The Emily Hobhouse Letters: South Africa in International Context, 1899-1926

Lead Research Organisation: Leeds Metropolitan University
Department Name: Cultural Studies and Humanities

Abstract

Emily Hobhouse (1860-1926) is celebrated in South Africa as a heroine of the South African War (1899-1902), but her wider involvement in South African affairs and international campaigning are largely unknown. Meanwhile in Britain she has been disregarded, her controversial attempts at relief work and international reconciliation during the First World War never properly accounted for. The Emily Hobhouse Letters project is an international research project centrally concerned with recovering Hobhouse's transnational epistolary network of activists, writers, journalists and politicians, in doing so offering a necessary re-internationalisation of early twentieth-century imperial and South African history and correcting her neglect in Britain.

It will be led by a UK-based Principal Investigator, who will work alongside Co-Investigators in the UK and South Africa, and in partnership with archivists and museum professionals in the UK and South Africa, to renew scholarly and public engagement with Hobhouse's legacy and to ask why, for Hobhouse and her circle, South Africa became the test-case of early twentieth-century liberal imperialism and liberal internationalism. The project will produce a joint-authored monograph and journal articles, and an international exhibition (touring to the Bodleian, Hull History Centre, the Liskeard Museum, the War Museum, and Smuts House Museum), which will focus on Hobhouse's mobilisation of an influential and interlocking transnational epistolary network of Quakers, international suffrage campaigners, anti-slavery activists, colonial politicians, reformers and writers, members of the Indian and African National Congresses, New Liberals and socialists in Britain. These will highlight the formative experience of Hobhouse and her circle's work for reconciliation in South Africa during an era of war, reconstruction, labour disputes, and arguments over national self-determination and will explore the legacy of this involvement - particularly their attitudes to race - for their approach to the politics of peace, relief and international oversight in Europe and South Africa after the First World War.

The exhibition will showcase material from the newly-deposited Emily Hobhouse papers at the Bodleian, which will for the first time be placed alongside her voluminous correspondence in archives in Britain, Geneva and South Africa in order to evaluate her strategic use of letter-writing and the behind-the-scenes influence of women's politicking. The project will employ two Research Assistants: one employed full-time to carry out research in South African archives and libraries; the other, employed on a 0.5 post for 18 months, to carry out research in the archives of international organisations such as Save the Children in Geneva. Both will be fully engaged in the project's outputs and its wider dissemination. The research team will also guide the cataloguing and selective digitisation of the Hobhouse Papers by trainee archivists and report on this to the SCOLMA conference for researchers and archivists of African history, and in its bulletin.

A workshop in South Africa with the Bodleian archivist, school teachers and heritage professionals will explore the optimum ways to present this new research to multiple audiences, including secondary-school pupils, in preparation for the exhibition, associated public lectures and website launch. The project website will include dedicated 'Gateways to Learning' which will use digitised Hobhouse material as gateways to structured teaching and learning material and include downloadable museum audio-guides to items in the collections of the War Museum and Smuts House (to accompany the exhibition or for use remotely). A conference at the University of the Free State on the re-internationalisation of South Africa's imperial history will extend this commitment to engaging with the ongoing post-apartheid revisioning and rethinking of the South African past.

Planned Impact

Key beneficiaries:
- Museum professionals and archivists
- Visitors to the project's touring exhibition and related events in South Africa and the UK
- Bodleian Library researchers, and online users
- Trainee archivists at Bodleian Library (on placement from University of Aberystwyth)
- SCOLMA members (UK archivists and researchers in African history)
- Local historians and local history societies (particularly in Cornwall, Hobhouse's birthplace)
- Secondary school pupils, teachers and heritage users
- Academic researchers across a range of disciplines (see academic beneficiaries)
Emily Hobhouse, and those prominent among her circle such as Gandhi and Smuts, generate significant public interest in South Africa, and have played a key part in the politics of its history and heritage. But whether rendered as heroes or hypocrites, they are often viewed in isolation, with little acknowledgement of the transnational networks of which they were part. The major impact of this project rests in its ability to capitalise on this interest while promoting public engagement with long overlooked aspects of South African history. A touring exhibition showcasing newly-deposited Hobhouse papers and the project's international research, public lectures, schools events, and a project website with dedicated 'Gateways to Learning' and museum audio-guides, will all raise the profile of Hobhouse and her circle's contribution to making South Africa a crucible of twentieth-century internationalism, imperial reformism, and humanitarianism, and stimulate re-engagement with South Africa's international heritage.

