AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sheffield
Department Name: Geography

Abstract

The AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network provides a platform for US and UK cultural institutions, and researchers to network around the topic of food. It will map existing stakeholders, datasets and food research priorities, advise on digitisation standards, run virtual workshops, link to cross-disciplinary UKRI research, and build capacity via pump priming funding for future research. The network-research themes are: 1. Manuscripts 2. Printed literature 3. Other collections.

WHY A FOOD DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP NETWORK? Food has become an increasingly popular subject of study due to its inherently multidisciplinary nature. Food's universal pervasiveness allows it to become an accessible window into every culture and time period. The materials and texts concerning food offer a continuous resource that spans thousands of years of human civilisation, with a massive corpus of written manuscripts, printed documents (books, pamphlets, menus), and other material culture and ephemera (including images and sound recordings) available for study. Many cultural institutions have large collections relating to food, some of which, now fully or partially digitised, are accessible to the global research community. However, knowledge of the existence and depth of many of the collections is limited, and there is a lack of communication between cultural institutions, data providers and researchers. Detailed mapping of the network has not been undertaken, and many possible connections have not yet been made.
There is a large existing academic audience for food-related content in the multidisciplinary fields of food studies, gastronomy, anthropology, archaeology, sociology, and nutrition, domestic and medical history. Given opportunity and access, an even wider public audience would engage with historic food texts. In addition, there are multiple food-related programmes of education research running in the UK and US, all of which require access to material and data.
Many global challenges are also directly related to food. The food system is linked to 30% of total greenhouse gas emissions, and healthcare costs are increasing due to diet-related issues (60%+ of adults in the UK and US are now Obese or Overweight). Food is also central to many countries' economies (11% of total employment in the US) and cultural heritage.
Addressing these food-related global issues requires an interdisciplinary approach featuring (digital) humanities researchers, and content from cultural institutions, to provide a narrative, context and grounding for research and solutions, to highlight underrepresented voices, and to give greater insight into cultures, traditions and the preservation/ of culinary knowledge.
Until now, coordination and networking between food-related UK and US cultural institutions and researchers has been limited.

UKRI has previously funded interdisciplinary research through Global Food Security (one of UKRI's multidisciplinary programmes), alongside investment in UKRI food networks such as the STFC food network+, and the EPSRC Internet of Food Things+. These networks have, however, been severely lacking in input from the humanities. This proposed network represents a vital opportunity for UK and US researchers and cultural institutions to engage with and link to the wider interdisciplinary food research programmes.

The main collaborating cultural organisations represent some of the largest and most important UK/US digitised food-based collections: the Boston University (project partner), U of Sheffield, U of Leeds, Wellcome Collection, Guildhall Library, U of York, U of Brighton, the Linnean Society, and Folger Shakespeare Library, UC San Diego Library, National Museum of American History, U of Southern Mississippi, U of South Florida (US).

Further impact and reach is delivered through our partner organisations: JISC, Adam Matthews, The Recipes Project, H-Nutrition, FRiED, N8 Agrifood, and the Friends of the Oxford Symposium.

Planned Impact

The main pathway to impact of the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network is to create a transatlantic network to stimulate collaboration between researchers and cultural institutions around the broad themes of digital scholarship and food.
There are structures and mechanisms already in place at the Investigator Universities to facilitate impact, including public and business engagement.
Since the main goal of the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network is to generate new transatlantic collaborations, we cannot be specific in how the impact is demonstrated in each of the three network-research themes (1. Manuscripts 2. Printed literature 3. Other collections).
We hope that:
Deliverable 1 will provide benefit to researchers and cultural institutions, increasing the use of currently digitised food collections
Deliverable 2 will provide guidance on harmonisation of metadata and linkage of data sets. It is hoped that this will lead to the funding application for the development of a robust, international, digital portal that will provide access to a wide range of food-related materials (documents, manuscripts, objects) in diverse collections.
Deliverables 3-5 will lead to greater networking of cultural institutions and researchers (including beyond humanities), and increased use of new digital research methods.
We will stipulate that all funded pump priming projects must contain a Pathways to Impact plan and adhere the general policy that all project findings will be made freely available for academic research, and publications should be written up in pertinent high-impact peer reviewed journals and presented at associated conferences. We will seek to create impact through public engagement via the website, Factsheets, media and social media such as Twitter.
In addition to our partnered cultural organisations, we will seek further impact through and within our partner organisations including JISC (and the Strategic Content Alliance); Global Food Security, STFC Food Network+, EPSRC Internet of Food Things+, EPSRC AI3 Science Discovery Network, The Recipes Project, H-Nutrition, Food Researchers in Edinburgh (FRiED), N8 Agrifood, the American Friends of the Oxford Symposium, and the Friends of the Oxford Symposium. These organisations can 'signal boost' our network, and provide input into the network, and be impacted by the network.
Additional impact will occur through and within our partnerships with industry such as Transkribus, SAGE Ocean, and Adam Matthews - all active in supporting digital academic research.
Policy impact and engagement with global issues (sustainability, obesity, hunger etc.) will be undertaken where possible, with engagement via Input to relevant expert groups, consultations, select committees and boards, i.e. Defra's and FSA's Expert Groups, and Scottish Government's Strategic Research (RESAS) Programme Board.
 
