Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - from Herculaneum and Pompeii to the North-East of England

Lead Research Organisation: Newcastle University
Department Name: School of Arts and Cultures

Abstract

Expanded Interiors was an interdisciplinary research project that brought site-specific contemporary fine art practice into a unique dialogue with ancient Roman wall paintings and architectural remains at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. It developed three large-scale artistic installations that explored through Contemporary art practice the decorations of two Roman houses. The research revealed new interpretations of compositional, perspectival and contextual methodologies used by Roman wall painters, and developed fresh methods for contemporary fine-art making such as techniques to structure an abundance of images. The project highlighted: 1. The positive impact contemporary art installations within archaeological sites can have on visiting audiences; 2. The strong potential for fruitful dialogues between digital humanities and fine art practice; 3. The project's contemporary topicality with regard to Roman wall painters' use and manipulation of multiple visual languages.

Expanded Interiors Re-Staged (EI Re-Staged) is a follow-on project that builds on Expanded Interiors (EI) and aims to enhance the reach and impact of the original project by creatively engaging with new UK-based audiences/user groups through public exhibition, workshop activity, and physical/online learning and documentation material. A multimedia gallery exhibition will develop new artistic and audience engagement with heritage and contemporary art, this delivered in partnership with the Hatton Gallery, and leading digital media company Animmersion.

We will:
(1) Re-present the creative outputs from the research project in new artistic physical and digital formats.These will combine interactive and virtual visual languages (including a VR environment and new artist commission). This multi-faceted approach will allow us to apply the research findings afresh, while maintaining their link to the original sites.

(2) Innovatively address young people in particular (a key hard-to-reach audience identified by a project partner, and a group specifically attracted by EI's interdisciplinary, practice-led research) with EI's research findings and new creative outputs, by closely involving a group of them (L-INK group, Hatton) from the project's outset, and by supporting them in developing a Young People's Guide for the exhibition.

(3) Develop inventive educational packs/information media for specific audiences that extend the legacy and impact of the EI research beyond the exhibition duration, while also providing formats transferable to other museums' and heritage sites' contexts. These are: A. An experimental VR environment (including the original exhibitions in the Roman houses); B. The Young People's Guide; C. An educational resource pack for Key Stage 2 pupils which will connect the research from EI with the local heritage / educational context in the North / East of England (e.g. Hadrian's Wall), while exploring the connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture; D. An interpretive guide to the exhibition for the general public.

(4) Foster a wider legacy for the EI and EI Re-Staged projects through closely and practically involving artists and heritage professionals in new modes of interpretation, exploration and audience engagement with heritage sites through a knowledge-sharing and networking workshop.

We anticipate that EI Re-Staged's varied dissemination and knowledge transfer activities will have positive, transformative effects (e.g. competence in navigating multiple visual languages) on all target audiences / user groups, and that its engagement strategy will provide a lasting case study for heritage / museums contexts, with its educational packs and information media widely used.

Publications

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Denton G. (2021) Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in Corridor8

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Hennessy-Vass N (2021) Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in Travel Begins at 40

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Nixon E. (2022) Expanded Interiors: Restaged: An alternative exhibition guide. Hatton Gallery in GEM - Group for Education in Museums - Case Studies - Young People

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Redfern H (2021) Expanded Interiors Re-Staged @Hatton Gallery in NARC. Magazine

 
Title 3D digital models of Roman objects and 3D replicas 
Description We 3D scanned Roman objects from the storerooms at Parco Archeologico di Ercolano (PaErco) and Parco Archeologico di Pompei (PAP) and produced 3D models. These 3D models were 3D printed into replicas (artistic and technical replicas, as we experimented with - for example - materiality, scale and shape). 18 replicas have been part of the fine-art installations in the two Roman houses. We made the datasets open-access under the FAIR principle on data.ncl. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact We have used some of these replicas at our workshops in Herculaneum (January 2018). It was the first time that replicas have been used for workshops there, and PaErco was interested in continuing the practice. It was also the first time that many participants handled replicas, and they were surprised by how powerful these objects remain despite being replicas. 18 replicas have become part of the art installations. Feedback from visitors to the exhibitions highlighted how the contemporary perspective onto these Roman objects have changed their understanding of them: 'I can imagine how they looked like before, among live people, earlier I saw them just as ancient history, without the touch of life'. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriors/blogpodcasts/videopodcastdigitalscanningmodellingin3d.h...
 
