Cultural leadership and the place of the artist

Lead Research Organisation: The Robert Gordon University
Department Name: Grays School of Art

Abstract

Context
This project aims to inform conceptual understanding of cultural leadership amongst artists and policy makers and to influence the long term direction of leadership development training in the sector. The proposal aims to develop awareness, use and impact of two related research projects: the Artist as Leader (AHRC funded 2006-8, PI Douglas, RA Fremantle) and Discourses of Cultural Leadership (IDEAS/RGU funded doctoral research, 2012-15, Price).

The Artist as Leader studied the processes through which artists shape their art forms, their sector's organisations and the wider public sphere. It involved contributions from artists and policy makers including senior leaders from Creative Scotland, Arts Council England, Southbank Centre, Jerwood Foundation, Scottish Government and British Council. The research was acknowledged by the national Clore Leadership Programme as influential in establishing dedicated Artist Fellowships among its opportunities. Ongoing relevance is demonstrated by continuing investment in cultural leadership by public and voluntary organisations in the UK and internationally.

However, the high level of demand for non-academic professional engagement with the research was not originally foreseen. Moreover, cultural sector circumstances changed rapidly in the aftermath of the Artist as Leader report's publication, with the implications of the global economic crisis creating political and financial upheaval. The economic growth and cultural sector investment which had framed initial work was replaced with a climate of cuts, resilience and survival.

The need to follow-up Artist as Leader was recognised by RGU in 2012 with investment in doctoral research responding to these altered contexts. This built on the Artist as Leader's framework for analysis, focusing on the now established term 'cultural leadership' (including libraries/heritage practice) and exploring relationships between this and the 'artist as leader' concept.

Aims and objectives
While the research has been updated, the professional network currently lacks opportunities to work through its implications for policy and practice. There is a need to develop pathways for engagement and to maximise the impact of both research projects. This demand is compounded by challenges currently facing the cultural sector in terms of relationships to public funding, pressures to develop new organisational models, and adjustments to roles and relationships necessitated by change.

The project aims to meet both this demand and an additional need identified through Discourses of Cultural Leadership in learning from different national contexts, building cross-cultural expertise. The project creates a partnership actively responding to the core research issues, discussing and disseminating its findings and establishing practical applications of its analytical methodology.

Partnership, activities and outcomes
The project will operate over 12 months from October 2015. Non-academic partners are the Clore Leadership Programme, Creative Scotland, the European Network of Cultural Administration Training Centres (ENCATC); additional interest is confirmed from BOZAR (Brussels) as a collaborating venue. These organisations and their networks will be engaged through a series of 3 one-day knowledge exchange events in London, Edinburgh and Brussels (25 participants at each) which will inform the development of sector-specific communications representing the research to wider networks of artists and organisational leaders. Responses to these initiatives, together with event discussions and ongoing feedback from our partners, will inform the direction of future research. A new web site will be developed to present the research, events and discussions. The event structure is based on previous labs held within the Artist as Leader work, including an Artist in Residence tasked with ensuring creative responses to the process and generating critical reflection.

Planned Impact

The project firstly benefits direct attendees at events, including representatives of partner organisations plus local sectors invited through partners' networks. It also reaches wider networks accessible through partner organisations via the dissemination of publications and research presentations/web resources. Partners include policy makers (Creative Scotland) and leadership specialists (Clore, ENCATC) with extensive reach to artists, cultural organisations and training providers (including 127 ENCATC members in 40 countries; 270 current and former Clore Fellows; CS network of 26,000 newsletter subscribers). By connecting influential stakeholders who would not otherwise exchange views the project aims to stimulate debate and new approaches to cultural leadership policy. The networks will produce direct engagement at events from over 60 artists/leaders.

Expected project impacts are planned according to a structured theory of knowledge exchange (Meagher et al. 2008):

Capacity building (increased knowledge of policy makers/practitioners):
1. contributing research and focus for engagement to existing networks (Clore, ENCATC, CS)
2. involving policy makers and training providers in models of leadership developed within the research, demonstrating how artists and cultural leaders contribute critically to organisational and social development through closer involvement in policy processes
3. opening up critical skills of artists to understand wider contextual circumstances, including socio-economic and political
4. supporting the network to share 'bite-sized' expertise through newsletters and ongoing communication
5. engaging policy makers and academics with case studies of leadership through practice, offered by practitioners in organisational/civic contexts, to support ongoing learning (through and beyond the project duration)

Instrumental (new ways of working/policy changes):
1. supporting more nuanced readings of participants' projects and experiences in relation to the models and issues developed from the Artist as Leader
2. influencing the formation and content of the proposed ENCATC European Cultural Leadership training programme (in development over the next 12-24 months). The precedent of Clore's institution of Artist Fellowships, following the first phase of Artist as Leader, shows how such effects can emerge.
3. influencing the formation of policy by nuancing the understanding of leadership (including the evolution of Creative Scotland's 10 year plan)
4. creating a pathway for mutual influence between UK and European initiatives

Conceptual (seeing things differently):
1. generating encounters between different stakeholder perspectives, and constructive challenge of existing frames of references, through the event based knowledge exchange process
2. opening dialogue around the meaning of cultural leadership and the needs of the sector in changing circumstances through engagement with the research and its methodology
3. stimulating artist responses via links to practice through Clore and Creative Scotland similar to how Clore Fellow Joshua Sofaer responded to Artist as Leader (http://www.joshuasofaer.com/2012/12/artistasleader/)

Attitudinal (willingness to collaborate across sectors):
1. developing exchange and collaboration between academic and non-academic specialists
2. offering a model for working across sectors, practices and national outlooks

Enduring connectivity (lasting relationships):
1. sustaining the core partnership during the 12 month process of the project and establishing potential for future collaboration (within the RA role).
2. taking forward existing relationships, building on the trust and common interests already established through both pieces of research.

The conceptual, attitudinal and enduring impacts aim towards the long term and sow seeds for further work. All outcomes are delivered at the levels of partners, event participants and extended networks.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Artist in residency 
Description The research engaged an artist in residence to join the programme in a series of international conversations about cultural leadership, to help us capture and interpret perspectives from research, creative practice and cultural policy. We were interested in applications from any art form. We were not seeking a polished artwork but the involvement of an artistic process in the creation of new knowledge. We develop an open call (deadline 22.1.2016) and received 22 applications from music, environmental arts, performing arts, dance, creative writing, photography and sound art. The level of application was high and international - UK, Spain, Netherlands, Romania, Australia, Malta, Austria and Lithuania. The selection panel included Douglas (PI), Fremantle (CoI) and Price (SRF). The criteria for selection included understanding of the research context, previous work i.e. experience and quality of the proposal in response to our brief and its framing in the research topic: cultural leadership and the place of the artist. Rosanna Irvine,a dancer with a practice-led PhD, was appointed and joined the research team in the Spring 2016. As artist in residence, Irvine attended the four seminars through this phase of the research and supported the core team in the development of each seminar. She was present as witness and as participant. She offered a different participatory artistic intervention for each seminar. Each intervention set out to be an embodied investigation to complement the more discursive elements of workshop delivery. She drew on the discussions and aspects of the theoretical framework that was emerging through the research. Drawing on Arendt's notion of leading as both beginning and following through, Irvine challenged how particular artistic processes might change how we experience ourselves acting - and how they might forge a 'leading' - in the world. Each intervention focused on the physical dimension of the discussion as an aspect of its content. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Each created a different rhythm to the discussion, inviting us to pay attention to the human dynamics and quality of encounter across the four events. Irvine created a detailed account of her residency in the project blog - https://ontheedgeresearch.org/category/leadership/ 
URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/category/leadership/
 
Description Through this grant we have developed an international community of researchers and practitioners engaged with cultural leadership development and concerned with the position of artists in relation to cultural management, policy and training. As this award was Follow-On Funding for Impact and Engagement, its outcomes are less to do with new findings and more to do with developing awareness and understanding of the research and exploring connections with burgeoning international discourse in research, policy and practice related to this topic.