Description The AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network ran a 2019 community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought US and UK libraries and archives could better support food researchers through digitisation and activities.
We were overwhelmed by the response to the community survey with 200 respondents from the global food research community - despite there being multiple 'disruption events' including an eight day university strike for many UK research institutions, as well as the Thanksgiving Holiday period. We're really excited to have the voices of so many food researchers help us shape what is needed by the community.
A summary discussion of the results is found here: https://recipes.hypotheses.org/17062
The main finding is that there is an appetite for more digitisation of food related content, and that there is a range of requests. With the use of the survey we can now tailor digitisation, and provide evidence of need to the food research community.
The results from the 2020 Archive survey (directed at curators and digitisation teams in cultural institutions). This was to capture information on the scope of their food-related collections, any barriers to digitization, and future ambitions. We had over 30 responses from global archives. The main findings were that some had digitised food collections, but many did not have knowledge about the location of their food related content, or it's availability digitally. This provides impetus for future network/co-ordination grants to further digitise and collate food related content.
The general objectives of the award were met, with specific case studies/subprojects still not concluding due to getting collaboration contracts in place, as well as impact of Coronavirus.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the final networking (US-UK) events were cancelled; and so the additional networking funding was used to enable the pilot projects to be extended.

Please find a collection of research summaries from the Network below:

Reynolds, Christian; Kernan, Sarah (2020): Around the Table: Research Technologies (Blog post). The University of Sheffield. Online resource. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.12994151.v1

Reynolds, Christian (2020): A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community (Blog post). The University of Sheffield. Online resource. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.12994178.v1

Elias, Megan J.; Kitchings, Laura; Spiegelman, Hannah (2020): Looking for Food in the New Smithsonian Institution Catalog, a White Paper. The University of Sheffield. Report. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.12993383.v1

Zamboni, Alice (2020): A survey of research projects improving the discoverability of manuscripts resources through digital technologies.. Report. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.13123394

Wheaton, Joe; Wheaton, Barbara; Saine, Kate (2020): The Sifter - what is it?. The University of Sheffield. Report. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.13259792.v1

Bertaud, Nathalie; Wilson, Marisa; Lingold, Mary Caton (2021): Searching for Sugar in Archives: Summary of activities and outcomes. The University of Sheffield. Report. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.13259816.v1

Haley, Andrew; Brannock, Jennifer (2021): Transcribing and Digitizing Mississippi Community Cookbooks: A Summary of Grant Activities. The University of Sheffield. Report. https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.13550417.v1

The Sifter website: https://thesifter.org/
Exploitation Route The results of the surveys can be used as an evidence base and justification for future UK-US networking and digitization grants.
The new digital resources could be used by both the academic and wider communities for future research.

This network has already led to funding applications with UKRI, and other consortia being formed.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://ahrcfoodnetwork.ac.uk
 
