 500 and 2200 visitors daily, and the British Museum's online database attracts 1.3 million pageviews per month. Such visitors will benefit from my research and will find links to the project blog where they can participate further.

Publications

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Stevens B (2018) These many ingenious adaptations of photography (parts I & 2) in Multiples: The Journal of the Society of Wood Engravers

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Stevens B (2018) Printmakers in the Dalziel Archive in Printmaking Today

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Stevens B (2017) Woodpeckers and the Human Picture Library in Ernest

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Stevens B K (2016) On Tap: the Dalziel Archive Digitised in The British Museum, Newsletter: The Friends of Prints and Drawings

 
Title Dalziel Archive Photographs 
Description As part of my project, I (Bethan Stevens, PI) managed the photography of every page of the Dalziel Archive, amounting to approximately 16,000 high quality tiff images of fine proof wood engravings. Photographs were taken by Sylph Editions, a collaborator in the project. The photographs are of exceptional quality. The tiff files are around 6200-8200 pixels; approximately 150 mb (average size to take in cropping); an Adobe RGB 1998 8bit colour profile is attached to each image. They are suitable for reproduction at 300dpi to maximum of A2; details will result in smaller file sizes. For more information about this photography see 'Intellectual Property and Licensing' and 'Collaborations and Partnership'. The photography has been completed and the images are being uploaded onto the database described in 'Research Databases and models'. In addition, Sylph Editions and myself are planning future publications that use the photographs creatively, and that reflect on the process of making them. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The photography has all been uploaded to the British Museum database and is available for download. It has been extensively used for all of the research, outputs and impact and engagement activities that are described in this report 
 
Title New word and image art works inspired by the Dalziel Project 
Description As part of the engagement activities developed during this award we have worked with several creative writers and visual artists who have made new artworks directly inspired by the project's workshops, research, website and database. This has been described in detail in the section on 'Engagement Activities', so is only briefly mentioned here. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact In all these cases, the creative product was itself an impact, produced because of direct inspiration by our research. In some cases we have been able to publish work by writers and artists who have never had the opportunity to publish their work before. Some of the new works, by Huddie Hamper, Maisy Plummer, Helen Bailey, Sahil Rathod, 'LL', George Clutterbuck, Camilla Bostock and others are published on our website (url below). Many have been published or exhibited, for example in 'Printmakers in the Dalziel Archive', my recent article in 'Printmaking Today' (see 'Publications'). Thus the project has been helping to develop confidence and launch work of talented young artists. Conversely, other well-established professional artists such as Chris Pig and Louise Hayward have attested to how the Dalziel Project changed their practice (see 'Engagement', especially 'Victorian Trade Engraving and Contemporary Practice - British Museum Workshop'; 'Engraved in Time'; 'Creative Writing Workshop'). 
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/category/createandcomment/
 
Description The Dalziel Project has produced a database of 54,000 wood engravings, 'India-proofs of wood-engravings by the Brothers Dalziel' (British Museum, 2016 - see 'Research Databases and Models') which publishes research findings on the previously unknown Dalziel Archive. The archive presents an astonishingly wide ranging portrait of Victorian print culture, including wood engravings produced annually from 1839 to 1893, from elite literary and visual works (Lewis Carroll's Alice books, Pre-Raphaelite artworks, Dickens' novels) to political cartoons, commercial illustrations and intricate scientific diagrams. Whereas other collections offer insights into mass visual culture, growing readerships, or artistic identities, the Dalziel Archive is unique in offering such a comprehensive visual archive seen from the technical and artisanal perspective of the wood engravers themselves. The Dalziel Project has catalogued and digitised this archive via the database just mentioned. It has raised awareness about this important resource and prompted its use, both within and outside the academy (see 'Publications' and 'Engagement'). The research published via the database and in other project outputs attributes thousands of previously unknown works to particular artists, books or publishers. My research on the Dalziel Archive has highlighted the collaborative nature of illustratration (previously associated much more closely with famous draughtsmen such as Rossetti or Tenniel), and produced important discoveries about the kinds of collaboration that were involved, with new archival evidence of debates between multiple artists during the proofing and re-drafting process. By interpreting annotations in the archive I have been able to create a picture of around thirty engraving employees who worked for Dalziel Brothers and actually made the artworks signed by the firm. An important picture has emerged of e.g. independent women engravers working under Dalziel's signature, such as Ann Byfield. We are starting to understand a previously unacknowledged collective labour force in the visual arts. Other key findings include new understanding of family-based art production in an industrialised culture, with particular focus on the chronological shifts of a large oeuvre extending over 5 decades. The project has also made discoveries about print techniques, such as developments in colour printing and the relationship between wood engraving and photography.
These project findings have been published in the database mentioned above, and also in other outputs including the journal articles 'Wood Engraving as Ghostwriting' and ''These many ingenious adaptations of photography' (see 'Publications'). Findings are also presented in accessible outputs such as the virtual exhibition 'Alice to Alice: Dalziel 1865-1871' (see 'Engagement', 'Woodpeckings: The Dalziel Archive, Victorian Print Culture, and Wood Engravings'). Furthermore, I have completed a substantial draft of my forthcoming monograph, The Wood Engravers' Self Portrait: The Dalziel Family 1839-1893.
Alongside historical discoveries about print culture and wood engraving, I have developed new word-image theories to help us interpret and understand the emergence of mass visual culture in the 19th century. Some of these - ideas about the signature, the line, the ghostwriter and amanuensis - are discussed in the articles already published, others have been presented in invited talks (see 'Awards and Recognition') and are forthcoming in the monograph. These include work on Victorian theories of the hand and fragmented artists' bodies, as well as animal-focused consideration of the Dalziels as capitalist 'rats'. The theoretical work draws on archival evidence, 19th-century art theory (e.g. by Ruskin, Linton) and contemporary theory (Beegan, Kooistra, Thomas) to devise new ways of thinking about our visual and print heritage.
The Dalziel Project is a creative-critical project. Alongside the outputs already mentioned, I have written a graphic novel collaged from the Dalziel Archive, Nick's Life in Scraps. This is currently with a literary agent who requested to see the full manuscript. The Dalziel Project has done substantial work with contemporary artists and writers, who have similarly produced creative work inspired by the project. This engagement work has been done with involvement of multiple colleagues, particularly George Mind (research technician), who after excellent contributions to the Dalziel Project throughout 2016-17 has now gained a place at a prestigious CDA in Westminster University / The National Portrait Gallery. While the project's engagement is mostly discussed in the 'Narrative Impact' section of this report, all this work has been profoundly symbiotic with the main body of research. This is discussed in detail, for instance, in my recent article 'Printmakers in the Dalziel Archive' (see 'Publications').
In this work I have met all the objectives of my original proposal. I have in fact exceeded these. The production of professional photography for the database was not part of my initial proposal, and was enabled through a partnerhip with Sylph Editions; our website and virtual exhibition was not part of the initial proposal, nor were several of the public and creative events; nor did I expect to have completed my creative manuscript at this stage.
Exploitation Route I am engaged with scholars interested in Victorian illustration, involved in regular discussion and debate through research papers, networks, and conferences.
In June 2017 the Dalziel Project hosted an academic conference at the British Museum, with 80 international delegates, 'Woodpeckings: Victorian prints, book illustration and word-image narratives'. Speakers attending the conference used the project's research to inform their talks, so that it is already provoking multiple scholarly responses. The research team is planning with colleagues at the British Museum to develop these papers into a collection of essays. Accessible scholarly essays inspired by the Dalziel Project by leading academics and curators are published on our website (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/category/createandcomment/ ).
The creative workshops and educational projects mentioned in my portfolio ('Engagement Activities') have already involved many others beyond academia in using my findings. New writing has been produced by workshop participators, as well as new works of visual art. There has also been significant use of the research in education, by teachers and students from key stage 3 to further education. This is discussed further in the sections on 'Narrative Impact' and 'Engagement'.
I have been pursusing opportunities for engagement that are likely to assist in my goals for inspring others with my research. An accessible narrative of my research was published in the online Guardian (26th November 2016), 'Alice in Wonderland's engravings - a forgotten story in pictures' (6009 shares on Facebook). In May 2016 I was invited to give a BAVS Talk, as part of an accessible series that represents leading research on Victorian Studies. This was professionally filmed and uploaded to YouTube (261 views). In spring 2019 I am timetabled to curate a gallery display based on my research in the British Museum, bringing this research to further audiences again.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel
 
