Cross-pollination: Re-valuing Pollinators through Arts and Science Collaboration

Lead Research Organisation: University of Wales, Lampeter
Department Name: School of Fine Art and Photography

Abstract

Most of the foods that we eat rely on insects for pollination. The populations of the honeybee and wild pollinators have rapidly declined due to habitat change, global warming and disease. There is a burden of responsibility for researchers and public bodies to explore ways to halt this decline. To date, most of the response to this challenge has been led by natural and social/economic scientists and although the arts community has worked on awareness raising projects there has been little collaboration. Responding to this observation, this network will bring together arts researchers with natural and social scientists, beneficiaries and policy makers to
explore the role that the arts can play in increasing understanding of the causes of the decline in pollinator populations and influence policy decisions to help halt this decline.

By bringing the network members together the 'Cross-pollination' project will:
- help scientists produce better understandings of pollinator decline;
- explore new collaborative ways of working where the perspectives of the 'arts' and 'sciences' enrich each other;
- help change the perceived value of pollinators;
- and effectively influence decision-making.

Drawing on existing networks, Liggins (PI) and Christie (Co-I) will bring together key researchers, artists and stakeholders to participate in a series of exploratory arts workshops that will explore theories of aesthetics, sensory perception, differences in perspectives and language, and investigate possible creative interactions and partnerships. From these meetings a series of speculative art interventions will be set up to produce art works and explore ideas arising from the collaborations. Using the methodology of the 'Art Crit', not normally used within the scientific community, Cross-pollination will enable researchers from various disciplines and stakeholders to interrogate the art process, to share reflections, and explore the range of value judgments. Throughout the process, artists will be partnered with scientists and decision makers with the expectation that a future research agenda will be developed.

Confirmed participants include award winning scientists in the area of pollinator research from the UK and USA and high profile arts researchers from the fields of aesthetics, perception and community arts. An important addition are two linguists studying the language of environmental research and its affect on perceived values. The Co-I Christie's expertise in the Valuation of Nature for Ecosystem Service Sustainability, will provide a further focus for the project. PI Liggins has undertaken a number of science/art projects, most recently with the NBGW and is presently contributing to the NERC project Duress Theme 5 led by Co-I Christie to deliver research through arts practice, particularly looking at differences in perception of value.

A number of the representatives in policy making organisations are also involved, such as Pollinator Taskforce Wales, Intergovernmental Science -Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Deliverable 3a Global Pollinator Assessment. Co-I Christie has led a number of research projects involved in the economic evaluation of nature and bio-diversity and was PI the NERC Valuing Nature Steering project. Further confirmed beneficiaries, who have been involved in the development of Cross-pollination include the BumbleBee Conservation Trust (Bee Wild project), BugLife, The Bee Garden at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (NBGW), Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, and the Heart of Wales Line and Arriva Trains Wales 120 Miles of Garden project. The NBGW, where some events will take place, is well-placed to disseminate many of the ideas and findings to the general public, as there is an established Bee Garden Visitors Centre, and there are already links with other National Gardens, such a Royal National Garden of Scotland and the Nanshan Botanic Gardens in China.

Planned Impact

From the outset organisations, policy makers and individuals who will benefit from the research findings will take part in the structured process of collaboration. The stakeholders listed below are confirmed network members and have been consulted in-depth on the development of Cross-pollination in order that the project maximises its potential impacts.

On a national level the project has ensured that for example the Welsh Pollinator Taskforce are active through the process as two key participants are members. The range of key participants have been carefully planned to maximise the opportunities for more inclusion of artists and arts researchers policy-making boards.

On a global level confirmed network participant Potts (Reading University) is a key member of the Intergovernmental Science -Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and Chair of the IPBIS Deliverable 3a Global Pollinator Assessment. This organisation acts as an interface between the scientific community and policymakers to build capacity for and strengthen the use of science in policy making and address gaps in the science-policy interface on biodiversity and ecosystem services. This organisation is currently looking at the socio-cultural, indigenous and other values associated with pollinators and pollination, and Cross-pollination will directly contribute to the assessment and via IPBES to policy making globally. The U.S.A. for example last year launched a Pollinator Health Task Force, after seeing a 23% reduction in bee populations, therefor it is important that this project involves international participants (Graystock), to internationalise the range of impacts, and ensure a more international representation.

Co-I Christie has been PI on a number of NERC and Defra funded projects for valuing ecosystem services for biodiversity, a contributor to the UK National Ecosystem Assessment (NEA), which in turn helped shape the UK Government's Natural Environment White Paper. He is at present lead investigator of the Valuation Theme of the DURESS project (Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability), and through key participation in Cross-pollination will be able to network the findings through a broad range of policy-makers and develop new methodologies for both economic and non-economic environment valuation projects.

Organisations who will ensure that any findings are incorporated into the public face of their enterprises are Dr Beynon's Bug farm and The Bee Garden at the NBGW, the Bee Wild Project (Bumblebee Conservation Trust) in West Wales, and the Heart of Wales Line and Arriva Trains Wales, 120 miles Station Gardens project. The former is a new centre opening in West Wales, the brainchild of the entomologist and TV presenter, Beynon, whose award winning research is in the field of beetles. At present the Farm is conducting field studies into farmland biodiversity, ecosystem services provided by wildlife particularly Lowland Heath (a priority habitat in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan), and the future of sustainable food production. Over the next few years a Public Tourist Centre is being developed at the site to enhance public awareness of the importance of insects for sustaining biodiversity. Beynon is a key participant and the art/science interactions of this project will have impact through this commercial enterprise. The Bee Garden at NBGW will display on-going findings of the project and the artworks. In addition the Garden holds training days and events for bee-keepers and Growing for Diversity.

In addition ongoing Blog and Social Media will commentate on the process of the project. This will be linked to the NBGW and to the UWTSD INSPIRE websites. The BBC One Show and BBC Spring-Watch have previously featured De Vere, Lucas and Beynon, and it is expected that this project will attract similar media coverage.