Description ? The project has led to digitization of (food related) materials within multiple archives. The two largest efforts have been at the University of Leeds, and University of Southern Mississippi.These new online archives have been used by the research community. ? The findings from the 2019 community survey (brief summary found here: https://recipes.hypotheses.org/17062), has informed policy and strategy for both archives, and content providers (such as Adam Matthew Digital). The results have also been discussed in the food studies community, with internal reflection on what is important to us as a community. ? The awards findings have also contributed to greater networking within UK-US archives, with sharing's of practice.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes
Amount € 49,858 (EUR)
Organisation Alpro Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Belgium
Start 02/2021 
End 02/2022
 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes project funded by The Alpro Foundation 
Organisation Meertens Institute
Country Netherlands 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution A Project Funded by the Alpro Foundation from 2021-2022. I have led the project. Plant-based diets are becoming popular across Europe but are not yet mainstream. If we are to shift diets across Europe, the recipes on offer must be appealing to consumers, and there must be evidence that dietary changes will make a difference. However, there are a limited number of tools available to communicate the complex impacts of shifting to plant-based dietary patterns for different European food cultures. Indeed, since consumers typically understand food choices as meals and recipes rather than as diets2, a recipe impact tool has long been requested by the public.3 In 2019 Dr Reynolds (PI) piloted the creation of a Natural Language Processing (NLP)4 tool that automatically calculated the greenhouse gas emission and calories of a recipe's ingredients and cooking method5. In this research we will expand this tool to express the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This novel tool will be a step change in allowing consumers (and food professionals) the opportunity to visualise and communicate plant-based food sustainability. This will help motivate consumers to shift towards plant-based diets. The project's novelty lies in the integration of NLP methods with environmental impacts and nutrition. This work is cutting edge and possible only due to the interdisciplinary collaboration of its investigators. As the language technology we are developing is aimed at automating recipe analysis, it paves the way for bringing food, nutrition, and sustainability research into the realm of big data, we expect this project to have a wide impact across the food system and academica. Objectives This research produces a tool that calculates the calories, the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This will increase food-climate awareness in consumers, offering them a means to investigate tradeoffs and integrate sustainable healthy food into different European food cultures. Our targeted outputs will inform consumers, food professionals and policy makers. Outputs include: Functional environmental NLP tool for recipe analysis Database of the GHGE, cost, biodiversity, water, land use European plant-based recipes (EUPBR) Academic publication: analysis of the sustainability of EUPBR Consumer/chef guidance on how to adapt EUPBR to be more sustainable (workshop output) Summary of findings for policy makers/nutrition professionals (report/webinar)
Collaborator Contribution Diana Maynard Diana Maynard is the lead computational linguist in the GATE research team, developers of the software the prototype tool uses, and has 30 years of experience in Natural Language Processing, including the application of NLP technology to understand social behaviour and drive policy change. Steve Brewer Steve Brewer Steve Brewer is the founder and director at Text Mining Solutions and in this project he is the lead consultant who designed the prototype tool. He will be continuing to develop the tool in this project. Rebeca Ibañez Martín Rebeca Ibañez Martín researches the history of nutritional knowledge and cooking, waste practices around food, and new technologies for nutrient recovery from waste water. She has extensive knowledge of anthropology of food and social studies of science. She will be running the stakeholder workshops. Marieke van Erp KNAW Humanities Cluster - The Netherlands Language Technology and Semantic Web expert with a penchant for interdisciplinary research. She leads the Digital Humanities Lab at the KNAW Humanities Cluster. She holds a PhD in computational linguistics from Tilburg University (2010) where she applied digital humanities methods to historic textual sources from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her research is focused on applying natural language processing to semantic web applications with a particular interest in digital humanities. She previously worked on the European NewsReader project and the Dutch humanities infrastructure project CLARIAH project and has been involved in the organisation of numerous workshops and conferences in natural language processing, semantic web, digital humanities and cultural heritage. She is the project manager of the EU Horizon 2020 Odeuropa project where she is also working on software tools that can recognise references to smells in texts. Christoph Trattner University of Bergen - Norway Christoph Trattner is a leader in analysis of recipes to examine Behavioral Data Science and Recommender Systems. He is currently leading a research project that tries to understand, predict and change online food preferences to tackle health-related food issues such as diabetes or obesity. Alain Starke Wageningen University & Research - Netherlands Alain Starke is a postdoctoral research fellow in human-computer interaction and (sustainable) food decision-making. Since the autumn of 2020, he has been working on the 'Me, My Diet, I' project to design personalized nutrition interventions to support healthy eating habits.
