Building sustainability and informing policy: The MicroPasts programme of knowledge exchange

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Institute of Archaeology

Abstract

This Follow-on project will build on the successful results achieved by the original MicroPasts project ('Crowd- and Community-Fuelled Archaeological Research') and will take them forward via two linked programmes of knowledge exchange that will have a transformative and long-lasting impact on heritage policy and practice, as well as on MicroPasts developers and contributors. MicroPasts initially received funding under the AHRC call for Digital Transformations in Community Research Co-Production in the Arts and Humanities and, over its 18 month duration (1 October 2013-31 March 2015), the team have developed, implemented and started to evaluate a novel model to support collaborative research in archaeology, history and heritage that draws on a combination of crowd-sourcing, co-design and crowd-funding.

We now propose to undertake knowledge exchanges and further evaluation with two aims: (1) to study and enable a community-led model of platform and project management that is sustainable in the longer-term, and (2) to inform heritage policy and practice in the UK, and guide investments in participatory projects that use crowd-sourcing and/or crowd-funding. With those aims in mind, we plan to engage interested MicroPasts contributors in discussions about how they might take responsibility for the day-to-day running of the MicroPasts websites, and then develop the technical resources, guidelines and skills that are necessary for a community-led model of platform and project management to become fully operational. With policy-makers, analysts and practitioners in the heritage sector, we wish to review the methods and results of the evaluation conducted over the lifetime of MicroPasts so far, to steer further reflection and develop knowledge about the benefits generated by the use of crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding, for individuals, communities and heritage, and about how best to capture these benefits.

We will respond to MicroPasts contributors' stated desire to take forward the work conducted until now and help maintain the digital resources created in the lifetime of MicroPasts, so that they can continue using and benefiting from them. In addition, the knowledge exchange programme with volunteers will offer both contributors and current core staff meaningful learning opportunities, which can also be important for employment and career development purposes. Beyond significantly strengthening the co-creative nature of MicroPasts, we expect that this model of community-led management could potentially provide an exemplar for the longer-term sustainability of other web-based participatory projects that use crowd-sourcing or crowd-funding. This knowledge exchange programme will produce tutorials and guidelines that will be made available open access for anyone to download and re-use.

Furthermore, knowledge exchange among heritage policy-makers and practitioners will bridge a substantial knowledge gap about the ways in which more participatory and digitally interactive cooperation with the public can support heritage organisations in re-designing and improving their services in the context of economic downturn. In addition, the project will help heritage institutions and funding bodies to face the numerous technical, ethical and methodological challenges of evaluating community- and crowd-fuelled projects. This strand of the knowledge exchange programme will be conducted via workshop discussions, followed by the write up of a summary paper and evaluation guidelines, together with a full report on the MicroPasts evaluation. These resources will be made available online, but also circulated directly amongst the extensive network of heritage professionals with whom the project staff and their proposed collaborators are in contact.

Planned Impact

The Follow-on project will have compelling outcomes and considerable impact at several different levels, on two main groups. The first point to stress is that MicroPasts volunteers will be participating in a knowledge exchange programme aimed at developing and implementing a community-led kind of platform and project management. The idea behind this programme emerged from discussions with regular volunteers and from their desire to take forward the work conducted until now and help maintain the digital resources created in the lifetime of MicroPasts, so that they can continue using and benefiting from them. In addition, the programme will facilitate the sharing of different skills and knowledge and, thus, offer to volunteers and other core staff meaningful learning opportunities, which will also be important for employment and career development purposes.