The main achievement of the project was therefore to generate sustained cross-sectoral engagement with the Artist as Leader research and with its ideas and legacy at UK, European and international levels. The project also allowed the research team to reconsider the value of the research and, by involving participants in critical dialogue around the central concepts in the context of sectoral change, to unlock its contemporary resonance and retest its analytical tools.

The process included successful delivery of the planned events, facilitating debate and creating new connections, not only between UK researchers and professional practice in the cultural sector, but also with European artists, researchers and policy makers. It proved particularly important to establish a place in European and indeed global discourse on cultural leadership during a year in which the topic has been a key concern for major professional and policy networks such as IFACCA and ENCATC.

Additional achievements included development of a methodology for engagement which allowed active reinterpretation of the research and its significance. The project also allowed us to link up different phases of research which has unfolded over a 10 year period, retrieving hidden impacts from earlier forms of engagement: in Edinburgh, we heard how Matt Hulse had transformed his approach to film making after attending the Artist as Leader residential lab in 2008, and in London we discovered how the Clore Leadership Programme instigated its 'Artist Fellowships' in response to the 2009 Research Report. At the same time, Joshua Sofaer's personal research into the Artist as Leader concept came face to face with Susan Benn's original impetus for the lab events, and our principle of putting artists at the heart of enquiries into leadership in their sector was embodied throughout with Rosanna Irvine's provocative and thoughtful interventions in each of the seminar events.

The award also resulted in connecting research team members to wider international platforms for sharing the research and participating in debate. This has helped to position this UK research as pivotal in shaping understanding of a key concept in cultural practice and policy at exactly the time when it has begun to come under wider European and global scrutiny. Without this project, our voice would very likely have been sidelined or overlooked in these debates. As it is, we have been able to discover the unusual value of bringing into policy discourse a long term research trajectory which cuts across immediate economic or political agendas and specific sectoral crises. We are now positioned to continue those conversations with key European players.
Exploitation Route The findings of this work can be taken forward by artists, cultural organisations, researchers into cultural policy and arts practice, policy makers and training providers. Interest in the work has been developed both within and beyond academia.

For cultural practitioners, the relevance of the work is as a framework for critical analysis of practice in relation to societal, organisational and political pressures. This potential has been tested repeatedly through the seminar events and clearly illustrated by encounters with artists who have reviewed their practice in relation to the earlier phases of the research.

For researchers, the exploration of values and assumptions contained within cultural leadership discourse provides grounding for further analysis of training provision and related policies.

Relevance for policy makers is already apparent from events such as ENCATC's Policy Debate and IFACCA's World Summit on cultural leadership in 2016, which have already drawn on the research to inform understanding of the topic as future research and training agendas are shaped.

The relevance of the work for training providers has already been recognised through specific invitations for research team members to present ideas from the research at professional development programmes in the UK and Europe.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/cultural-leadership-and-the-place-of-the-artist-2015-16/
 
Description We have applied Dr Laura Meagher's five point impact framework to the project both at the point of application and here, in reporting as follows: building capacity, conceptual, instrumental, attitudinal and durational impacts. We built capacity, increasing the knowledge of policy makers and practitioners by informing them of the research undertaken and invited each participant to contribute thoughts, views and experiences of cultural leadership from within their particular experiences. We folded key points of learning iteratively into the subsequent events. Unlike the dominant discourses on leadership based in management, we offered a different conceptual approach informed by arts practices on the ground and their resonance and dissonance with current theoretical perspectives (e.g. Arendt's theories of action in political philosophy and Gielen's theories of culture and the arts in sociology). Our case studies of artists as leaders demonstrated a diversity of ways in which some artists have challenged themselves to engage in issues such as ecology and climate change. In this way we provided high level, well researched examples with which participants engaged critically. Both through the content and method deployed within the project's event structure, we challenged the participating artists to engage in wider societal developments and challenged cultural organisations and policy makers to consider in what ways the different forms of expertise (artistic, organizational and at a policy level) give form to culture and systems of value. In terms of new ways of working, instrumental impact is evidenced in the various invitations, mainly from the European partners (ENCATC, IETM and University of Groningen's COST network) for Price (SRF) to deliver keynotes, lead panel discussions and participate in a new funding proposal. While the research did not set out to produce a 'tool box' for leadership training, it did seek to influence what such training might be. The organization Natverkstan (Gothenburg) have sought Price (SRF)'s input in restructuring their leadership training, responding swiftly to the potential of the research for practice. ENCATC's president, Schramme, has cited the research as a new conceptual underpinning the organisation's future approach to training (IFACCA conference 2016). At the London event Sept 2016 Clore Leadership programme clearly acknowledged the influence that the earlier Artist as Leader research (2006-9) had already exerted in terms of underpinning their Artist Fellowship programme. While the Fellowship programme to this point had focused on portfolio artistic development, Clore indicated that they were now keen to move forward in particular connecting artists with non-art sectors. In terms of durational and attitudinal impacts, we set out to develop a discourse that could slowly gather momentum. The underpinning research has a long tail spanning over 10 years. By revisiting some of the original partners and involving them in this new phase, by demonstrating clearly how the research had evolved in relation to distinctive periods of cultural change (progressive, resilient, oppressive), we were able to effectively build trust and confidence across academic and non academic partners. We managed to sustain the interest and participation of the core partnership across the year. We gathered three new significant partners into the programme in the form of participating 'venues'. These event sites were meaningful in drawing into the research, related activities (exhibitions) and communities of interest that had not previously been involved (Woodend Barn, BOZAR, Wellcome Trust). By regularly updating the web log through diverse voices, including the key partners, we expanded the reach of the research, effectively doubling the number of followers beyond the event structure. Influence on sectoral understanding and development around the topic is evidenced not only through the various invitations received by team members to present further at major conferences and courses but also by the extensive references to the research in Prof. Annick Schramme's overview of European cultural leadership provided to the International Federation of Arts Councils and Creative Agencies' World Summit in Malta during October 2016. In this way the research has become part of the background understanding of cultural leadership as a topic for the professional sector internationally at a senior level. The research has co-incided with Brexit and the implications for future partnerships in Europe is unclear. However, we have picked up very positive indications that future partnerships are welcome, not least via the COST network.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Cultural leadership training
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The project's Senior Research Fellow, Jon Price, was invited as a result of the activities of the project to contribute directly to two major cultural leadership training programmes: Natverkstan's 'Kulturverkstan' course for emerging cultural leaders in Gothenburg (SE), and King's College London's 'Leading Culture in the 21st Century' international programme for established global leaders (forthcoming, April 2017). As well as delivering a session to the Gothenburg participants (about 30 young cultural managers) in December 2016 which introduced numerous concepts from the last 10 years of research, Price also met with Natverkstan staff and organisers to further discuss relationships between their programmes and the research trajectory. Dialogue remains open. Both relationships provide the opportunity to apply research arising from and following the Artist as Leader programme of 2006-9 to contemporary sectoral development at international level, directly influencing the ways in which these professionals understanding, interpret and carry out their roles. These new sessions have in particular been designed to share practical analytical techniques relevant to professional leadership practice in the cultural sector. Each of these opportunities derives directly from connections made within the present project and each offers the potential for continued connections and influence.
URL http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/executive-education/Leadingculture.aspx
 
Description IFACCA World Summit discussion paper
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL http://media.ifacca.org/files/DiscussionPaper2016.pdf
 