Publications

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Title 'Ethereal Vessels'and 'Petal' Artist- Sarah Tombs; Scientists- Dr Heather Whitney and Mike Harrap, Bristol University, Dr Natasha de Vere, NBGW, Michele Bales, Buglife 
Description Dr Heather Whitney and Mike Harrap, researchers at Bristol University Bee Lab, are investigating the multimodal 'cues' that pollinators use to find flowers and collect pollen and nectar. The Bee Lab's research involves looking at floral temperature by using thermal imaging on flowers, floral colour and floral surface texture to understand how bees are able to locate and learn flower identity and location of nectar and pollen. One aspect of the Bee Lab's research involves casting the surface of petals using a process that mirrors sculptural methods, and which inspired Tombs to develop a body of work. The result is a group of petal forms that explore surface texture and fragility using a range of materials that include wax, stone, and glass. Scattered petals float on the surface of a still pool. The petals, made in wax are exposed to the environment and will breakdown with time. Their decline is a reminder of the consequences of mono-culture planting and the fragility of ecosystems. One aim of this project is to encourage access to the artworks through a programme of multi sensory workshops, which was the catalyst for Sarah Tombs's stone petal. Tombs looked closely at numerous petal shapes and surfaces and has created a smooth stone organic form by carving stone. Its surface is intended to be explored through touch. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Artifice - Artist, Daniel Trivedy; Scientists Michelle Bales Buglife Dr Heather Whitney and Mike Harrap, Bristol University, Dr Sarah Beynon; Linguist, Dr Paul Thompson 
Description Artificial plants have become ubiquitous objects in our everyday environment; synthetic topiary balls seem almost omnipresent and canbe readily found outside shops, offices, flats and public houses. The growing trend towards artificial plants and synthetic grass has become a source of consternation for Daniel Trivedy. The Cross Pollination Project Introductory Days provided the opportunity to situate these observations into a wider context. Drawing from the presentation by Buglife relating to pollinator habitats and Urban Buzz, there was a growing awareness by him that the increase in sales of artificial plants and grass directly undermined the positive awareness work conducted by Buglife. Artifice consists of a number of absurd and fictitious pollen forms created from artificial plants and synthetic grass. The work references the prevalence of these plastic forms in our everyday environment and a perceived shift in our relationship to nature. Fantasy names were provided for these plastic pollen artifacts from two sources, the linguist involved in the project, Dr Paul Thompson, Birmingham University and Dr Beynon, Scientist. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totaled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Title Cross Pollination Exhibition 
Description The exhibitions have been listed here as the method of curating was also considered as an Artistic and Creative Product. The works were first exhibited from 7th July 2017 to 30th August 2017 at Oriel Yr Ardd and throughout the National Botanic Garden of Wales including the Great Glass House and Plas Pilipala. The second exhibition curated differently for the space is sited at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm (from 11th November 2017 -to Spring 2018) In addition to the separate art works which made up the total exhibition, described in separate sections under Creative and Artistic Products, two guest artists (Chatwin: Martin) contacted Professor Andrea Liggins about their work and were subsequently invited to participate in the exhibition, as they were experienced in working with a wide range of international pollinator scientists. Their exhibits further enriched the exhibition at both venues. The separate art works were as follows - Artifice Bee Line Buzzing Machine Fragile Traces Glass Bees Hoverflies and Forgotten Landscapes Hoverflies and Bio-mimicry Masquerades Petal and Ethereal Vessels Phenomenology of Colour - Residency Pollinator Trail Shimmer Wall Signals When Less is More Wings Guest project - Every Last Mouthful 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The Cross-pollination exhibition, which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. Bruce Langridge Head of Interpretation at the NBGW says of the exhibition "In a summer when the lack of summer insects across the UK provoked widespread public concern, the Cross-pollination exhibition provided a timely reminder to Garden visitors that we need to better understand our pollinating insects if we are to help to conserve them. By focusing on less well known pollinators such as hoverflies, using unusual media such as recycled glass and plastic grass, and by looking at pollinator eye-level imagery, the exhibition expertly brought the hidden world of scientific observation to the eyes, ears and hearts of thousands of Garden visitors." 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Cross-pollination catalogue 
Description A 64 page approximately 30cms square, full colour, perfect bound, catalogue was produced in English and Welsh. These were and are still for sale at both exhibition venues. The artists, scientists and the public commented on the professionalism of the catalogue. It contained considerable quantity of text as it was believed that as the project was complex and the resultant exhibition had research applications that the high level of text was necessary. Each artist/collaboration had one or usually two images, and Welsh and English texts describing the concepts and process of making, written by the artist. There were also quotations in English only from the scientists and artists. A PDF version of the catalogue is available on the blog. As the exhibition was sited at different areas of the NBGW, a colour A4 tour guide of the exhibits was also produced. As this was seen as very useful this was repeated at the second venue Dr Beynon's Bug farm. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The quality of the catalogue added gravitas to the artworks and processes, which was important in forming the positive perceptions of the scientists. The professional quality of the catalogue, as well as the content, was viewed by the scientists as adding weight to the creative work. The quotes throughout the catalogue demonstrated the positive change of perception from those involved in the collaborations. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Fragile Traces - Artist, Carly Wilshere; Scientists Dr Natasha De Vere, National Botanic Garden of Wales and Dr Sarah Beynon, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm 
Description For the cross pollination project Carly Wilshere has drawn inspiration from visits to Dr Sarah Beynon's Bug Farm, where a substantial collection of butterflies is housed, and from visits to the butterfly house in the National Botanical Garden of Wales. She has always had a fascination with glass cases in which butterflies and insects are carefully pinned, preserved and displayed. Wilshere played with this idea to create photograms, marking the fragile existence of native butterflies and pollinators. The technique is almost like an X-ray revealing delicate details and portraying the butterflies vulnerability. Yet it also reveals their strength, close ups exposing scales, which are akin to armour. This inspired her to create glass butterfly armour pieces and spinal sculptures revealing the butterfly's inner strength. Wilshere has created other pieces using direct prints from butterfly wings. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. This particular work formed the basis of 4 day workshops with 20 family groups at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, where sun pictures (cyanotypes ) were made, encouraging creativity and the understanding of pollinators and the plants they visit. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Glass Bees - Artists, Dr Tyra Oseng-Rees, Carly Wilshere-Butler; Scientists Dr Peter Graystock, Cornell University, U.S.A., Sinead Lynch from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust 
Description The general public are often unaware of the range of species of bumblebee nor that two species of the 28 in the UK have already become extinct. This project had two aims a) to explore, with a positive approach, the fragility of these amazing creatures and b) demonstrate the variety that exists among the 26 species of bumblebee currently in the UK. Dr Tyra Oseng-Rees and Carly Wilshere made different bumblebees using a combination of fused recycled glass and enameled wiring. Bottle glass was collected cleaned and crushed, then mixed with colouring, moulded and fired in a kiln. The wings, legs and antenna were made of enameled steel wiring. The handmade bees shown in the exhibition illustrated the variations of the bumblebees through sizes, colour of the banding, shapes of the antenna to distinguish between males and females, pollen baskets for queens and workers for the social bee species and darker colours of the wings for cuckoo bees, and are made of fragile, recycled glass. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totaled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Hoverflies and Bio-mimicry Masquerades- Artist, Professor Karen Ingham: Scientists Dr. Natasha de Vere, National Botanic Garden of Wales, Andrew Lucas, Natural Resources Wales 
Description Hoverflies are essential but under valued pollinators. Incredible biomimics, they are often mistaken for bees and wasps. This is because they are a prime example of Batesian mimicry, mimicking dangerous species as protection from predation. They also have a voracious appetite for garden pests like Aphids. Over 250 species have been recorded in the UK, and more than 85 species have been found in a single garden. In this sense they are 'promiscuous pollinators', pollinating a wide range of plants. This is elegantly illustrated in the research of Dr. Natasha DeVere and Andrew Lucas with their Hoverflies 'barcodes', part of the groundbreaking Barcode Wales project. It is the Hoverfly's ability to change its appearance, its 'bio-mimicry masquerading' that fascinates Karen Ingham and that she has explored in this digital textiles based project, which extends her earlier research in 'Pollinator Frocks' www.kareningham.org.uk/pollinator-frocks . Ingham has worked with a design concept that plays on the remarkable skill of Hoverflies in mimicking so many other pollinating insects, alluding to a DNA spiral and the metamorphic changes from a simple brown Rhingia species to the bee like Volucella bombylans. She was also interested in using the bioinformatics data of De Vere and Lucas, which graphically demonstrates the breadth and importance of the Hoverflies pollination habitat. These informatics barcodes have been integrated into a retro style gingham picnic cloth that acts as a reminder to 'think before you swat' as many Hoverflies are mistakenly killed by the public who think they are bees or wasps. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Hoverflies and Forgotten Landscapes - Artist, Professor Andrea Liggins; Scientist, Andrew Lucas, Natural Resources Wales 
Description Professor Andrea Liggins and Andrew Lucas explored their combined research in the creation of photographic artworks that promote the often forgotten and neglected habitats of the hoverfly. To plan for the art project two sites were visited on a wet and cold day, more like November than July, a day when all the hoverflies were sheltering in among the thickets of brambles. Lucas works for Natural Resources Wales and his doctorate research is focussed upon the habitats suited to hoverflies, using DNA Barcoding (with Dr Natasha de Vere of the National Botanic Garden of Wales) he is investigating the flower preferences of the different species of hoverfly at several sites across South West Wales. Liggins' research identifies those non-picturesque landscapes that are not usually painted or drawn but are so important environmentally, for example the hedgerows, the lowland peat-bogs and flowering pastures. Her quest has been to find ways of photographing such places to show their beauty and value. Liggins' previous photography shows a landscape to look out from - not at, and is not about what a place looks like but what it feels to be immersed within the undergrowth. Her work celebrates the messiness of nature, its clutter and unpredictability, well suited to the habitat that hoverflies are drawn to. There are over 250 species of hoverfly in the UK, many pass by unnoticed and are given very little thought or value, by most people. However, research shows that hoverflies are very important to pollination. To explore their variety and individuality Liggins has produced photographic portraits of hoverfly faces, which she exhibits next to photographs of the landscapes in which they have been found. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. C) The collaboration of Professor Andrea Liggins PI (arts and photography researcher) with Andrew Lucas, ( hoverfly scientist/researcher working for Natural Resources Wales) has resulted in early impact. Liggin's research has been focused on finding ways of imaging those type of landscapes that have been seen to date as having little visual value, the lowland peat-bog, the grasslands and hedgerows. It is this type of environment, namely wet grassland, that is the preferred habitat of the hoverfly and some trial photographic artworks have been produced. Lucas believes that these non-descriptive, atmospheric images of his study sites, may help to convey the essence and in turn value of these non-picturesque and often overlooked landscapes. Therefor, the photographs have been and will be included in a number of papers and presentations by Lucas. Natural Resources Wales have decided to use them on their website under the theme of grassland management. Presentations to date include to the annual meeting of The British Ecological Society as well as three regional conservation groups. This collaboration is continuing. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title PolliNation: Artists Crossing Borders with Scientists to Explore the Value of Pollinator Health 
Description The collaboration with the Entomology Department at Cornell University, has led to an invitation for 10 artists to exhibit at the The Mann Gallery, Alberta R. Mann library, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14855: 15th April - 30th September 2019. Seven of the original artists involved in the Cross-pollination project and three new artists. The publicity for the exhibition states " The new Mann Gallery exhibit, PolliNation: Artists Crossing Borders with Scientists to Explore the Value of Pollinator Health showcases the results of a multi-year collaboration between Cornell entomologists, UK based scientists and Welsh artists who, crossing national and disciplinary boundaries, work to reveal and celebrate the beauty and importance of pollinators, and how their fate is linked to our planet, and to our own." Two of the research team members will accompany the exhibition and will give talks and presentations to alumni, students and staff. The exhibition has been timed to coincide with the Entomology Departments Alumni Festival. Seven of the 10 artists who are exhibiting have produced new work that has been developed from the previous Cross-pollination exhibition 2017. Below is a description from the accompanying exhibition texts for each of the new pieces. PolliNation PORTRAITS, Professor Andrea Liggins, Collaborating scientist: Assistant Professor Scott McArt, Dr Jason Dombroskie, Cornell University, Digital colour prints, Most people when asked to describe a pollinator will think of a honeybee or a bumblebee such as Bombus terrestris (Europe), not realising that there are 25,000 known species of bee in the world (about 4,000 in the USA and 250 in the UK). A quote from the British writer John Fowles suggests " The greatest threat to our countryside is less the physical harm we do than a growing detachment from that reality". These portraits attempt to address the separation of people from the diversity and richness of these wonderful and very important creatures. They were collected from around the world, Bolivia, Australia and Argentina for example, and from as far back as the 1800s. This work originates with Andrea Liggins working in collaboration with Dr Andrew Lucas, photographing forgotten and overlooked landscapes, the wild, marshy fields of Wales and the forgotten pollinators themselves - Hoverflies. During a 4 day visit to Cornell University, Liggins was introduced to the amazing insect collection (CUIC). She spent her visit making these portraits of bees, hoverflies and moths, assisted by a research student Paige Muniz. Liggins says of the photographs "These are not sharply focused images, that show you what the bees and hoverflies look like in all their scientific detail but are meant to be portraits, that engage you with their 'being'. I don't know whether bees and hoverflies have personalities, but I saw each of them as an individual, full of character. I felt that I came to know each one, as a portrait artist would get to know the sitter and I hope that comes across." FROM THE COLLECTION: NEST AND EGGS Sarah Tombs Bees wax, Bronze and Glass Assistant Professor Scott McArt, Assistant Professor, Dr Peter Graystock, Cornell University, New York In August 2017 Sarah Tombs visited Cornell University to observe Dr Graystock and his team undertaking field research. During the visit Tombs looked at pollinators eggs and nests in the Cornell University Insect Collection. Some nests and eggs are found hanging from branches, this became the inspiration for her bronze and glass sculptures. DISSECTING THE ANTHROPOCENE Daniel Trivedy Collaborating Scientists: Dr Peter Graystock, Cornell University, now at Imperial College, London There has been a noticeable trend towards the use of artificial plants in our everyday environment; the omnipresence of synthetic topiary balls and artificial grass are a common manifestation of this trend. It appears that some members of the public want to be surrounded by the forms of nature but in a way that is clean, sterile and user friendly. The use of non-biodegradable plastics to create these forms is problematic, with their final destination likely to be landfill. The Anthropocene is a proposed geological epoch that represents human impact on the Earth's geology and ecosystems. Dissecting the Anthropocene is a site-specific work that has been made for placement within the Mann library. Within the artwork, artificial plant forms have been dissected and displayed as pinned specimens, reminiscent of real scientific samples. The constituent parts act as a metaphor for the dissection of attitudes and values in society .The placement of the artwork in a life sciences library is a deliberate provocation. The tension between the artwork and its setting is designed to mirror the potential disconnect that can occur between science and some of the prevailing attitudes and values in society. The question is posed - what are the ramifications of this disconnect if change is to be effected? FRAGARIA VESCA: WILD STRAWBERRY Annette Marie Townsend Collaborating Scientist; Assistant Professor Scott McArt, Cornell University The concept for this artwork was conceived following a chance conversation between scientist and artist at the Cross-Pollination Conference in 2017. Since that time, scientific data and wax samples have