Description Details follow under four headings: 'Developing practice in museums and cultural institutions'; 'Developing understanding of 19th-century print culture across a broad reach of viewers'; 'Inpsiring new practice among artists and writers'; and 'Developing teaching and curricula in Schools and FE education': Developing practice in museums: British Museum I have worked closely in collaboration with the Prints and Drawings Department of the British Museum, who are project partner in the Dalziel Project. My Dalziel Archive database is published in the museum's online catalogue (free-to-access, with 1.3 million pageviews per month). With excellent input from research technician George Mind, from 2015 to 2017 I led several public events in the museum, including creative writing workshops, artists' workshops and a teachers' study day. My gallery display on the Dalziel Brothers is timetabled for March-May 2019. We also organised 'Woodpeckings', an international conference at the British Museum, June 16-17th 2017. 'Woodpeckings' brought innovative, international research into dialogue with participants beyond the academy, with contributions from interdisciplinary scholars, museum curators and professional artists. Comments on the Dalziel Project from museum liaisons, Hugo Chapman (Keeper) and Sheila O'Connell (curator) in a summary interview at the end of the funding period (August 2017): • 'Our job as curators is to promulgate and get people in to look at the collection and I think what you've done is absolutely fantastic in that regard The Dalziel volumes were a sleeping giant, in a way, and you've revived them and made them extraordinarily accessible.' (Hugo Chapman, British Museum) • 'It's made me think, gosh, you know, in an ideal world we'd have other projects on other parts of the collection with people like you, encouraging an interest in parts of the collection that haven't really been looked at before' (Sheila O'Connell, British Museum) • 'The conference was enormously successful in bridging a gap between the people who looked at literature and those who looked at illustrations. There was something of a gulf between them and they didn't normally talk and to get them to look at both their different disciplines was actually a great achievement' (Hugo Chapman, British Museum) • 'Extraordinarily impressive the way you've brought all this new interest to the Dalziels and to Victorian wood engraving' (Sheila O'Connell, British Museum) Developing understanding of 19th-century print culture across a broad reach of viewers: • The project's website Woodpeckings: The Dalziel Archive, Victorian Print Culture and Wood Engravings (www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel - launched September 2016) has been visited on 7,054 occasions, by 4,311 visitors, from 76 countries around the world. The site hosts a major virtual exhibition, 'Alice to Alice: Dalziel 1865-1871'; it includes explanatory text and labels that share the Dalziel Project's research outputs in an accessible way. As well as engaging a large number of viewers, the curated material on the website and museum database has prompted enquiries from members of the public newly interested in Dalziel (these included emails from non-academic researchers of William Bell Scott and Lewis Carroll, and from private individuals interested in the way the project connected with their family history or house history). We opened our virtual exhibition with a special one-day event at the Brighton Digital Festival, attended by over 100 visitors. The event included presentation of research by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI) and colleagues George Mind, Hannah Field, Nicholas Royle and Lindsay Smith. • My article 'Alice in Wonderland's Engravings-A Forgotten Story in Pictures' was published in The Guardian online on 26 November 2016. The story has been actively shared on Facebook 6,009 times. Acts of sharing like this mark readers who went beyond passive reception of the article and wanted actively to disseminate what they have learnt. The article was similarly successful on Twitter. The @dalzielproject Twitter account was launched in September 2016. We have used it to share research that has emerged from the project, and get a particularly enthusiastic response from art practitioners and museum professionals. Our Twitter initiatives included a Dalziel Advent Calendar, which we posted every day from December 1st to 25th 2016. Here we shared unfamiliar Victorian illustrations discovered in the project's research, with key historical information (e.g. about publication contexts or artistic techniques). During that month alone, our tweets had a total of 33,899 impressions, and were actively engaged with 1084 times. Inpsiring new practice among artists and writers: Between September 2016 and July 2017 we organised four workshops at the British Museum and Sussex, aimed at creative writers and artists, stimulating new work and changing people's professional practice. Some of this work has been published on our Woodpeckings website. In addition to excellent post-event feedback, several independent projects are emerging out of the workshops: • Nancy Campbell, Forward Prize short-listed poet, co-organised a workshop with me in December 2016. She has just completed a trade book for Scribner, The Library of Ice, which features a chapter on my research into the Dalziels and its relation to her writing. • The wood engraver and painter Peter S Smith attended our workshop in April 2017. This directly inspired his latest work, Dalziels' Apprentice, which explores techniques of 19th-century wood engraving in the light of the Dalziel Project's research. He said: 'I was interested in what it feels like to do that kind of thing - clearing away the white around black lines You can't beat trying something out for yourself to help you understand.' He will put this new work in the London Original Print Fair at the RA in May 2017, and enter it for the RA summer show. Following our work together, Smith has given public demonstrations focusing on 19th-century engraving practices at St