The project team are in conversation with project partners at the Bodleian, War Museum, Smuts House, Heritage Portal, Hull History Centre and Liskeard Museum in order to maximise the potential impact of this research in museum, educational, and archivist circles. Early in the project, members of the project team will share their experience of working on the new Hobhouse papers with the SCOLMA network, followed by a publication in their bulletin. A workshop in South Africa with Lucy McCann (of the Bodleian and SCOLMA), our South African project partners, members of the South African Heritage Resources Agency, and school teachers, will explore the optimal way to present our research for multiple audiences. All project partners bring considerable expertise in public engagement to the project, and will extend its reach by updating their own contacts and social media regarding the project's findings and potential for future research. In turn we will create new networks from which researchers, heritage professionals and archivists will benefit.

The touring exhibition will be of interest to academic and local researchers, school pupils and teachers, museum visitors and tourists, and the audio-guides accompanying the exhibition will extend this impact through reinterpretations of items in the War Museum and Smuts House collections. Audio-guides will be downloadable for use in the museums or remotely (for example in a class room setting), and will form part of the project's website, which will also update on findings, invite responses from project partners, and promote forthcoming events. It will include dedicated 'Gateway to Learning' which use digitised items in the Hobhouse collection alongside further resources and teaching materials for secondary schools. The website will ultimately be hosted by Heritage Portal and will thus benefit from its remit of promoting South African history and heritage.

The partnership with the Bodleian offers particularly fruitful scope for multiple impacts: the UK launch of the exhibition and accompanying public engagement activities; the influence of Lucy McCann's expertise and contacts through SCOLMA; the enhancement of the trainee archivists' learning and professional development; and the opportunity for the project team to guide the cataloguing and selective digitisation of Hobhouse's papers.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The Hobhouse project's research findings can be grouped into two main areas:

1) Our international exhibition showcased the key findings of our historical research, which has revealed the significance and influence of some aspects of Hobhouse's work that have previously received scant scholarly attention, including:
- Her prominent role in reconstruction work in the aftermath of the South African War, including lobbying for compensation for some individuals, collection and later publication of testimony, and eventually the establishment of a spinning and weaving school, and later a lace school.
- Her role in suffrage work in Britain, including as chair of the People's Suffrage Federation, her later work in suffrage, pacifist and feminist circles in Europe, and her attempts to engage white South African women in suffrage politics.
- Her establishment of a feeding scheme for German school children in Leipzig in 1919, and the significant extent to which this was supported by her South African networks.
- The centrality of South Africa in Hobhouse's life and work, and its place as a touchstone for her, as reflected in the critical importance of her correspondence with Mrs R.I. Steyn in shedding light on Hobhouse's ideas, activities and networks.
- An appreciation for the importance of how Hobhouse has been commemorated, and particularly her own role in attempting to craft and control her self-memorialisation, and the role she has played as an icon of Afrikaner nationalism.

2) The second and unexpected strand of our research findings relates to our public engagement activities in South Africa, which in themselves generated valuable research findings, in particular a reassessment of Hobhouse's place in contemporary South Africa. The project exhibition and related public engagement events were met with skepticism and even hostility by some circles in South Africa who felt that our project threatened Hobhouse's status as a 'heroine', and undermined Afrikaner claims to victimhood on which some aspects of 'new' South African nationalisms rest. This has led us to reflect on the continuing potency of Hobhouse's legacy in South Africa.