The second point to emphasise is the transformative impact of this initiative on heritage policy and practice. By the end of the Follow-on, key representatives from these two groups participating in the workshops will have co-produced new knowledge on the value of crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding in the heritage sector, to the benefit of heritage and heritage institutions, individuals and communities, online or offline. While there has been initial thinking on these topics, there hasn't yet been a moment of focussed and collaborative discussion resulting in operational recommendations for the heritage sector. Workshop delegates will also reach conclusions on best practice for evaluating web-based heritage projects that leverage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding methods. The outcomes of the workshops will be key to understanding whether new policy and new guidance should be developed to address the specific needs of crowd-fuelled projects, and also to inform future grant-making decisions in these areas. In addition, our evaluation guidelines will be useful for grantees, since, for example, only very general suggestions are currently offered by HLF on the best ways to measure the results of their projects. For heritage practitioners, we expect the core value of the Follow-on to be that of obtaining clear advice on the most cost-effective solutions for including crowd-sourcing projects in their educational and curatorial programmes, and crowd-funding as part of their development strategies.

To communicate the project outcomes to national and international audiences of researchers, policy-makers and practitioners in the cultural sector, we will write a paper summarising and commenting on the workshop discussions and publish it in a relevant journal such as Cultural Trends. In addition, the report on the evaluation of the MicroPasts project and the evaluation guidelines that will be produced will be made available for download from the MicroPasts main website and archived open access with UCL Discovery. We also, importantly, rely on the input of workshop participants and particularly of those mentioned in the Collaboration section, to disseminate the outcomes of this Follow-on widely, amongst their professional networks.

Publications

10 25 50
publication icon
Bonacchi C (2017) Digital Co-production in Archaeology. An editorial in Internet Archaeology

publication icon
Bonacchi C (2015) Experiments in Crowd-funding Community Archaeology in Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage

publication icon
Bonacchi C (2019) Participation in heritage crowdsourcing in Museum Management and Curatorship

publication icon
Chiara Bonacchi (2018) Co-producing Knowledge Online in AHRC Connected Community Review Series

publication icon
Marta Krzyzanska; (2018) The Heritage of Brexit

 
Description We have found common ground about crowd-sourcing approaches with a range of major policy stakeholders in archaeology and heritage, and successfully transitioned to a sustainable crowd-sourcing venture with considerable volunteer input from members of the general public.
Exploitation Route With respect to the funding and oversight of crowd-sourcing initiatives in the humanities sector by national policy bodies.
Sectors Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://research.micropasts.org/2015/11/12/initial-reflections-on-the-micropasts-knowledge-exchange-workshop/
 
Description The MicroPasts site is ongoing and continues to attract lots of contributors. We have also strongly diversified the range of participating institutions including new ones in Italy and the US. Our 3d models created via the MicroPasts site for the British Museum have been used in children's learning events and have been downloaded and 3d printed worldwide.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Dr Chiara Bonacchi participated in the expert workshop organized by the AHRC, Heritage Futures, the Alan Turing Institute and the British Library on 'Heritage Data', British Library, UK.Participation on the potential of big data for research in the GLAM sector.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact A number of points relating to crowdsourcing and social media data mining were raised and informed the conversation and report - these points derived from research undertaken as part of the MicroPasts and Ancient Identities Today projects.
 
Description Digital Data Curation 
Organisation British Museum
Department Department of Britain, Europe and Prehistory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Bonacchi for this collaboration, has started to organise a workshop on the public curation of big data that fuels research in the heritage sector. The workshop will be held in May 2017
Collaborator Contribution NA The workshop has not taken place yet.
Impact NA
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Data Curation 
Organisation Carleton University
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Bonacchi for this collaboration, has started to organise a workshop on the public curation of big data that fuels research in the heritage sector. The workshop will be held in May 2017
Collaborator Contribution NA The workshop has not taken place yet.
Impact NA
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Data Curation 
Organisation Harvard University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Bonacchi for this collaboration, has started to organise a workshop on the public curation of big data that fuels research in the heritage sector. The workshop will be held in May 2017
Collaborator Contribution NA The workshop has not taken place yet.
Impact NA
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Data Curation 
Organisation Michigan State University
Department Department of Plant Biology
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Bonacchi for this collaboration, has started to organise a workshop on the public curation of big data that fuels research in the heritage sector. The workshop will be held in May 2017
Collaborator Contribution NA The workshop has not taken place yet.
Impact NA
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Data Curation 
Organisation University College London
Department Division of Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Bonacchi for this collaboration, has started to organise a workshop on the public curation of big data that fuels research in the heritage sector. The workshop will be held in May 2017
Collaborator Contribution NA The workshop has not taken place yet.
Impact NA
Start Year 2016
 