Bride's Printing Library and Eames Fine Art gallery. • Artist Louise Hayward has made new work following my museum workshop, and wrote: 'I feel this may be a different phase of work for me. The BM workshop was easily one of, if not the highlight of 2017 for me so thank you again, it was very special.' • Artist and publisher Chris Pig wrote that our workshop 'made me look at my practice afresh, which has gone straight back into the work'. • Artist Neil Bousfield made his new piece What Hope for Holding Back the Sea (Ballot) in response to the Dalziel workshop. This was chosen for exhibition in the National Open Art Exhibition 2017. • Several other writers and artists reported in feedback on how their practice was developed by the Dalziel Project. I have written an article on some of this work recently published in Printmaking Today in March 2018. Developing teaching and curricula in Schools and FE education: Stevens and George Mind (research technician) co-organised a major educational programme aimed at re-imagining the Dalziel Archive. • 'Engraved in Time' at UCA Rochester (February 2017, repeated February 2018). We worked with Year 12 students and staff to design a new core module for the Extended Diploma in Art and Design. Tutors commented that they were 'extremely pleased' with student work for this unit, and that it was 'infinitely better' than in previous years. One of the tutors noted that 'the students enjoyed the research aspect which has sometimes been lacking in other projects' and that they 'really engaged with the Dalziel Project as it was a "live" project', and that students were inspired by the possiblity of publication on our blog, as well as the links to the University of Sussex and the British Museum. • 'Caught in Time: Victorian Childhood'. Organised two workshops on nineteenth-century illustration at Portslade Aldridge Community Academy (April 2017), involving 48 children from Years 7-8 on the 'Stretch and Challenge' programme, and colleagues Hannah Field, George Mind and Lindsay Smith. This provided a successful model for adopting interdisciplinary approach into the curriculum and enabled students to develop their knowledge and creative skills. Teacher Melanie Smith commented: "The students were really engaged and learnt a lot about Victorian literature. [The activities] served as a great way to get them thinking about childhood in the past and how it has changed. The students learnt about print-making and how images were created historically It has shown me the importance of visual support to engage young students and the story-telling using images activity would be great to replicate in the classroom." • 'Masterclass for National Art and Design Saturday Club'. We organised a one-day workshop for 14-16-year-olds, led by George Mind and hosted by the Saturday Club, a charity dedicated to raising attainment, broadening horizons and enhancing life skills among young people. Work produced was part of an exhibition at Somerset House in June 2017 (www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/national-saturday-club-summer-show). One participant later completed a work experience placement with me (Bethan Stevens, PI) at the British Museum. A Teachers' day at the British Museum on July 8th 2017 consolidated our work and future plans. We brought together school teachers, artists and museum professionals to discuss future plans for a bid for AHRC Follow-on Funding for Impact and Engagement (to be submitted spring 2018). We plan to host a series of events connecting the digital with craft-based work. We will co-curate a virtual exhibition with young people and visual artists, and organise digital installations of 19th-century prints.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Training provided for doctoral researchers in the British Museum
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Training organised by Bethan Stevens (PI) and Luisa Calè (Assistant Dean, Birkbeck) 'Bound, Unbound, Archived, Exhibited: Researching Illustrations and Books in the British Museum' 9th May 2017 British Museum Department of Prints and Drawings and Birkbeck School of Arts With Luisa Cale (Birkbeck) I organised and delivered a training day at the British Museum Prints and Drawings Study Room, focusing on several word-image collections including the Dalziel Archive. The training day also included invited contributions from curators and researchers, Esther Chadwick (British Museum), Ed King (British Museum) and George Mind (Sussex). The training worked extremely well at introducing doctoral students to archival, print and book research in a museum setting, as well as making links with digital outputs. Students were asked to prepare in advance a rationale for an exhibition sourced from the British Museum Collection Online, and all produced very innovative ideas, mostly fuelled by questions about selecting and curating a digital database and forms of virtual access of nineteenth-century paper archives, pushing the idea of the exhibition through digital projects rather than exhibitions for a gallery. During the event participants and facilitators gave feedback and there was lively discussion. There were some outstanding presentations taking advantage of British Museum Department of Prints and Drawings, the BM's online collection, and the Dalziel project, to show the cycle of production from proofs to books to digital repository. From student feedback: 'Fascinating afternoon, with many different angles covered, and inspiring in terms of looking at any collection. Interested to hear about the practical workshops etc. which have been organised for children etc. Also the book as material object was enthusiastically discussed Enjoyed the balance of hands-on, presentation and discussion, combined with contribution.' 'What an extraordinary opportunity! The material we have seen, the place we have had access to and the level of the discussion have been very valuable and inspiring. I would really recommend this workshop.'
URL http://www.chase.ac.uk/events/2017/4/9/bound-unbound-archived-exhibited-researching-illustrations-an...
 