Impact https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2020.621577 doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.621577 a multi-disciplinary publication.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes project funded by The Alpro Foundation 
Organisation Text Mining Solutions Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution A Project Funded by the Alpro Foundation from 2021-2022. I have led the project. Plant-based diets are becoming popular across Europe but are not yet mainstream. If we are to shift diets across Europe, the recipes on offer must be appealing to consumers, and there must be evidence that dietary changes will make a difference. However, there are a limited number of tools available to communicate the complex impacts of shifting to plant-based dietary patterns for different European food cultures. Indeed, since consumers typically understand food choices as meals and recipes rather than as diets2, a recipe impact tool has long been requested by the public.3 In 2019 Dr Reynolds (PI) piloted the creation of a Natural Language Processing (NLP)4 tool that automatically calculated the greenhouse gas emission and calories of a recipe's ingredients and cooking method5. In this research we will expand this tool to express the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This novel tool will be a step change in allowing consumers (and food professionals) the opportunity to visualise and communicate plant-based food sustainability. This will help motivate consumers to shift towards plant-based diets. The project's novelty lies in the integration of NLP methods with environmental impacts and nutrition. This work is cutting edge and possible only due to the interdisciplinary collaboration of its investigators. As the language technology we are developing is aimed at automating recipe analysis, it paves the way for bringing food, nutrition, and sustainability research into the realm of big data, we expect this project to have a wide impact across the food system and academica. Objectives This research produces a tool that calculates the calories, the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This will increase food-climate awareness in consumers, offering them a means to investigate tradeoffs and integrate sustainable healthy food into different European food cultures. Our targeted outputs will inform consumers, food professionals and policy makers. Outputs include: Functional environmental NLP tool for recipe analysis Database of the GHGE, cost, biodiversity, water, land use European plant-based recipes (EUPBR) Academic publication: analysis of the sustainability of EUPBR Consumer/chef guidance on how to adapt EUPBR to be more sustainable (workshop output) Summary of findings for policy makers/nutrition professionals (report/webinar)
Collaborator Contribution Diana Maynard Diana Maynard is the lead computational linguist in the GATE research team, developers of the software the prototype tool uses, and has 30 years of experience in Natural Language Processing, including the application of NLP technology to understand social behaviour and drive policy change. Steve Brewer Steve Brewer Steve Brewer is the founder and director at Text Mining Solutions and in this project he is the lead consultant who designed the prototype tool. He will be continuing to develop the tool in this project. Rebeca Ibañez Martín Rebeca Ibañez Martín researches the history of nutritional knowledge and cooking, waste practices around food, and new technologies for nutrient recovery from waste water. She has extensive knowledge of anthropology of food and social studies of science. She will be running the stakeholder workshops. Marieke van Erp KNAW Humanities Cluster - The Netherlands Language Technology and Semantic Web expert with a penchant for interdisciplinary research. She leads the Digital Humanities Lab at the KNAW Humanities Cluster. She holds a PhD in computational linguistics from Tilburg University (2010) where she applied digital humanities methods to historic textual sources from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her research is focused on applying natural language processing to semantic web applications with a particular interest in digital humanities. She previously worked on the European NewsReader project and the Dutch humanities infrastructure project CLARIAH project and has been involved in the organisation of numerous workshops and conferences in natural language processing, semantic web, digital humanities and cultural heritage. She is the project manager of the EU Horizon 2020 Odeuropa project where she is also working on software tools that can recognise references to smells in texts. Christoph Trattner University of Bergen - Norway Christoph Trattner is a leader in analysis of recipes to examine Behavioral Data Science and Recommender Systems. He is currently leading a research project that tries to understand, predict and change online food preferences to tackle health-related food issues such as diabetes or obesity. Alain Starke Wageningen University & Research - Netherlands Alain Starke is a postdoctoral research fellow in human-computer interaction and (sustainable) food decision-making. Since the autumn of 2020, he has been working on the 'Me, My Diet, I' project to design personalized nutrition interventions to support healthy eating habits.
Impact https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2020.621577 doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.621577 a multi-disciplinary publication.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes project funded by The Alpro Foundation 
Organisation University of Bergen