Description Heritage Crowdsourcing 
Organisation British Museum
Department Digital and Publishing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Dr Chiara Bonacchi has been working with other members of the MicroPasts team (Daniel Pett, British Museum; Andy Bevan UCL Institute of Archaeology) and the crowdsourcing development company SciFabric on the creation of new crowdsourcing templates that will be used as part of the Ancient Identities Today project. MicroPasts is an AHRC-funded project that is still ongoing as a collaboration between the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology. Dr Bonacchi enriched the MicroPasts crowdsourcing website with new kinds of heritage crowdsourcing.
Collaborator Contribution Daniel Pett, Andy Bevan and SciFabric supported Chiara Bonacchi in the technical development and review of the new heritage crowdsourcing templates.
Impact As a result of this collaboration a number of new templates for heritage crowdsourcing were developed. These templates will be used for the Ancient Identities Today project. However, they have also been shared and made available for download and re-use via the project GitHub account: https://github.com/IARHeritages.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Heritage Crowdsourcing 
Organisation SciFabric
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dr Chiara Bonacchi has been working with other members of the MicroPasts team (Daniel Pett, British Museum; Andy Bevan UCL Institute of Archaeology) and the crowdsourcing development company SciFabric on the creation of new crowdsourcing templates that will be used as part of the Ancient Identities Today project. MicroPasts is an AHRC-funded project that is still ongoing as a collaboration between the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology. Dr Bonacchi enriched the MicroPasts crowdsourcing website with new kinds of heritage crowdsourcing.
Collaborator Contribution Daniel Pett, Andy Bevan and SciFabric supported Chiara Bonacchi in the technical development and review of the new heritage crowdsourcing templates.
Impact As a result of this collaboration a number of new templates for heritage crowdsourcing were developed. These templates will be used for the Ancient Identities Today project. However, they have also been shared and made available for download and re-use via the project GitHub account: https://github.com/IARHeritages.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Heritage Crowdsourcing 
Organisation University College London
Department Institute of Archaeology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Dr Chiara Bonacchi has been working with other members of the MicroPasts team (Daniel Pett, British Museum; Andy Bevan UCL Institute of Archaeology) and the crowdsourcing development company SciFabric on the creation of new crowdsourcing templates that will be used as part of the Ancient Identities Today project. MicroPasts is an AHRC-funded project that is still ongoing as a collaboration between the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology. Dr Bonacchi enriched the MicroPasts crowdsourcing website with new kinds of heritage crowdsourcing.
Collaborator Contribution Daniel Pett, Andy Bevan and SciFabric supported Chiara Bonacchi in the technical development and review of the new heritage crowdsourcing templates.
Impact As a result of this collaboration a number of new templates for heritage crowdsourcing were developed. These templates will be used for the Ancient Identities Today project. However, they have also been shared and made available for download and re-use via the project GitHub account: https://github.com/IARHeritages.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation Art Fund
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation National Museum of the Royal Navy
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation Nesta
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation The Heritage Alliance
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The team organised a knowledge exchange event to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. The workshop was held at the UCL Institute of Archaeology on 23 September 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Speakers from partner organisations participated in the workshops and provided their viewpoints and comments on the subjects that were addressed.
Impact Two back-to-back workshops (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) were organise to pursue the objectives listed below. 2. Workshop objectives Workshop 1 (Morning, 23 September 2015) Using crowd-based methods in a heritage 'ecology' 1. To guide organisational change in the heritage sector via crowd-based methods • What can crowd-based methods bring to organisations, groups, and individuals committed to heritage research, management and preservation? • What are the potential shortcomings of such methods and how should these be addressed? 2. To improve the longer-term sustainability of crowd-based initiatives • Who has the capacity to implement crowd-based online platforms and related offline initiatives at present? • To what extent can such efforts sustain themselves over the longer-term or contribute to the sustainability of heritage institutions? • If new funding policies are needed to support such activities, what should these look like and what synergies should be involved (e.g. between arts, heritage and higher education funding bodies)? 3. To create a UK-based interest group on the topic of crowd-based methods • How could or should the knowledge resulting from this workshop be disseminated more widely across the arts, heritage and higher education sectors? • What are the implications of the growth of crowd-based methods for heritage policy, for example in terms of funding or capacity building? Workshop 2 (Afternoon, 23 September 2015) Evaluating heritage crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding 1. To focus on what insights are useful for evaluation purposes 2. To identify key measures, useful descriptors and simple evaluation methods 3. To discuss any emerging ethical challenges related to evaluation practices, and how to address them
Start Year 2015
 