Description CHASE Cohort Development Fund
Amount £2,374 (GBP)
Funding ID (co-investigator with Luisa Cale, Birkbeck). Includes two consecutive awards for doctoral trainings in 2017 (£598) and 2018 (£1776) 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Department Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts South-East England (CHASE)
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 07/2018
 
Description Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF)
Amount £4,558 (GBP)
Funding ID (with fellow co-investigators: Hannah Field and Lindsay Smith) 
Organisation University of Sussex 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2018 
End 07/2019
 
Description Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF)
Amount £4,819 (GBP)
Funding ID (with new co-investigators: Hannah Field and Lindsay Smith) 
Organisation University of Sussex 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 07/2017
 
Title India-proofs of wood-engravings by the Brothers Dalziel 
Description India-proofs of wood-engravings by the Brothers Dalziel (British Museum, 2016) [monograph-length database, sole-authored by Bethan Stevens, PI, approximately 50,000 words, plus thousands of new attributions and 16,000 digital photographs] http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?searchText=%22university+of+sussex%22 This complete catalogue of the Dalziel Archive makes newly accessible a major collection in a national museum of 54,000 wood engravings, previously unused. My catalogue includes new artistic attributions of several thousands of works of art, alongside historical and material discoveries made during the project. It also identifies many previously unknown illustrations with specific writers, publishers and books. Entries vary, but each of my 49 records is approx 1000 words long, not including the attribution of designers to thousands of specified prints. The entire database is monograph-length. Alongside the written entries are around 16,000 photographs taken by photographers from Sylph Editions under my direction and published here for the first time. Relevant database entries can be located e.g. by searching for the phrase 'AHRC', 'Bethan Stevens', 'University of Sussex' or 'India-Proofs of Wood-Engravings by the Brothers Dalziel'. The url below is a good starting point, or a guide to using the database can be found here: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/dalziel-online-catalogue/ The database is maintained by the British Museum; new research will continue to be added as it is discovered. I also worked with colleagues at the British Museum, particularly Monica Sidhu (volunteer), to make sure all images were uploaded to the database. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This has been published in an ideal place to maximise impact; the British Museum Collections Online database has around 1.3 million page views per month. We have used the database with all collaborators in the engagement activities described in this report (see 'Engagement'), and it was used and discussed by several international scholars at our recent conference in the British Museum (see 'Woodpeckings Conference' in 'Engagement'), including Professors Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, Julia Thomas, Claire Pettitt, Mark Turner, Caroline Arscott and Laurel Brake. I have received received email enquiries from viewers of the database, including amateur researchers, collectors, art lovers, academics and museum curators. 
URL http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?searchText=%22university+of+suss...
 
Description British Museum 
Organisation British Museum
Department Department of Prints and Drawings
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I have worked closely in collaboration with the Prints and Drawings Department of the British Museum, who are project partner in the Dalziel Project. Here are comments made about the project by my museum liaisons, Hugo Chapman (Keeper) and Sheila O'Connell (curator) in a summary interview at the end of the funding period (August 2017): • 'Our job as curators is to promulgate and get people in to look at the collection and I think what you've done is absolutely fantastic in that regard The Dalziel volumes were a sleeping giant, in a way, and you've revived them and made them extraordinarily accessible.' (Hugo Chapman, British Museum) • 'It's made me think, gosh, you know, in an ideal world we'd have other projects on other parts of the collection with people like you, encouraging an interest in parts of the collection that haven't really been looked at before. [] Extraordinarily impressive the way you've brought all this new interest to the Dalziels and to Victorian wood engraving' (Sheila O'Connell, British Museum) As well as regular exchange of knowledge faciliated by working closely together, I have particularly contributed the following: • Authored the Dalziel Archive database, which is published in the museum's online catalogue (free-to-access, with 1.3 million pageviews per month). My work includes new artistic attributions of several thousands of works of art, alongside historical and material discoveries made during the research project. The Dalziel database is monograph-length (approx. 50,000 words in length). Alongside the written entries are around 16,000 photographs taken under my supervision and published here for the first time. • I have also directed a programme of public and educational events around the Dalziel Archive, both in the museum and beyond, co-organised by the project's Research Technician, George Mind. More information on these events - which included creative writing workshops, artists' workshops and a teachers' study day - can be found under 'Engagement'. • I was the organiser of Woodpeckings, an international conference at the British Museum, June 16-17th 2017, again with George Mind as co-organiser. Woodpeckings brought innovative, international research into dialogue with participants beyond the academy, with contributions from interdisciplinary scholars, museum curators and professional artists. • My gallery display on the Dalziel Brothers is timetabled in the British Museum for March-May 2019.
Collaborator Contribution Curators at the British Museum have made invaluable contributions to the project, particularly Sheila O'Connell, Hugo Chapman, Esther Chadwick, Antony Griffiths, Isabel Seligman and Monica Sidhu. O'Connell, Seligman, Chadwick and Chapman helped host the British Museum conference and contributed talks. The museum also provided a venue and staffing for the conference and several public events organised by the project (see 'Engagement'). Curators have shared their expertise in printmaking techniques and in the museum's collection history, which has been crucial in helping me to understand the new discoveries that are emerging from my research, and has assisted in all outputs. The British Museum has provided me with an office and facilitated my access to their collection and other collections internationally, helping me to find important and unknown primary research material. They have enabled me to have the entire Dalziel Archive photographed, and have given me license to use these photographs in all my future outputs. They have published my online catalogue on Collections Online, and are supporting and maintaining this database. In 2019 they will host my museum display.
Impact All outputs associated with the project develop from this partnership. See for instance: Database: 'India-proofs of wood-engravings by the Brothers Dalziel' (Research databases and models) Article: 'Wood Engraving as Ghostwriting', DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/0950236X.2017.1365756 Article: 'On Tap: The Dalziel Archive Digitalised' 'Woodpeckings Conference' (Engagement) Website: 'Woodpeckings: The Dalziel Archive, Victorian Print Culture, and Wood Engravings' (Engagement) Workshop: 'Victorian Trade Engraving and Contemporary Practice - British Museum Workshop' (Engagement) Workshop: 'Masterclass for National Art and Design Saturday Club' (Engagement) Workshop: 'Caught in Time: Victorian Childhood' (Engagement) Educational programme: 'Engraved in Time - curriculum development for 16 to 17 year olds at Rochester UCA' (Engagement) Workshop: 'Seascape and the Arctic: Creative Writing Workshop (British Museum)' (Engagement)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Sylph Editions 
Organisation Sylph Editions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I have facilitated access to the British Museum's Dalziel Archive for photographers at Sylph Editions, and the rights to use images from the archive in their publications. Later in the project, I will be writing a creative output based on my research into the Dalziel family of wood engravers; this will be a work of fiction that will be published by Sylph and illustrated by the Dalziel images.
Collaborator Contribution Photographers at Sylph editions took commercial quality photographs of every page of the Dalziel Archive, amounting to around 16,000 high resolution tiff files of fine proof wood engravings. The photographs are for use by Sylph, myself and the British Museum. As collaborators in the project, Sylph produced photographs at a greatly reduced rate. This has had a huge impact on the project's outputs, since it has allowed us to provide commercial quality images where we had budgeted on creating amateur photographs for study purposes only. More information on different aspects of this output is given in the sections 'Databases and Models', 'Intellectual Property and Licensing' and 'Artistic and Creative Products'.
Impact Database: India-Proofs of Wood-Engravings by the Brothers Dalziel, 1839-1893 (British Museum, 2015-2016) http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx?searchText=%22university+of+sussex%22. The photography produced through this partnership has been essential for all the publications and engagement activities listed in this report.
Start Year 2015
 