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution A Project Funded by the Alpro Foundation from 2021-2022. I have led the project. Plant-based diets are becoming popular across Europe but are not yet mainstream. If we are to shift diets across Europe, the recipes on offer must be appealing to consumers, and there must be evidence that dietary changes will make a difference. However, there are a limited number of tools available to communicate the complex impacts of shifting to plant-based dietary patterns for different European food cultures. Indeed, since consumers typically understand food choices as meals and recipes rather than as diets2, a recipe impact tool has long been requested by the public.3 In 2019 Dr Reynolds (PI) piloted the creation of a Natural Language Processing (NLP)4 tool that automatically calculated the greenhouse gas emission and calories of a recipe's ingredients and cooking method5. In this research we will expand this tool to express the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This novel tool will be a step change in allowing consumers (and food professionals) the opportunity to visualise and communicate plant-based food sustainability. This will help motivate consumers to shift towards plant-based diets. The project's novelty lies in the integration of NLP methods with environmental impacts and nutrition. This work is cutting edge and possible only due to the interdisciplinary collaboration of its investigators. As the language technology we are developing is aimed at automating recipe analysis, it paves the way for bringing food, nutrition, and sustainability research into the realm of big data, we expect this project to have a wide impact across the food system and academica. Objectives This research produces a tool that calculates the calories, the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This will increase food-climate awareness in consumers, offering them a means to investigate tradeoffs and integrate sustainable healthy food into different European food cultures. Our targeted outputs will inform consumers, food professionals and policy makers. Outputs include: Functional environmental NLP tool for recipe analysis Database of the GHGE, cost, biodiversity, water, land use European plant-based recipes (EUPBR) Academic publication: analysis of the sustainability of EUPBR Consumer/chef guidance on how to adapt EUPBR to be more sustainable (workshop output) Summary of findings for policy makers/nutrition professionals (report/webinar)
Collaborator Contribution Diana Maynard Diana Maynard is the lead computational linguist in the GATE research team, developers of the software the prototype tool uses, and has 30 years of experience in Natural Language Processing, including the application of NLP technology to understand social behaviour and drive policy change. Steve Brewer Steve Brewer Steve Brewer is the founder and director at Text Mining Solutions and in this project he is the lead consultant who designed the prototype tool. He will be continuing to develop the tool in this project. Rebeca Ibañez Martín Rebeca Ibañez Martín researches the history of nutritional knowledge and cooking, waste practices around food, and new technologies for nutrient recovery from waste water. She has extensive knowledge of anthropology of food and social studies of science. She will be running the stakeholder workshops. Marieke van Erp KNAW Humanities Cluster - The Netherlands Language Technology and Semantic Web expert with a penchant for interdisciplinary research. She leads the Digital Humanities Lab at the KNAW Humanities Cluster. She holds a PhD in computational linguistics from Tilburg University (2010) where she applied digital humanities methods to historic textual sources from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her research is focused on applying natural language processing to semantic web applications with a particular interest in digital humanities. She previously worked on the European NewsReader project and the Dutch humanities infrastructure project CLARIAH project and has been involved in the organisation of numerous workshops and conferences in natural language processing, semantic web, digital humanities and cultural heritage. She is the project manager of the EU Horizon 2020 Odeuropa project where she is also working on software tools that can recognise references to smells in texts. Christoph Trattner University of Bergen - Norway Christoph Trattner is a leader in analysis of recipes to examine Behavioral Data Science and Recommender Systems. He is currently leading a research project that tries to understand, predict and change online food preferences to tackle health-related food issues such as diabetes or obesity. Alain Starke Wageningen University & Research - Netherlands Alain Starke is a postdoctoral research fellow in human-computer interaction and (sustainable) food decision-making. Since the autumn of 2020, he has been working on the 'Me, My Diet, I' project to design personalized nutrition interventions to support healthy eating habits.
Impact https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2020.621577 doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.621577 a multi-disciplinary publication.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes project funded by The Alpro Foundation 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution A Project Funded by the Alpro Foundation from 2021-2022. I have led the project. Plant-based diets are becoming popular across Europe but are not yet mainstream. If we are to shift diets across Europe, the recipes on offer must be appealing to consumers, and there must be evidence that dietary changes will make a difference. However, there are a limited number of tools available to communicate the complex impacts of shifting to plant-based dietary patterns for different European food cultures. Indeed, since consumers typically understand food choices as meals and recipes rather than as diets2, a recipe impact tool has long been requested by the public.3 In 2019 Dr Reynolds (PI) piloted the creation of a Natural Language Processing (NLP)4 tool that automatically calculated the greenhouse gas emission and calories of a recipe's ingredients and cooking method5. In this research we will expand this tool to express the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This novel tool will be a step change in allowing consumers (and food professionals) the opportunity to visualise and communicate plant-based food sustainability. This will help motivate consumers to shift towards plant-based diets. The project's novelty lies in the integration of NLP methods with environmental impacts and nutrition. This work is cutting edge and possible only due to the interdisciplinary collaboration of its investigators. As the language technology we are developing is aimed at automating recipe analysis, it paves the way for bringing food, nutrition, and sustainability research into the realm of big data, we expect this project to have a wide impact across the food system and academica. Objectives This research produces a tool that calculates the calories, the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This will increase food-climate awareness in consumers, offering them a means to investigate tradeoffs and integrate sustainable healthy food into different European food cultures. Our targeted outputs will inform consumers, food professionals and policy makers. Outputs include: Functional environmental NLP tool for recipe analysis Database of the GHGE, cost, biodiversity, water, land use European plant-based recipes (EUPBR) Academic publication: analysis of the sustainability of EUPBR Consumer/chef guidance on how to adapt EUPBR to be more sustainable (workshop output) Summary of findings for policy makers/nutrition professionals (report/webinar)