been sent across continents and the concept has grown into a piece of collaborative scientific art. The Fragaria vesca, Wild strawberry sculpture, created using traditional wax model making techniques, has been made from honey bee wax provided by Dr. Scott McArt, Assistant Professor at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the NYS Beekeeper Tech Team. The honey bee wax, collected from bee colonies in New York State, has been analysed and found to contain pesticide residues. As the sculpture contains traces of these agricultural chemicals, they have been listed as artist's materials. Wax has been used by artists in the creation of scientific models for education and teaching since the late 17th century, and botanical wax model making reached a height of popularity during the advent of the public museum in the 19th century. The translucency and life-like quality of the material enabled artists to create realistic and beautiful representations of plants for gallery displays, in order to engage visitors with scientific discovery. This work continues this tradition, aiming to raise awareness of the widespread use of agricultural chemicals and the transfer of these chemicals from agricultural crops to wildflowers and pollinators, promoting discussion on the man-made issues which have contributed to the global decline of pollinating insects. ETCHED ENTOMOLOGY Annette Marie Townsend Collaborating Scientist; Assistant Professor Scott McArt, Cornell University The series Etched Entomology was inspired by the scientific collections at Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales. Techniques normally used in printmaking, printed circuit board manufacturing and jewellery design have been combined in an innovative way to produce a series of closely observed images. Each image is hand drawn directly onto a copper surface, which is then etched, oxidised, sanded, scored and polished. The oxidation process produces an outer surface layer on the copper plate, protecting the delicate copper insect. The etched drawings play on the themes of darkness and light, encasement, detail, repetition, order and protection, all observed within the museum environment. Each handmade plate is unique and marked with an identifying series of letters and numbers, echoing the collection reference system employed by museums. FRAGILE TRACES Artist- Carly Wilshere-Butler Collaborating Scientists- Dr Sarah Beynon, Sarah Sharpe, Dr Natasha de Vere, Phd students Abigial Lowe and Laura Jones Conservationist- Sinead Lynch The purpose of the fragile traces project was to illustrate the fragility of our pollinators and their habitats. To begin with the project concentrated on moths as they are often less revered than their cousins the butterfly, although they carry out an equally important role at pollinating; often doing their important job unseen at night. Initially photogram images of moths in bell jars were produced to illustrate the need for their protection. During field trips, bee walks and engagement workshops it became apparent that it would be far more successful to help the public create this connection themselves and to emphasise the importance of pollinators. Also people often learn kinesthetically so retain the important scientific information more readily if they learn by doing. For this reason two outcomes were created, one multisensory video and secondly a series of cyanotype workshops. IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI This film highlights the issue of artificial lighting which is adding to the moths decline as they naturally navigate themselves by the light of the moon. The title can be interpreted in different ways and one such interpretation is that they are flying to the light, beckoning us to take notice and change our practices. The fragile glass dominos represent the moths decline as each species becomes extinct one by one. As the footage slows there is a likeness to bells ringing heard as the glass dominos fall. A link was made to the poem 'For Whom the Bell Tolls' by John Donne, in which interpretations have suggested he was trying to draw people's attention to how the world is interconnected. Further research discovered that bells are often placed at the doors to places of worship to cleanse people's minds and leave them open to new ways of thinking. In the second part of the video the moths are resurrected suggesting that we can bring back our moth population or at least preserve the species we have; by listening to new scientific research and adopting new practices that work alongside nature and not against it. Cyanotype pollinator prints. The cyanotype prints represent the engagement workshops held at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm and at The National Botanical Gardens of Wales. Participants were encouraged to walk through wild flower meadows enabling them to see and experience the pollinators in their habitat. They were then able to pick plant material and record them by creating cyanotype prints similar to those to the ones Anna Atkins created in the 1800s; she was the first female photographer to combine art and science. In the relaxed environment of the workshop people were able to learn the plants names while touching the specimens therefore retaining the information more readily. When creating prints some plant material was only placed loosely on the paper by participants to create blurred and faded prints creating depth as if a plant is in the picture and also illustrating the pollinator's ephemeral qualities. This project was developed further to create prints for this exhibition incorporating plants used and identified to be good pollinator plants in the DNA Barcode project run by Natatasha De Vere and her PhD students at the National Botanic Gardens of Wales. The images illustrate the surprising results that honey bees often use trees and hedgerow plants and only supplement with wild flowers and weeds; travelling further even if selected flowers are closer. The plant material used were specimens from the DNA Barcode project so were labelled, it was decided to leave these in the prints to show where they came from and to show the ethos of this project which is part of the Barcode of Life initiative, where all findings are open access. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact As a result of the Cross-pollination project and the collaboration with scientists, some of the artists have moved into news methods and ways of working. Conceptually the artwork shave been enhanced and enriched. The project has developed strong links between the artists, scientists and the two universities, Cornell University, U.S.A. and UWTSD and has provided the opportunity for an international exhibition. It is intended that this will lead to further collaborative work and visits. The exhibition will reach new audiences, alumni, students, researchers and staff as it is timed to coincide with the Entomology Department's Alumni Festival. It is planned that the exhibition will inspire a new generation of U.S.A. scientists to collaborate with artists in the future, as the project has already achieved this, albeit on a relatively small scale, in the UK. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Shimmer Wall- Artist, Daniel Trivedy; Scientists, Dr Heather Whitney and Mike Harrap, Bristol University, Dr Natasha de Vere, NBGW, Michele Bales, Buglife 
Description The relationship between flowers and their pollinators is often an intricate one that has evolved symbiotically. Particular plant species have their favoured pollinators and use a variety of signals to attract them. There is an analogy to be drawn between the way that flowers use multiple cues to attract insects and complex forms of advertising. The Bee Lab based at Bristol University is currently conducting research into the signals used by pollinators to find flowers. Daniel Trivedy was intrigued by the use of resin discs in Flight Arena experiments that tries to establish the role structural iridescence plays in pollination. Shimmer Wall is an installation of multiple resin discs cast from the surface of flower petals. The work references traditional forms of advertising and the role petal surface plays in attracting pollinators. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title Signals - Artist, Dr Shelley Doolan; Scientists, Dr Heather Whitney and Mike Harrap Bristol Bee Lab, Bristol University 
Description The project draws upon research into multi-modal signals produced by plants to attract pollinators. Working with Mike Harrap and Heather Whitney from the 'Bee Lab' at Bristol University, Shelley Doolan has created a series of tactile objects that explore and reveal the structures of petal textures. As flower displays are targeted at their pollinators and their sensory apparatus not that of humans, many signals flowers send are not apparent to humans. One such signal is floral petal texture. The microscopic shape and surface structure of the cells on the petal surfaces of flowers can differ between flower species. These micro- textures are normally only visible under a scanning electron microscope. Pollinators like bees can detect these micro-textures using feelers on their antennae and feet. These can be used to recognise and distinguish more rewarding flowers from less rewarding ones. Floral petal texture can also affect a pollinator's grip on flowers. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title The Bee Line - Artists, Professor Andrea Liggins and Alex Roberts; Stakeholder, Gill Wright, Heart of Wales Line, The Bee Line Project (Arriva Trains) 
Description The heart of Wales Line runs for 120 miles with 30 stations. An initiative co-ordinated by Gill Wright, with a host of volunteers, aims to create bee friendly gardens at each station. In becoming involved in the Crosspollination project many ideas were discussed, with contributions from artists and scientists. As a result the initiative will be named the Bee Line and will promote the plight of pollinators to all the tourists and travellers on the train journeys, and the local towns and villages. Each station will have an 'adopted' bee (Honey, Bumble or Solitary) and supporting artist Alex Roberts illustrated each selected bee. Andrea Liggins photographed (and is continuing to do so) the volunteers and the gardens. Andrea believes it is important to foreground the work of volunteers as it is often the unpaid enthusiasts who make a huge difference in environmental works, whether for example Bumblebee counting for the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, clearing rubbish from Nature Reserves, or in this case caring for the station gardens. Works produced 20" x 20" photographs of volunteers and gardens, framed. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. This piece is one of two to be also exhibited along the Heart of Wales Line (Arriva Trains) during the summer of 2018). In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totaled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. C) In particular this artwork has had further impact, The Chair of Heart of Wales Railway Development Group was invited to the Introductory Networking Event as this group was planning bee friendly gardens at each of the 27 stations on the line. At this event a suggestion was made by one of the attending artists for each station on the Heart of Wales Line ( Arriva Trains) to 'adopt' a species of bee. Following discussions of the concept an executive decision was taken to give the Heart of Wales garden project the title the Bee Line, with stations along the route being branded for different bee species, and bee gardens at each station being developed with assistance of scientists involved in the project, from the National Botanic Garden of Wales and the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Although not passing through populous areas, this line is primarily a tourist line and the renaming and branding will enhance the public's awareness of the plight of the bee, as well as other pollinators, particularly as it is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2018 . The collaboration from the scientists with the volunteers developing the gardens will ensure greater success with this initiative. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Title The Buzzing Machine - Artists, Dr Paul Jeff, Dr Laura Jenkins, Dan Butler; Scientists, Duncan Coston, Professor Simon Potts & Dr Tom Breeze at University of Reading 
Description In 1922 the painter Paul Klee made a small pen and ink drawing on watercolour. It was called The Twittering Machine, and seems to show a group of birds tethered to a hand cranked machine. Although there are many interpretations of this painting it can be said that it represents some kind of relationship between nature and industrialization, or perhaps a world where the work of man and the work of nature struggle to exist in some sort of harmony. The presence of a handle indicates that this delicate balance of nature and machine needs the hand of humanity to intervene, to take control and to create the balance that is needed for the whole arrangement to work. In co-operation with scientist Duncan Coston the artists have re-designed and made a Buzzing Machine, a mechanical box that moves 'dancing bees' and is computer linked to recorded mechanical 'buzzing' sounds, in order to carry on Klee's work of drawing attention to the fragile balance between nature and our industrialized environment. This work is particularly concerned with the conservation of our bee population, raising awareness and educating people about the importance of bee cross-pollination in relation to our foodstuffs. Exhibited at the NBGW 2017 Dr Beynon's Bug Farm 2017/18 and in July 2018 The Heart of Wales Line (Arriva Trains). 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totaled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them.C) This artwork is one of two intended for exhibition along the Heart of Wales Line as a performance piece. The Chair of Heart of Wales Railway Development Group was invited to the Introductory Networking Event as this group was planning bee friendly gardens at each of the 27 stations on the line. At this event a suggestion was made by one of the attending artists for each station on the Heart of Wales Line ( Arriva Trains) to 'adopt' a species of bee. Following discussions of the concept an executive decision was taken to give the Heart of Wales garden project the title the Bee Line, with stations along the route being branded for different bee species, and bee gardens at each station being developed with assistance of scientists involved in the project, from the National Botanic Garden of Wales and the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Although not passing through populous areas, this line is primarily a tourist line and the renaming and branding will enhance the public's awareness of the plight of the bee, as well as other pollinators, particularly as it is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2018 . The collaboration from the scientists with the volunteers developing the gardens will ensure greater success with this initiative. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title The Pollinator Trail- Artists- Sarah Tombs and Myles Mansfield; Scientist, Dr Sarah Beynon, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm 
Description Dr Beynon's Bug Farm Pollinator Trail will encourage members of the public visiting The Bug Farm to explore the Bug Farm Trail using the senses of an insect pollinator moving from one piece of artwork to another and seeing the world from a pollinator's eye- view. Moving through wildflower meadows managed for pollinators, passing bee hives, solitary bee nests, bumblebee nests and hoverfly nests, this truly immersive journey leads people into the hidden world of life in the undergrowth. This project has seen students from UWTSD, Swansea College of Art respond to specific locations at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm. Each student has created work for the site that engages with visitors in several ways. Myles Mansfield is an artist based in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. For the two exhibitions he created large sculptures of bees and other pollinators in recycled steel and engine parts both using his experience of working with metal in the automotive industry. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title When Less is More- Artist, Professor Karen Ingham; Scientists, Dr Sarah Beynon Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Professor Michael Christie Aberystwyth University, Duncan Coston Reading University, Sinead Lynch BCT 
Description When Less Is More is a film installation that aims to raise awareness of the threat to Britain's traditional pastoral farming systems. It is also a lament for what is fast becoming a lost way of life. Flower and pollinator rich hay meadows are the treasured wildflower fields of our youth but these abundant and productive systems for grazing livestock have become increasingly rare with the advent of modern sugar rich grasses such as rye, along with the pressures to intensify production. In less than 100 years this intensification has wiped out 97% of traditional hay meadows in the UK, with the associated wildlife they support. This 'green-washing' of the countryside, with the emphasis on regulated green squares of land, is destroying our wildlife. The desire for tightly manicured green spaces is echoed in the domestic environment as we intensively mow our lawns resulting in a kind of 'green death'. This artist's film, informed by the discussions with project scientists, is not a documentary, but an interpretive snapshot of these two very different systems. The intention is to prompt the viewer into making connections between the wider issues surrounding environmental farming practices in relation to domestic gardening practice. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This artwork was one of sixteen developed for the Cross-pollination exhibition which to date has been held at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (throughout all parts of the Garden) and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire, where it currently is still on show. Plans are in place to exhibit as part of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature, June 2018, and Cornell University, USA in 2020. In 2017 the number of visitors to the exhibitions totalled 29,804. There were 8 days of workshop sessions with schools, families and young people with learning difficulties, a total of 414 participants. Other activities around the exhibition included 5 art crits where the work and exhibition was discussed between participants (scientists, economist, and artists) including a linguist who was researching art/science communication through this project. Notable impacts include A) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial scepticism from many of the scientists, to complete involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line. Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. B) The exhibitions, conference and public/schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Title individual exhibits 
Description Carly Wilshere - Butler, a member of the research team, has shown pieces of artwork in three regional/national exhibitions: British Society of Enamellers, Bursary online Exhibition, 2018; The National Botanic Garden of Wales, Bee and Pollinator Festival, August 2018; Swansea Open, Glynn Vivian Gallery, Dec.2017 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Although relatively small scale individual pieces of artwork, the inclusion in a range of exhibition venues widens the accessibility to the project. 
 