Description Artists Practising Well
Amount £2,500 (GBP)
Organisation The Clore Leadership Programme 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Title Iterative dissemination methodology 
Description The dissemination methodology developed in this research offers a number of distinctive qualities that break with the conventions of academic research and address our stated aim to reach and affect communities of practice across the arts and culture. At each event we established a well -informed research foundation to the discussion by articulating the two earlier stages of the research: Artist as Leader 2006-8 (Douglas& Fremantle) and The Discourse of Cultural Leadership, Price's PhD study 2012-16. Both of these periods of research had been developed with strong links with cultural and artistic communities, predominantly but not exclusively in the UK. We judged appropriate levels of detail and voice, adjusting with each event how to communicate the academic research in ways that would be compelling and meaningful to the fields of practice (arts, curatorship, arts administration, cultural policy) represented by the participants. We developed through an iterative process, a framework for thinking about cultural leadership and the place of the artist informed by theory (e.g. Arendt, Holden & Hewison, Gielen) and by key practices, offering a new case study at each event - Barenboim at the Barn, John Newling in Edinburgh, Helen Mayer and Newton Harrison in Brussels and Matt Hulse in London. In this way our own thinking as researchers was consistently challenged and developed, particularly through the feedback from participants both in earlier sessions and within each session. Each participating community was distinctive, not just in terms of geography but also in terms of area of cultural practice: The Barn event focused on a particular rural arts organisation, its Board and wider relations with the regional academic and community council sectors. The Edinburgh event (hosted by Creative Scotland) focused on the arts and environment. The Brussels event (hosted by ENCATC) drew participants from across the arts - visual, music and performance and also drew leaders of key organisations across UK and predominantly Europe. The London event (hosted by Clore leadership programme connected individuals from earlier stages of the research in particular the Artist as Leader (2006-9) with new organisations and individuals many of whom had benefitted from Clore Fellowship programme . Through these interconnections it became clear that the original research had underpinned the founding of the Clore fellowship programme. Each of the host organisations were invited to guide both the venue and invitation lists. The choice of venues set out consciously to add value and meaning to the research and its dissemination. This worked particularly well for the Barn pilot (Aberdeenshire), Bozar in Brussels and the Wellcome Trust, London. In both Bozar and Wellcome we were able to link the content with the current exhibitions, Bedlam and Facing the Future Art in Europe 1945-68 respectively. The physical environment therefore resonated with the content we were discussing, further developing the dissemination process as an experience of learning. Finally, the artist in residence focused further on the psycho-physical aspects of encounter, the need to deeply listen and be aware of others engaging in the discussion in quite different ways. It reminded us that creativity lay at the heart of our discussion. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact As well as addressing our audiences in active ways which have maximised their engagement with the research, this method has allowed us to evolve our own understanding of the research through the process of sharing it. This in turn opens up new avenues for possible new work and allows us to respond to the rapidly changing political and cultural circumstances which have recast some of the key questions around leadership and cultural policy during the course of the last year. We have identified the need to articulate this process in a more formal way so as to be able to share its potential with other researchers. This is at an early stage, but an immediate context in which this may become possible is within the COST project partnership currently seeking European funding for network based research dissemination activity. 
 