Title Bella Ciao / Ciao Bella - Catrin Huber 
Description Bella Ciao is a series of large artistic prints of Roman figures onto ten large perspex-panels. Letters are laser cut into the perspex, that can be combined to spell out different words such as Ciao Bella - Bella Ciao. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Bella Ciao - Ciao Bella was part of the Expanded Interiors exhibition at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. Please see the exhibition's comment on reach, significance, and notable impacts. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriors/art/
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Face Pots 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Face Pots, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). Replicas of Roman face cups from Pompeii are part of Huber's installation Along and Through, which was originally exhibited within the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii. This teaching material playfully explores what Roman face pots are and their history, while linking Italian and British Roman sites. It encourages pupils to explore the Roman heritage they share with Pompeii and Herculaneum and the rich connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture, while creatively engaging them with Roman history. Texts by Catrin Huber (text on slide 21), Eniko Hudak, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Eniko Hudak, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. Please also note that this Powerpoint presentation 'Roman Face Pots' contains a link to a video by master potter Graham Taylor from Potted-History, who has created for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged a hands-on introduction and demonstration to how the Romans made their face pots, together with instructions and a demonstration for children (and adults) to do their own face pots. The exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors. Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors installations had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. Her installations had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in this new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition ran from 3 July to 10 August 2021. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/presentation/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Educational_resource_pac...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Face Pots 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Face Pots, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). Replicas of Roman face cups from Pompeii are part of Huber's installation Along and Through, which was originally exhibited within the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii. This teaching material playfully explores what Roman face pots are and their history, while linking Italian and British Roman sites. It encourages pupils to explore the Roman heritage they share with Pompeii and Herculaneum and the rich connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture, while creatively engaging them with Roman history. Texts by Catrin Huber (text on slide 21), Eniko Hudak, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Eniko Hudak, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. Please also note that this Powerpoint presentation 'Roman Face Pots' contains a link to a video by master potter Graham Taylor from Potted-History, who has created for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged a hands-on introduction and demonstration to how the Romans made their face pots, together with instructions and a demonstration for children (and adults) to do their own face pots. The exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors. Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors installations had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. Her installations had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in this new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition ran from 3 July to 10 August 2021. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/presentation/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Educational_resource_pac...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Interiors 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Interiors, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). As part of Expanded Interiors Catrin Huber developed three large-scale installations that responded to and were in dialogue with the interior decorations, wall paintings, and architecture of two Roman houses: the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. This teaching material aims to creatively engage pupils with Roman interior decoration both in Italy and the UK, while linking it to their present day life. Pupils will also discover how a contemporary artist responded to an archaeological site, and will be encouraged to do their own artworks in response.Texts by Catrin Huber, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. The exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors. Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors installations had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in this new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition ran from 3 July to 10 August 2021. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/presentation/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Educational_resource_pac...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Interiors 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Interiors, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). As part of Expanded Interiors Catrin Huber developed three large-scale installations that responded to and were in dialogue with the interior decorations, wall paintings, and architecture of two Roman houses: the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. This teaching material aims to creatively engage pupils with Roman interior decoration both in Italy and the UK, while linking it to their present day life. Pupils will also discover how a contemporary artist responded to an archaeological site, and will be encouraged to do their own artworks in response.Texts by Catrin Huber, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. The exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors. Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors installations had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in this new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition ran from 3 July to 10 August 2021. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/presentation/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Educational_resource_pac...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Exhibition Guide 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata The interpretation leaflet was designed by Jaakko Tuomivaara from Supergroup Studios. Texts are by Catrin Huber and Rosie Morris. Photography by Amedeo Benestante (Gallery 1, Gallery 4), Catrin Huber (Gallery 2), Rosie Morris (Gallery 3), and need to be credited accordingly. The interpretation leaflet provided an introduction to the project, research and exhibition and guided the viewer through the exhibition. Texts by the respective artists (Catrin Huber / Rosie Morris) provided contexts for the different exhibition galleries while linking the research / installations to Hadrian's Wall and relevant local museums (e.g. Segedunum, Hancock Museum). The guide was / is available in physical / digital form in the Hatton Gallery and on its website, and on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's website. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Exhibition_Guide/19086563
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Exhibition Guide 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata The interpretation leaflet was designed by Jaakko Tuomivaara from Supergroup Studios. Texts are by Catrin Huber and Rosie Morris. Photography by Amedeo Benestante (Gallery 1, Gallery 4), Catrin Huber (Gallery 2), Rosie Morris (Gallery 3), and need to be credited accordingly. The interpretation leaflet provided an introduction to the project, research and exhibition and guided the viewer through the exhibition. Texts by the respective artists (Catrin Huber / Rosie Morris) provided contexts for the different exhibition galleries while linking the research / installations to Hadrian's Wall and relevant local museums (e.g. Segedunum, Hancock Museum). The guide was / is available in physical / digital form in the Hatton Gallery and on its website, and on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's website. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Exhibition_Guide/19086563/1
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - all gallery spaces 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images of the exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged at The Hatton Gallery have to be credited to the exhibited artists, Catrin Huber or Rosie Morris and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Sam Grant, Catrin Huber, Rosie Morris (Please see file name for information) This dataset contains images of all four galleries of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, and also wall and interpretation leaflet texts. Please note that there are additional datasets for each gallery space with further photographic documentation.Gallery 1 titled Along and Through at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). Gallery 2 titled The Corner Escape at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displayed 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / painting. Gallery 3 titled In / out / of this world at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation In / out / of this world, which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. Gallery 4 titled Light Trap at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on persplex, 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). Light Trap also displayed Black Hole, Asteroids, and White Dwarf, textile wall hangings of various sizes; and Light Trap, a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - all gallery spaces 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images of the exhibition Expanded Interiors Re-Staged at The Hatton Gallery have to be credited to the exhibited artists, Catrin Huber or Rosie Morris and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Sam Grant, Catrin Huber, Rosie Morris (Please see file name for information) This dataset contains images of all four galleries of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, and also wall and interpretation leaflet texts. Please note that there are additional datasets for each gallery space with further photographic documentation.Gallery 1 titled Along and Through at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). Gallery 2 titled The Corner Escape at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displayed 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / painting. Gallery 3 titled In / out / of this world at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation In / out / of this world, which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. Gallery 4 titled Light Trap at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on persplex, 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). Light Trap also displayed Black Hole, Asteroids, and White Dwarf, textile wall hangings of various sizes; and Light Trap, a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 1 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in gallery 1: Catrin Huber, Along and Through have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson or Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 1 titled Along and Through at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). This dataset contains images for Along and Through, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 1. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 1 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in gallery 1: Catrin Huber, Along and Through have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson or Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 1 titled Along and Through at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). This dataset contains images for Along and Through, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 1. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 2 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, gallery 2: Catrin Huber: The Corner Escape have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Catrin Huber, Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 2 titled The Corner Escape at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displays 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / collage / painting. This dataset contains images of The Corner Escape and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 2. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 2 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, gallery 2: Catrin Huber: The Corner Escape have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Catrin Huber, Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 2 titled The Corner Escape at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displays 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / collage / painting. This dataset contains images of The Corner Escape and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 2. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 3 - Rosie Morris 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission in gallery 3: Rosie Morris: In / out / of this world have to be credited to the artist Rosie Morris and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Sam Grant, Rosie Morris (Please see file name for information)Gallery 3 titled In / out / of this world at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation In / out / of this world, which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. This dataset contains images of In / out / of this world and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 3. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission was part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, which forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 3 - Rosie Morris 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission in gallery 3: Rosie Morris: In / out / of this world have to be credited to the artist Rosie Morris and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Sam Grant, Rosie Morris (Please see file name for information)Gallery 3 titled In / out / of this world at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation In / out / of this world, which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. This dataset contains images of In / out / of this world and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 3. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission was part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, which forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 4 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in gallery 4: Catrin Huber: Light Trap have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Catrin Huber, Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 4 titled Light Trap at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on perspex, and 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). Light Trap also displays Black Hole, Asteroids, and White Dwarf, textile wall hangings of various sizes; and Light Trap, a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. This dataset contains images of Light Trap and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 4. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 4 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Images for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged in gallery 4: Catrin Huber: Light Trap have to be credited to the artist Catrin Huber and the respective photographer: Colin Davidson, Catrin Huber, Arto Polus (Please see file name for information)Gallery 4 titled Light Trap at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on perspex, and 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). Light Trap also displays Black Hole, Asteroids, and White Dwarf, textile wall hangings of various sizes; and Light Trap, a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. This dataset contains images of Light Trap and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 4. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Project Overview Metadata 
Description Please read the attached Project Overview Metadata 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Project_Overview_Metadata/1908...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Project Overview Metadata 
Description Please read the attached Project Overview Metadata 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Project_Overview_Metadata/1908...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Young People's Guide for the exhibition 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Text, images, design of the Young People's Guide have to be credited to it's creators, L-INK group members: Ella Nixon, Remy Harkensee, Angelica Jones, Caitlin Milne, Caroline Reeves, Naomi Harrison.This dataset contains a PDF of the Young People's Guide, a sample of the consent form, and the Project Overview Metadata. A series of meetings and workshops prior to the opening of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition allowed six members of the Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adults group (L-INK) to research ideas and the exhibition process, in order to develop new interpretation material aimed at their peers: a Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. The group was included from the beginning in the development process of the exhibition, gaining insights through Zoom meetings with the artists and north-east based VR company, Animmersion Ltd; The Young People Guide offered an opportunity for the group to give voice to their perspectives as young adults, and to find fresh ways to engaging their peers with the research and exhibition. The guide was available in physical form in the Hatton Gallery during the exhibition, and is still available in digital form via Hatton Gallery and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's websites. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition formed one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The Young People's Guide accompanied the exhibition. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Young_People_s_Guide_for_the_e...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Young People's Guide for the exhibition 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata Text, images, design of the Young People's Guide have to be credited to it's creators, L-INK group members: Ella Nixon, Remy Harkensee, Angelica Jones, Caitlin Milne, Caroline Reeves, Naomi Harrison.This dataset contains a PDF of the Young People's Guide, a sample of the consent form, and the Project Overview Metadata. A series of meetings and workshops prior to the opening of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition allowed six members of the Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adults group (L-INK) to research ideas and the exhibition process, in order to develop new interpretation material aimed at their peers: a Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. The group was included from the beginning in the development process of the exhibition, gaining insights through Zoom meetings with the artists and north-east based VR company, Animmersion Ltd; The Young People Guide offered an opportunity for the group to give voice to their perspectives as young adults, and to find fresh ways to engaging their peers with the research and exhibition. The guide was available in physical form in the Hatton Gallery during the exhibition, and is still available in digital form via Hatton Gallery and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's websites. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition formed one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The Young People's Guide accompanied the exhibition. The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue. 
Type Of Art  
Year Produced 2022 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Young_People_s_Guide_for_the_e...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - exhibition by Catrin Huber and commission by Rosie Morris 