Description As Cross-pollination is a network project recently completed 31st November 2017 the findings are at present initial findings with others being collated. Initial findings were presented at the Cross-pollination conference November 2016. Three findings are outlined here with more detail pending. All three relate to that of examining the perceptions and language of artists and scientists of one another and their disciplines, with the objective of developing greater understanding to inform this project and future art/science collaborations.
1) After the 2 day Intro Networking Event the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire to examine perceptions held at the beginning of the project. The questionnaire was designed and analyzed by Dr Sophie Bennett from Aberystwyth University. The results from the second survey at the end of the project have yet to be analyzed and the comparison data which looks at any changes of perception during the life of the project is not yet available.
Section from Analysis of Cross-Pollination Questionnaire One - April 2016
Respondent profile
The majority of questionnaire are female (75%), based in Wales and are 35 years of age or over (64%). Most participants described themselves as scientists (42%) or artists (33%).
Summary of results
1. Difference between disciplines
Results from the questionnaire indicate that, overall, participants do not view arts and science as completely distinct disciplines. The majority of participants were able to work with others around them, no matter what their discipline and became less aware of any differences as the event progressed. The commonality between disciplines was mentioned by some participants and realised during the networking event. Where differences do occur, participants described these as being differences of methods and methodology, education and overall focus. This was described by a number of participants as the difference in focus between end goal and process. Scientists use a framework of evidence and metrics to reach an end goal, whereas the arts concern themselves with the process, using qualitative methods and intuition. This was described by one participant as:
"I still find it difficult to understand how a process can be useful if there is no end goal! In science, you talk about a piece of research in terms of what you found out. It sometimes seems condescending to ask an artist why they did something or what that art actually means/depicts."
Some participants describe differences as a result of opposite perspectives, where scientists use hypotheses to begin with and artists use grounded theory to arrive at a hypothesis: Formulating a hypothesis which is proven/disproved if often used in the scientific research and grounded theory where experimental works leads to the formulations of a hypothesis is used in artistic research.
2) Two members of the cross-pollination collaborators specifically researched language differences between artists and scientists involved in the project. The first Dr Paul Thompson an Environmental Linguist from the University of Birmingham, who specializes in environmental language changes, looked at the use and understanding of language and how individual research was presented to an audience. He circulated a questionnaire to all members of the group, scientists and artists. The results are still being collated for possible publication, however, early results show that the most obvious difference is that the arts researchers present their work to an audience from a more personal perspective, using the personal pronoun in their descriptions of methods for example. Their reports on the Cross-pollination project as a whole tended to follow this pattern. 3) Dr Peter Graystock from Cornell University also presented his perceptions and findings re. the Cross-pollination project, through collaborating directly with the artists and arts researchers. His initial position at the start of the project was that artists and scientists were polar opposites, but found that benefits could be realised in collaboration. He suggested that the means of portraying scientific research to the public consisted of Why, When and What? but rarely How the research was undertaken. Whereas his suggestion was that arts practice research concentrated on the How? Graystock proposed that if scientists personalised the presentation of research by including how the research was undertaken, including the progression of methods, this would enhance public acceptance and engagement. This research is also in the process of being finalised for possible publication.
Exploitation Route Although the project was a Networking project, the outputs have been diverse and numerous and many of the findings are still being collated. The two day conference presented many of the findings and the catalogue for the exhibition contained quotes from the scientists and the artists expressing their perspectives on the project. However, the findings need to be formalised through publication. All the collaborative partners has expressed the wish for this project to continue through further funding, to research the early findings in greater depth.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Environment

URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com
 
Description The Cross-pollination project is a networking project and as a result of bringing artists, scientists and stakeholders together initial impacts have already been achieved. A) The Chair of Heart of Wales Railway Development Group was invited to the Introductory Networking Event as this group was planning bee friendly gardens at each of the 27 stations on the line. At this event a suggestion was made by one of the attending artists for each station on the Heart of Wales Line ( Arriva Trains) to 'adopt' a species of bee. Following discussions of the concept an executive decision was taken to give the Heart of Wales garden project the title the Bee Line, with stations along the route being branded for different bee species, and bee gardens at each station being developed with assistance of scientists involved in the project, from the National Botanic Garden of Wales and the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Although not passing through populous areas, this line is primarily a tourist line and the renaming and branding will enhance the public's awareness of the plight of the bee, as well as other pollinators, particularly as it is celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2018 . The collaboration from the scientists with the volunteers developing the gardens will ensure greater success with this initiative. B) The collaboration of Professor Andrea Liggins PI (arts and photography researcher) with Andrew Lucas, ( hoverfly scientist/researcher working for Natural Resources Wales) has resulted in early impact. Liggin's research has been focused on finding ways of imaging those type of landscapes that have been seen to date as having little visual value, the lowland peat-bog, the grasslands and hedgerows. It is this type of environment, namely wet grassland, that is the preferred habitat of the hoverfly and some trial photographic artworks have been produced. Lucas believes that these non-descriptive, atmospheric images of his study sites, may help to convey the essence and in turn value of these non-picturesque and often overlooked landscapes. Therefor, the photographs have been and will be included in a number of papers and presentations by Lucas. Natural Resources Wales have decided to use them on their website under the theme of grassland management. Presentations to date include to the annual meeting of The British Ecological Society, three regional conservation groups and the International Barcode of Life Conference in South Africa, November 2017 . This collaboration is continuing. C) Two successful residencies at Cornell University U.S.A. have led to the collaborating artists being invited to not only exhibit but to be involved in the planning and production of art works for a 'pollinator garden' at the university. D) One of the Cornell University residencies has resulted in a three way collaboration between the artist Sarah Tombs, scientists at Cornell University (Professor Scott McArt and Dr Peter Graystock ) and Prof. David Williams, consultant anaesthetist and lead in medical simulation at Swansea University, to develop an educational game and simulation activity that describes the spread of pathogens. The existing model could be used to illustrate spread of any epidemic (e.g. Cholera, HIV, Ebola); or adapted to other medical teaching activities. E) One of the aims of the Cross- pollination project was to encourage environmental policy makers to include artists and arts researchers onto decision making boards. There has been some early regional success with this and as examples Professor Catrin Webster has been included as a member of the St David's Pollinator Trail Committee, Professor Andrea Liggins is a member of The Heart of Wales Line 150 Years and Bee Line Committee and is in discussions with Ann Humble of the Welsh Government, (Head of Evidence and Analysis, ERA EU Exit Division) about involvement in an advisory capacity. F) One of the main aims of the project was to demonstrate to scientists that art research can contribute to scientific research and that collaboration with artists would be a valid practice. There has been a complete seed change, from what was initial sceptism from many of the scientists, to total involvement and appreciation of the benefits of such collaboration. In impact terms this could be measured by the inclusion of artists in new projects and future proposals for funding. Of the six science teams involved in the project, two teams have applied for and received funding which now included artist/ art researcher participation and the remaining teams have planned collaborations with artists, some who were participants in the project. In addition the organisations involved i.e. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Buglife, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, the Heart of Wales Line Arriva Trains, and the National Botanic Garden of Wales are all continuing to collaborate with the project after funding. G) The exhibitions, conference, public and schools workshops have informed the public about the pollinator crisis and material evidence has been collated to demonstrate that there have been behavioural changes as a response to greater knowledge of pollinators and the problems facing them. Since 2017 there have been further developments to a project initiated through the Cross-pollination collaborations with Dr Beynon's Bug farm, with the St David's Pollinator Trail. Through the collaboration process with Dr Sarah Beynon and Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, plans were initiated and some work undertaken towards a Pollinator Trail. This was initially planned for the Farm, which is an award winning tourist destination. This initiative has now developed into a multi-funded project with contributions from artists and art researchers associated with the Cross-pollination project. It is part funded via the Welsh Government's Welsh Government's Tourism Product Innovation Fund which aims to encourage new innovative product ideas working in partnership which will have a greater impact and attract more visitors. The Pollinator Trail has also been supported by Biodiversity Solutions.The impact has been for the greater use of artists and artworks in this predominantly science based project. The St Davids Pollinator Trail is now a community wide project coordinated by The Bug Farm. There is a large contribution from artists through art pieces along the trail. The St Davids Pollinator Trail is actually made up of two trails. The City Trail takes in a selection of local businesses and heritage sites within the city centre while the Explorer Trail stretches further across the St Davids peninsula and includes Whitesands Beach, Ramsey Island, cafes, accommodation providers, gardens and The Bug Farm. Three of the main artists involved in the Cross-pollination project have produced works for the St Davids Pollinator Trail. One artist is a member of the Pollinator Trail Development Committee. The aims of the Trail are to: Raise awareness about the importance of insect pollinators and to inspire people to preserve existing, or create new, pollinator habitat. Encourage visitors (and locals) to explore the wonderful businesses and beautiful countryside across the St Davids peninsula. Link conservation with creativity by exhibiting a range of Welsh artwork along the Pollinator Trail
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Education,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Pollinator Trail
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description The Bee Line project
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Arts Council of Wales Organisations Grant for Production
Amount £19,550 (GBP)
Funding ID DN:\20161086 
Organisation The Arts Council for Wales 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 09/2017
 
Description Bondareff Family Fund for Mann Library, Cornell University
Amount $500 (USD)
Organisation Cornell University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United States
Start 04/2019 
End 09/2019
 
Title The Art- Crit used to investigate language and perceptual differences between artists and scientists. 
Description The Art Crit is an established teaching method in most British Art Schools. The Art Crit is a model of learning whereby artists present their work to a group in order to gain feedback on how that work is being 'read' and ways that they might develop it further. The work 'crit' is a shortened version of the word critique (not criticism) and is a process in which people discuss ideas stimulated by an art object, drawing, painting etc. It is comparable to the 19th Century Salon, in which intellectuals, writers, artist and critics formed informal meetings to discuss the context, content, and rational behind an artwork or artefact together with an analysis of its aesthetic properties and visual intent. The Art Crit has not however been used to explore and investigate cross-disciplinary communications. In this project the Art Crits were used as research tools to explore differences of language, the communication and miss-communication between the scientists and the artists, and to further the understanding of the collaboration processes. Important to the research process was the inclusion of a linguist Dr Paul Thompson from Birmingham University, who's areas of expertise included the changing language of environmental and ecological research. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The interactions started before the ACW funding April 2016 with two introductory days, in Swansea and in the National Botanic Garden of Wales, when the participants came together to share ideas, discuss their wide-ranging research and start the collaboration process. These days included Pecha Kucha presentations and a speed-networking event. As the partnerships started working together they communicated both in person and through emails/Skype to discuss work in progress. In a more formal manner five online art crits were held, a very familiar method of interaction for the artists but new to the scientists. The first three were in small groups of up to 10 participants via Skype and although very informative for many of the artists and scientists, the technology did provide a barrier. The most significant question that arose from the science perspective during these online crits, when looking at images for textiles, was "How do people view this as information rather than a beautiful image?" The artist responded that "art provokes responses and ideas rather than telling people the information. Intrigue encourages further investigation, so that viewers think and work at this information. It allows viewers to consider 'visual information' to create questioning, and this combined with the scientific research is especially helpful to visual learners to gain a more enriched experience and deeper understanding of the information holistically." This question demonstrated that some scientists at that stage still viewed the art as only illustrating the science, to provide a more readily accessible way to provide science data. At the final two crits held at the final exhibition (NBGW) during the installation stage the perspectives and beliefs of the scientist had changed. These two days of discussion were excellent, with all participants fully involved. Their enthusiasm for engaging with the artworks exceeded expectations. As an example of this change of perception is the following statement from Duncan Coston, "I have worked on multiple research projects looking into the impact of agricultural techniques on pollination services with scientific researchers from across the UK and Europe. However, this has been the first project where I have collaborated with researchers from the Arts. Although I originally had some misgiving on how the Arts and Sciences would work together, with both disciplines having such different methods and processes, I was immediately put to rights! This project has opened up a whole set of ideas and ways of looking at scientific research. The whole process has been a big eye opener to me and I hope to continue collaborating with the arts and across other disciplines through my career". 
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description Hoverfly partnership 
Organisation Natural Resources Wales
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Two collaborative artworks were undertaken, 'Hoverflies and Forgotten Landscapes' and 'Hoverflies and Bio-mimicry Masquerades', both projects are described in the Creative and Artistic Products section.
Collaborator Contribution Full engagement with the artistic production. Meetings and on-site work. Engagement with Art Crits and Paper at the two day Cross-pollination conference 'Beyond Bees: the role of hoverflies in pollination' - Andrew Lucas, Natural Resources Wales
Impact The artworks part of the Cross- pollination exhibition at the National Botanic Garden of Wales July and August 2017 and at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire ,October 2017 to May 2018 - 'Hoverflies and Forgotten Landscapes' and 'Hoverflies and Bio-mimicry Masquerades', both projects are described in the Creative and Artistic Products section. The collaboration of Professor Andrea Liggins PI (arts and photography researcher) with Andrew Lucas, ( hoverfly scientist/researcher working for Natural Resources Wales) has resulted in some impact. Liggin's research has been focused on finding ways of imaging those type of landscapes that have been seen to date as having little visual value, the lowland peat-bog, the grasslands and hedgerows. It is this type of environment, namely wet grassland, that is the preferred habitat of the hoverfly and some trial photographic artworks have been produced. Lucas believes that these non-descriptive, atmospheric images of his study sites, may help to convey the essence and in turn value of these non-picturesque and often overlooked landscapes. Therefor, the photographs have been and will be included in a number of papers and presentations by Lucas. Natural Resources Wales have decided to use them on their website under the theme of grassland management. Presentations to date include to the annual meeting of The British Ecological Society as well as three regional conservation groups and in November 2017 at the International Barcode of Life Conference in South Africa. Multi-disciplinary - Art and Design and Science
Start Year 2017
 