Description Cultural leadership and the place of the Artist: core partners 
Organisation Creative Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The partnership was assembled by the research team through connections established by project co-ordinator Jonathan Price in earlier stages of the research. The research team therefore introduced the partners to each other and generated new relationships and dialogue between them. The team introduced partners to the research and created opportunities for access to it by partners' networks. The partnership was co-ordinated by the research team and each of the three main project events was held in collaboration with one partner. Price also contributed keynote talks to two events run or hosted by ENCATC during the course of the project, connecting the research with their wider network of members.
Collaborator Contribution All partners contributed staff time towards attendance at events and support for event production. Creative Scotland sent officers to our Banchory (March 2016), Edinburgh (May) and Brussels (July) events, contributing more than three full days of officer time and all related travel and accommodation costs. They also made their Head of Engagement and Head of Research available for a planning meeting in Edinburgh (February) and supplied network details for invitation lists for the Edinburgh event. Creative Scotland's events team also advised on venue options and catering for the Edinburgh event, while their communications team tweeted about events and included details in newsletters. Creative Scotland's Head of Research also attended a presentation about the project given to the International Conference on Cultural Policy Research in Seoul in July 2016. ENCATC sent their President, Professor Annick Schramme, to our Edinburgh and Brussels events and another member of staff to the London event (September 2016). The Brussels event was also attended by their Secretary-General, Gianna Lia Cogliandro Beyens, and by two other members of staff who supported with photography, social media and welcoming guests. ENCATC therefore contributed more than 5 full days of staff time to the project as well as advising on guest lists for Brussels and providing access to their network. ENCATC supported communications through social media and newsletters circulated to their 130 member organisations in over 40 countries. They held two additional events about European Cultural Leadership in Brussels (including their annual policy debate) at which the project was presented to their members, and created a slot at their annual conference (October 2016) to further present the research. The Clore Leadership Programme sent representatives to Brussels and London, contributing two full days of staff time as well as relevant travel and accommodation costs. They advised on guest lists for London and provided access to their network, sending out some of the invitations directly. They also provided an introduction to the Wellcome Trust, allowing us to secure provision of a high value central London venue free of charge.
Impact Price, J. 2016. 'Locating cultural leadership'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Masterclass on European Cultural Leadership, Brussels, 22nd March. (Opening address defining challenges for a day of debate on leadership training provision in the European cultural sector). Price, J. 2016. 'Cultural leadership and the role of the artist'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Annual Policy Debate, Brussels, 22nd June. (Opening address and contribution to panel sessions for major European policy debate around cultural leadership). Price, J. 2016. 'Evolving cultural leadership: lessons from policy, practice and training'. Paper presented to International Conference on Cultural Policy Research, Seoul, 7th July. (Outlining the full trajectory of the research to an international academic audience). Fremantle, C., Douglas, A. & Price J. 2016. 'Authorship and leadership'. Article submitted to Harvard Business Review (acceptance pending), 1st September. (Exploring relevance of the research for a wider business context). Price, J. 2016. 'Leadership in culture'. Panel session with Schramme, A. (chair), Nabben, I. & Verhallen, M. at ENCATC Annual Conference, Valencia, 5th October. (Discussing cultural, educational and training implications of the research in a European context). Douglas, A. 2016 Leading Cultures of Transition through arts practice (invited keynote), Seminar Tiempos de Transicion, el lugar de los humanidados ante la crisis ecologico-social, Polytechnico Universidad di Valencia 28-30 November 2016.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Cultural leadership and the place of the Artist: core partners 
Organisation European Network on Cultural Management and Policy
Country Belgium 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution The partnership was assembled by the research team through connections established by project co-ordinator Jonathan Price in earlier stages of the research. The research team therefore introduced the partners to each other and generated new relationships and dialogue between them. The team introduced partners to the research and created opportunities for access to it by partners' networks. The partnership was co-ordinated by the research team and each of the three main project events was held in collaboration with one partner. Price also contributed keynote talks to two events run or hosted by ENCATC during the course of the project, connecting the research with their wider network of members.
Collaborator Contribution All partners contributed staff time towards attendance at events and support for event production. Creative Scotland sent officers to our Banchory (March 2016), Edinburgh (May) and Brussels (July) events, contributing more than three full days of officer time and all related travel and accommodation costs. They also made their Head of Engagement and Head of Research available for a planning meeting in Edinburgh (February) and supplied network details for invitation lists for the Edinburgh event. Creative Scotland's events team also advised on venue options and catering for the Edinburgh event, while their communications team tweeted about events and included details in newsletters. Creative Scotland's Head of Research also attended a presentation about the project given to the International Conference on Cultural Policy Research in Seoul in July 2016. ENCATC sent their President, Professor Annick Schramme, to our Edinburgh and Brussels events and another member of staff to the London event (September 2016). The Brussels event was also attended by their Secretary-General, Gianna Lia Cogliandro Beyens, and by two other members of staff who supported with photography, social media and welcoming guests. ENCATC therefore contributed more than 5 full days of staff time to the project as well as advising on guest lists for Brussels and providing access to their network. ENCATC supported communications through social media and newsletters circulated to their 130 member organisations in over 40 countries. They held two additional events about European Cultural Leadership in Brussels (including their annual policy debate) at which the project was presented to their members, and created a slot at their annual conference (October 2016) to further present the research. The Clore Leadership Programme sent representatives to Brussels and London, contributing two full days of staff time as well as relevant travel and accommodation costs. They advised on guest lists for London and provided access to their network, sending out some of the invitations directly. They also provided an introduction to the Wellcome Trust, allowing us to secure provision of a high value central London venue free of charge.
Impact Price, J. 2016. 'Locating cultural leadership'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Masterclass on European Cultural Leadership, Brussels, 22nd March. (Opening address defining challenges for a day of debate on leadership training provision in the European cultural sector). Price, J. 2016. 'Cultural leadership and the role of the artist'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Annual Policy Debate, Brussels, 22nd June. (Opening address and contribution to panel sessions for major European policy debate around cultural leadership). Price, J. 2016. 'Evolving cultural leadership: lessons from policy, practice and training'. Paper presented to International Conference on Cultural Policy Research, Seoul, 7th July. (Outlining the full trajectory of the research to an international academic audience). Fremantle, C., Douglas, A. & Price J. 2016. 'Authorship and leadership'. Article submitted to Harvard Business Review (acceptance pending), 1st September. (Exploring relevance of the research for a wider business context). Price, J. 2016. 'Leadership in culture'. Panel session with Schramme, A. (chair), Nabben, I. & Verhallen, M. at ENCATC Annual Conference, Valencia, 5th October. (Discussing cultural, educational and training implications of the research in a European context). Douglas, A. 2016 Leading Cultures of Transition through arts practice (invited keynote), Seminar Tiempos de Transicion, el lugar de los humanidados ante la crisis ecologico-social, Polytechnico Universidad di Valencia 28-30 November 2016.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Cultural leadership and the place of the Artist: core partners 
Organisation The Clore Leadership Programme
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The partnership was assembled by the research team through connections established by project co-ordinator Jonathan Price in earlier stages of the research. The research team therefore introduced the partners to each other and generated new relationships and dialogue between them. The team introduced partners to the research and created opportunities for access to it by partners' networks. The partnership was co-ordinated by the research team and each of the three main project events was held in collaboration with one partner. Price also contributed keynote talks to two events run or hosted by ENCATC during the course of the project, connecting the research with their wider network of members.
Collaborator Contribution All partners contributed staff time towards attendance at events and support for event production. Creative Scotland sent officers to our Banchory (March 2016), Edinburgh (May) and Brussels (July) events, contributing more than three full days of officer time and all related travel and accommodation costs. They also made their Head of Engagement and Head of Research available for a planning meeting in Edinburgh (February) and supplied network details for invitation lists for the Edinburgh event. Creative Scotland's events team also advised on venue options and catering for the Edinburgh event, while their communications team tweeted about events and included details in newsletters. Creative Scotland's Head of Research also attended a presentation about the project given to the International Conference on Cultural Policy Research in Seoul in July 2016. ENCATC sent their President, Professor Annick Schramme, to our Edinburgh and Brussels events and another member of staff to the London event (September 2016). The Brussels event was also attended by their Secretary-General, Gianna Lia Cogliandro Beyens, and by two other members of staff who supported with photography, social media and welcoming guests. ENCATC therefore contributed more than 5 full days of staff time to the project as well as advising on guest lists for Brussels and providing access to their network. ENCATC supported communications through social media and newsletters circulated to their 130 member organisations in over 40 countries. They held two additional events about European Cultural Leadership in Brussels (including their annual policy debate) at which the project was presented to their members, and created a slot at their annual conference (October 2016) to further present the research. The Clore Leadership Programme sent representatives to Brussels and London, contributing two full days of staff time as well as relevant travel and accommodation costs. They advised on guest lists for London and provided access to their network, sending out some of the invitations directly. They also provided an introduction to the Wellcome Trust, allowing us to secure provision of a high value central London venue free of charge.
Impact Price, J. 2016. 'Locating cultural leadership'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Masterclass on European Cultural Leadership, Brussels, 22nd March. (Opening address defining challenges for a day of debate on leadership training provision in the European cultural sector). Price, J. 2016. 'Cultural leadership and the role of the artist'. Keynote delivered to ENCATC Annual Policy Debate, Brussels, 22nd June. (Opening address and contribution to panel sessions for major European policy debate around cultural leadership). Price, J. 2016. 'Evolving cultural leadership: lessons from policy, practice and training'. Paper presented to International Conference on Cultural Policy Research, Seoul, 7th July. (Outlining the full trajectory of the research to an international academic audience). Fremantle, C., Douglas, A. & Price J. 2016. 'Authorship and leadership'. Article submitted to Harvard Business Review (acceptance pending), 1st September. (Exploring relevance of the research for a wider business context). Price, J. 2016. 'Leadership in culture'. Panel session with Schramme, A. (chair), Nabben, I. & Verhallen, M. at ENCATC Annual Conference, Valencia, 5th October. (Discussing cultural, educational and training implications of the research in a European context). Douglas, A. 2016 Leading Cultures of Transition through arts practice (invited keynote), Seminar Tiempos de Transicion, el lugar de los humanidados ante la crisis ecologico-social, Polytechnico Universidad di Valencia 28-30 November 2016.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Venue partnerships 
Organisation Centre for Fine Arts
Country Belgium 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Each of the three venues was contacted by the project's co-ordinator, Jon Price (Senior Research Fellow). The Wellcome Trust was suggested through our core partner the Clore Leadership Programme, who had an existing relationship with the venue. Jon Price met with venue staff and discussed the event to explore relationships with the Trust's own interests in the main topics. An invitation was extended for Trust staff to attend the event and other attendees were directed towards a new Wellcome Trust Collection exhibition which opened the same day in their adjacent building. Woodend Barn staff and board members were invited to develop a relationship with the project by hosting a pilot event additional to the originally planned schedule. This allowed us to try out presentation formats while also extending an existing relationship between the Barn and Gray's School of Art. Jon Price and Anne Douglas met with the Barn's Chair and Director in advance to discuss the aims of the project and the nature of the research, which were felt to be complementary with the Barn's cultural and community development commitments through which, as an institution, it plays a range of leadership roles locally. The Barn was given the opportunity to invite interested people from its network to take part alongside contributors from Gray's and its contact lists. This allowed both organisations to benefit from bringing together two communities and adding a specific research based event to the Barn's creative programme. BOZAR were approached by Jon Price on the basis of a potentially complementary relationship between our research topics and the centre's discussion-based cultural events programme. Price met with senior BOZAR staff in Brussels the year before the event and corresponded regularly with them subsequently. BOZAR included the event in their discussion room programme on the basis of their own enquiries into leadership and the role of art in cultural change. The discussion room is a publicly accessible space immediately outside the centre's main exhibition rooms, so passing attendees could stop and listen to parts of the debate. This animated BOZAR's 'Facing the Future' exhibition, which we also facilitated all seminar participants to visit.
Collaborator Contribution The Wellcome Trust hosted the project's London seminar, providing conference rooms and technical support at their Euston headquarters as an in-kind contribution. The ability to take the project to these centrally located, high quality premises added significantly to the presentation and status of the event, and the setting received positive comments from participants. Woodend Barn hosted the project's pilot event in Banchory. We hired the space at the normal rate, but staff time was provided by their Director (attending the seminar for half a day and attending an earlier planning meeting), three of their board members (also attending the event, plus the board chair attending a planning meeting) and their technician (assisting with recording and photography). BOZAR, the flagship fine arts centre in Brussels, hosted our Belgian seminar. Space was provided free of charge in the central 'Discussion room' space set up within their 'Imagine Europe' exhibition programme. This provided a high profile setting for our debate and assisted us greatly in attracting representatives of major European cultural networks. Space in BOZAR is notoriously difficult to secure (and the commercial rates are expensive) so this was a high value contribution on many levels. Contextualising the seminar in relation to Bozar's wider European discussion programme added further resonance, especially as we were one of the first events to use the space (and the first British-led event) after the Brexit referendum.
Impact 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar Woodend Barn Arts Centre, Banchory, 14th March (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and trustees) 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, BOZAR (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and cultural networks) Brussels, 12th July 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, Wellcome Trust, London, 15th September (combining artists, researchers, training organisations and cultural organisations)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Venue partnerships 
Organisation Wellcome Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Each of the three venues was contacted by the project's co-ordinator, Jon Price (Senior Research Fellow). The Wellcome Trust was suggested through our core partner the Clore Leadership Programme, who had an existing relationship with the venue. Jon Price met with venue staff and discussed the event to explore relationships with the Trust's own interests in the main topics. An invitation was extended for Trust staff to attend the event and other attendees were directed towards a new Wellcome Trust Collection exhibition which opened the same day in their adjacent building. Woodend Barn staff and board members were invited to develop a relationship with the project by hosting a pilot event additional to the originally planned schedule. This allowed us to try out presentation formats while also extending an existing relationship between the Barn and Gray's School of Art. Jon Price and Anne Douglas met with the Barn's Chair and Director in advance to discuss the aims of the project and the nature of the research, which were felt to be complementary with the Barn's cultural and community development commitments through which, as an institution, it plays a range of leadership roles locally. The Barn was given the opportunity to invite interested people from its network to take part alongside contributors from Gray's and its contact lists. This allowed both organisations to benefit from bringing together two communities and adding a specific research based event to the Barn's creative programme. BOZAR were approached by Jon Price on the basis of a potentially complementary relationship between our research topics and the centre's discussion-based cultural events programme. Price met with senior BOZAR staff in Brussels the year before the event and corresponded regularly with them subsequently. BOZAR included the event in their discussion room programme on the basis of their own enquiries into leadership and the role of art in cultural change. The discussion room is a publicly accessible space immediately outside the centre's main exhibition rooms, so passing attendees could stop and listen to parts of the debate. This animated BOZAR's 'Facing the Future' exhibition, which we also facilitated all seminar participants to visit.
Collaborator Contribution The Wellcome Trust hosted the project's London seminar, providing conference rooms and technical support at their Euston headquarters as an in-kind contribution. The ability to take the project to these centrally located, high quality premises added significantly to the presentation and status of the event, and the setting received positive comments from participants. Woodend Barn hosted the project's pilot event in Banchory. We hired the space at the normal rate, but staff time was provided by their Director (attending the seminar for half a day and attending an earlier planning meeting), three of their board members (also attending the event, plus the board chair attending a planning meeting) and their technician (assisting with recording and photography). BOZAR, the flagship fine arts centre in Brussels, hosted our Belgian seminar. Space was provided free of charge in the central 'Discussion room' space set up within their 'Imagine Europe' exhibition programme. This provided a high profile setting for our debate and assisted us greatly in attracting representatives of major European cultural networks. Space in BOZAR is notoriously difficult to secure (and the commercial rates are expensive) so this was a high value contribution on many levels. Contextualising the seminar in relation to Bozar's wider European discussion programme added further resonance, especially as we were one of the first events to use the space (and the first British-led event) after the Brexit referendum.
Impact 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar Woodend Barn Arts Centre, Banchory, 14th March (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and trustees) 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, BOZAR (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and cultural networks) Brussels, 12th July 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, Wellcome Trust, London, 15th September (combining artists, researchers, training organisations and cultural organisations)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Venue partnerships 
Organisation Woodend Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Each of the three venues was contacted by the project's co-ordinator, Jon Price (Senior Research Fellow). The Wellcome Trust was suggested through our core partner the Clore Leadership Programme, who had an existing relationship with the venue. Jon Price met with venue staff and discussed the event to explore relationships with the Trust's own interests in the main topics. An invitation was extended for Trust staff to attend the event and other attendees were directed towards a new Wellcome Trust Collection exhibition which opened the same day in their adjacent building. Woodend Barn staff and board members were invited to develop a relationship with the project by hosting a pilot event additional to the originally planned schedule. This allowed us to try out presentation formats while also extending an existing relationship between the Barn and Gray's School of Art. Jon Price and Anne Douglas met with the Barn's Chair and Director in advance to discuss the aims of the project and the nature of the research, which were felt to be complementary with the Barn's cultural and community development commitments through which, as an institution, it plays a range of leadership roles locally. The Barn was given the opportunity to invite interested people from its network to take part alongside contributors from Gray's and its contact lists. This allowed both organisations to benefit from bringing together two communities and adding a specific research based event to the Barn's creative programme. BOZAR were approached by Jon Price on the basis of a potentially complementary relationship between our research topics and the centre's discussion-based cultural events programme. Price met with senior BOZAR staff in Brussels the year before the event and corresponded regularly with them subsequently. BOZAR included the event in their discussion room programme on the basis of their own enquiries into leadership and the role of art in cultural change. The discussion room is a publicly accessible space immediately outside the centre's main exhibition rooms, so passing attendees could stop and listen to parts of the debate. This animated BOZAR's 'Facing the Future' exhibition, which we also facilitated all seminar participants to visit.
Collaborator Contribution The Wellcome Trust hosted the project's London seminar, providing conference rooms and technical support at their Euston headquarters as an in-kind contribution. The ability to take the project to these centrally located, high quality premises added significantly to the presentation and status of the event, and the setting received positive comments from participants. Woodend Barn hosted the project's pilot event in Banchory. We hired the space at the normal rate, but staff time was provided by their Director (attending the seminar for half a day and attending an earlier planning meeting), three of their board members (also attending the event, plus the board chair attending a planning meeting) and their technician (assisting with recording and photography). BOZAR, the flagship fine arts centre in Brussels, hosted our Belgian seminar. Space was provided free of charge in the central 'Discussion room' space set up within their 'Imagine Europe' exhibition programme. This provided a high profile setting for our debate and assisted us greatly in attracting representatives of major European cultural networks. Space in BOZAR is notoriously difficult to secure (and the commercial rates are expensive) so this was a high value contribution on many levels. Contextualising the seminar in relation to Bozar's wider European discussion programme added further resonance, especially as we were one of the first events to use the space (and the first British-led event) after the Brexit referendum.
Impact 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar Woodend Barn Arts Centre, Banchory, 14th March (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and trustees) 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, BOZAR (combining artists, policy makers, researchers and cultural networks) Brussels, 12th July 2016 Cultural Leadership and the place of the Artist; seminar, Wellcome Trust, London, 15th September (combining artists, researchers, training organisations and cultural organisations)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Announcement of Artist in Residence opportunity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The call relating to the project's Artist in Residence role was issued in February 2016. Full details were published on the On The Edge blog site (link below) and the call was publicised by partners Creative Scotland (in their nationwide newsletter) and ENCATC (via their twitter feed). The opportunity was reposted in several national and international arts websites (for example, see this Craft Scotland listing: http://tinyurl.com/h8l9qge). This led to a substantial national and international response, driving relevant traffic to the blog (the specialist call details were downloaded over 100 times) and increasing awareness of the research activity within a key professional audience - in addition to giving us a good pool of applicants from which to select the participating artist.