Description The overall Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition comprised of four gallery exhibitions: Gallery 1 titled 'Along and Through' at the Hatton Gallery exhibited Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation incorporating 3D printed face cups, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). Gallery 2 titled 'The Corner Escape' at the Hatton Gallery exhibited Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displayed Huber's 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / painting. Gallery 3 exhibited Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation 'In / out / of this world', which comprised of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. Gallery 4 titled 'Light Trap' at the Hatton Gallery exhibited Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on persplex, 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). 'Light Trap' also displayed Huber's 'Black Hole', 'Asteroids', and 'White Dwarf', textile wall hangings of various sizes; and 'Light Trap', a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. Each gallery space featured a wall text that guided the visitors through the exhibition: a quote from a fictional Roman wall painter that set Roman wall paintings in relation to the work displayed in each room. These quotes were taken from Catrin Huber's text: 'Art, Architecture, and life', a fictional conversation between three historical artists. The exhibition was also accompanied by an exhibition guide with texts by the artists Catrin Huber and Rosie Morris, creatively written about their respective gallery spaces, while linking the work to Expanded Interiors research, the exhibition context, and the historical Roman context of the North-East. The curation of the exhibition reflected on the complex nature of Roman house decoration, aiming to work with a dramatic choreography of changing exhibition spaces, and a building up of complexity in terms of addressing interiors spaces and use of multiple media and visual languages. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition and Rosie Morris' Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission at the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle upon Tyne reached broad UK-based audiences and had 1152 visitors despite Covid 19 restrictions being in place that included having to limit visitor numbers per visit and pre-booking. It gained strong media coverage (e.g. 3 min feature on BBC Look North as part of the News (6:30pm,Friday 16th July 2021); review by Grace Denton in Corridor8, featured as case study in GEM's Biannual Case Studies (GEM: Vol. 28, 2022)) and very positive and extensive feedback from exhibition visitors. Based on visitor questionnaires (89 questionnaires returned), the majority of visitors, 91%, enjoyed the exhibition, with 80.9% of responses rating the exhibition as 5 or 4 on the scale of 5 being excellent through to 1 being poor. For some visitors the overall exhibition experience had very significant impact: "As in Q7 I'm open to most things in art and this show has been a bit of an eyeopener, a very enjoyable one. Anything that helps create art work and/or help understanding of past artwork is good."; "Removing boundaries and helping to [understand?] the connection between culture across time + space. At its best this could help form a small part of aiding greater human understanding generally"; "Viewing inhabitants animated and imagined environment.- Mind blown! The range of pieces, the level of visual tactility. I adore the BRP's, I think the multiplicity of the work and shifting mediums enhanced my appreciation of it."; "Loved that you could experience the art in different ways - really enjoyed the variety of media. Was great to be able to see it, walk inside it & then experience it within the 'video game"; "Hard to quantify the most enjoyable part... It was all so beautiful and moving. I was especially impressed with the animated 3D scan of Huber's work in situ in Herculaneum and Pompeii. It felt all the more fascinating and illuminating with that being the final room." 67.42% of respondents stated that the exhibition had changed their understanding of the relationships between contemporary art and Roman Wall painting. For some it introduced the concept of the relationship between the two for the first time and how it can engage with archaeology. For others it introduced them to a new way of looking at and thinking about the context of Roman Wall painting within Roman life outside of the more usual heritage site and museum context and bringing it closer to the contemporary experience: "I'd never thought of the link before so was a new + interesting experience."; "Strange to see contemporary wall art in ancient surroundings - Starts an interesting existential question about art and the meaning of it."; "Before the exhibition it was a subject I had never thought about or really knew anything about."; "Made me more aware of roman wall painting and the relevance and parallels to modern life."; "I've never considered these possible relationships, so it introduced this to me"; "Linking past to present highlights the reality of Roman life - not always a museum space once domestic interiors"; I didn't know much about Roman wall painting but the audio work helped me to understand how they played with space and illusions in a similar way to lots of site-specific contemporary art."; "Breaking down boundaries across time and space"; "I had never considered the two to be connected but after seeing the exhibition I like the use of contemporary art as a means of re-imagining these historic spaces."; "I feel Roman art is closer to us and more alive and present than I used to perceive it."; "I never before considered the impact of Roman wall painting, but now I realise its significance, especially from an artist's viewpoint." For some visitors the impact on their way of thinking about contemporary art in the heritage context was significant: "...The curation and layout of the rooms of this exhibition accumulate the knowledge and appreciation perfectly. Something I had never considered "for me" before and feels like such an excellent "penny drop" moment. Thank You!"; "My mind is set racing - I can bridge the past + present." The exhibition also impacted on how visitors looked at Roman objects, with 56.18% of respondents stating that the exhibition had changed their existing view of Roman objects, so that they would now view and understand them differently, by way of the context in which they could be exhibited, their context as objects in Roman life and culture and the connections with contemporary life and culture: "It allowed me to look at the objects in a very different context which I believe is important. Challenging how we see things is, I feel necessary for us to understand our relationship with objects."; Absolutely! seeing them within this framing brought new life to them. With humour and warm hearted generosity the accompanying text made them understandable and fun again."; "Yes, seeing the 3D printed replicas brought them into our high-tech contemporary context and brought up ideas of ownership and value - relevant to current discussions about museums, decolonisation and returning artefacts. I also liked the pot with the sticky-out tongue, which reminded me that the Romans had a sense of humour."; "I will be able to notice the art and creativity in Roman objects more"; The re-contextualised face cups looked surprisingly modern. Like a ceramic by Picasso. they brought out the modernity of antiquity."; "Presented in a contemporary context these objects have a timeless quality"; "I have seen a lot of Roman objects in museums in the UK and Italy but the exhibition showed how they could be re-imagined."; "Never imagined a 3D printing made after a Roman artefact. Now I feel Roman objects could become part of our daily life again."; "The incorporation of Roman objects in contemporary art installations allowed me to view them in a context other than a traditional museum setting." For 43.82% of respondents the exhibition also changed how they thought about fine-art practice and archeological research, either through their encounter with the displacement of archaeology into a gallery or through the opportunity to experience fine-art in the context of archeological sites and artefacts. The exhibition prompted people to re-think the connections between the two disciplines and the potential for developing their relationships: "I now feel rather embarrassed about previously finding archaeology stuff and boring...! Very impressed and grateful for this breath of life into it for me - and hopefully many others!"; "It has opened my mind to acknowledging how unique aspects of art can be linked together, despite them seeming so different from each other on the surface."; 'It has demonstrated how the two fields can be interlinked. i.e. how fine art can be used to further understanding and experience of archaeological sites such as Herculaneum and Pompeii.";"I can see link previously, now I feel it."; "This was the first show I have seen that considers the two topics together."; "The two seem more connected as disciplines." The exhibition also prompted some people to think specifically about the use of contemporary art as a means to explore Roman wall paintings and contemporary art and the value of seeing them brought together in the exhibition: "I think it is a very creative and intriguing way to bring out great historical pieces from Roman times. It opens the door for further perspectives on an era that is exceptionally complex."; It modernises the concept of Roman Paintings making it more accessible to a wider variety of people in current society."; "great referencing between different times! there's so much to unpack in history that modern art is the perfect tool for"; " I think it extremely refreshing. I usually wouldn't take interest in Roman painting and through the use of contemporary art this has allowed me to explore something very different."; "I really enjoyed seeing this, as it allows people to see Roman paintings from a new perspective, rather than them forming low expectations based on stereotypes."; "I think the contrast between contemporary and ancient works highlights the Roman paintings"; "I like to see the comparison between contemporary and Roman paintings - and think that the contemporary art helps us to relate to the Roman paintings on a more personal level"; The connection across different times/styles was thought provoking The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project aimed to help explore connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture within the context of the Roman heritage of the North East of England, for example, Hadrian's Wall. The exhibition, as a significant part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project, hoped to engage its audience with this heritage, 71.91% of whom had visited a Roman site in the North East. 40.45% of responders to the questionnaire answered that the exhibition had made them think about the Roman heritage of the North East, prompting some to make connections between the Roman sites of Italy and the North East, some to consider the value of contemporary art in engaging people with the local Roman heritage or change their views on Roman sites as locations of art rather than history. 43.83% of the respondents confirmed that the exhibition had encouraged them to find out about, visit or revisit their local Roman sites in the UK, for example, Segedunum at Wallsend, Bishop Auckland, Arbeia Roman Fort at South Shields, Housteads and Hexham, Northumberland, Ambleside in Cumbria or abroad, at Pompeii. "The exhibition allowed me to reimagine some of the Roman sites in the area as places of art as well as history. I can envision some of the artefacts in these spaces."; "Always enjoyed Roman sites, but will now be able to view it in a different way."; "As I was going through the exhibition I did think about all the Roman heritage we have in this area."; "Useful notes to help make the connections in the handout we were given at the start"; "It makes you realise how the North East has a connection with Roman Art."; I love history + all things Roman. Motivates me to revisit Roman sites.";"Lots of North East sites came to mind from the exhibition.", "I'll go back with fresh eyes. - There are some excellent wall paintings in the Segedunum museum."; "Time to revisit with fresh perspective"; "Unsure which, yet, but keep to research and visit again. Thought perhaps only good for children and history buffs, but have now reconsidered!"; "Such a rich history here in the N.E. so the exib is just another aspect /way of seeing this history in a contemporary sense." The exhibition also incorporated Catrin Huber's 'Light Trap', a Virtual Reality, real-time environment which was specifically designed to engage visitors with the research findings of Expanded Interiors in a new way, in the new location, while maintaining their link to the original Roman sites. It worked as both: documentation and artwork. 77.53% of the questionnaire respondents said that this digital format had helped them to imagine the installations in their original Roman locations. The consensus from these respondents was overwhelmingly positive, bringing the archaeology to life, demonstrating the potential for its use and adding to the exhibition experience: "Brilliance, I love the chance to 'look' around the place that is both real + imagined. Nervous previously about doing this but would try these again!!!"; "So interesting! Favourite part! ['favourite part' underlined for emphasis] Made it more of an experience after seeing the installations in real life then imagining it in situ."; "A master piece of Art in itself! Incredibly helpful additional context, particularly understanding the light and height of the space."; "I loved the interactivity of the 3D environment. It really helped to bring the archaeology to life. The movement of light and shadow was really interesting and created a sense of time. The 3D interaction tied in nicely with the rest of the exhibition."; "Very much enjoyed this. Felt like I was actually there experiencing the art in in its original environment."; 'Absolutely love the interactive rooms. It really gives you a sense of being there. The light dancing across the room provide different views."; "Fascinating - gave a much better experience being immersed within it"; "Excellent for providing thought and discussion"; "It was a highlight for me especially having just experiencing the art first-hand.";"It was excellent. Really gave the exhibition something extra"; "Loved being able to "walk" around the roman house using the console."; "Love it (picture of a heart) Enjoyable. Quite a privileged feeing - makes art accessible to masses."; "Really immersive and exciting."; "Definitely, wonderful experience."; "Easy to use. Did add a lot to the exhibition"; "LOVED THIS"; "I thought it was amazing and eye opening" 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - artwork: 'From where I sit' 
Description Photographic print on Hahnemuhle Bamboo paper, 14 x 21cm. The image depicts a corner of a dark domestic space, with a shard of warm interior light entering through a doorway, onto the floor and wall. The image has been digitally manipulated so that a second, overlapping shard of light bounces into the room at an unrealistic angle. This is an uncannily familiar domestic scene, showing the view of a parent waiting for their child to sleep. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This work was re-produced in a limited edition of 20. 17 of these copies have sold. As a potential future outcome, this could be re-exhibited either individually or alongside the other commissioned works, bringing the work to new audiences. There is also future potential to develop and abstract the image into a screen print. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - artwork: 'This chamber of mine' 
Description Plywood box, mirrored acrylic, mount board, obeche, primer, wire, rocking horse, LED light and clear acrylic plinth, 14 x 14 x 40cm. Inspired by dioramas and Victorian doll houses, the scene depicted is of an all-white interior with cool bluish light revealing a cracked basement/ground floor, staircase, pillars, open window, partially open door, tree roots and a rocking horse. The mirror gives the illusion of a scene extending through the wall behind it, whereas the reflected scene is to the side. The artwork is displayed, as if floating, on an acrylic shelf with its base at 40cm high. The artwork refers to psychoanalysis, surrealism and the complicated relationship between childhood, parenthood and home. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact As a potential future outcome, this could be re-exhibited either individually or alongside the other commissioned works, bringing the work to new audiences. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - artwork: 'Curtains' 
Description Oil painting on canvas of closed disheveled curtains with light glowing through, 122 x 190cm. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact As a potential future outcome, this could be re-exhibited either individually or alongside the other commissioned works, bringing the work to new audiences. Visitor questionnaires noted this painting as a highlight in the feedback. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - artwork: 'Sunlit walls' 
Description Enlarged pastel drawings printed on paper, hung to cover full length of walls, various sizes, total size 19m 48cm x 395cm. The pastel drawing depicts an imagined view of light from windows and openings encircling a space. The colour palette uses predominantly warm colours such as pink, reds and yellows. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact These were designed to be able to be re-hung and exhibited, so this is a potential future outcome, in either in the same or a collaged form, to create new work for new audiences. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - artwork: 'Threshold' 
Description Mapped projection and printed vinyl, various sizes, total size 818cm x 400cm x 285cm. The image depicts painted diamonds arranged in lines that fan out from a focal point on the floor to the sides of the room and then vertically up the walls. The image between the floor vinyl and the projected film on the walls lines up. In the film, on top of the diamond lines warm and cool coloured light moving though a curtain dances along and down the walls from left to right. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact As a potential future outcome, this could be re-exhibited either individually or alongside the other commissioned works, bringing the work to new audiences. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged Commission by Rosie Morris: ' In / out / of this world' - installation. 
Description 'In / out / of this world' is a new commissioned installation made for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged at the Hatton Gallery, Newcastle, responding to the research of the Expanded Interiors research team, led by Catrin Huber. In particular, the commission responds to the roman wall painters use of theatrical contrasts and the notion of home in an architectural space fluctuating between private and public. The commission by Rosie Morris comprises of 5 individual works: prints of enlarged pastel drawings hung from the walls, entitled 'Sunlit walls'; an oil on canvas painting, entitled 'Curtains'; a wooden mirrored diorama box, 'This chamber of mine'; a digital photographic print on entitled, 'From where I sit'; and a mapped video projection and vinyl floor print entitled, ' Threshold'. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact As part of wider Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, the commission 'In / out / of this world' helped to change visitors understanding of possible relationships between contemporary art and Roman wall painting, 67.42% of visitors agreeing with this question in the Visitor Questionnaire. Several visitors note how the installation 'In / out / of this world' effectively introduces ideas and sets a tone and appreciation for viewing the exhibition as a whole. "I really loved the impact of Rosie Morris's room at the start"; "Rosie's installation prompted a real sense of slowness and made me want to spend time take in each element."; "beginning with Morris' work distilling ideas of light and form and depth right down to simple and beautiful notions. The curation and layout of the rooms of this exhibition accumulate the knowledge and appreciation perfectly. Something I had never considered ""for me"" before and feels like such an excellent ""penny drop"" moment. Thank You!" 80.9% of visitors rated the exhibition as 4-5. Specific positive responds to 'In / out / of this world' liked how the installation made "you could feel like you are inside the painting" and " the walls covered in colour enclose you" a "colourful and dreamy world". Highlights within the installation itself were the painting 'Curtains' and the diorama 'This chamber of mine'. The installation was designed to be packable and transportable, enabling it to be shown in a new context or arrangement in a future gallery setting, with a critical awareness of the short-term use of site-specific installations. This remains a potential future outcome taking the story of Expanded Interiors and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged to new audiences. 
URL http://www.rosiemorris.co.uk/in-out-of-this-world
 