Title Dalziel Archive Photography 
Description As part of the project, I (Bethan Stevens, PI) managed the photography of every page of the Dalziel Archive, amounting to approximately 16,000 high quality tiff images. These were taken by photographers at Sylph Editions, who are partners in the project. I negotiated with the British Museum and Sylph Editions to ensure all parties have appropriate rights to the images. Copyright is with the photographers, the museum has full exclusive and non-exclusive rights, and I have been granted a licence to use the images for all editorial purposes, in any general, academic or internet publications. The images are freely viewable online, and anyone can download and use high-quality tiffs for open access purposes, under a creative commons license. 
IP Reference  
Protection Copyrighted (e.g. software)
Year Protection Granted 2016
Licensed Yes
Impact The photography has all been uploaded to the British Museum database and is available for download. It has been extensively used for all of the research, outputs and impact and engagement activities that are described in this report.
 
Description Woodpeckings: The Dalziel Archive, Victorian Print Culture, and Wood Engravings 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact September 2016 saw the launch of our website 'Woodpeckings: The Dalziel Archive, Victorian Print Culture, and Wood Engravings', created by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI) and George Mind (research technician). As well as presenting general information about the research project and its findings, the website hosts the project's major virtual exhibition, 'Alice to Alice: Dalziel 1865-1871'. This features around 200 highlights out of the 12,885 illustrations produced by the Brothers Dalziel in the years book-ended by their most famous publications, 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking-Glass' (1871). The show is divided into ten thematic sections, and each one includes wood engravings from the Alice books, accompanied by other images created to illustrate work by Dickens, Christina Rossetti, Anthony Trollope and Hans Christian Andersen. It includes more unusual items that have never been exhibited since their first publication. For example, there are Victorian design and engineering illustrations, ranging from door knobs to the electric telegram and ballcock diagrams; medical and veterinary art; and wood-engraved interpretations of radical photography by Julia Margaret Cameron.
Our site has now been visited 7225 times by 4455 users in 87 countries.
The aim of the new website is to celebrate and share research findings and resources in an innovative way, and encourage to artists, educators, researchers and other interested individuals to engage with it. For example, the website includes a blog in which we have published several new works inspired by the project's research and database: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/category/createandcomment/ . This blog includes critical and creative work; it has published new poetry, word-image works, visual art and short accessible essays. It includes works by international academics, 16-17 year old art students, and emerging new creative writers. For example, essays by Professor Lorraine Janzen Kooistra and curator Georgina Grant appear alongside 'My Monsters Inside', an art work by young artist Mime Gerrits published to mark Mental Health awareness week.
More information about impacts arising from the website is given in other sections of this report, including 'Engraved in Time', 'Seascapes and the Arctic', and 'Exhibition launch and Brighton Digital Festival'.
Update for 2018-19: The website continues to flourish. During the last year, in our 'Create and Comment' section, we have published an accessible essay by the research team (On Draughtsp'onship and Women Artists, by Bethan Stevens); a book review; several blog posts in which contemporary artists respond to the Dalziel Archive; a new illustrated poem; new work by young student artists and other content. We have redesigned and updated the website to make it easier to use and more accessible. This includes integrating our twitter and instagram feed with the site. We have now been visited 10,256 times by 6,558 users in 106 countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018,2019
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/
 
Description Article in The Guardian 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'Alice in Wonderland's engravings - a forgotten story in pictures' by myself (Bethan Stevens) was published in the online Guardian on 26th November 2016, telling the story of the proofs for the illustrations to Lewis Carroll's 'Alice' books, and also sharing the project's research about the Dalziel Brothers' place in this. This piece was shared on Facebook 5942 times, a testament to the new information and perspective it offered to readers about some extremely familiar cultural objects (the Alice illustrations). The article was similarly successful on Twitter. Many people tweeted about it; one example is a tweet from the British Museum which earned 1126 engagements, including 178 retweets and 278 likes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.theguardian.com/books/gallery/2016/nov/26/alice-in-wonderlands-engravings-a-forgotten-st...
 