Our intention is for our key academic output from the project, a monograph on Hobhouse's place in the history of South Africa, including the ongoing use of her legacy in the service of political projects, to develop both of these areas of our research findings. We want to address both our historical research findings, but also the unexpected ways in which the public dissemination of our research has revealed new insights into the persistence of a 'cult of memory' around Hobhouse in South Africa. Our working title for the book is 'Emily Hobhouse and the Politics of Memory in Twentieth Century South Africa'.
Exploitation Route We had hoped that our research might result in a reappraisal of Hobhouse and her legacy, and that this might be reflected in both heritage and education sectors. Instead, the response in South Africa to our findings suggests that these have instead led to a reinforcement of existing interpretations of Hobhouse and her legacy. However, this in itself has generated new insights for the project team who intend to integrate reflection on the process of doing this research in their planned academic outputs.
Sectors Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description The last year of the project (2019) saw the launch of an international exhibition on display at academic institutions and museum sites in both South Africa and the UK, accompanied by a number of public engagement events. In the UK the exhibition was well-received, and generated a degree of public interest. For example, at the Hull History Centre launch, where PI Dampier and Co-I Gill delivered a lunchtime lecture, 62 members of the public attended. The Alfred Gillett Trust reported good visitor numbers and public interest when the exhibition was on display there. At the various public engagement activities linked to the exhibition, the project team fielded questions and discussions about their research on Hobhouse's life and work. Though feedback cards about the exhibition were available for members of the public to complete at all sites, very few were submitted. In South Africa, the exhibition was launched at the Free State Arts Festival in Bloemfontein, and publicised with a newspaper article co-authored by the project team in South Africa's 'Business Day' national newspaper, and by coverage in the Afrikaans language newspaper, 'Die Volksblad'. However, representatives from the the War Museum, one of our project partners, were hostile to our exhibition, which they interpreted as undermining Hobhouse's status as a 'heroine of the Boer people' and as undermining 'new nationalisms' in South Africa by problematising Afrikaner claims to victimhood (claims which were made to gain political capital as Afrikaner nationalism developed in the early 20th century, but which have been reinvented and repeated in the context of post-apartheid South Africa, as a means of fostering equivalences of suffering and thus new forms of nationalism). Our attempt to place Hobhouse in her historical context and critically examine the politicised use of her legacy in South African history was deemed by some to be an 'attack' on both Hobhouse and Afrikaners. A critical article expressing some of these objections to our approach also appeared in the South African newspaper, Die Vryeweekblad. We invited the War Museum to engage in further critical dialogue, but they declined to elaborate their views. As a project team, our view of our research's impact is two-fold: 1) though our findings have not prompted a re-thinking of Hobhouse's life and work in South Africa, or a re-evaluation of her place in Afrikaner nationalist history, they have generated discussion and debate with heritage professionals, which may be developed further in the future, and 2) the process of attempting to generate non-academic impacts has in itself brought new insights to light, in particular a fuller appreciation of the ongoing potency of the cult of memory around Hobhouse in South Africa, and the entrenched social and political identities associated with this. The impact of our public engagement events and activities has primarily been on our own views of Hobhouse's place in South African history, and our growing realisation of the extent to which the challenges and controversy regarding how the past is represented, preserved and commemorated in post-apartheid South Africa have barely been confronted. Our engagement with these issues will be further developed in our planned academic outputs.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Abbey House talk 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill and Helen Dampier presented a talk entitled, 'Ministering Angels? Women and relief work in war and peace', 'A Woman's Place? Adult Talk Series', Abbey House Museum, Leeds, 15 November 2018. The talk was attended by a small but interested local audience, all of whom asked for more information about Hobhouse and our project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Barcelona Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill presented a paper entitled "Save the Children and the question of compassion for 'enemy' children'" at Vulnerables: Compassio I Cures D'infermeria en la Historira de L'Humanitarisme, CSIC, Barcelona, 8 March, 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Birmingham seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In June 2019, Dr Rebecca Gill and Dr Helen Dampier delivered a seminar paper, 'Crafting Values: teaching citizenship and reconciliation in South Africa', at the University of Birmingham (invited speakers). The audience feedback on this paper was invaluable in shaping our approach to the Humanitarian Handicrafts workshop we hosted a few weeks later.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/domus/events/2019/crafting-values.aspx
 
Description Bodleian display 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project team curated a display of Emily Hobhouse's newly-donated papers at the Bodleian Library (See: https://visit.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/display/war-without-glamour), exhibited between 21 September - 24 November 2019. The display was an opportunity to showcase a number of items from the Hobhouse archive, most of which have not been publicly displayed or accessible before.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://visit.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/display/war-without-glamour
 