Several unsuccessful applicants also stayed in contact with the project, electing to receive further information and (in several cases) attending project events in Banchory and Edinburgh. This activity therefore led directly to sustained engagement with the research among professionals who would otherwise not have encountered it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/2016/02/04/artist-in-residence-call/
 
Description Article: Price, J. 2017. The construction of cultural leadership: concepts and critique. ENCATC Journal of Cultural Management and Policy, 7:1. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Encatc journal as an extensive readership internationally. This paper articulated key concepts underpinning the Cultural leadership research and has led to subsequent invitations to present at workshops and become part of an EU research grant proposal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.encatc.org/en/resources/encatc-journal/
 
Description Banchory pilot event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A pilot event was held in Banchory, Aberdeenshire, to try out ideas for our main dissemination seminars in Edinburgh, Brussels and London. This was hosted by Woodend Barn, a regional arts centre, establishing a new partnership within the project. About 20 people attended the half day event, including board members from the venue, artists (local and national), researchers (local and national), policy makers from Robert Gordon University and Aberdeen City Council, and a representative from our partner organisation Creative Scotland. As well as trialling presentation of the research and some exercises to stimulate discussion, this allowed us to promote the project locally and engage an additional audience within Scotland, including artists and researchers from as far afield as Glasgow.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/2016/04/01/questioning-cultural-leadership/
 
Description Brussels seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 25 professionals attended a one-day seminar at BOZAR, the flagship cultural centre of Brussels, on 12th July 2016. Relationships with the venue were carefully established by project co-ordinator Jon Price during the months leading up to the event, including 2 site visits and meeting with senior staff the previous autumn. The space is generally quite exclusive and colleagues from our Brussels based partners ENCATC remarked that they have themselves never yet managed to hold an event there. We were able to define a relationship between our form of enquiry and the venue's interest in opening up debate about key themes in European cultural development. The seminar was eventually held in BOZAR's dedicated 'discussion room', a programmed public space located adjacent to their main galleries. It was held in the context of the exhibition 'Facing the Future', in which parallels were drawn between art's role in re-imagining the world in the years following the second world war, and the particular challenges it faces in confronting the present period of political and economic upheaval. We recast our debate against this background and adjusted our presentations to suggest how the contemporary challenge of cultural leadership can be interpreted as grappling with these uncertainties, highlighting the specific role of artists in redefining the social and political relevance of the sector. Helped by the profile of our presence within BOZAR, we were able to attract representatives of other European cultural networks (IETM, EUNIC) alongside our project partners (ENCATC and the Clore Leadership Programme), researchers from the UK and Belgium, and professional cultural practitioners from various backgrounds. Nationalities represented included British, Belgian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Dutch, German, Italian and Polish.