Title Painting Installation 1 - Catrin Huber 
Description 9 paintings on aluminum frames, which form one over 11m long painting. The painting was specifically developed for the House of the Cryptoporticus. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Please see Expanded Interiors exhibition at the House of the Cryptoporticus for reach, significance, and notable impacts for installation 1. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriors/art/
 
Title Painting Installation 2 - Catrin Huber 
Description 15 paintings on aluminum frames, which form one painted room. The 'painting room' was specifically developed for the House of the Cryptoporticus. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Please see Expanded Interiors exhibition at the House of the Cryptoporticus for reach, significance, and notable impacts for installation 2. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriors/art/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'Along and Through' - Gallery 1 in the Hatton Gallery 
Description Gallery 1 titled 'Along and Through' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation incorporating 3D replicas of Roman face cups, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). Here the painting installation cuts through the light-filled, Roman-influenced architecture of the Hatton Gallery. The colourful 'wall paintings' of the installation are set in dialogue with the beautiful, white Georgian architecture of gallery 1. The installation reflects, among other things, on the colours, theatricality and choreography of movement within Roman houses, while highlighting the architecture of the Hatton Gallery. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The exhibition 'Along and Through' in gallery 1 at the Hatton Gallery, as part of the overall Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, helped change visitor understanding of the relationship between contemporary art and Roman wall painting (67.42% of respondents to visitor questionnaire). Visitors commented that 'The dialogue between ancient and modern was fascinating. Wall paintings are amazing.'; 'the quote in the 'Along or Through' exhibition allowed me to consider the connections between the two'; 'the installation of the artwork was very engaging'; Interesting use of historical spaces, interpreted in an differing way"; 'The exploration of Roman wall painting as a theme and innovative representations of this motif.; 'I liked the element of fun and colour used throughout the exhibition to encourage us to think about the Roman villas as spaces used in every day life.'. They also highlighted the "Dynamic placement of (the) art work'. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery1/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'Asteroids' 
Description 'Asteroids' were two medium scaled, silver (different shades, textures, surface quality of silver) wall hangings (about 32 x 27cm) made out of different fabrics that depict architecture obscured by large shadows of plant leaves (philodendron). They were tw of four wall hangings that anchored the installation 'Bella Ciao' within gallery 4 of the Hatton Gallery. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The wall hangings were exhibited as part of Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition and are potential future outputs. Visitor feedback noted 'the fabric wall hangings' as a particular highlight of the exhibition. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery4/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'Black Hole' 
Description 'Black hole' is a large scale, black (different shades, textures, surface quality of black) wall hanging (300 x 200cm) made out of different fabrics that depicts architecture obscured by large shadows of plant leaves (philodendron). It was one of four wall hangings that anchored the installation 'Bella Ciao' within gallery 4 of the Hatton Gallery. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The wall hanging was exhibited as part of Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition and is a potential future output. Visitor feedback noted 'the fabric wall hangings' as a particular highlight of the exhibition. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery4/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'Light Trap' - Gallery 4 in the Hatton Gallery 
Description Gallery 4 titled 'Light Trap' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on perspex, and 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). 'Light Trap' also displays 'Black Hole', 'Asteroids', and 'White Dwarf', textile wall hangings of various sizes; and 'Light Trap', a 3D real-time environment (VR documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. This exhibition allowed for the 'direct' juxtaposition of the interiors of the Roman houses and the Hatton Gallery, and of the virtual and real installations. It also celebrated light and shadows, in their ephemeral and material manifestations (e.g. within the VR, within the exhibition space, on the different materials such as the fabric). 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The exhibition 'Light Trap' and the artworks displayed in gallery 4 were most frequently mentioned when visitors commented on what they enjoyed most about the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. Among other things, this gallery helped change visitor understanding of the relationship between contemporary art and Roman wall painting (67.42% of respondents to visitor questionnaire). In particular the 3D real-time environment helped visitors to imagine the installations in their original context, while linking historical context and contemporary exhibition. Visitors commented: ' The final room (gallery 4) helped to explain the ideas in the work.'; 'I was especially impressed with the animated 3D scan of Huber's work in situ in Herculaneum and Pompeii. It felt all the more fascinating and illuminating with that being the final room.'; '. Loved being able to ""walk"" around the roman house using the console.'; 'The three dimensional drawing/sculptural game of the initial installation of the pieces in Italy going from seeing the pieces in real life to in a game setting was really interesting and made me want to go around again'. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery4/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'The Corner Escape' 
Description 'The Corner Escape' is a printed wallpaper based on drawings and collages, which is to be displayed across a corner. The dimensions are: 72cm x 70cm. It anchored the installation 'Around and Up' within gallery 2 of the Hatton Gallery. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The 'Corner Escape' was exhibited as part of Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition and is a potential future output. Visitor feedback noted 'the small image (in) gallery 2' as a particular highlight of the exhibition. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery2/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'The Corner Escape' - Gallery 2 in the Hatton Gallery 
Description Gallery 2 titled 'The Corner Escape' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up", a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displays 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / collage / painting. The installation created a room within a room responding to the theatricality and choreography of movement within Roman wall painting, while highlighting the architecture of the Hatton Gallery by drawing attention to the corners of the room. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The exhibition 'The Corner Escape' in gallery 2 at the Hatton Gallery as part of the overall Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition helped change visitor understanding of the relationship between contemporary art and Roman wall painting (67.42% of respondents to visitor questionnaire). Visitor commented that 'The curation and layout of the rooms of this exhibition accumulate the knowledge and appreciation perfectly. Something I had never considered ""for me"" before and feels like such an excellent ""penny drop"" moment. Thank You!"'. The 'room inside a room' was noted by visitors as their highlight of the exhibition: 'The corner escape - it was really cool to be able to step inside the artwork'; 'Being able to "Step into" the exhibits, inhabit the space'; '. The powerful colour and bold shapes really appealed and the eyebending effects were amazing it was as if the space was distorted.'; 'Illusional space, flat surfaces can portray hidden angles and openings'. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery2/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'White Dwarf' 
Description 'White Dwarf' is a medium scale, white (different shades, textures, surface quality of white) wall hanging (100 x 70cm) made out of different fabrics that depicts architecture obscured by large shadows of plant leaves (philodendron). It was one of four wall hangings that anchored the installation 'Bella Ciao' within gallery 4 of the Hatton Gallery. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The wall hanging was exhibited as part of Catrin Huber's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition and is a potential future output. Visitor feedback noted 'the fabric wall hangings' as a particular highlight of the exhibition. Please see the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition entry for more information on Impact. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery4/
 