Description Bodleian talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Helen Dampier and Dr Rebecca Gill delivered a public talk entitled 'War Without Glamour: Emily Hobhouse and the 'enemy' civilian, 1899-1919' at the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. This was to promote the display of Hobhouse's papers we curated for the Bodleian's Proscholium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description CHORD blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following our presentation on 'The Invention of a Boer Home Industries' at the CHORD (Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution; University of Wolverhampton) workshop in June 2018, we were invited to contribute a related blog piece for the CHORD website. This was written by Rebecca Gill and Helen Dampier, with the help of the Impact Support Officer at the University of Huddersfield, Laura Breen. The blog has led to further inquiries about our project, and has put us in touch with scholars who work on the history of textiles and material culture, some of whom we have subsequently invited to a workshop we are co-hosting at the University of Huddersfield in June 2019 (Humanitarian Handicrafts).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/07/20/hobhouse/
 
Description CHORD workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact P-I Dampier and Co-I Gill presented a paper entitled "The Invention of a Boer Home Industries: Emily Hobhouse and the Creation and Preservation of a South African 'Textiles from Below" at the Centre for the History of Retailing and Distribution (CHORD) at the University of Wolverhampton on 7 June 2018. This was part of a workshop on 'Textiles and Dress from Below: Ordinary and Everyday Textiles and Dress in Museums and Historic Houses' and it was attended by a mix of academics and heritage professionals. Apart from our paper prompting interested questions, there were two additional outcomes:

1. We were invited to write a guest blog based on our paper for the CHORD website (see separate entry on ResearchFish for this).
2. We made contact with a number of academics working on the cultural history of textiles, who we have been able to invite to participate in our forthcoming conference on Humanitarian Handicrafts in 2019. See: https://www.humanitarianhandicrafts.com/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Cornish Times Article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An article entitled '£400,000 for research into Emily's letters', about our project was published in the newspaper the 'Cornish Times', 19 August 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cornwall Today Article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An article entitled 'Patience, Prudence and Pluck' on Hobhouse, and specifically on our project and our research, was published in the newspaper 'Cornwall Today' on 1 October 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Document handling session Bodleian 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact The project team hosted a document handling session, using Hobhouse's papers, at the Bodleian Library for volunteers from the Alfred Gillett Trust (one of our project partners) in September 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Dublin Paper RG and TE 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill and Tatjana Eichert (project RA) delivered a paper, 'Saving the 'enemy' child: Emily Hobhouse's Leipzig feeding scheme and the origins of the international Save the Children movement', at the Humanitarianism and the Greater War, 1912-1923 Conference, University College Dublin, 5 - 6 September 2019. The paper prompted discussion about the early years of the Save the Children Fund and its place in post-war politics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.ucd.ie/warstudies/t4media/Humanitarianism%20_nd_Greater_War_programme_2019.pdf
 
Description ESSHC conference 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill and Helen Dampier presented a paper entitled 'Constructing a Humanitarian Self: Emily Hobhouse's Auto/biographical Traces, 1899 - 1926' at the European Social Science History Conference in Belfast in April 2018. We did so as part of a panel on the topic of Biography and Humanitarianism, which we were invited to join. The panel was made up of other prominent scholars: Joy Damousi, Melanie Oppenheimer and Rosemary Wall. Following the successful panel we agreed as a group to submit a proposal for a special edition based on our papers to the academic journal Past & Present. Our proposal is under development.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Gendering the Peace Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill and Kate Law presented a paper entitled "'South Africa as Test Case?' Emily Hobhouse and the International Peace Movement" at the Gendering the Peace conference held at the University of Sheffield in January 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Geneva paper 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill delivered a paper entitled, 'The Emotional Labour of Doing Relief Work and Writing About It: Emily Hobhouse's 'Martyr Complex' 1899-1926' at the 'Gendering Humanitarian Knowledge: Global Histories of Compassion from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present' conference at the University of Geneva, 20 - 21 April 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description HASA panel 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The project team put together a panel for the Historical Association of South Africa (HASA) conference in June 2018. Rebecca Gill and Helen Dampier presented a paper entitled 'Emily Hobhouse and Self-biography, 1899-1926: Reflections om her letters to R.I. Steyn', and Cornelis Muller presented a paper entitled 'A contested legacy: The commemoration and memorialisation of Emily Hobhouse in South Africa'. The panel was well-attended and was specially mentioned by the conference organisers in their closing plenary. It was singled out for our well-delivered papers, but also for being the only panel at the conference dedicated to examining the biography of one historical figure - and a woman.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Heritage Portal textiles request 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Our project partner, The Heritage Portal, published a short publicity piece on our project, and our call for Hobhouse-related textiles.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.theheritageportal.co.za/notice/new-emily-hobhouse-project-seeks-spinning-weaving-school-t...
 