Always conceived as an event to bridge divisions between British and European perspectives and discourse on leadership, the event happened to fall less than 3 weeks after the Brexit vote and was notable for being a British-led cultural debate taking place in the heart of Brussels at a peculiarly sensitive time. This gave the seminar further significance in both symbolic and practical ways: our commitment to making new connections in Europe and sharing ideas at this time was certainly appreciated by many European attendees while the opportunity to be part of this was valued by several of those who travelled from the UK.

Members of the public were able to encounter the event and listen in to parts of the debate as they passed the space on the way to the exhibitions. The debate also encouraged members of our own team to reflect differently on the research, re-examining the concepts and assumptions in the light of wider international agendas (e.g. Eastern European perspectives on the concept of leadership, the political role of the arts and the cultural significance of the financial crisis). Event feedback showed that we had introduced new concepts and historical understanding of cultural leadership development to many of those present, including thinking about the frequent absence of artists (either as contributors or priorities) in transnational cultural policy discourse.

Several tangible outcomes resulted:
- the network IETM subsequently invited Jon Price to be a panellist at their November 2016 Plenary event in Valencia, extending our direct contributions to European research and debate;
- IETM reported on the research in their members' newsletter, publishing a link to Price's PhD thesis which led to a substantial spike in access to our Open Air repository and further dissemination of the work;
- conversations with Dr Johan Kolsteeg were continued, leading towards a subsequent invitation to On The Edge Research to become a partner in a COST funding application aimed at raising the profile of cultural leadership research in the European policy agenda;
- the attendance of Kathleen Coessens (Brussels Conservatoire) led to her reflection on the debate and the ideas it generated in a later blog post for On The Edge (March 2017, forthcoming).
- the attendance of Kate Dunton (King's College London) began conversations that led to Jon Price being invited to talk at KCL's 'Leading Culture in the 21st Century' professional training programme in April 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description ENCATC Annual Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SRF Jonathan Price was an invited panellist for the session 'Leadership in Culture' during a dedicated member's day as part of the ENCATC annual conference held in Valencia during October 2016. Price spoke alongside two representatives from the Netherlands Leadership in Culture programme (Isalien Nabben and Marjolein Verhallen) in a session chaired by ENCATC President and Professor at the University of Antwerp/Antwerp Management School, Annick Schramme and attended by nearly 100 network members and special guests before participating in debate. This allowed highlighting of the research in front of a particularly relevant major international audience, many of whom are directly engaged in cultural management education. The session led to numerous further discussions in the succeeding days as well as requests for information about the research. Meanwhile, the final day of the conference saw the announcement of Price's shortlisting for the ENCATC Research Awards, leading to further interest in the work from several international participants.

A relationship was also established with several representatives of ENCATC's international partner The Association of Arts Administration Educators (AAAE). Price has subsequently developed a successful proposal for a panel session on leadership at AAAE's May 2017 conference in Edinburgh alongside AAAE board member Professor David Edelman (US) and Dr Sanja Petricic (RS).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.encatc.org/media/1277-encatc_ac_reader_2016.pdf
 
Description ENCATC Stakeholders' Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project activities were written about in articles in the ENCATC newsletter which went out to members and other stakeholders of this European and international network which operates in over 40 countries. This allowed presentation of the whole project to a major international interest group on several occasions as well as specific publicity about the project's seminar events. Our artist-in-residence call was also distributed further via this partnership, through the ENCATC twitter account, which led to several international submissions. Numerous ENCATC members or contacts subsequently requested further information, became informed about the research and attended the project's events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.encatc.org/media/821-encatc_digest_101.compressed.pdf
 
Description Edinburgh seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A group of 20 professional practitioners from the arts and cultural sector attended a full day workshop held at Edinburgh Methodist Church. Attendees included artists, leaders of arts organisations, representatives of partner organisations (Creative Scotland, ENCATC and Woodend Arts) with a particular emphasis on Scottish environmental artists. The group was, however, international in scope, with Annick Schramme of ENCATC travelling from Antwerp and film maker Matt Hulse coming from Beijing. Matt's previous involvement in the previous Artist as Leader research project, and his experience of changing his creative practice in response to engagement with the research, was a focal point for discussion. Matt subsequently reported an increased interest in relating research to practice. Annick Schramme reported a change in her understanding of who can be considered a leader in the arts, and expressed interest in the event methodology (use of a range of exercises, presentations and discussion formats). Other attendees reflected on their changed understanding of what is distinctive about arts leadership and therefore how to go about making change. The event is discussed on a blog post published shortly afterwards (see URL below). The event also informed development of the research team's approach to subsequent seminars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/2016/04/01/questioning-cultural-leadership/
 
Description IETM Plenary 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In November 2016 SRF Jonathan Price participated in an expert panel on training and education in arts and culture within the IETM Valencia Plenary Meeting, allowing exploration of how the leadership research can inform the development of the sector. This session provided an opportunity for further dissemination of the research to a professional audience, with the IETM theatre and performing arts network attracting mainly sectoral professionals to its main annual event. The invitation arose from IETM staff engagement at the project's Brussels seminar in July, their attendance of Price's keynote at the ENCATC Policy Debate the previous month, and Price's own participation in IETM's Satellite meeting in Paris in March 2016. As a result of the session Price was approached by attendees from Spain, France, the UK and the Czech Republic to follow up ideas and exchange contact details; in particular audience members reported changing their understanding of the processes through which leadership operates in culture in light of the analysis presented. This has generated additional interest in the research with a notable spike in downloads of research materials around the time of the event.

In the course of the event Price also established contacts with local festival organisation Cabanyal Intim, which he has now connected with London seminar attendees Space 2 to explore a possible project partnership in connection with the Leeds 2023 European Capital of Culture bid (in early stages as of March 2017).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.ietm.org/en/session/64/train-for-today-and-tomorrow
 
Description IFACCA World Summit on Arts & Culture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact SRF Jonathan Price attended the biennial summit of the International Federation of Arts Council and Creative Agencies which in Valletta during October 2016 took the topic of cultural leadership as its focus. Price therefore contributed a presentation to the conference's 'Open Session' programme which provided an opportunity to inform a wider international audience about the project (by then almost complete) and the trajectory of cultural leadership research. The conference was also attended by representatives of all of our project partners: Janet Archer, CEO of Creative Scotland (who attended Price's Open Session presentation); Sue Hoyle, Director of the Clore Leadership Programme (who spoke elsewhere), and Annick Schramme, who contributed a piece to the conference's discussion paper which heavily referenced and quoted our research (notably Price's thesis and June contribution to ENCATC's Policy Debate). Several attendees asked for further information about the research which Price followed up in correspondence subsequent to the conference. Attendance of the conference also allowed renewal of contact with international networks such as IETM and On The Move as well as providing the opportunity to see how international thinking on our core research topic had moved on during the course of the year. Price also took the opportunity to conduct a new research interview with Dea Vidovic from Croatia's Kultura Nova Foundation, following up a conversation begun at IETM's Paris Satellite event in March, to inform future writing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.artsummit.org/programme/open-sessions/
 
Description Initial media release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The research award was announced in an initial media release as a good news story for RGU and our partners. It was distributed via our press office to local, regional and national media (including arts trade press) and also sent to partners for use in their own networks. It was picked up by press outlets locally including Aberdeen Evening Express and featured on the Aberdeen and Grampian Chamber of Commerce website. It was also featured prominently on RGU's main website and the link promoted via social media. The announcement was noticed by several people acquainted with the research team particularly in the Scottish research sector, leading to requests for additional information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.rgu.ac.uk/news/scottish-researchers-scoop-international-cultural-leadership-project/
 
Description International Conference on Cultural Policy Research 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SRF Jonathan Price presented a paper at the ICCPR 2016 conference in Seoul (July 2016) to introduce the Artist as Leader and cultural leadership research trajectory to a wider international audience beyond Europe, also introducing new ideas on leadership that were emerging from the seminars and other engagement activities. Around 25 professionals and academics attended the session and the paper was also made available for download on the conference website. Price also promoted the work in conversation with numerous conference attendees, identifying potential invitees for the remaining project research seminars, and attending (by invitation) a session organised by Telemark University (NO) regarding potential collaboration on Horizon 2020 proposals.