Title by Catrin Huber for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition: 'Light Trap' - a 3D real-time environement (Virtual Reality) 
Description This was an interactive 3D real-time environment (VR) conceived by Catrin Huber and realised by developers Dan Johnston and Jakob Stokes from Animmersion. It was projected onto the gallery wall and could be explored and navigated via a game controller. The 3D real-time environment consisted of two different spaces: the reception room of the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the underground complex of the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii. The House of the Beautiful Courtyard could be experienced and navigated in three stages: 1. The empty reception room in which the Roman wall paintings were animated into 3D architectural structures, and through light and shadows (simulating light according to times of the day and year); 2. A point-cloud view of the reception room (scanner vision); 3. The reception room with Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' as exhibited in 'real' in Herculaneum in 2018 /2019. These three stages at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard were accompanied by an audio piece, written and performed by Dr Fiona Anderson. The underground passageway at the House of the Cryptoporticus featured Catrin Huber's installations 'Along and Through' and 'Around and Up' as exhibited in the Roman house in 'real' in 2018/2019. The Roman wall paintings in the main passageway as well as one of the face cups in Catrin Huber's installation were animated. The whole underground passageway was animated by light that simulated changing light conditions across the year. The House of the Cryptoporticus featured an audio play written by Catrin Huber and performed by actor Mary Jane Wells: a fictional discussion between three historical artists: an anonymous Roman wall painter, El Lissitzky, and Kurt Schwitters. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The 3D real-time environment 'Light Trap' was specifically designed to engage visitors with the research of Expanded Interiors in a new way, while maintaining the installations / research's link to the original Roman sites. 77.53% of the exhibition questionnaire respondents said that this digital format had helped them to imagine the installations in their original Roman locations. The consensus from these respondents was overwhelmingly positive, bringing the archaeology to life, adding understanding to research and exhibition context, demonstrating the potential for its use and adding to the exhibition experience. For some people this exhibition was their first introduction and experience to this technology, which was encouraged and supported by the assistance of a dedicated gallery and VR assistant. Comments from visitors included: "A master piece of Art in itself! Incredibly helpful additional context, particularly understanding the light and height of the space."; "Absolutely love the interactive rooms. It really gives you a sense of being there. The light dancing across the room provide different views."; "Loved being able to "walk" around the roman house using the console."; "It was a highlight for me especially having just experiencing the art first-hand."; "Easy to use. Did add a lot to the exhibition"; "Love it (picture of a heart) Enjoyable. Quite a privileged feeling - makes art accessible to masses."; " The interactive animation really gives a sense of the atmosphere in Pompeii & Herculaneum - and seeing that in combination with the actual sometimes is exciting."; "Really immersive and exciting."; "LOVED THIS"; ""Brilliant, I loved the chance to 'look' around the place that is both real + imagined. Nervous previously about doing this but would try these again!!"; "So interesting! Favourite part! Made it more of an experience after seeing the installations in real life then imagining it in situ."; "Fascinating - gave a much better experience being immersed within it"; "I loved the interactivity of the 3D environment. It really helped to bring the archaeology to life. The movement of light and shadow was really interesting and created a sense of time. The 3D interaction tied in nicely with the rest of the exhibition."; ""Very much enjoyed this. Felt like I was actually there experiencing the art in in its original environment."; "I thought it was amazing and eye opening"; "It was excellent. Really gave the exhibition something extra"; 'Excellent for providing thought and discussion'; "Best thought ever". 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/gallery4/
 
Description Expanded Interiors Re-Staged was a follow-on project that built upon Expanded Interiors (EI). It aimed to enhance the original project's reach and impact by creatively engaging with new UK-based audiences through public exhibition, workshop activity, and physical/online learning and documentation material. A multimedia gallery exhibition developed new artistic and audience engagement with heritage and contemporary art, this delivered in partnership with the Hatton Gallery, and digital media company Animmersion.
All our project objectives were met. This enabled new research and engagement trajectories to be developed, and we will be pursuing these in the future.
Though activities sometimes had to be adapted due to COVID 19 restrictions, this actually resulted in some positive and unexpected results.
Significant achievements included a multi-faceted approach to re-presenting creative outputs from the original research project by combining immersive, interactive, and virtual visual languages. This proved immensely successful (please see impact narrative). The aforementioned approach allowed PI Catrin Huber to bring different voices (polyphone approach to curation) to the exhibition including Huber's fictional discussion between three historical artists, a text by art historian Dr Fiona Anderson about Herculaneum, the incorporation of Kurt Schwitters' Merzbarn wall, and Rosie Morris's commission.
Such a multi-faceted approach also facilitated a more thorough insight into research processes, enabling audiences to access the work from different perspectives, and providing multiple entry-points to the research. Curating in this way not only enabled the dissemination of Expanded Interiors' research outputs and findings - it triggered a new set of questions relating to exhibition practices, the work itself, and the context of the Hatton Gallery and the North East of England: What happens in the collision of different classical receptions, such as Huber's painting installations and the Georgian architecture of the Hatton Gallery?; How can the juxtaposition of physical and digital real-time environments be used to connect different times and locations?
New questions also addressed points such as the ownership and value of objects in relation to current discussions about museums, decolonisation and the returning of artefacts. It was particularly exciting, too, to discover that Huber's installations from Herculaneum and Pompeii worked like 're-agents': bringing their traces and history to this new location, they sparked a new dialogue across multiple locations and times. This was re-enforced by a hugely popular 3D, real-time environment titled 'Light Trap'. This featured Roman houses in Pompeii and Herculaneum, and its success was evidenced in the substantial positive feedback we received from exhibition visitors. It also prompted a question: What other contexts can these installations activate and/or re-interpret through their physical and digital re-presentations?
Another valued achievement was our successful work with the L-INK group. This involved the group's sustained engagement with the project, and resulted in additional positive outcomes such as a member of the group being invited to publish a Case Study on 'Expanded Interiors Re-Staged: an alternative exhibition guide', citing the project's engagement of young people as an example of good practice for GEM (the Group for Education in Museums) Case Studies: Young People's edition (January 2022).
Exploitation Route Our work with young adults and their creation of the Young People's Guide featured as an example of good practice in the GEM (the Group for Education in Museums) Case Studies: Young People's Edition (January 2022). It also garnered positive feedback at our sharing day / workshop with artists and heritage and education professionals. We anticipate that this sustained involvement of young adults in project development will be an approach that education officers and curators in the museums and heritage sector will build upon.
The educational resource pack had incredibly positive feedback at our sharing day, too. Following on from the January/February 2022 launch/publication of the material, we anticipate its wide use within the school and heritage sector, both regionally and nationally.
We have archived (via open-access and under the FAIR principle) rich datasets of images, documentation and interpretation materials, educational resource packs, and feedback transcripts. These have already had numerous views and downloads, thus informing practice and research in the fine-art, education, museums and heritage sectors.
The multi-faceted, multi-media approach of the exhibition was highly successful, resulting in substantial positive feedback from visitors, artists and curators. Huber plans to develop this approach further, and we anticipate it influencing future curatorial practice and engagement with Roman decorations within a Fine Art context. Huber's 3D real-time environment 'Light Trap' was particularly well received, evidenced through comments such as 'amazing and eye opening'; 'best thought ever'; 'A master piece of Art in itself!, and 'Incredibly helpful additional context'. Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's work with VR within heritage settings has already inspired new research trajectories. Huber has, for example, been approached to be an advisor on a future research project, one which will explore the use of VR to address legacy in temporary site-specific commissioning / audience development within the heritage sector. Huber also plans to build upon another identified gain, namely the potential of using VR not only to ensure a project's legacy, but also as a tool to set-up new, international networks, and as an educational means within exhibition and school contexts.
Relocating Expanded Interiors installations from Herculaneum and Pompeii to new geographic locations and different exhibition contexts will greatly expand the reach of the research, bringing it to new international audiences while also connecting international locations via a new dialogue and network. Following on from the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged sharing day, workshops and previous academic discussions, we anticipate our findings and methods will inform relevant academic, practical, and public debates in the future, influencing practices within relevant heritage and art organisations.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/
 