Description BAVS annual conference, Cardiff 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact My talk was entitled 'Greedy Rats: The Business of Victorian Wood Engraving'. Delivered at the annual BAVS conference, 'Consuming the Victorians', held at Cardiff University, 31/8/2016 - 2/9/2016. Around 25 delegates attended my presentation, with a high proportion of postgraduate students. Many of these approached me afterwards to talk about the Dalziel Archive and ways they could use it in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cataloguers' Tea (British Museum) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On July 15th 2016 I contributed to a 'Cataloguers' Tea' at the British Museum Prints and Drawings department. Several colleagues engaged in cataloguing areas of the collection shared the work they had been doing, and the questions, challenges and knowledge that had emerged. I presented examples from the Dalziel Archive and drew attention to new printmaking techniques that could be found in this collection, as well as methodological questions that the archive raised. This was one event among several more informal moments in which I have exchanged knowledge with curators and cataloguers at the British Museum, learning from them and also passing on important discoveries from this project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Caught in Time: Victorian Childhood: Workshops at Portslade Aldridge Community Academy 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
'Caught in Time: Victorian Childhood' involved 48 children from Years 7-8 on the 'Stretch and Challenge' programme at the Portslade Aldridge Community Academy (April 2017), and their teacher, Melanie Smith.
The workshops were organised, designed and delivered by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI), George Mind (research technician), with Sussex colleagues Hannah Field (lecturer) and Lindsay Smith (professor). The workshops explored childhood, word-image narratives and nineteenth-century illustration. It provided a successful model for adopting interdisciplinary approach into the curriculum and enabled students to develop their knowledge and creative skills.
Teacher Melanie Smith commented: "The students were really engaged and learnt a lot about Victorian literature. [The activities] served as a great way to get them thinking about childhood in the past and how it has changed. The students learnt about print-making and how images were created historically It has shown me the importance of visual support to engage young students and the story-telling using images activity would be great to replicate in the classroom."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Creative Writing Workshop, 'Seascapes and the Arctic' (British Museum) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
'Seascapes and The Arctic' was a creative writing workshop held at the British Museum on 3rd December 2016, led by Forward Prize short-listed poet Nancy Campbell, and myself (Bethan Stevens, PI). The workshop offered an afternoon of talks and creative writing practice around the collections of the British Museum's department of Prints and Drawings. I introduced the current project, talking about my research on the archive and about the discoveries made about wood engraving. We particularly focused on wood engravings of the sea and of Arctic landscapes, and Nancy Campbell, whose poetry collection is themed around the Arctic, led a discussion of these. Participants wrote poetry inspired by the Dalziel wood engravings. Following the workshop, Campbell has been writing a trade book for Scribner, The Library of Ice, which features a chapter on my research into the Dalziels and its relation to her writing.
There were eleven particpants at the workshop with varying occupations: writing, curating, bookselling, librarianship, arts organisation and architecture. Two participants reported that work done in the workshop would be developed in forthcoming publications: a professional novelist said the workshop helped her develop her new novel about wood engravers, and a lecturer from Kent said she would use poetry written in the workshop to help complete the coda to her forthcoming poetry collection. Two postgraduate students from other institutions (Kings and Goldsmiths) said our workshop helped them develop ideas and a poem for their PhD and MA work respectively. Other participants arrived with less experience of writing, and said the work introduced them to new ideas about creative writing, wood engraving and word-image relationships, as well as teaching them new writing techniques. Two of the participants were involved in teaching creative workshops outside of a university setting (at the British Council and the British Museum) and both said they would use ideas from the workshop in their future teaching, being inspired by some of our collaborative exercises and by the use of archives for creative work.
Some poems written during our workshop are published on the Dalziel blog (e.g. 'Ice Bound', 'A Glass of this Kind' and 'Song for Gouging Wood and Water').
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/category/createandcomment/
 
Description Engraved in Time - curriculum development for 16 to 17 year olds at Rochester UCA 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Initiative organised by the Dalziel Project
In January/February 2017 and January/February 2018 we worked with Rochester UCA to create, develop, deliver and assess a new module, 'Engraved in Time'. George Mind (research technician) and myself (Bethan Stevens, PI), worked with two tutors and 108 young artists (year 12: 16-17 year olds) who are studying for the Extended Diploma in Art and Design. We gave introductory talks to launch the project with the students, and throughout they worked with research and education packs designed by ourselves. At the end of the module we participated in the students' assessment, listening to them talk about how they had used the research to further their own creative work.
The art work students produced accounted for 15% of their final diploma mark. We have since published some of the students' work on our website ('Knight and Beggar' and 'Who Cares for You? You're Nothing but a Pack of Cards', and others - url below). News about the project and their outcomes has spread e.g. through Twitter (@dalzielproject). Some of the students' work is really brilliant, and through these avenues we can help them reach new audiences themselves. We see this module as a pilot and plan to do more work with school-age art students in the future. Tutors commented that they were 'extremely pleased' with student work for this unit, and that it was 'infinitely better' in comparison with previous years, especially since 'in the past students have struggled to engage with and pass this unit'. Both tutors described the education pack as 'excellent', and noted that our website had 'heaps of useful knowledge'. One of the tutors noted that 'the students enjoyed the research aspect which has sometimes been lacking in other projects' and that they 'really engaged with the Dalziel Project as it was a "live" project', and that students were inspired by the possiblity of publication on our blog, as well as the links to the University of Sussex and the British Museum. Tutors were also pleased that the students got experience doing formal presentations of their work to an external researcher.
This activity has had an important impact on curriculum development, resulting in an innovative module design for UCA that is now well established. The project helped the students learn new research skills and put their own artistic practice in a new historical context. Student feedback included comments such as:
'I learnt a lot more about the Victorian era and how the wood engraving was the method of mass production'.
'I have always struggled with research but this project helped me to produce information in relation to what I was doing at a high standard.'
'This project 100% helped my research skills, I'm now able to delve deeper into the work we're doing'.
'I thought it was brilliant that we were allowed access to the archive. I was inspired by so many of the images. I think it was the diversity of the images I found most interesting. I was made aware of the Dalziel Brothers. Also methods in creative narratives. I will definitely be implementing ideas from this project into the final unit'.
'It made me see art in a different way. Rather it opened my eyes to a different style of artwork.'
'I found it inspiring getting to work with a moment in history and recreating in my way the story of the whole family's business, and how many famous books they illustrated was just amazing.'
'I learnt that mixing different media (photography & illustration) can be a good thing'.
'I found the idea of creating a narrative through images very inspiring'.
'I learnt a lot about engravings and the process that engravers and designers had to go through to achieve the detailed prints'.
'Working in a group isn't as easy as it seems The Dalziel Brothers' work wasn't always theirs, their employees just always signed it "Dalziel" '.
'I would really like to expand on this as I thoroughly enjoyed it and my outcome was a success'.
'This is the most in-depth research I've done'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/category/createandcomment/
 