Collaborator Contribution Diana Maynard Diana Maynard is the lead computational linguist in the GATE research team, developers of the software the prototype tool uses, and has 30 years of experience in Natural Language Processing, including the application of NLP technology to understand social behaviour and drive policy change. Steve Brewer Steve Brewer Steve Brewer is the founder and director at Text Mining Solutions and in this project he is the lead consultant who designed the prototype tool. He will be continuing to develop the tool in this project. Rebeca Ibañez Martín Rebeca Ibañez Martín researches the history of nutritional knowledge and cooking, waste practices around food, and new technologies for nutrient recovery from waste water. She has extensive knowledge of anthropology of food and social studies of science. She will be running the stakeholder workshops. Marieke van Erp KNAW Humanities Cluster - The Netherlands Language Technology and Semantic Web expert with a penchant for interdisciplinary research. She leads the Digital Humanities Lab at the KNAW Humanities Cluster. She holds a PhD in computational linguistics from Tilburg University (2010) where she applied digital humanities methods to historic textual sources from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her research is focused on applying natural language processing to semantic web applications with a particular interest in digital humanities. She previously worked on the European NewsReader project and the Dutch humanities infrastructure project CLARIAH project and has been involved in the organisation of numerous workshops and conferences in natural language processing, semantic web, digital humanities and cultural heritage. She is the project manager of the EU Horizon 2020 Odeuropa project where she is also working on software tools that can recognise references to smells in texts. Christoph Trattner University of Bergen - Norway Christoph Trattner is a leader in analysis of recipes to examine Behavioral Data Science and Recommender Systems. He is currently leading a research project that tries to understand, predict and change online food preferences to tackle health-related food issues such as diabetes or obesity. Alain Starke Wageningen University & Research - Netherlands Alain Starke is a postdoctoral research fellow in human-computer interaction and (sustainable) food decision-making. Since the autumn of 2020, he has been working on the 'Me, My Diet, I' project to design personalized nutrition interventions to support healthy eating habits.
Impact https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2020.621577 doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.621577 a multi-disciplinary publication.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Communicating the environmental impact of plant based recipes project funded by The Alpro Foundation 
Organisation Wageningen University & Research
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution A Project Funded by the Alpro Foundation from 2021-2022. I have led the project. Plant-based diets are becoming popular across Europe but are not yet mainstream. If we are to shift diets across Europe, the recipes on offer must be appealing to consumers, and there must be evidence that dietary changes will make a difference. However, there are a limited number of tools available to communicate the complex impacts of shifting to plant-based dietary patterns for different European food cultures. Indeed, since consumers typically understand food choices as meals and recipes rather than as diets2, a recipe impact tool has long been requested by the public.3 In 2019 Dr Reynolds (PI) piloted the creation of a Natural Language Processing (NLP)4 tool that automatically calculated the greenhouse gas emission and calories of a recipe's ingredients and cooking method5. In this research we will expand this tool to express the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This novel tool will be a step change in allowing consumers (and food professionals) the opportunity to visualise and communicate plant-based food sustainability. This will help motivate consumers to shift towards plant-based diets. The project's novelty lies in the integration of NLP methods with environmental impacts and nutrition. This work is cutting edge and possible only due to the interdisciplinary collaboration of its investigators. As the language technology we are developing is aimed at automating recipe analysis, it paves the way for bringing food, nutrition, and sustainability research into the realm of big data, we expect this project to have a wide impact across the food system and academica. Objectives This research produces a tool that calculates the calories, the biodiversity, economic, and climate benefits of plant-based recipes. This will increase food-climate awareness in consumers, offering them a means to investigate tradeoffs and integrate sustainable healthy food into different European food cultures. Our targeted outputs will inform consumers, food professionals and policy makers. Outputs include: Functional environmental NLP tool for recipe analysis Database of the GHGE, cost, biodiversity, water, land use European plant-based recipes (EUPBR) Academic publication: analysis of the sustainability of EUPBR Consumer/chef guidance on how to adapt EUPBR to be more sustainable (workshop output) Summary of findings for policy makers/nutrition professionals (report/webinar)