Description Heroes conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Helen Dampier was invited to give a keynote address at 'The Hero and Heroism: Then, There and Now' conference at Leeds Beckett University in September 2019. The address was entitled, '"Saint Emily": The Creation of Emily Hobhouse as a Heroine in South Africa, 1901 - 1926'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/-/media/files/schools/csh/the-hero-heroism/heroes-2019-programmev2.pd...
 
Description Hobhouse Twitter account 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Our project Twitter account offers updates of project related activities and public engagement events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
URL https://twitter.com/emilyhobhouse?lang=en
 
Description Hull talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact When the project exhibition was on display at Hull History Centre in September 2019, Dr Helen Dampier and Dr Rebecca Gill delivered a public lecture, 'War Without Glamour: Emily Hobhouse and the 'enemy' civilian, 1899-1919', for the Centre's Lunchtime Club, which was attended by 62 members of the public, many of whom commented that this was their first encounter with Hobhouse and her peace work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Humanitarian Handicrafts workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The project organised a highly successful two-day international workshop on 'Humanitarian Handicrafts', held at the University of Huddersfield in June 2019. It was organised in collaboration with the Centre for Culture and the Arts (Leeds Beckett University), the University of Huddersfield, and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester, and was attended by 25 scholars. The workshop was accompanied by a pop-up exhibition of handicrafts produced by or for humanitarian organisations. There have been two outcomes from this event:
1) With Dr Rebecca Gill, Prof Bertrand Taithe and Dr Claire Barber I am co-editing a book, Humanitarian Handicrafts, exploring how and why humanitarians and humanitarian organisations have generated the production of artisanal products and 'folk' artwork in a range of different contexts over the past 120 years.
2) We have organised a follow-up one day workshop on 22 April 2020 to help us develop the proposal further, and it will be submitted to McGill University Press, with whom we are already in discussion. The book will include my co-authored chapter (with Dr Rebecca Gill) entitled 'Emily Hobhouse and the Boer Home Industries'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/events/school-events/humanitarian-handicrafts/
 
Description In Conversation event at Free State Arts Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact To tie in with the launch in South Africa of the project exhibition 'War Without Glamour: The Life and Legacy of Emily Hobhouse' at the Free State Arts Festival in Bloemfontein, an 'In Conversation' round-table event was held on 5 July 2019. Members of the project team - Helen Dampier, Rebecca Gill and Cornelis Mulller - joined with Borrie LaGrange (director of communication for Médecins Sans Frontières Southern Africa) and Savo Heleta (author of 'Not My Turn to Die: Memoirs of a Broken Childhood in Bosnia' and researcher at Nelson Mandela University) to discuss the ethics of humanitarian photography and the contemporary relevance of Hobhouse's activism. The round-table event, which was sold out, formed part of the Literature Festival in Bloemfontein. The audience was made up of members of the public and representatives from local museums and heritage organisations. The event prompted some lively debate and discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.vrystaatkunstefees.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/VK-Program-2019-verkort.pdf
 
Description JRUL workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill and Helen Dampier presented "The Emily Hobhouse Letters: Epistolary Networks and 'Self-biography'" at a workshop hosted by The Lives and Afterlives of Letters Network at the University of Manchester on Friday 16 February 2018. The workshop allowed for an interesting exchange of ideas between researchers working on letters-based projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://livesofletters.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/ethical-and-interpretative-issues-workshop-16-februa...
 
Description Leeds Cultural Conversation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Helen Dampier presented a talk entitled 'Forgotten Heroine? Recovering Emily Hobhouse, 1899-1902' as part of the Leeds Cultural Conversation series of monthly lunchtime talks organised by the Centre for Culture & the Arts in partnership with Leeds City Council, and supported by Palgrave Macmillan. The series showcases the leading research being undertaken by Leeds Beckett University's academic staff and encourages debate and public engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://leedsbeckett.ac.uk/events/faculty-events/forgotten-heroine/
 