An ironic bonus was that this conference allowed the work to be presented to our partner Creative Scotland's Head of Research, who was present in Korea but unable to make either of the events in Scotland. Also present was Jo Caust (University of Melbourne), who followed up the session by inviting Price to contribute a book chapter to the forthcoming second edition of Arts Leadership (Routledge) under her editorship.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://iccpr2016.sm.ac.kr/
 
Description Invited paper at international symposium: Embedded Artists Artists outside the world: the world in quest of artists. Nov 1st 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Anne Douglas presented on artistic leadership in the opening up of contemporary arts practice to public life to a selected group of international speakers including artists, economists, curators, academics and researchers at the University of the Arts, Zurich (ZHDK). This was the second international symposium organised by ZHDK and their research team looking into the changing nature of artistic practice and implications for pedagogy and economics. They (somewhat uniquely) drew together practitioners, practice-led researchers with economists and museum curators. Focus: This symposium focused on the concept of the Embedded Artist, a development in which individual artists, including Frances Whitehead, the keynote speaker, have pioneered approaches to artists working on societal issues with large institutions and organisations such as ecological restoration in the case of Whitehead working in Gary, Indiana, and Chicago US. The hosts were particularly interested in our research into cultural leadership and the place of the artist, how leadership (a term unpopular, if not distasteful to the arts sector but of interest in the economic sector) could be conceptualised and evidenced within the work of particular individuals, opening up the question of its appropriateness and relevance. It drew out a discussion about research approaches and US/UK- Europe differences. I drew on the theoretical framing of artistic and cultural leadership developed in this award period (2015-16). Of unexpected relevance was the practice-led research approach that bridged connections between practising artists with the economists, who were social scientists. Contributors included Professor Frances Whitehead, Art Institute Chicago; Daniel Baumann, Director, Kunsthalle, Zurich; Elisa Duca & Robin Detje, performance artists; Joanna Worokowicz, Indiana University (economics); John Davies, NESTA (economics); Ann Markusen, University of Minnesota, US (economics); Jens Badura (philosopher) Germany; Jochen Roller (choreographer) Germany; Kok Heung Leun (socially engaged theatre producer), Singapore. Ours hosts were Professor Harmut Wickert, Vice President of ZHDK and head of Theatre Studies and Frédéric Martel, Senior researcher. PhD and Masters level students from across Europe participated by leading the discussions. The presentation has resulted in a chapter in the forthcoming publication by ZHDK entitled The Embedded Artists Spring 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://artsunrelated.com/2019/01/19/embedded-artists-conference-zhdk-nov-2018/
 
Description Invited presentation and discussion 'Supervision and Support: A Collation of Questions, Findings, Resources from LAHF' by Nicola Naismith on 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an event hosted by London Arts in Health Forum instigated by Nicola Naismith, Clore Artist Fellow undertaking AHRC Funded Research Project with Gray's School of Art, RGU into the wellbeing of artists working in healthcare. This research was funded by the AHRC and hosted by Clore Leadership programme. Naismith had completed an artist fellowship with Clore and then undertook the research into wellbeing. Clore Leadership programme was one of four partners in the Cultural Leadership and the place of the artist research (this award) and had developed the Artist Fellowship strand of work in response to our research. Clore recommended our research team to Naismith on the basis on this research and its relevance to her own focus.

This event brought together a panel of artists, researchers and therapists to address the question of what forms of support artists working in health and wellbeing contexts need in order to practise well and avoid burnout, stress and emotional trauma. The event was attended by practitioners, organisational leaders and policy-makers working in healthcare. The event outcomes were summarised in a Report from London Arts in Health Forum which is available on their website and was highlighted through their newsletter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.lahf.org.uk/resources/supervision-and-support-collation-questions-finding-and-resources-l...
 
Description London seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was the third and final full day seminar held within this project, bringing our debate back to the UK, this time in the capital. This allowed us to engage with a new range of audiences, particularly building on connections with the Clore Leadership Programme, as several attendees were among their past and present Fellows. We also built further on connections with past research, inviting Susan Benn (formerly of PAL Labs), one of the original partners in the original Artist as Leader research. Among the Clore-related guests was artist Joshua Sofaer, who researched and wrote prominently on the Artist as Leader concept in the immediate wake of that research, but with whom dialogue had not previously been established by the research team. Five other attendees travelled from Leeds and Salford, ensuring that our English representation was not entirely London-centred. As well as a representative of ENCATC we also had international attendance from Swedish cultural development organisation Natverkstan (Gothenburg), a partner in the 'Fika' international cultural leadership programme, with whom we had been in discussion since Jon Price's attendance at ENCATC's seminar on cultural leadership in Brussels in March. This meant that this event featured rare dialogue across different national cultural leadership programmes, as the Clore Leadership Programme were this time represented by Fellowship director Sharon Armstrong-Williams. This led to more open and critical reflection on the key concepts by Clore than had seemed possible within the previous events. This allowed cultural professionals and researchers alike to better understand Clore's own recent evolution and relationship to the concepts and questions raised within the research.

This event was hosted by the Wellcome Trust, who provided us with superb meeting rooms at their central London headquarters, helping us to hold a high quality event affordably and accessibly. This followed discussions with Trust staff who had become interested in the central topic and their sense of its relevance and importance. Susan Benn's contributions allowed us to reflect on the initial impetus for the Artist as Leader research and understand further the ways in which challenges have evolved within the professional sector. The relationship of research to professional practice was discussed and what emerged was how rare and valuable it was for organisers to take time out and engage with fresh ideas.

In this respect, the attendance of three members of staff from Leeds-based arts organisation Space 2 has had particularly interesting outcomes. They have maintained contact with fellow attendees Susan Benn and Judith Knight (from London cultural venue Arts Admin) as they seek to explore links with like-minded professionals beyond their home city. As of March 2017 Judith Knight has agreed to serve on a Space 2 committee developing ideas towards the proposed Leeds 2023 European Capital of Culture bid. Space 2 have also reported that, following the discussion at this event, they engaged in a total rethink about the relationship between leadership and artistic practice within their company, leading to a proposed change of structure and governance model allowing greater autonomy for staff and renewed creative freedom for members of their management team. This has informed their approach going into a new NPO funding bid to Arts Council England. Meanwhile, Space 2 have subsequently engaged Jon Price for evaluation work aiming at a further re-examination of their practice, including in relation to complementary models of work in Europe. A possible partnership with Valencian cultural organisation Cabanyal Intim is now being explored, further to connections made through Price's panel presentation at the IETM Plenary meeting, which itself arose as a result of this project.