Description Exhibition Launch - Brighton Digital Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
On 21st September 2016 we had a launch event for our virtual exhibition, 'Alice to Alice: Dalziel 1865-1871'. We installed the exhibition in the Digital Humanities Lab at the University of Sussex, using a range of technologies, from projection and wall-mounted iPads, to an installation of retro 1980s televisions. Using a range a media, we made a stunning site-based display out of the virtual exhibition. We opened this to the public as part of the Brighton Digital Festival; some of the visitors we spoke to included local designers and photographers. A few days beforehand I led a creative writing workshop at Sussex using the exhibition, and on the day we put on a series of talks with contributions from Hannah Field, George Mind, Nicholas Royle, Lindsay Smith and myself (all Sussex) and Isabel Seligman (British Museum). There were just over a hundred visitors on the one day we were open. Following the success of this event, we are planning a follow-on funding bid for an impact activity working with schools across Britain to co-curate and install digital exhibitions of Victorian illustration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://brightondigitalfestival.co.uk/event/virtual-exhibition-alice-alice-dalziel-1865-1871/
 
Description Illustration conference (Providence RI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference paper: 'The Illustrator as Biographer / the Illustrator as Archivist: the Dalziel Family, 1839-1893'. Delivered by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI) at 'The Illustrator as as Public Intellectual', a conference at the Rhode Island School of Design, 5/11/2015 - 7/1/2015. Since the conference was at an art school, it went beyond my normal peer group, and was largely attended by professional practitioners. Around 30 delegates attended my presentation, and many approached me afterwards to talk about the Dalziel Archive and ways they could use it in their work. I am in discussion with some of the artists who attended the conference about planning future impact activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Literature and Illustration in the Archives: 6th-Form workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project. Event at the Keep, Brighton, thinking about how to use archives and rare book collections to develop readings of A-level set texts, and to produce creative responses to these. Event involved 12 students from the John Roan School, Greenwich, and their teacher, Emma Page. The workshop was organised, designed and delivered by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI) and Laura Gill (Sussex Research Assistant). The workshop provided a successful model for adopting interdisciplinary approach into the curriculum and enabled students to develop their knowledge and creative skills. Teacher Emma Page commented: "It was a fantastic experience for the students. I think handling and being trusted with old, rare and fragile texts really caught their imaginations as well as all the fascinating content - all of which will have provided lots of insights for contextualising their set texts".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Masterclass for National Art and Design Saturday Club 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
'Masterclass for National Art and Design Saturday Club'. We organised a one-day workshop for twenty 14-16-year-olds, hosted by the Saturday Club, a charity dedicated to raising attainment, broadening horizons and enhancing life skills among young people. Work produced was part of an exhibition at Somerset House in June 2017 (https://www.somersethouse.org.uk/residents/saturday-club-trust).
Participants reflected on research produced by the fellowship and learnt how to produce word-image narratives. They made their own textile prints inspired by the research. The workshop was led by George Mind (research technician) with support from myself (Bethan Stevens, PI) and Gabrielle Mind (Saturday Club lecturer).
One participant later completed a work experience placement with me at the British Museum.
Participants particularly enjoyed the historical component to this practical workshop:
'I liked how we learned about the Victorian times before we did anything I now know how printing worked'.
'I've learnt how to develop ideas from pictures into words.'
'I've learnt the many ways the Victorians produced images. I have learnt new ways of thinking for ideas like the exquisite corpse creative writing collage, scrapbooking. I plan to do more scrapbooking'.
'I plan to develop [this work] in my GCSE'.
Future plans: 'Using Victorian illustrations in School'
'The people who directed the workshop were chatty, positive and they knew so much!'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.somersethouse.org.uk/residents/saturday-club-trust
 
Description Teachers Day, British Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
Our Teachers' day at the British Museum on July 8th 2017 consolidated our work and future plans. We brought together school teachers, artists and museum professionals to discuss future plans for a bid for AHRC Follow-on Funding for Impact and Engagement (to be submitted later in 2018).
The workshop was organised by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI), with George Mind (research technician), Luisa Cale (Assistant Dean, Birkbeck) Hannah Field (Lecturer, Sussex) and Lindsay Smith (Professor, Sussex).
Also attending were: Chris Glynn and Gabrielle Mind (Lecturers in visual arts, FE & HE)
Louise Hayward, Chris Pig, Edwina Ellis and Peter Smith (artists and wood engravers)
Kayleigh Torpey, Emma Page, Nabila Milikan (key stage 3 teachers)
Ben Samuels (Director and actor)
Sheila O'Connell (Curator)
We wrote a draft education pack that was presented during the workshop, and discussed; we have plans to develop this into a textbook in the future.
During the workshop we examined material from the Dalziel Archive and discussed the project's research findings from our different points of view. We planned ways that we can collaborate as academics, artists and teachers. We plan to host a series of events connecting the digital with craft-based work. We will co-curate a virtual exhibition with young people and visual artists, and organise digital installations of 19th-century prints.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/2017/02/15/caught-in-time/
 