Collaborator Contribution Diana Maynard Diana Maynard is the lead computational linguist in the GATE research team, developers of the software the prototype tool uses, and has 30 years of experience in Natural Language Processing, including the application of NLP technology to understand social behaviour and drive policy change. Steve Brewer Steve Brewer Steve Brewer is the founder and director at Text Mining Solutions and in this project he is the lead consultant who designed the prototype tool. He will be continuing to develop the tool in this project. Rebeca Ibañez Martín Rebeca Ibañez Martín researches the history of nutritional knowledge and cooking, waste practices around food, and new technologies for nutrient recovery from waste water. She has extensive knowledge of anthropology of food and social studies of science. She will be running the stakeholder workshops. Marieke van Erp KNAW Humanities Cluster - The Netherlands Language Technology and Semantic Web expert with a penchant for interdisciplinary research. She leads the Digital Humanities Lab at the KNAW Humanities Cluster. She holds a PhD in computational linguistics from Tilburg University (2010) where she applied digital humanities methods to historic textual sources from the Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her research is focused on applying natural language processing to semantic web applications with a particular interest in digital humanities. She previously worked on the European NewsReader project and the Dutch humanities infrastructure project CLARIAH project and has been involved in the organisation of numerous workshops and conferences in natural language processing, semantic web, digital humanities and cultural heritage. She is the project manager of the EU Horizon 2020 Odeuropa project where she is also working on software tools that can recognise references to smells in texts. Christoph Trattner University of Bergen - Norway Christoph Trattner is a leader in analysis of recipes to examine Behavioral Data Science and Recommender Systems. He is currently leading a research project that tries to understand, predict and change online food preferences to tackle health-related food issues such as diabetes or obesity. Alain Starke Wageningen University & Research - Netherlands Alain Starke is a postdoctoral research fellow in human-computer interaction and (sustainable) food decision-making. Since the autumn of 2020, he has been working on the 'Me, My Diet, I' project to design personalized nutrition interventions to support healthy eating habits.
Impact https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/frai.2020.621577 doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.621577 a multi-disciplinary publication.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation Brunel University London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation Curating Tomorrow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation Quadram Institute Bioscience
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation University of Leeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Consortium built for Towards a National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration came about due to the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship network. We worked together to propose a bid to the National Collection: Discovery Projects Outline bid 17 November 2020. See jes-2440372 The bid was unsuccessful. But parties remain engaged in re-working the bid to new funding options.
Collaborator Contribution THE CHALLENGE "Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment. From shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, to rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, the impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale." - United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/climatechange/) The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy support, interdisciplinary research and public engagement related to the grand challenges of food and climate change. It will focus on exploring two linked concepts within Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) collections:1) the current and potential impact of climate change on food (production and consumption); and 2) the impact of food on climate change. To explore food and climate in the NC effectively, we must solve problems that are fundamental to delivering the NC itself. These problems include 1) the lack of common metadata and its imprecision, as well as inconsistent use of terminologies to tag and interpret these materials, 2) a lack of skills and tools to investigate and search collections. THE SOLUTION We will build on existing research (including the AHRC US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network), to construct an ontology of food and climate change. This will be used to explore GLAM collections and link to wider climate, nutrition and geographical data. This ontology will be used in conjunction with Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Machine Learning to create a network mapping, semantic enrichment, and visualisation of the keywords that different collections (botanic gardens, museums, archives, and libraries etc) use to describe and give context to collections relating to food and climate. This mapping will be validated as case studies in partner collections focused on Recipes, Food production and Herbarium/images. Interdisciplinary researchers will be supported in accessing our NLP/AI tools and ontology through capacity building workshops, Small Private Online Courses, and pilot project funding. The tools and mapping will be available to citizens, community groups, educational institutions, industry and policy makers, through our engagement campaign. Our public engagement campaign will integrate and update existing campaigns to include material found and developed using our tools and ontology. (previous projects include RBGE's Climate House, Kew's IncrEdibles, MEAL's Food Museum, Wellcome Trust-funded The Crunch, a Take A Bite Out of Climate Change, and 2021'S COP26 PE activities "Reimagining Museums for Climate Action"). Co-developed with the