Description Network Partnerships for the Production of Artworks ( Heart of Wales Line ) 
Organisation Arriva UK Trains Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Heart of Wales Line ( Arriva Trains) are planning to plant bee friendly gardens at every one of the 27 stations on its route. This is a tourist line as it passes through mostly scenic and rural landscapes, from Llanelli to Shrewsbury. Upon being invited as a proposed collaborator in the project the Chair of the Development Committee attended the Introductory Networking Event and took an active role. in discussion one of the research team suggested re- naming the line The Bee Line, and this proposal was taken forward to the management of Arriva Trains and accepted in September 2016. Of the fourteen art/science projects planned, two arts projects are planned for the line and in addition the Networking event and subsequent meetings and Art Crit have enabled both scientific and creative expertise to be contributed towards the plans. In addition the PI's expertise has been instrumental in the production of the new branding and exhibition potential of the line, with the intention of each station adopting a species of bee. This collaboration will extend beyond the life of the project, as the railway line will be celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2018, and more arts input is planned. The Bee Line will add significantly to public understand of the problems facing pollinators and bees in particular. Art projects planned are - Project 7: Buzzing Machine Artist - Dr Paul Jeff Scientists -Duncan Coston and scientists at Reading University (Professor Simon Potts and Dr Tom Breeze) Stakeholder - Gill Wright, Heart of Wales Railway Line Based on Paul Klee's 1922 drawing 'Twittering Machine', which shows a hand-cranked contraption to which 4 birds appear to be tethered in a union of nature and the industrialised environment, this work comments on the uneasy balance between our natural pollinators such as bees, and the industrialised 'climate' that we have brought about. Whilst Klee's machine seemed to focus on the looming catastrophe of man's effects on the natural world, our 'Buzzing Machine' is primarily concerned with re-discovering the harmony that is necessary for all species to work together as one large machine. Collaborating with the Heart of Wales Railway Jeff envisages a machine similar to Klee's incorporating model bees, that will be mounted on a 'tea trolley' and can be wheeled up and down the carriages allowing children perhaps to turn the handle. Jeff also proposes that this mobile installation contain a sound piece, the machinery of which can be concealed under the cloth covering the trolley. The sound piece to consist of multiple recordings by the choirs of the towns up and down the railway line and producing harmonies based on the buzz of the bumblebee. These recordings will be edited together to produce an interesting soundscape that will accompany the trolley on its journey. If a stop was long enough, for example, at the start and end of the line, then the trolley could be made to do a platform performance for travellers. To compliment this mobile pollination journey along the garden train line there will be a second 'cross-pollinating' trolley as a bridge between the art and science for the project and to convey both the pollinator science and public information. Scientist Dr Duncan Coston from the University of Reading will use this trolley to educate the travellers on the differences between pollinated foods and other foods in order to provide a link to pollination food security through a split service of foods pollinated by bees and those not. Again platform performances on this second trolley can be possible. Project 13: Bee Volunteers Artist - Professor Andrea Liggins Stakeholder - Gill Wright, The Heart of Wales Line (Bee Line) Portraits of the volunteers at every station of the The Heart of Wales Line (32) involved in the Bee Project to plant pollinator gardens at every station, 120 miles of Station bee gardens. A plan developed through the early meetings of the Cross Pollination project is to add the name Bee Line to the Heart of Wales to show the work that this railway is undertaking to protect pollinators. The portraits will be exhibited at every station.
Collaborator Contribution Although the collaborator has added no science expertise, the contribution to impact of the project has been extremely beneficial. Attending and playing an active role in the meetings and Introductory Network Event through presentation about the plans for the Heart of Wales Line, has ensured that collaboration with not only the research team and other collaborators such as the Bumblebee Conservation Trust has been well received. The Chair of the Development Committee reported from the Introductory Network Event to Arriva Trains management and obtained approval for the change of name for the line, together with subsequent project approval.
Impact No outcomes as yet. Multi-disciplinary - Art, Business
Start Year 2016
 
Description Network Partnerships for the Production of Artworks (National Botanic Garden of Wales) 
Organisation National Botanic Garden of Wales
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Cross-pollination is a networking scheme to bring scientists and stakeholders together with artists. Fourteen art/science artwork production projects have arisen from the Introductory Network Events and subsequent visits and meetings (in person and Skype). The artistic outputs from these collaborations were exhibited at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, both in the gallery and throughout the garden space.The exhibition was held for the whole of July and August 2017. To ensure the partnerships operate to their fullest potential, the research team (artists) have visited the scientists and or held meetings with Skype. Also engagement with the other end users (stakeholders), the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm and Chair of the Heart of Wales Line (Arriva Trains) Development Committee has taken place, through meetings and shared project development. Four of the artworks in the Cross-pollination exhibition
Collaborator Contribution Discussions and concept development of Cross- pollination project. Contribution to Introductory Networking Event through presentation of the research at NBGW by Dr Natasha De Vere, and the second day was held at NBGW. Science perspective contribution to the online 'Art Crits' held February and March 2017. The in kind contribution is twofold a) to ensure that the interpretation and accessibility of the final exhibition of all 14 art/science projects is maximized and b) discussions with the individual artists and scientific contribution to such. The Head of Interpretation at the garden, contributed to the successful bid writing for the Arts Council of Wales Production Grant. This application was made as the number, ambition and complexity of the proposed individual art/science artistic outputs more than doubled from the original plans. Hosting the two day research art crit, where the scientists involved in the project and the artists/art researchers involved discussed the work which formed the basis of the research undertaken by the linguist involved in the project. Hosting the Cross-pollination exhibition, 14 exhibits in total across the garden and in the gallery. The scientist on a residency in the garden, from Bristol University gave tours of the exhibition as did the Head of Interpretation. Promotion through the NBGW website. Hosting of Schools workshops for young people with learning dificulties.
Impact Fourteen exhibited art-works and series held throughout the garden and the gallery. Series of tours of exhibition and workshops for young people with learning difficulties. Multi-disciplinary - Art, Botanics, Science, Perception and Interpretation, Environment.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Network Partnerships for the Production of Artworks (The Bee Lab) 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department Queen's School of Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Creative expertise. After the Introductory Network Event four artists/arts researchers visited the Bee Lab at Bristol University to discuss further the possible collaborative artworks. Five individual artwork projects are completed and are described in the Creative and Artistic Outputs section.
Collaborator Contribution Active contribution to Introductory Network Event including presentation of research via Pecha Kucha, meetings and Art Crits. Scientific expertise to Cross-pollination project through hosting artists at the Bee Lab and subsequent meetings. Tours of the exhibition at the National Botanic Garden of Wales by Mike Harrap, whilst he was on secondment, during July/August 2017. Introductions to organisers of the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature for a possible exhibition of the Cross-pollination artworks, described in Creative and Artworks section. Contribution of Paper to the Cross-pollination conference Working with Artists - Mike Harrap.
Impact Exhibition pieces and artworks - 'Artifice', 'Signals', 'Petal', 'Ethereal Vessels' and 'Shimmer Wall'. Plans to exhibit pieces of the exhibition at the Bath and Bristol Festival of Nature. Multi-disciplinary - Art, Pollinator Science
Start Year 2016
 