The London seminar has highlighted the value of cultural organisations being given serious opportunities to engage with research and with each other in a reflective environment. At this event, the ten-year trajectory begun by the Artist as Leader research was highlighted by the presence of individuals who have become involved in each of the three distinct stages of that process (2006-9: Artist as Leader - Douglas, Fremantle, Benn; 2010-15 new research and responses: Sofaer, Price; 2015-16 wider partnerships: Clore, Creative Scotland, ENCATC) as well as those who are continuing to take leadership development forward and who are rethinking it in the context of their own organisations and programmes (Clore, Natverkstan, Space 2).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description On The Edge blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The blogsite for On The Edge research featured regular articles about the project's activity promoted to a growing list of interested subscribers and reaching a wide range of site visitors (over 3500 unique viewers in 2016 alone from 100 countries globally, while direct subscriptions to the blog doubled during the project period). As well as articles from core staff members (Douglas, Fremantle and Price), a guest blog slot was instigated featuring valuable reflections on the engagement events, research ideas and personal creative practice. These included contributions from Matt Hulse, a film maker and participant in the initial Artist as Leader research, who reflected on changes made to his practice following engagement with that research on his return (from Beijing) to our Edinburgh event in May 2016. Our Artist in Residence, Rosanna Irvine, contributed the next piece, reflecting on her interventions in the events and the effects on her own understanding of artistic leadership. Articles are still being submitted: next in the series will be Kathleen Coessens (Brussels Conservatoire) who attended the Brussels event and has already submitted an article. Scottish eco-artists Tim Collins and Reiko Goto have also committed to providing writing in response to their attendance in Edinburgh and subsequent reflections. The blog articles have allowed us to record new ideas arising from the events in more informal ways than usually possible through the research process. They have allowed us to think in public and are part of the iterative dissemination methodology through which our own understanding of the research has evolved in the course of presenting and sharing it. The articles have therefore had impact on our own thinking as a team, while also providing challenges to the selected participants to articulate their own understanding and the changes resulting from engaging with the research. Together, the articles form a permanent record of the engagement process which can continue to reach new audiences attracted to the blog.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL https://ontheedgeresearch.org/
 
Description Pilot event announcement 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A short article on Woodend Barn's website highlighted the staging of our pilot seminar event in their venue in March 2016. This contributed to increased local and regional awareness of the engagement project, for which most of the other activities were scheduled to take place further afield (nationally or internationally). The information informed the Barn's core audiences and subscribers including their board members, several of whom subsequently attended the session. The piece also allowed the Barn as a contributing partner to highlight its involvement in research to its core funder Creative Scotland (itself a project partner and represented at the session). The venue passed on a number of requests to attend the session to the project team as a result of this publicity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.woodendbarn.com/seminar-cultural-leadership-and-the-place-of-the-artist/
 
Description Price, J. 2016 Arts leadership in theory and practice. Lecture and workshop for Kulturverkstan International Project Management Training Programme. Gothenburg, 19th December. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jonathan Price delivered a three hour lecture, seminar and discussion for Gothenburg-based cultural agency Natverkstan's on their regular professional programme Kulturverkstan: Education in International Cultural Project Management. This proceeded from Natverkstan's interest in our research through its relationship with our core project partner ENCATC and Natverkstan director Karin Dalborg's attendance at our third project seminar in London in July 2016.

Title: Leading in the cultural sector

Participants: about 30 students on Kulturverkstan's two-year advanced vocational education in international cultural project management. Students are musicians, actors, writers, film makers, artists - but also people with an academic or other background who want to realise their ideas in practical cultural projects. It is aimed at early/mid-career cultural professionals.

Focus: a one-hour introductory lecture introduced concepts for thinking about leadership in the cultural and creative sectors overall, including outline of the Artist as Leader findings. The group was then given questions to address to explore the links between their own practices and areas of policy that affect them. Following this, some further ideas from cultural leadership literature were introduced to open up wider debate about the possible meanings of leadership for the group.

Outcomes: the students gained insight into new theoretical concepts including awareness of the Artist as Leader report and the subsequent research programme. Through the exercises and debate these ideas were related to their individual professional practices to develop deeper understanding of their day to day roles and potential for generating cultural change. Additional informal debate with Natverkstan staff after the event about the research and related issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.natverkstan.net/
 
Description Price, J. 2017. Leading culture in the 21st century. Lecture and seminar for King's College London's Executive Leadership Programme. London, 7th April 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Jonathan Price delivered a one hour keynote/presentation and Q&A as part of Leading Culture in the 21st Century, a new Executive Leadership Programme commissioned by King's College London and hosted at KCL's Bush House.

Title: The Development and Discourse of Cultural Leadership

Participants:
The programme was delivered to 18 senior leaders (including CEOs and Managing Directors) working in diverse cultural fields (from music, theatre and visual arts to circus, game development and publishing) in international locations. These included participants from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, China, Ethiopia, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, South Africa and Sweden.
Focus: The conceptual underpinning of cultural leadership and latest research findings. The presentation drew on the Artist as Leader and Price's subsequent research, including discussions held during Cultural Leadership and the Place of the Artist, unpicking the terminology of cultural leadership to show how very different concepts and values are often wrapped up in the same language. Price examined the history of the term to trace some common assumptions about who can be a cultural leader and how they're expected to operate. The subsequent discussion explored the ways a cultural leader might be different from any other kind of leader and the interaction between creative, organisational and social responsibilities. Price outlined how ideas of 'entrepreneurial', 'generous' and 'public' leadership can be used to make sense of these contrasting challenges.

Outcomes: The presentation stimulated and encouraged participants to set their understanding of cultural leadership within a set of historical theoretical frameworks. As the introductory classroom session for the programme, this presentation provided a theoretical framework underpinning the subsequent practice-focused contributions which drew on professional case studies and elements of technical training. A continuing relationship with programme director Hilary Carty, who has gone on to become the new Chief Executive for the Clore Leadership Programme, replacing our previous collaborator Sue Hoyle.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.kcl.ac.uk/business/executive-education/open-course/leading-culture-21st-century.aspx
 
Description Research Award media release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A media release was issued by RGU in November 2016 to promote SRF Jonathan Price's shortlisting for the ENCATC research award, also mentioning the engagement project and highlighting the continuing research. This was distributed nationally and the news was also featured internationally via ENCATC's own website and media relations. The story was featured in local press in Aberdeenshire and highlighted in the news section of RGU's website. This drove further interest in the research including downloads of the thesis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rgu.ac.uk/news/rgu-researcher-shortlisted-for-major-international-award/
 
Description The panel and presentation at AAAE's Edinburgh conference:Edelman, D., Petricic, S. & Price, J. 2017. Cultural leadership in an age of anxiety. Collaborative panel session prepared for the Association of Arts Administration Educators (Annual International Conference). Edinburgh, 30th May 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jonathan Price participated in a 90 minute panel session prepared in collaboration with David Edelman (Associate Professor of Arts Management and Director of the Performing Arts Leadership and Management Program at Shenandoah Conservatory) and Sanja Petricic (Associate professor and Vice Dean for Student Affairs, Faculty for Media and Communication, Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia). AAAE is a US-based network of higher education specialists in cultural practice. It has collaborated with our project partner ENCATC on several events and the invitation to participate in this session arose from Price's earlier presentation on Cultural Leadership and the Place of the Artist (and subsequent discussions) at the ENCATC conference in Valencia in October 2016.

Title: Cultural leadership in an age of anxiety

Participants: around 30 international conference attendees from academia, education and professional practice.

Focus: the session sought to relate recent research (including insights arising from Cultural Leadership and the Place of the Artist) to new challenges arising from contemporary political upheaval and the accompanying anxiety in society and, specifically, the cultural sector. It responded particularly to the rise of populist leaders, new forms of nationalism, divisive rhetoric and crumbling economies which have combined to sweep away old certainties and undermine the institutions that represent them. Liberal values are everywhere in retreat while expertise and truth appear devalued. It is for this environment that our artists, creative entrepreneurs and cultural leaders must be equipped by the education and training that we provide. In such contexts, the session asked, what forms of knowledge should we share? Are we at risk of providing training that meets only yesterday's challenges? Or should the political events of the world be shut out of the classroom as distractions from our cultural concerns? The panel brought research and theory around artistic and cultural leadership to bear on these questions and opened up debate about whether culture can ever be separated from the political, or politics kept out of education, when it can be argued that to devote your life or the resources of your community to education and the arts is already a political act.

Outcomes: establishment of a new collaborative relationship with Edelman and Petricic. Generation of debate about the relationship of culture, politics and education at a moment when educational institutions and their staff are frequently pressed to avoid the adoption of overtly political positions. Exploring new forms of relevance of the recent research and communicating this to an international audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://aaae2017.sched.com/list/descriptions/