Description The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project has thus far impacted upon: 1. Regional and national audiences. 2. Teachers and school children. 3. Young adults. 4. Contemporary visual arts, heritage and educational practitioners. It had already had positive, transformative effects on all of our target audiences and user groups, as outlined below. 1. The Expanded Interiors (EI) Re-Staged exhibition at the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle upon Tyne reached broad UK-based audiences, and had 1152 visitors despite Covid 19 restrictions being in place. It gained strong media coverage and very positive, extensive feedback from exhibition visitors (see also 'artistic & creative outputs'). Indeed, EI Re-Staged's multi faceted approach to the re-presentation of the creative outputs from the original research project proved immensely successful, using a combination of immersive, interactive, and virtual visual languages. Comments included: "Viewing inhabitants animated an imagined environment.- Mind blown! The range of pieces, the level of visual tactility. I adore the BRP's, I think the multiplicity of the work and shifting mediums enhanced my appreciation of it."; "Loved that you could experience the art in different ways - really enjoyed the variety of media. Was great to be able to see it, walk inside it & then experience it within the 'video game'"; "Hard to quantify the most enjoyable part... It was all so beautiful and moving. I was especially impressed with the animated 3D scan of Huber's work in situ in Herculaneum and Pompeii. It felt all the more fascinating and illuminating with that being the final room.". Based on visitor questionnaires, the vast majority of visitors (91%), enjoyed the exhibition, with 80.9% of responses rating the exhibition as 5 or 4 on the scale of 5 being excellent through to 1 being poor. Visitors highlighted the exhibition's significance in changing their understanding about contemporary art and Roman wall painting, and the relationship between them: "...The curation and layout of the rooms of this exhibition accumulate the knowledge and appreciation perfectly. Something I had never considered "for me" before and feels like such an excellent "penny drop" moment. Thank You!"; "this show has been a bit of an eyeopener, a very enjoyable one. Anything that helps create art work and/or help understanding of past artwork is good."; "Removing boundaries and helping to [understand?] the connection between culture across time + space. At its best this could help form a small part of aiding greater human understanding generally". 67.42% of respondents stated that the exhibition had changed their understanding of relationships between contemporary art and Roman wall painting. For some, it introduced the concept of the relationship between the two for the first time and brought to light how it can engage with archaeology. For others, it introduced a new way of looking at and thinking about the context of Roman Wall painting within Roman life, one focusing outside of the more usual heritage site and museum context, and bringing it closer to the contemporary experience: "I had never considered the two to be connected but after seeing the exhibition I like the use of contemporary art as a means of re-imagining these historic spaces."; "Strange to see contemporary wall art in ancient surroundings - Starts an interesting existential question about art and the meaning of it."; "Made me more aware of roman wall painting and the relevance and parallels to modern life."; "Linking past to present highlights the reality of Roman life - not always a museum space once domestic interiors"; "I didn't know much about Roman wall painting but the audio work helped me to understand how they played with space and illusions in a similar way to lots of site-specific contemporary art."; "Breaking down boundaries across time and space"; "I feel Roman art is closer to us and more alive and present than I used to perceive it."; "I never before considered the impact of Roman wall painting, but now I realise its significance, especially from an artist's viewpoint." The exhibition also impacted upon the way in which visitors looked at Roman objects, with 56.18% of respondents stating that the exhibition had changed their existing view of Roman objects, so that they would now view and understand them differently, particularly regarding the context in which they could be exhibited, their context as objects in Roman life and culture, and their connections with contemporary life and culture: "It allowed me to look at the objects in a very different context which I believe is important. Challenging how we see things is, I feel necessary for us to understand our relationship with objects."; "Absolutely! seeing them within this framing brought new life to them. With humour and warm hearted generosity the accompanying text made them understandable and fun again."; "Yes, seeing the 3D printed replicas brought them into our high-tech contemporary context and brought up ideas of ownership and value - relevant to current discussions about museums, decolonisation and returning artefacts. I also liked the pot with the sticky-out tongue, which reminded me that the Romans had a sense of humour."; "I will be able to notice the art and creativity in Roman objects more"; "Presented in a contemporary context these objects have a timeless quality"; "I have seen a lot of Roman objects in museums in the UK and Italy but the exhibition showed how they could be re-imagined"; "Never imagined a 3D printing made after a Roman artefact. Now I feel Roman objects could become part of our daily life again." For 43.82% of respondents, the exhibition also changed how they thought about fine-art practice and archaeological research, either through their encounter with the displacement of archaeology into a gallery or through the opportunity to experience fine-art in the context of archaeological sites and artefacts. The exhibition prompted people to re-think the connections between the two disciplines, and about the potential for developing their relationships: "I now feel rather embarrassed about previously finding archaeology stuff boring...! Very impressed and grateful for this breath of life into it for me - and hopefully many others!"; "It has opened my mind to acknowledging how unique aspects of art can be linked together, despite them seeming so different from each other on the surface."; "It has demonstrated how the two fields can be interlinked. i.e. how fine art can be used to further understanding and experience of archaeological sites such as Herculaneum and Pompeii"; "I can see link previously, now I feel it."; "This was the first show I have seen that considers the two topics together."; "The two seem more connected as disciplines." The exhibition also prompted some to think specifically about the use of contemporary art as a means to explore Roman wall paintings and contemporary art, and about the value of seeing them brought together within the exhibition: "I think it is a very creative and intriguing way to bring out great historical pieces from Roman times. It opens the door for further perspectives on an era that is exceptionally complex."; "It modernises the concept of Roman Paintings making it more accessible to a wider variety of people in current society."; "great referencing between different times! There's so much to unpack in history that modern art is the perfect tool for"; "I think it extremely refreshing. I usually wouldn't take interest in Roman painting and through the use of contemporary art this has allowed me to explore something very different."; "I really enjoyed seeing this, as it allows people to see Roman paintings from a new perspective, rather than them forming low expectations based on stereotypes"; "I think the contrast between contemporary and ancient works highlights the Roman paintings"; "I like to see the comparison between contemporary and Roman paintings - and think that the contemporary art helps us to relate to the Roman paintings on a more personal level"; "The connection across different times/styles was thought provoking". The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project aimed to help explore connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture within the context of the Roman heritage of the North East of England, e.g. Hadrian's Wall. The exhibition, a significant part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project, hoped this heritage would engage its audience, 71.91% of whom had visited a Roman site in the North East. 40.45% of questionnaire responders stated that the exhibition had made them think about the Roman heritage of the North East, and some were prompted to make connections between Roman sites in Italy and those in the North East. Some responders were led to re-consider the value of contemporary art in engaging people with the local Roman heritage, or to change their views on Roman sites as locations of art rather than history. Meanwhile 43.83% of respondents confirmed that the exhibition had encouraged them to find out about, visit or revisit local Roman sites in the UK, sites such as Segedunum at Wallsend, Bishop Auckland, Arbeia Roman Fort at South Shields, Housteads and Hexham, Northumberland, and Ambleside in Cumbria. Some also felt inspired to venture abroad to Pompeii. "The exhibition allowed me to reimagine some of the Roman sites in the area as places of art as well as history. I can envision some of the artefacts in these spaces."; "Always enjoyed Roman sites, but will now be able to view it in a different way."; "As I was going through the exhibition I did think about all the Roman heritage we have in this area."; "Useful notes to help make the connections in the handout we were given at the start"; "It makes you realise how the North East has a connection with Roman Art."; I love history + all things Roman. Motivates me to revisit Roman sites."; "Lots of North East sites came to mind from the exhibition.", "I'll go back with fresh eyes. - There are some excellent wall paintings in the Segedunum museum."; "Time to revisit with fresh perspective"; "Unsure which, yet, but keep to research and visit again. Thought perhaps only good for children and history buffs, but have now reconsidered!"; "Such a rich history here in the N.E. so the exib is just another aspect / way of seeing this history in a contemporary sense." The exhibition also incorporated Catrin Huber's 'Light Trap', a Virtual Reality, real-time environment specifically designed to engage visitors with the research findings of Expanded Interiors in a new way in the new location, while maintaining the findings' link to the original Roman sites. It worked as both documentation and artwork. 77.53% of questionnaire respondents said that this digital format had helped them to imagine the installations in their original Roman locations. The consensus among respondents was overwhelmingly positive, bringing the archaeology to life, demonstrating the potential for its use, and adding to the exhibition experience: "Brilliant, I love the chance to 'look' around the place that is both real + imagined. Nervous previously about doing this but would try these again!!!"; "So interesting! Favourite part! ['favourite part' underlined for emphasis] Made it more of an experience after seeing the installations in real life then imagining it in situ."; "A master piece of Art in itself! Incredibly helpful additional context, particularly understanding the light and height of the space."; "I loved the interactivity of the 3D environment. It really helped to bring the archaeology to life. The movement of light and shadow was really interesting and created a sense of time. The 3D interaction tied in nicely with the rest of the exhibition."; "Very much enjoyed this. Felt like I was actually there experiencing the art in in its original environment."; "Absolutely love the interactive rooms. It really gives you a sense of being there. The light dancing across the room provide different views."; "Fascinating - gave a much better experience being immersed within it"; "Excellent for providing thought and discussion"; "It was a highlight for me especially having just experiencing the art first-hand.";"It was excellent. Really gave the exhibition something extra"; "Loved being able to "walk" around the roman house using the console."; "Love it (picture of a heart) Enjoyable. Quite a privileged feeling - makes art accessible to masses."; "Really immersive and exciting."; "Definitely, wonderful experience."; "Easy to use. Did add a lot to the exhibition"; "LOVED THIS"; "I thought it was amazing and eye opening". 2. In addition to the exhibition, the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project aimed to connect Expanded Interiors research with the local heritage of the North-East of England within an educational context. This part of the project took the form of three Workshops in primary schools in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. From the teachers' viewpoint, the workshops and their use of creative arts practice changed the way they looked at archaeology, history and heritage, and the way in which they would now incorporate art practice, so that they would teach in a new way or use it as a means of supporting existing teaching. They also believed our workshops changed the way their pupils looked at the connections between local history / the history of Pompeii and Herculaneum, and between Roman and contemporary visual culture. Comments included: "It has change [sic] the way I will look at and teach history"; "I will incorporate more art into my teaching through also using the book 'A street through time'"; "They (the students) could make links between the use of decor and colour." Pupil response to the workshops was overwhelmingly positive - they all contributed opinions, describing how the activity gave them the opportunity to create designs and learn about colour and texture and as being "fun", "cool", "amazing", "interesting", "fascinating" and "different". For some it generated the wish to learn more about the subject and visit the sites: "I think it was amazing and fun to build and learn new facts."; "It was very interesting and fascinating to learn about different colours and places"; "I thought it was very interesting and clever - makes me want to go there and learn more". For some pupils, the activities of making and designing fostered connections between Roman and contemporary art and life, and made history more interesting and understandable. It stimulated their creative thinking, and for some the experience evidenced how exploring history via art and making things benefited their well-being. To enhance and sustain these activities, we created educational resource packs (published open-access in February 2022). These aim to stimulate a lasting impact on school children, creatively engaging pupils with Roman interior decoration and with Roman objects in Italy and the UK, and linking this experience to their present-day life. We had very positive feedback on the educational resource packs at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day, an event that brought together artists and heritage / education professionals. 3. Building upon Expanded Interiors success in engaging young adults, we opted to involve / work closely with a group of them while developing Expanded Interiors Re-Staged. Thus members of the Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's L-ink group (a group for young adults) researched, developed and designed a Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. This was the first time that such a guide had been produced for an exhibition at the Hatton Gallery, and it has since been featured as an example of best practice in the 28th edition of GEM (Group for Education in Museums) Case Studies, on the theme of young people in museums, heritage sites, and cultural organisations. Excitingly, the case study 'Expanded Interiors Re-Staged: an alternative exhibition guide' was written by one of the young participants herself. The Young People's Guide represented an opportunity for the group to give voice to their perspectives as young adults, and for them to find fresh ways to engage their peers with the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged research and exhibition. Visitor feedback on the exhibition indicated that the Young People's Guide provided an alternative - and welcome - way for visitors to experience, interpret and think about the exhibition. Comments included: "Particularly liked the Spotify sound clip suggestions within the youth group's booklet"; "....And it was really nice to have the thoughts about colour and music from the young peoples guide"; "Young peoples (guide) better for non-experts". The L-ink Group of young people involved in developing the guide were paid for their work and gained real-life experience of being a valued part of an exhibition project team, participating in meetings and workshops, and gaining insights into artists' working methods and intentions. In the post-Focus group meeting, participating L-ink members commented upon the benefits of being involved in the project, and how this experience had changed their understanding of subjects such as research and artistic process, Roman history, and the relationship between art and archaeology: "I think as well, the artistic processes that go into it, I found really interesting. About the idea of, like, all of the research. And then like hearing Catrin, like the conversations, which has fascinated us all, I think. And how that kind of like influenced how you created the art. That was like a real learning process,..."; " l went to Segedunum as well, not necessarily because of this but while we were making this and, yeh - looked at a lot of the Roman artefacts there. And, I suppose doing this project gave it a different perspective, one that I wouldn't have considered If I'd just sort of showed up, just for a day out"; "It was just so interesting and like (..) if you study a lot of art history, sometimes it's hard to actually see it from like a different angle because you're so busy like looking at books and then you see like the finished products of the exhibitions. So it was like a completely different perspective that I just feel you don't get at when you are learning about art in schools or, even university the history of art". It also changed their ideas of what an interpretation leaflet is: "Yeh, it really made me think about an exhibition guide as like a creative thing". The Hatton Gallery exhibition officer who worked closely with the L-ink group commented on the development of the L-Ink Young People's Guide: "They've never had anything like this before - they've never had the responsibility of putting together a guide like this that other people will actually want to pick up and see and feeling like the research that they have done matters" and "When they saw everything in print for the first time they were really happy about it and so proud, so pleased with what they had managed to achieve. So I think It's been quite an overwhelming experience and really positive for them." As well as impacting positively on the young adults, exhibition visitors, and all partner's involved, the work with the L-ink group has been highlighted nationally as an example of best practice for working with young people in the museum and heritage context. 4. Through our exhibition, website, workshops, talks, engagement activities (e.g. small group tours for curators) and the sharing day, Expanded Interiors Re- Staged has started to impact upon Contemporary visual art, heritage and education professionals. This is evidenced in comments from visitors to the exhibition: "Though my practice has a different area of interest the use of space and installation have inspired my own thinking."; "I never before considered the impact of Roman wall painting, but now I realise its significance, especially from an artist's viewpoint."; "I really enjoyed the 3D point cloud survey, I'm an architect and have not seen one before as detailed + full of texture + colour". The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day brought together strategically-targeted artists, heritage and education professionals, and digital media specialists. Participants experienced a creative interdisciplinary knowledge-exchange workshop that enabled sharing of Expanded Interiors research findings, and the launch and circulation of our education and documentation material. Further, the workshop/sharing day has encouraged new collaborations between artists, heritage professionals and the digital media sector (e.g. post workshop we've been approached to connect artists and education professionals with digital media specialists). It also explored the potential for contemporary Fine Art practice and VR technologies to facilitate fresh public engagement with Roman archaeological heritage. Comments and feedback included: "Just a comment on this very stimulating event - that this project brings to the fore and exemplifies the continuum of our desire and our ability to imagine and represent other realities - the Romans, it seems to me, in their wall paintings were creating virtual realities to take them beyond the confines and limitations of their own actual physical spaces."; "Very interesting to get an insight into all the phases of this large, ambitious and multi sited project. Very interested in hearing how Catrin worked with the various partners and collaborators"; "Thank you all for today, it's been most fascinating and insightful..."; "Great opportunity to listen and develop my own thinking"; "That was all totally fascinating. What a wonderful project integrating many disciplines".
First Year Of Impact 2021
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic

 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Face Pots 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Face Pots, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). Replicas of Roman face cups from Pompeii are part of Huber's installation Along and Through, which was originally exhibited within the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii. This teaching material playfully explores what Roman face pots are and their history, while linking Italian and British Roman sites. It encourages pupils to explore the Roman heritage they share with Pompeii and Herculaneum and the rich connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture, while creatively engaging them with Roman history. Texts by Catrin Huber (text on slide 21), Eniko Hudak, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Eniko Hudak, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. Please also note that this Powerpoint presentation 'Roman Face Pots' contains a link to a video by master potter Graham Taylor from Potted-History, who has created for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged a hands-on introduction and demonstration to how the Romans made their face pots, together with instructions and a demonstration for children (and adults) to do their own face pots. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 36 views and 15 downloads by mid-March 2022. The educational resource packs are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). We have had very positive feedback on the educational resource packs at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day that brought together artists, heritage and education professionals. Further impact will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/resources/
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Interiors 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Interiors, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. The Powerpoint presentation is also available as a PDF. These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). As part of Expanded Interiors Catrin Huber developed three large-scale installations that responded to and were in dialogue with the interior decorations, wall paintings, and architecture of two Roman houses: the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. This teaching material aims to creatively engage pupils with Roman interior decoration both in Italy and the UK, while linking it to their present day life. Pupils will also discover how a contemporary artist responded to an archaeological site, and will be encouraged to do their own artworks in response.Texts by Catrin Huber, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Design by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife. Please note that you can adapt the Powerpoint presentation to your own needs, however all the images are protected under the following licence: CC BY-NC-ND-4.0. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 34 views and 13 downloads by mid-March 2022. The educational resource packs are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). We have had very positive feedback on the educational resource packs at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day that brought together artists, heritage and education professionals. Further impact will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/resources/
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Exhibition Guide 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. The interpretation leaflet was designed by Jaakko Tuomivaara from Supergroup Studios. Texts are by Catrin Huber and Rosie Morris. Photography by Amedeo Benestante (Gallery 1, Gallery 4), Catrin Huber (Gallery 2), Rosie Morris (Gallery 3), and need to be credited accordingly. The interpretation leaflet provided an introduction to the project, research and exhibition and guided the viewer through the exhibition. Texts by the respective artists (Catrin Huber / Rosie Morris) provided contexts for the different exhibition galleries while linking the research / installations to Hadrian's Wall and relevant local museums (e.g. Segedunum, Hancock Museum). The guide was / is available in physical / digital form in the Hatton Gallery and on its website, and on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's website. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition forms one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 21 views and 9 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the 'Exhibition Guide', please see entry in the 'Engagement Activities' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Exhibition_Guide/19086563/1
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Exhibition feedback 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset comprises the comments gathered from the 89 visitors to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition who gave feedback about their experience either 1) via an online questionnaire on the project website (https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/questionnaire/) or 2) from written responses on a paper questionnaire, handed out at the exhibition, which were subsequently transferred into the online questionnaire form by members of the project team. This dataset consists of collated feedback from the 89 respondents. The feedback is available as a pdf. document and has been collated by question.The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This dataset has been published at the beginning of February 2022 and has had 17 views and 7 downloads by mid-March 2022. The feedback has been incredibly useful for our own project evaluation, especially in relationship to the exhibition and its many relating aspects (e.g. interpretations, Young People's Guide, 3D real-time environment / VR, installations) and for future planning especially regarding VR, exhibition planning, and concept. The feedback has been shared with our partners. We also had a direct enquiry re feedback on the exhibition from a research associates working on another research projects. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/dataset/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Exhibition_feedback/19077452/...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Exhibition feedback 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata This dataset comprises the comments gathered from the 89 visitors to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition who gave feedback about their experience either 1) via an online questionnaire on the project website (https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/questionnaire/) or 2) from written responses on a paper questionnaire, handed out at the exhibition, which were subsequently transferred into the online questionnaire form by members of the project team. This dataset consists of collated feedback from the 89 respondents. The feedback is available as a pdf. document and has been collated by question.The exhibition, Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, relocated to Newcastle's Hatton Gallery contemporary installations created by visual artist Catrin Huber as part of an earlier project, Expanded Interiors, which had been sited and displayed at the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The installations sited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum and the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii, had responded to and were in dialogue with the specific nature of the buildings and wall paintings from these two Roman houses. They were shown in situ from May 2018 - January 2019. In the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle these installations were exhibited alongside new work developed by Catrin Huber to set them in a fresh dialogue in a new context, with the distinctive architecture of the Hatton Gallery. Artist Rosie Morris, who was part of the original Expanded Interiors research team was commissioned to develop her own contemporary installation in response to the research done within the Roman houses, and the new venue 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/dataset/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Exhibition_feedback/19077452
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - all gallery spaces 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. This dataset contains images of all four galleries of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, and also wall and interpretation leaflet texts. Please note that there are additional datasets for each gallery space with further photographic documentation. Gallery 1 titled 'Along and Through' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). Gallery 2 titled 'The Corner Escape' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displayed 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / painting. Gallery 3 titled 'In / out / of this world' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission, which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. Gallery 4 titled 'Light Trap' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on persplex, 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). 'Light Trap' also displayed 'Black Hole', 'Asteroids', and 'White Dwarf', textile wall hangings of various sizes; and 'Light Trap', a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 40 views and 63 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the exhibition, please see the 'Artistic & Creative Products' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 1 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. Gallery 1 titled 'Along and Through' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Along and Through', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). This dataset contains images for 'Along and Through', together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 1. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 39 views and 54 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the exhibition, please see the 'Artistic & Creative Products' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 2 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. Gallery 2 titled 'The Corner Escape' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Around and Up', a large-scale painting installation, which was originally exhibited at the House of the Cryptoporticus in Pompeii (July 2018 - January 2019). It also displays 'The Corner Escape', a wall paper drawing / collage / painting. This dataset contains images of 'The Corner Escape' and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 2. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 44 views and 66 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the exhibition, please see the 'Artistic & Creative Products' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 3 - Rosie Morris 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. Gallery 3 titled 'In / out / of this world' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Rosie Morris's Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission and installation 'In / out / of this world', which comprises of 'Sunlit walls', large-scale digital prints of drawings; 'Curtains', an oil painting; 'This chamber of mine', a diorama; 'From where I sit', a photograph; and 'Threshold' a video projection and vinyl floor. This dataset contains images of 'In / out / of this world' and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 3. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 36 views and 57 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the exhibition, please see the 'Artistic & Creative Products' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Photographic documentation of the exhibition - gallery 4 - Catrin Huber 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. Gallery 4 titled 'Light Trap' at the Hatton Gallery exhibits Catrin Huber's installation 'Bella Ciao' a large-scale installation comprising scaffolding-like construction, prints on perspex, and 3D printed replicas of Roman statues. 'Bella Ciao' was originally exhibited at the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum (May 2018 - January 2019). 'Light Trap' also displays 'Black Hole', 'Asteroids', and 'White Dwarf', textile wall hangings of various sizes; and 'Light Trap', a 3D real-time environment (documentation and artwork) showing Huber's installations within the interiors of the House of the Cryptoporticus and the House of the Beautiful Coutyard in Pompeii and Herculaneum. This dataset contains images of 'Light Trap' and all the artworks, together with the wall and interpretation leaflet texts (PDF documents) for Gallery 4. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 45 views and 61 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the exhibition, please see the 'Artistic & Creative Products' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Photographic_documentation_of_...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Project Overview Metadata 
Description This dataset provides an information sheet for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged and all its datasets. This information sheet is also part of all other Expanded Interiors Re-Staged datasets. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 32 views and 4 downloads by mid-March 2022. It provides information about the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Project_Overview_Metadata/1908...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - School workshop feedback 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata.This dataset comprises feedback from the three school workshops, which were undertaken as part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. These resources consist of a sample questionnaire, one for teachers and one for pupils, and a compilation of the feedback collated by question.The three school workshops took place in July 2021 at two primary schools in the North-East of England whose locations are in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. The project ran one workshop with pupils in Years 3 and 4 (ages 7-9) and two workshops with pupils in Year 6 (ages 10 - 11). The aim of the workshops was to connect, within an educational context, the research from Expanded Interiors Re-Staged and Expanded Interiors (the previous project), with the local heritage of the North-East of England, while exploring the connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture. This happened through a presentation by the artist, and hands-on creative activities with the children. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published at the beginning of February 2022 and has had 18 views and 17 downloads by mid-March 2022. The school workshop feedback has impacted on the development of our educational resource pack (please see respective dataset) and will impact on future design of school workshops. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/dataset/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_School_workshop_feedback/1907...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - School workshop feedback 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata.This dataset comprises feedback from the three school workshops, which were undertaken as part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. These resources consist of a sample questionnaire, one for teachers and one for pupils, and a compilation of the feedback collated by question.The three school workshops took place in July 2021 at two primary schools in the North-East of England whose locations are in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. The project ran one workshop with pupils in Years 3 and 4 (ages 7-9) and two workshops with pupils in Year 6 (ages 10 - 11). The aim of the workshops was to connect, within an educational context, the research from Expanded Interiors Re-Staged and Expanded Interiors (the previous project), with the local heritage of the North-East of England, while exploring the connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture. This happened through a presentation by the artist, and hands-on creative activities with the children. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/dataset/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_School_workshop_feedback/1907...
 