Description Network Partnerships for the Production of Artworks at the Bug Farm 
Organisation Dr Beynon's Bug Farm
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Two individual art/science artwork projects developed from the Introductory Network Event and subsequent meetings, these two projects have potential to develop further after the life of the project and have formed the basis of a funding application by Dr Beynon, which was achieved. Creative and artistic expertise. Multi-disciplinary workshop for schoolchildren held at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, to promote the plight of pollinators and encourage children to engage with insects in a more positive manner. The artworks are 'When Less is More" and 'Pollinator Trail' which are described in the Artistic and Creative Products section.
Collaborator Contribution Project Steering Group Member. Scientific and commercial impact expertise. Considerable contribution to Introductory Network Event, and presentation of research through Pecha Kucha. Several meetings and contribution to Art Crit to provide expertise for the artwork projects. Hosting artists and students to work on Pollinator Trail project. Hosting multidisciplinary schools workshop. Hosting and organising family workshops during October 2017. The tour of the Cross-pollination Exhibition originally at the National Botanic Garden of Wales from October 17 at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, with catalogue . Hosting the second day of the Cross-pollination conference 11th November 2017, focussing on impact and policy. Hosting the trail of the learning game "Outbreak", developed with partners from Cornell University.
Impact Exhibition of 14 art pieces Cross-pollination exhibition October 2017 to present. Twelve of the individual pieces described in Artistic and Creative Products Section section. The production of permanent sculptures in the pollinator trail. Further funding achieved by Dr Beynon's Bug Farm for the extension of the Pollinator Trail across St Davids, Pembrokeshire to become the first bee friendly city and as a tourist attraction, an idea developed through the Cross-pollination project. A school workshop and a series of workshops for families 2017. Two artist in residencies A) Professor Catrin Webster (continuing) and B) Carly Wiltshire. Postgraduate teaching project. Trial of the learning game 'Outbreak' which is being further developed. An artist on the project Professor Catrin Webster invited as arts advisor onto the St.David's Pollinator Trail committee. Multidisciplinary,Science, Art and Commercial Business Impact.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Projects at Cornell University, USA 
Organisation Cornell University
Department Department of Entomology
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Originally two artists from the Cross-pollination project, Sarah Tombs and Daniel Trivedy visited for a short residency Cornell University, Department of Ecology in August 2017. Their time was spent observing and shadowing researchers in their field work, making drawings, sound and film recordings and documenting the team's research. Visits to the Dyce laboratory and discussions with the team revealed interesting research methods, which involved a range of methods that included low-tech collection of bee specimens, experiments and team work, to complex computer data modeling and info-graphics. Once back in the UK several meetings were held with Prof. David Williams, consultant anaesthetist and lead in medical simulation at Swansea University to develop ideas for a presentation for the Cross- Pollination project conference in November 2017. Work was developed around the notion of interactive participatory games in order to 'simulate' the processes observed in the field. The outcome was that two different activities were created. Artworks were also created. In November 2017 Professor Andrea Liggins and Dr Tyra Oseng - Rees visited for a further short residency. Both took part in research meetings and Liggins produced photographic artworks to be exhibited, in the Collection house. Discussions were held and plans made for the Cross-pollination exhibition to be shown at the Mann Library, Cornell university in 2020. In addition plans were made for arts contribution to the future pollinator garden at the University.
Collaborator Contribution Hosting the four artists/researchers at the University. Staff time used in discussions and meetings and in the collaboration with art works. Collaboration in the development of the game 'Outbreak' particularly Version 2. The existing model could be used to illustrate spread of any epidemic (e.g. Cholera, HIV, Ebola); or adapted to other medical teaching activities. Staff at Cornell are using the game as a teaching resource. Providing the Cross-pollination conference with the keynote speaker on the first day and conference presentation on the second day that demonstrated how science can learn from interaction with artists. 'Breaking the rules of science communication to better communicate science' Dr Peter Graystock, Cornell University, New York, USA The collaboration continues.
Impact Interactive participatory game used to learn ways that pathogens are spread. Artworks 'Glass Bees', and a development of the 'Hoverfly portrait' work to extend the portraits for pollinators world-wide. Other outcomes planned for the future.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Reading University 
Organisation University of Reading
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Artists worked with Scientists from the University of Reading on collaborative projects i.e. 'The Buzzing Machine' and 'When Less is More'. These are described in more detail under Artistic and Creative Products.
Collaborator Contribution Fully engaged with all parts of the project, particularly the Art Crits, discussions regarding the collaborative project and networking. Two members of staff Dr Tom Breeze and Duncan Coston gave papers over the two days of the Cross Pollination Conference ( 'Crop Pollination - lessons learned across borders' - Dr Tom Breeze and 'Research, Festivals and Art: bringing research to the wider public' - Duncan Coston). Duncan Coston is continuing to work with Dr Paul Jeff on a performance of the Buzzing Machine artwork to take place on the Heart of Wales Line in 2018.
Impact The scientists at the University of Reading involved in the Cross-pollination project wrote into a NERC bid 'Modelling Landscapes for Resilient Pollination Services in the UK' an element of art and design. This funding has been achieved and includes funds for an artist to work in collaboration with the scientists.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Arts in Action 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Carly Wilshere- Butler worked as an artist on the Cross-pollination project and as a result has arranged and taught a number of workshops based around pollinators. This week long workshop was funded by Swansea City Council and was held in Gwyrosydd Primary School, which is in a Community First area. It was part of the Arts in Action project and the target age was reception age pupils. The children (and their teachers) were taken through tasks which taught them colour theory, positive and negative shapes, identification of insects particularly pollinators and the plants they use for food and habitat. Their design work culminated in them creating fused glass panels which were then made in to stained glass units. The work was then exhibited at Swansea College of Art as part of the Arts in Action Initiative.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.uwtsd.ac.uk/art-design/arts-in-action
 
Description Bug Farm Family workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact At Dr Beynon's Bug farm, some works were installed in October so that they would be available for the Autumn half term break for visitors to see and also as a series of workshops for families was planned. These workshops with a total of 20 families attending involved adults and children collecting plant materials and the production of cyanotypes (sun pictures). Carly Wilshere running the workshops, gave a talks about pollinators, particularly the bumblebee with knowledge gained from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust Identification day. Questionnaires were completed at the end of the workshops. All the comments were positive,"helpful and a good source of interesting information, its always nice to be able to create work of your own to take away- it reinforces information and makes memories too".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.facebook.com/events/352911898501374/
 
Description Cross-pollination Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Cross-pollination Conference 10th/11th November 2017
Day 1: Friday 10th November 2017, 10.00am - 5.30pm at the Reading room, Alex Design Exchange, Swansea College of Art, UWTSD, Swansea SA1 5DU
10.30 Welcome
10.40 Introduction to the Project - Professor Andrea Liggins, UWTSD.
11.00 Keynote from the Science perspective - Multiple stresses on bees and multiple solutions to improve pollinator health: New York as an emerging success story - Dr Scott McArt, Cornell University, New York, USA
11.30 Keynote from the Arts Perspective - Catching light - Seeing more than meets the eye - Dr Mark Cocks, UWTSD
12.00 Working with Artists - Mike Harrap, Bristol Bee Lab, University of Bristol
12.25 Communicating Cross-pollination - Dr Paul Thompson, University of Birmingham
12.50 Beyond Bees: the role of hoverflies in pollination - Andrew Lucas, Natural Resources Wales
13.15 Lunch and networking, slide show of artworks
14.00 A panel discussion about the experiences of the project and impact, with Dr Paul Jeff, Dr Tyra Oseng-Rees, Dr Sarah Beynon, Sinead Lynch, Prof Mike Christie, Sarah Tombs Chair)
14.45 Crop Pollination - lessons learned across borders - Dr Tom Breeze, University of Reading
15.10 When Less is More - Professor Karen Ingham, UWTSD and Swansea University

16.00 Every Last Mouthful - Chatwin and Martin
16.25 Remembering Forgotten Landscapes - Professor Andrea Liggins, UWTSD
16.50 Research, Festivals and Art: bringing research to the wider public - Duncan Coston, University of Reading
17.15 Round up discussions and thoughts to take to Day Two
17.40 Close
Cross-pollination Conference 10th/11th November 2017
Day 2: Saturday 11th November 2017, 11am - 5pm, Dr Beynons Bug Farm, St Davids, Pembrokeshire SA62 6BX

11.20 Introduction to Policy for Pollinators - Professor Mike Christie, Aberystwyth University
11.50 Environment and Rural Affairs Policy development in the aftermath of the vote to leave the EU - Ann Humble, Head of Evidence and Analysis, ERA EU Exit Division, Welsh Government
12.20 The Pollinator Trail - Dr Sarah Beynon, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm and Oxford University
12.50 Breaking the rules of science communication to better communicate science - Dr Peter Graystock, Cornell University, New York, USA
14.00 Arts event - Sarah Tombs, UWTSD and Daniel Trivedy, Arts Council of Wales
14.15 The Process of Making - Dr Shelley Doolan, UWTSD
14.40 The Idea of Cross-pollination, from conceptual art to the concept of food - Dr Paul Jeff (UWTSD)
15.00 Questions and Discussions (with coffee/tea)- Professor Mike Christie (Chair)
15.50 Round up and close - Professor Mike Christie and Professor Andrea Liggins




18.30 approximately - Pollinator Feast and entertainment
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description Cyanotypes at the Bug Farm 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Carly Wilshere- Butler worked as an artist on the Cross-pollination project and as a result has arranged and taught a number of workshops based around pollinators. Building on a previous residency and workshop she spent a further week holding workshops for children and adults producing Cyanotype prints. Attendees were given a tour of Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, collecting wild flowers. these were then used to make Cyanotype prints. During the workshop the role of pollinators and the difficulties they experienced were discussed. A questionnaire was completed which demonstrated that the participants had become more aware of the plight of pollinators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.thebugfarm.co.uk/
 