Description Leeds Cultural Conversation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact To accompany the display of the project exhibition in Leeds, Dr Helen Dampier and Dr Rebecca Gill delivered a public talk in November 2019, 'Set in Stone? The Politics of Curating the Life of Emily Hobhouse in Contemporary South Africa', as part of the Leeds Cultural Conversation series at Leeds Town Hall. There were approximately 25 people in attendance, including academics, postgraduate students and members of the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/events/school-events/lcc-emily-hobhouse/
 
Description Oxford paper 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Helen Dampier and Rebecca Gill presented a paper entitled 'Shared Suffering? Emily Hobhouse and the translation of Tant' Alie of Transvaal: Her Diary 1880-1902' at the Long Nineteenth-Century Seminar Series, Oriel College, University of Oxford, 10 October 2018.The audience were responsive, and a stimulating discussion followed the paper. The paper also resulted in a new contact, Prof David Hopkin, who works on a cognate area, and who we have subsequently invited to a workshop our project is co-hosting in June 2019 (Humanitarian Handicrafts).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://talks.ox.ac.uk/talks/series/id/8a75bcf0-2a74-43aa-958e-290a056f9120?show_all=true
 
Description Project Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We held our Project Workshop at the War Museum, Bloemfontein, South Africa on 19 June 2018. Entitled 'Heritage and Public Engagement: An Afternoon Workshop for Historians and Heritage Professionals', this was aimed at helping the project team think through the complex debates about history and public engagement in contemporary South Africa, the better to prepare for our project exhibition in 2019. The event was attended by historians and heritage professionals, and was discussion and activity-based. The main outcomes were:

1. Strongly informing plans and ideas of the project team for 2019 project exhibition in South Africa
2. Establishing key contacts for future engagement activities
3. Obtaining valuable feedback (written and verbal) from participants about their experience of the workshop
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.wmbr.org.za/view.asp?ItemID=62&tname=tblComponent1&oname=News%20%20/%20Events&pg=news
 
Description Project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We have a project website which we use to publicise project activities, and to encourage public engagement with our planned project events (such as our project workshop, taking place on 19 June 2018).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
URL https://emilyhobhouselettersproject.wordpress.com/
 
Description SA exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project exhibition in South Africa was displayed under the title 'War Without Glamour: The Life and Legacy of Emily Hobhouse' and was launched as part of the Free State Arts Festival in Bloemfontein in July 2019. The exhibition was made up of 18 panels comprised of a total of c12,000 words of text, alongside images, maps and interactive 'flipbooks'. This core exhibition was accompanied by satellite panels on display at the National Museum and at the War Museum, both in Bloemfontein. Exact visitor numbers are not available, but the festival attracts thousands of visitors from the local region and more widely from across South Africa, so is likely to have had considerable reach. Feedback cards were provided for visitors, and though only a small number of these were completed, feedback was generally positive. Some comments included:

"Deeply moved. Am 80 years of age. Remember stories my mother told me about E.H. Her legacy should always be honoured."
"Thank you for the objective and aesthetic way this exhibition was put together - it inspires me to re-read the publications mentioned."

However, not all feedback received was positive, and representatives from the War Museum expressed the view that our exhibition disagreed with their interpretation of Hobhouse's legacy. Their view was that by highlighting the use of Hobhouse's legacy by the Afrikaner nationalist movement, our exhibition was an attack on Afrikaners. This feedback has made the project team reassess our assumptions about Hobhouse's place in contemporary South Africa, and our reflections on this will be developed in future written academic outputs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.vrystaatkunstefees.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/VK-Program-2019-verkort.pdf
 
Description SAHS Conference 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Cornelis Muller presented "'I've upset their applecart'": Emily Hobhouse's activism as non-state actor during the period of reconstruction, 1902-1910" at the South African Historical Society Conference, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, 21-23 June 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description School trip to War Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This event was coordinated by the history department of the St. Michael's School for Girls in Bloemfontein, South Africa (contacts: principal Imelita vd Bergh and History teacher Grant Trewerne), the War Museum (education officer Dané van Wyk) and the Hobhouse Letters project. Approximately 20-25 Grade 11 and 12 history learners from the school were transported to the War Museum in Bloemfontein, where they were led on a tour of the museum and in the auditorium were given a presentation on Hobhouse's post-war work in South Africa. The trip ended with a visit to the Women's Monument where learners were given some background information on the memorial.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Social History Society Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Helen Dampier presented a paper by Helen Dampier, Rebecca Gill and Kate Law entitled 'Researching the Letters of Emily Hobhouse' at the 2016 Social History Society Conference at the University of Lancaster. The audience was composed of other academics, and some postgraduate students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Textiles and weaving workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A collaborative event was held for secondary school learners of the Reamohetse School of the Arts in Botshabelo outside Bloemfontein, South Africa and was coordinated by the Oliewenhuis Art Museum (contact: Yolanda de Kock) and Bloemfontein's National Museum (contact: Sudré Havenga) in collaboration with the Free State Department of Education (contact: Carina van der Merwe), a textiles and design lecturer from the Central University of Technology (Marianne le Roux), and Hobhouse Letters Project.