Description Twitter project - Dalziel advent calendar etc. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The @dalzielproject Twitter account was launched in September 2016. We have been using it to share research that has emerged from the project, and we have noticed that our discoveries get a particularly enthusiastic response from art practitioners and museum professionals. We have 206 followers, which we are very pleased with for such a new account. Our Twitter initiatives included a Dalziel Advent Calendar, which we posted every day from December 1st to 25th 2016. Here, we used Twitter to share unfamiliar Victorian illustrations discovered in my research, often with key historical information that had been discovered (e.g. about publication contexts or artistic techniques). During that month alone, our tweets had a total of 33,899 impressions, and were actively engaged with 1084 times. This included 151 retweets, 250 likes and 11 replies.
Update for 2019: We continue to use social media to engage new users with this research, reaching out through a series of tweets on The Twelve Days of Christmas, and celebrating Victorian women artists on International Women's Day, for example.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018,2019
URL https://twitter.com/dalzielproject
 
Description Victorian Trade Engraving and Contemporary Practice - British Museum Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Event organised by the Dalziel Project.
The Dalziel Public and Educational Programme works to extend the reach of the Dalziel Project beyond the realms of academia and encourage schools, art clubs, artists, designers, historians, and interested individuals to engage with the archive. On Saturday 8th April 2017, we were joined in the Prints and Drawings study room at the British Museum by ten contemporary artists - specialising in wood engraving and printmaking - for a day of discussion and study of the Dalziel Archive. Each artist was sent a digital album ahead of the workshop, and on the day presented their thoughts and insights to the group, sharing knowledge across the fields of practice and research.
The workshop was chaired by myself (Bethan Stevens, PI), co-organised with George Mind (research technician). Also participating were: Hugo Chapman, Sheila O'Connell and Isabel Seligman (British Museum) and printmakers Alex Binnie, Neil Bousfield, Simon Brett, Louise Hayward, Peter Lawrence, Keith Pettitt, Chris Pig, Peter Smith, Maggie Storm and Jazmin Velasco.
Impact from the workshop has included several artists making new work directly inspired by the Dalziel Archive, and also reporting changes in their artistic practice. Here are some examples:
- The wood engraver and painter Peter S Smith attended the workshop, which directly inspired his latest work, Dalziels' Apprentice, exploring techniques of 19th-century wood engraving in the light of my research. He said: 'I was interested in what it feels like to do that kind of thing - clearing away the white around black lines You can't beat trying something out for yourself to help you understand.' He will put this new work in the London Original Print Fair at the RA in May 2017, and enter it for the RA summer show. Following our work together, Smith has given public demonstrations focusing on 19th-century engraving practices at St Bride's Printing Library and Eames Fine Art gallery.
- Artist Louise Hayward has made new work following my museum workshop, and wrote: 'I feel this may be a different phase of work for me. The BM workshop was easily one of, if not the highlight of 2017 for me so thank you again, it was very special.'
- Artist and publisher Chris Pig wrote that our workshop 'made me look at my practice afresh, which has gone straight back into the work'.
- Artist Neil Bousfield made his new piece What Hope for Holding Back the Sea (Ballot) in response to the Dalziel workshop. This was chosen for exhibition in the National Open Art Exhibition 2017.
- Several other writers and artists reported in feedback on how their practice was developed by the Dalziel Project. I have written a feature on some of this work published in Printmaking Today in March 2018. Participants have also published writing on the workshop, e.g. Simon Brett, 'Victorian Trade Engraving and Contemporary Practice', in Multiples, May 2017 pp. 3-6.
- I am in discussion with several participants about future activity bringing together printmakers, academics and schools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/2016/12/31/victorian-trade-engraving-and-contemporary-practi...
 
Description Woodpeckings conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Event organised by Bethan Stevens (PI) and George Mind (Research technician). 'Woodpeckings: Victorian prints, book illustration and word-image narratives' was an international conference at the British Museum, June 16-17th 2017. The event was co-hosted by Sussex and the British Museum. Partners from the latter included Hugo Chapman (Keeper), and Sheila O'Connell, Esther Chadwick and Isabel Seligman (curators). Hugo Chapman described the event as particularly important in bringing interdisciplinary perspectives to the museum: 'The conference was enormously successful in bridging a gap between the people who looked at literature and those who looked at illustrations. There was something of a gulf between them and they didn't normally talk and to get them to look at both their different disciplines was actually a great achievement' (Hugo Chapman, British Museum)
Our conference brought innovative, international research into dialogue with participants beyond the academy, with contributions from interdisciplinary scholars, museum curators and professional artists/filmmakers. The audience likewise brought together researchers, curators, collectors and members of the museum-visiting public (80 attendees in all). This event brought new material from the Dalziel Project into the rich field of word-image scholarship. Papers ranges from analyses of pictorial initials made for canonical Victorian novels, to theories of art instruction and interrogations of the album form. Contributors came from a rich international field, as follows:

Caroline Arscott (Courtauld), Geoff Belknap (University of Leicester), Neil Bousfield (Norwich University of the Arts), Laurel Brake (Birkbeck), Luisa Calè (Birkbeck), Esther Chadwick (British Museum), Douglas Downing (Independant Scholar), Hannah Field (Sussex), Michael Goodman (Cardiff), Georgina Grant (Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust), Natalie Hume (Courtauld), Lorraine Janzen Kooistra (Ryerson), Peter Lawrence (Society of Wood Engravers), Brian Maidment (Liverpool John Moores), Katharine Martin (V&A), Susan Matthews (Roehampton), George Mind (Sussex), Felicity Myrone (British Library), Tom Mole (Edinburgh), Sheila O'Connell (British Museum), Clare Pettitt (Kings), Isabel Seligman (British Museum), David Skilton (Cardiff), Lindsay Smith (Sussex), Bethan Stevens (Sussex), Julia Thomas (Cardiff), Mark Turner (Kings) and Kiera Vaclavik (Queen Mary).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.sussex.ac.uk/english/dalziel/woodpeckings-conference-programme/