Description Magic Mountain Catalogue Transcription 
Organisation Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The MicroPasts team developed a crowdsourcing application for the transcription of the Magic Mountain catalogue, housed at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science to support PhD research.
Collaborator Contribution The Denver Museum of Nature and Science made available for crowdsourcing activities the Magic Mountain catalogue it owns.
Impact One crowdsourcing application for the transcription of the catalogue (so far).
Start Year 2016
 
Description Partnership with Museo Egizio 
Organisation Egyptian Museum of Turin
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have been crowdsourcing the 3D photo-masking and modelling of objects housed at the Egyptian Museum of Turin, Italy.
Collaborator Contribution The Museum helped to make MicroPasts known in Italy, through nation-wide publicity via articles in major Italian newspapers such as La Repubblica and La Stampa.
Impact 3D models, shared via the 3D modelling platform Sketchfab; blog posts; engagement of members of the public living in Italy (further internationalisation of the research and crowdsourcing activity); formal inclusion of a 'public archaeology' and open data agenda in the policy of Museo Egizio.
Start Year 2016
 
Description 'Archeologia e comunicazione' (Archaeology and Communication). Keynote given by Dr Chiara Bonacchi for the Workshop 'Archeologia e comunita': una stratigrafia di relezioni' (Archaeology and communities: a statigraphy of relations', given on 19/12/17 at IULM University, Milan, Italy. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A lecture where both MicroPasts and the Ancient Identities Today projects featured prominently.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 12-16/09/18 talk: 'Crowdsourcing Arts and Heritage', for the 5th International Symposium on Cultural Heritage Conservation and Digitisation (Tsinghua University, Beijing, China).  
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 12-16/09/18'Crowdsourcing Arts and Heritage', for the 5th International Symposium on Cultural Heritage Conservation and Digitisation (Tsinghua University, Beijing, China). 
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 12/02/19 talk: Cultural Citizenship and participation in heritage crowdsourcing', Centre for the Environment, Heritage and Policy, University of Stirling (Stirling, UK). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 12/02/19 Cultural Citizenship and participation in heritage crowdsourcing', Centre for the Environment, Heritage and Policy, University of Stirling (Stirling, UK).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 2017, 'Digital Heritage 'Big' Data Hacking and Visualisation', International Workshop organised at the UCL Institute of Archaeology by Dr Chiara Bonacchi and Dan Pett (British Museum, UK). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop will discuss expressive uses of 'big data' visualisations to engage citizens with the results of research into the human past and its contemporary legacies. It will bring together perspectives coming from the creative arts, design, software development, cultural heritage and museum studies.
Speakers and discussants will reflect over the principles that could and should be driving the development of digital applications for the public interpretation and communication of heritage research that is based on the analysis of relatively large, varied and rapidly changing quantities of data extracted from web infrastructures.
The workshop is linked to the Ancient Identities Today project, which is experimenting with approaches that combine the use of 'smaller' and 'bigger' data online and offline, to study and communicate the meanings and uses of ideas and materials from the Iron Age, Roman and Early Medieval pasts in contemporary Britain.
Organisers: Chiara Bonacchi (UCL Institute of Archaeology) and Daniel Pett (British Museum)
The event is funded by the UCL Global Engagement Fund, with additional sponsorship from the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, and the UCL Institute of Archaeology Heritage Studies Section.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://ancientidentities.org/digital-heritage-workshop/
 