20-30 learners from the Reamohetse School of the Arts participated in a workshop about natural textile dyeing, textile design and basic weaving. Marianne le Roux, CUT lecturer in textile design taught participants about natural dyes used for dyeing and showed samples of textile design. This presentation was followed by a session where learners were given a short background on the life of Emily Hobhouse and the role she played in establishing spinning and weaving schools after the South African war. Learners were each given a weaving kit provided by the Hobhouse project and were assisted in weaving their own pot holders. After the weaving session learners were guided through the Hobhouse project satellite exhibition in the foyer of the National Museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description The Guardian Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill presented a paper entitled "'The Manchester Guardian, 'liberal internationalism', and the lessons of the Boer War" at the 'Comment is Free, but facts are sacred': The Guardian in Local, National and Global History Conference, John Rylands Library, University of Manchester, April 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description UK exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event was the project's UK exhibition, entitled 'War Without Glamour: Emily Hobhouse's Peace Activism 1899-1926'. The exhibition was made up of 18 panels, comprising c12,000 words of text, accompanied by images, maps, timelines, and interactive 'flipbooks'. The exhibition uncovered Hobhouse's less well-known contribution to international peace, humanitarianism, and South African politics in the post-war period, including her work in Germany following the First World War. Through her remarkable writings - most vividly her book War Without Glamour - it told the story of her lifelong commitment to revealing the devastating impact of war on civilians. It showcased newly-donated papers at the Bodleian Library in Oxford alongside letters, paintings and artefacts from international collections.

The UK exhibition was successfully launched at the University of Huddersfield on 27 June, where it was displayed until the end of August. It was then displayed at Hull History Centre in September, the Alfred Gillett Trust (Street, Somerset) in October, and at Leeds Beckett University in November, before being transported to Liskeard Museum in Cornwall (near Hobhouse's birthplace), where it will be on display until Spring 2020.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Volksblad and Die Burger 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A journalist in South Africa, Elsabe Brits, wrote a short article about our project and encouraged members of the public in possession of textiles produced by Hobhouse's Spinning & Weaving School to contact the project team. The article appeared in two Afrikaans-language newspapers in South Africa, 'Die Volksblad' and 'Die Burger', on 2 February 2016. We received responses from about half a dozen individuals in South Africa, and our RA was able to meet and interview some of these respondents.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B192jIky9mauUzB0YjM1VnFQYWc/view
 
Description Volksblad article 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The project team were interviewed by 'Die Volksblad' newspaper, South Africa's oldest Afrikaans-language newspaper, to coincide with the launch of the project exhibition 'War Without Glamour: The Life and Legacy of Emily Hobhouse' at the Free State Arts Festival in Bloemfontein, South Africa. The resulting article, which appeared on 5 July 2019, commented favourably on the exhibition.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.pressreader.com/south-africa/volksblad/20190705/page/15/textview
 
Description WHN Conference Paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Helen Dampier and Rebecca Gill presented an academic paper entitled "'A Powerful Peace Document'? Emily Hobhouse and Tant' Alie of the Transvaal: Her Diary 1880-1902", at the Women's History Network Conference, University of Birmingham in September 2017. Discussion with the audience of about 25 academics and postgraduate students prompted us to revise parts of our paper in reworking it for publication as a journal article. The conference was also an opportunity to network with other professional historians, and to publicise our project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Whitley Lecture 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Rebecca Gill delivered the annual Whitley lecture at the University of Huddersfield. This drew on the Hobhouse project research and was entitled 'Emily Hobhouse and the feeding of 'enemy' children after the First World War: some Whitley connections'. The lecture enabled new connections to be made which brought our project research to a wider local and national audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018