Description Exhibition Private View and Tour at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On November 11th 2017, the 2nd day of the Cross-pollination was held at Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, Pembrokeshire. The conference concluded with a Private View and accompanied tour of the exhibition open to the general public. Discussions were held about the work with the artists and scientists involved in the collaborations and a Q&A period was included.After the Private View a Pollinator Feast was held where only foods pollinated by insects or animals were served.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description Growing the Future - Cyanotype Workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Carly Wilshere- Butler is an artist who worked on the Cross-pollination project. Her collaborations initiated by the project with the National Botanic Garden of Wales and Dr Beynon's Bug Farm have led to a number of opportunities to work with the community and share ideas and promote the plight of pollinators.
This series of 5 'taster day' workshops was funded by the Growing the Future project at the National Botanic Garden of Wales. Attendees were of mixed age and from different parts of the UK, mostly regional. The activities included selecting flowers and plants popular with pollinators and producing Cyanotype prints using sunlight as a source light. These prints were then made into cards, display prints and labels.
A discussion about pollinators took place during the practice workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Intro Networking Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Networking Intro Event
During 7th and 8th April 2016 the Intro Networking Event took place at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Alex Campus, Swansea and the National Botanic Garden of Wales.
During March the key participants of the project were finalised, and these attended this event joined by further interested parties. All the participants came together to share ideas, discuss their wide-ranging research and start the collaboration process.
The main aim of the Networking Intro Event was to initiate an inter-disciplinary research network on the vital subject of pollinators. During the project this network, through collaborative art projects, will explore how science and art research can interact to create new ideas and innovative methodologies for research into pollinators.
Participants of the event included award-winning scientists in the area of pollinator research from the UK and USA, high profile artists and arts researchers from the fields of aesthetics, perception and community arts. Important additions were linguists studying the language of environmental research and its affect on perceived values. The project leader Professor Andrea Liggins (University of Wales Trinity Saint David) has undertaken a number of science/art projects, most recently with Dr De Vere Head of Science and Conservation at the National Botanic Garden of Wales. Professor Michael Christie's (Aberystwyth University) expertise in the Valuation of Nature for Ecosystem Service Sustainability provided a further focus for the event.
A number of the representatives in policy-making organisations were also involved, such as members of the Pollinator Taskforce Wales and the Intergovernmental Science -Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Co-I Christie has led a number of research projects focussing on the economic evaluation of nature and bio-diversity and was PI for the NERC Valuing Nature Steering project. Further participants at this event, included the Bumblebee Conservation Trust (Bee Wild project), BugLife, The Bee Garden at the National Botanic Garden of Wales (NBGW), Dr Beynon's Bug Farm, a representative from Natural Resources Wales (also a scientist), and a representative of the Heart of Wales Line and Arriva Trains Wales 120 Miles of Bee Garden project.
Day One started with presentations about art/science collaborations from the perspective of firstly the artist and then the scientist. These presentations were followed by sixteen Pecha Kucha, where each participant had 6 minutes and 40 seconds to describe their research.
PechaKucha or Pecha Kucha (pronounced 'pech-a-kee-shoe' and is Japanese for 'chit-chat') is a presentation style in which 20 slides are shown for 20 seconds each (6 minutes and 40 seconds in total). The format was conceived to keep presentations concise and fast-paced. Pecha Kucha has been used by artists and designers to view several presentations within a short time period.
This was followed by a speed-networking event where each individual scientist and artist had a chance to meet and discuss possible collaborative art projects for 15 mins.
Day Two progressed from these introductions with the objectives of sharing ideas and forming collaborative partnerships. The enthusiasm of the participants was tangible resulting in a multitude of possible art/science projects, which were arranged under themes. These were:-
1. Farming and Environment Policy
2. Multi-model
3. Pollinators and their Habitats
4. Preservation (Wild Bees)
5. Communication
6. Lines and Journeys
7. Perception and Motivation
Professor Mike Christie summed up in a presentation on the potential of the project to influence policy-making and this was followed by a tour of the National Botanic Garden of Wales, with a focus on the new butterfly house in the making by Head of Science and Conservation, Dr Natasha De Vere.
Follow-on Meetings
The thematic groups met in person (including visits to The Bee Lab Bristol, Dr Beynon's Bug Farm and the Science Lab at the National Botanic Garden of Wales) and via Skype to discuss and finalise the individual Art/Science projects. From these meetings, which took place prior to September 2016, a large number of art outputs were agreed, twice as many that were in the AHRC proposal. The networking to date therefor had been very successful, but more funding was required. An application to the Arts Council of Wales was made, which was successful and this ensured that the following projects could progress.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description Safekeeping Bees, Symposium Plymouth University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Safekeeping Bees was an Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Future of Bees in Britain. Speakers were from a wide variety of backgrounds, the audience included bee-keepers, environmental activists, students both undergraduate and post-graduate and PG, artists and scientists.
Speakers included Nick Bentham-Green, A collaborative approach to conserving the Cornish Black Honey Bee; Mark Edwards, Working together as a community - Plymouth University beekeepers; Amy Shelton, Honeyscribe - An Artistic Investigation into the health of the honeybee; Dr. William Kirk, Keele University, 'The best plants to help British bees'; and myself, Professor Andrea Liggins, 'Cross-pollination - Revaluing Pollinators through Arts and Science Collaboration'.
The symposium was organised by Heidi Morstang (Convener of Land/Water and the Visual Arts Research Group) Plymouth University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description School visit and workshop to the NBGW 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A group of 16 students with additional learning needs from the Canolfan Amanwy facility at Ysgol Dyffryn Aman participated in a day long workshop and visit to the Cross- pollination exhibition at the National Botanic Garden of Wales.
The day started with a guided walking tour and discussion of the exhibition.
The students responded well to works, in particular they were inspired by Myles Mansfield's Bee Sculpture made from recycled engines and discarded industrial items, and asked questions about some of the plastic topiary in Daniel Trivedy's Artifice installation. They interacted with Paul Jeff and Daniel Butlers' Buzzing Machine, which they took turns to play. They touched the surface of Sarah Tombs's stone petal.
This engagement with several sculptural works enabled them to ask questions about pollinators and how our artwork was made.
Mansfield and Tombs had constructed a large metal bee structure for the students to work with using recycled materials.
The group then went to the studio and sorted out materials and teams to work on the sculpture. One team made large wings from acetate, sticking on beads and other shiny materials. Other teams concentrated on embellishing the bee, by wrapping and tying fabric and stuffing materials to create a body.
The students worked with energy all day and at the end of the day they named the bee - Tenbee.
Class teacher Anthony Wood said of the day,
' The staff and pupils had a BRILLIANT day, they worked very hard and learned a lot in a really accessible way. By making a large sculpture together they learnt about team work as well as bees and how to make sculptures from recycled waste. Some pupils that do not usually get involved with art projects really got into working in 3D. It has inspired us to visit the botanic gardens again. We hope that the gardens find a good space to exhibit Tenbee until we collect the sculpture to display in the school'
Tenbee was collected and is now on display in the school's reception area so that other pupils and students can see the artwork.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description Series of tours of Exhibition at the National Botanic Garden of Wales 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact At the NBGW the a series of tours were held for the general public of the Cross-pollination exhibition which consisted of 14 exhibits including textiles, photography, glass, sculpture and painting. The first tour was run by the Garden's Head of Interpretation and was aimed at raising awareness among Garden staff. The 8 attendees, from horticulture, science and education departments, became exhibition advocates at the end of the tour, able and willing to talk to their colleagues who were curious but missed the tour. Also at the NBGW weekly tours were held during August, one by Sarah Tombs and the other three by a previously sceptical scientist from the University of Bristol, Bee Lab on secondment to the NBGW, average of 10/12 people per tour. This scientist's enthusiasm for the art works had developed through the process of working with three of the artists and coupled with his scientific knowledge gave a very different but relevant viewpoint to the exhibition. The exhibition catalogue was also on sale and was discussed with the audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://crosspollinationartsciencecollaboration.wordpress.com/
 
Description The Bug Farm School Event - pilot 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact As part of the Cross-pollination outreach agenda, together with scientist Dr Sarah Beynon, artists Dan Trivedy, Sarah Tombs and Professor Andrea Liggins ran a very successful pilot project at Dr Beynon's The Bug Farm (with Ysgol Croesgoch) to test the feasibility of getting participants to engage with and discover more about bugs and pollinators. Beynon and Tombs gave a talk on the science and art perspectives of insects, and then using recycled materials, the children made 'musical' instruments to imitate insect noises. Alongside this, they learnt about the science behind how and why bugs make sounds (e.g. grasshopper stridulation). They recorded their sounds individually and using the MadPad app on a iPad to make the sounds, which they then recorded together by the children as an insect orchestra. The resulting piece of music was then played back to them in an empty grain silo.
Please follow the link below to hear and watch the Ysgol Croesgoch 'Bug Orchestra':
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h75uiljveef1h1o/AADQ4WYXNU0LG5Ldf5DP3bhCa?dl=0?view=IMG_0021.m4v
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.dropbox.com/sh/h75uiljveef1h1o/AADQ4WYXNU0LG5Ldf5DP3bhCa?dl=0&preview=IMG_0021.m4v