communities over the duration of the project, our outreach activities include workshops, webinars, Massive Open Online courses, transcribeathons, data hacks, and development of educational materials and "serious" games. All drawing on the linked collections uncovered by this project to create more effective activities. Our public engagement methods will be delivered to a wider UK audience using citizen science methods pioneered by PI Reynolds to engage and measure impact. The longer term objective of this project is to empower stakeholders/citizens to create better adaptive resilient communities that use materials in the NC/GLAM collections to respond to food and climate challenges. We also wish to provide the wider UK and International GLAM community (at different scales and capacities) guidance on how to link and open their connections to engage with food and climate change. To deliver these longer term objectives we will provide best practice guides and frameworks for both GLAMS, and other stakeholders. The project will mobilise the forthcoming National Collection (NC) for policy, research and public engagement related to food and climate change. This project will achieve this by 1) creating an ontology (a controlled vocabulary) based on established international food classification systems and emerging food/climate ontologies and meta-data in GLAM collections. This ontology will be deployed throughout the future NC, linking collections together and to additional data including: nutrition, climate, agriculture, and environmental impacts. 2) Develop tools to identify and explore collections datasets that relate to food and climate, these include natural language processing (GATE, for entity recognition and semantic enrichment), machine vision and artificial intelligence techniques. 3) Quantify, visualise and explore the provenance of linkages between items using new Techniques (prototypes) for Visualisation. 4) Build food and climate research capacity and enable adoption of NLP/semantic technologies for use in the NC. This will be achieved through research workshops, organisational and policy maker support programmes, pilot funding calls, and the development of Small Private Online Courses and Massive Open Online courses. 5) Produce an embedded Public Engagement (Citizen Science) approach focusing on using the linked collections/tools to engage stakeholders in action linked to food and climate change (including improving societal resilience and adaptation). Case studies in collections (RGBE, Kew, Leeds, MEAL, and Folger) will validate our ontology, tools, research methods, and public engagement methods. We will produce guidance for GLAM collections throughout the UK to use food and climate change to explore, reinterpret, give context to; and engage wider audiences with their material (and material in the wider NC), KEY OBJECTIVES 1) Develop the food and climate ontology 2) Develop tools and visualisation approaches to use the ontology with the NC 3) Build capacity for a critical mass of food and climate research using our tools/ontology/the NC 4) Co-create and validate new public/researcher/stakeholder citizen science and engagement methods using the food and climate materials from NC collections 5) Validate our approaches with collections case studies around Recipes, Food Production, and Herbarium/illustrations. IMPACT OBJECTIVES 1) Support UK GLAMs to link/explore their collections with food/climate outcomes as part of the wider NC. We will record changes to GLAMS structures. 2) Empower policy makers/stakeholders to use the NC to create more effective policy on food/climate. We will record use of tools/NC in Food/Climate policy inc. devolved nations. 3) Enable citizens/stakeholders to harness the NC to a) manage climate and food issues, b) understand food and biodiversity impacts from climate change. c) to understand food, biodiversity and climate policy, (and how it relates to collections). d) create a resilient and adaptive food system. We will record use and change of diet/society/economic impacts/etc. DELIVERABLES summary D1.1 NC F/CC ontology D1.2 development/validation reports D2.1 NLP tools MV tools D2.2 case study reports (rpts) and academic publications (pub). D2.3 Semantically enriched data. D3.1 Visualisation tools D3.2 case study reports and academic publications. D3.3 taxonomy D4.1 Workshop rpts D4.2pubs D5.1 SPOC, 5.2 rpts D6 Recordings of workshops 6.2 rpts 6.3 pubs D7.1 Reports on pilots (may lead to publications) D8.1 Workshop rpts 8.2 pubs, 8.3 Rpts on new PE methods D9.1 RCT citizen science PE campaign w/Citizens, Schools (n=50), Universities (n=15), and activist/community groups (n=15). 9.2 Rpts 9.3pubs, 9.4frameworks, best practice guides. D10.1 Recordings of workshops, 10.2rpts 10.3pubs D11.1MOOC, 11.2rpts
Impact Only output is a bid application on J-es
Start Year 2020
 
Description Oxford Food Symposium Transcribathon 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On Friday, 12 July 2019, Heather Wolfe, co-director of the Folger Shakespeare Library's 'Before' Farm to Table initiative led symposiasts of the Oxford Symposium on Food & Cookery through a Transcribathon. The objective of this was to transcribe "W.a.317", an English-language handwritten recipe book from the 18th c. Much fun was had as the symposiasts worked through the text of the book (as can be seen from the Instagram and Twitter posts below). The completed transcriptions will become part of the Folger's recipe-book corpus, which will be available online in 2020.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://sites.google.com/sheffield.ac.uk/ahrc-foodnetwork/news?authuser=0
 
Description Participation in Food and the Book conference (Expert panel) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Reynolds represent the project on an expert panel at the Food and the Book Conference https://www.newberry.org/10022020-food-and-book-1300-1800.

1-2 pm CDT
Roundtable: Digitizing Food in the Book
Moderator: Elisa Tersigni (Folger Shakespeare Library)

Bruno Laurioux (l'Université de Tours) and Helmut W. Klug (University of Graz)
Hillary Nunn (University of Akron)
Christian Reynolds (City University, London)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.newberry.org/10022020-food-and-book-1300-1800