Description Dr Chiara Bonacchi participated in the expert workshop organized by the AHRC, Heritage Futures, the Alan Turing Institute and the British Library on 'Heritage Data', British Library, UK. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participation on the potential of big data for research in the GLAM sector. A number of points relating to crowdsourcing and social media data mining were raised and informed the conversation and report - these points derived from research undertaken as part of the MicroPasts and Ancient Identities Today projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Two back-to-back workshops were organised to share the practices, shortcomings and achievements experienced by the MicroPasts project and use these as fodder for wider discussion about the use and evaluation of both crowd-sourcing and crowd-funding within a broader heritage 'ecology'. About 30 delegated participated amongst heritage policy-makers, funders and practitioners. The day allowed producing a more focussed view of the value of crowdsourcing and crowdfunding for the heritage sector - attendees brought back the discussion into their daily activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHoSalhpL825RuHkQh2tbjg
 
Description Lecture on Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding in Archaeology, given on 19 Feb 2018 at the UCL Institute of Archaeology by CB 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Lecture on Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding in Archaeology, delivered using MicroPasts as a case study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Lecture on Heritage Crowdsourcing delivered as part of the PG course on Archaeological Data Science, at the UCL Institute of Archaeology, in December 2018. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The class introduced heritage crowdsourcing from both a theoretical and a practical point of view, using the MicroPasts case study as a platform. About 10 PG students participated and required further information about the topic presented.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Michigan State University: Institute of Digital Archaeology Method and Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Co-Investigator Daniel Pett participated for 2 years in the MSUDAI workshops funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. These two years of workshops, talks and practical activities culminated in participants using the MicroPasts platform to deploy their own crowdsourcing projects (institutions included Denver Museum of Nature and Science and Minnesota Historical Society) and gain benefits from international co-operation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://digitalarchaeology.msu.edu/final-thoughts-on-msudai-crowdsourcing-and-the-world-of-digital-ar...
 
Description Talk given on 22/06/2017 by Dr Chiara Bonacchi, for the workshop 'Digital and Analogue tools in heritage management - Contemporary and future perspectives', Newcastle University, UK. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk on crowdsourcing in heritage - raised awareness of the processes and methods that support this activity. About 30 participants gained awareness of this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description VR Event, British Museum (August 2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The 3D models of archaeological artefacts that we had crowd-sourced were used in a VR walk-through of a Bronze Age roundhouse at the British Musuem
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2015/08/10/virtual-reality-how-the-samsung-digital-discovery-centre-cr...
 
Description Volunteer training 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The MicroPasts team has been training about 12 volunteers in a number of different technical activities, ranging from the creation of 3D models and Wikipedia entries, to website, blog and community forum management. This has generated substantial skill-uilding leading not only on greater and longer-term self-sustainability of the MicroPasts website but also to new career pathways for some of the volunteers involved.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description • 2018, 'The pop-up museum', Exhibition session at Mozilla Festival (Mozfest), London. Co-organised with Dan Pett (Fitzwilliam Museum), Jennifer Wexler (British Museum), 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact • 2018, 'The pop-up museum', Exhibition session at Mozilla Festival (Mozfest), London. Co-organised with Dan Pett (Fitzwilliam Museum), Jennifer Wexler (British Museum),
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description • 2018, Social Heritages: Addressing Global Challenges in Contemporary Society. Culture and Heritage Session, delivered for Research Week, at University of Stirling, UK. Highlighting innovative research directions for the field. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 2018, Social Heritages: Addressing Global Challenges in Contemporary Society. Culture and Heritage Session, delivered for Research Week, at University of Stirling, UK. Highlighting innovative research directions for the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018