Title Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Young People's Guide for the exhibition 
Description Please read in conjunction with the Project Overview Metadata. Text, images, design of the Young People's Guide have to be credited to it's creators, L-INK group members: Ella Nixon, Remy Harkensee, Angelica Jones, Caitlin Milne, Caroline Reeves, Naomi Harrison.This dataset contains a PDF of the Young People's Guide, a sample of the consent form, and the Project Overview Metadata. A series of meetings and workshops prior to the opening of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition allowed six members of the Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adults group (L-INK) to research ideas and the exhibition process, in order to develop new interpretation material aimed at their peers: a Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. The group was included from the beginning in the development process of the exhibition, gaining insights through Zoom meetings with the artists and north-east based VR company, Animmersion Ltd; The Young People Guide offered an opportunity for the group to give voice to their perspectives as young adults, and to find fresh ways to engaging their peers with the research and exhibition. The guide was available in physical form in the Hatton Gallery during the exhibition, and is still available in digital form via Hatton Gallery and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's websites. The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition formed one of the key outputs of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. The Young People's Guide accompanied the exhibition. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The dataset has been published in February 2022 and has had 42 views and 15 downloads by mid-March 2022. For impact for the 'Young People's Guide', please see entry in the 'Engagement Activities' section. Further impact from this dataset will need to be reported next year. 
URL https://data.ncl.ac.uk/articles/figure/Expanded_Interiors_Re-Staged_-_Young_People_s_Guide_for_the_e...
 
Description Artist presentation by Catrin Huber about Expanded Interiors for 'Interconnections Symposium: Humanities, Creative Arts Practice and the Cultural Sector', Newcastle University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk was part of the Interconnections symposium, and discussed Expanded Interiors with reference to Expanded Interiors Re-Staged. The symposium was 'an exploration of the cultural sector and its connection and benefits to higher education'. Participants included representatives of leading national cultural organisations and researchers from a range of disciplines. The talks resulted in lively discussions to explore and encourage opportunities and potentials of collaborations across the sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ncl.ac.uk/nuhri/news/news-items/interconnections/
 
Description Artist talk by Catrin Huber about Expanded Interiors for Glasgow School of Arts 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact About 20 members of the staff team in Fine Art at Glasgow School of Art attended the presentation and discussion about Expanded Interiors. They were particularly interested in the process of the project, including fundraising and organisation. It resulted in an engaged Q&A session and participants commented on how useful the conversation had been.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.gsa.ac.uk/about-gsa/
 
Description Artist talk by lead artist Catrin Huber and commissioned artist Rosie Morris about the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lead artist Catrin Huber and commissioned artist Rosie Morris gave a Zoom talk (due to Covid 19 restrictions) for the Hatton Gallery on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, which was attended by about 20 participants. In this talk, Huber and Morris discussed their practices, research and ideas surrounding their work and their thoughts on developing their current exhibition / commission. The talk was recorded and is now available to watch online and has been viewed a further 65 times by March 22.
The talks resulted in engaged discussions and raised interesting questions. Chat comments included:'Thank you so much for very interesting insights into thought processes, background and production of work with both artists. Your enthusiasm and passions are inspirational :)'; 'thank you! Was so wonderful to see all the working drawings and models especially!'; 'Loved this. Thank you both. I am very much looking forward to seeing your work in the flesh. really well presented and structured explanation.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja4A1IuclKc
 
Description Artist-led taster workshop with artist Rosie Morris to introduce new and current young people to the Hatton and Laing's L-Ink young people group. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact After working with curator Zoe Allen (Hatton & Laing Art Gallery) on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition Rosie Morris was asked to lead an artist-led taster workshop, introducing new and current young people to the L-INK young people group. 6 young people aged 16-24 participated in addition to two staff members. Participants created artworks to gift one another and engaged in interesting discussions about the history of how public art galleries are designed and the resulting experience: "It was better than I thought, I didn't expect such good discussions around art" (participant, feedback questionnaire). 100% of the participants enjoyed the workshop and would like to join the L-INK group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://laingartgallery.org.uk/about-us/l-ink
 
Description Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Face Pots 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This educational resource pack contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Face Pots, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. Designed by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe, it contains texts by Catrin Huber (text on slide 21), Eniko Hudak, and Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Eniko Hudak, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife.
These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6). Replicas of Roman face cups from Pompeii are part of Huber's installation Along and Through, which was originally exhibited within the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii. This teaching material playfully explores what Roman face pots are and their history, while linking Italian and British Roman sites. It encourages pupils to explore the Roman heritage they share with Pompeii and Herculaneum and the rich connections between Roman and contemporary visual culture, while creatively engaging them with Roman history. Please note that the resource pack has been launched in February 2022 and has been published on data.ncl under the following licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. 2 (with 27 views and 7 downloads on the 24.02.22). We have had very positive feedback on the educational resource packs at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day that brought together artists, heritage and education professionals. Further impact will need to be reported next year.

Please also note that this Powerpoint presentation 'Roman Face Pots' contains a link to a video by master potter Graham Taylor from Potted-History, who has created for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged a hands-on introduction and demonstration to how the Romans made their face pots, together with instructions and a demonstration for children (and adults) to do their own face pots.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/resources/
 
Description Expanded Interiors Re-Staged - Educational resource pack - Roman Interiors 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This educational resource pack contains an adaptable Powerpoint presentation for schools: Roman Interiors, together with its respective worksheet (PDF). These built on the research done for Expanded Interiors. Designed by Dr Harriet Sutcliffe, it contains texts by Catrin Huber and Dr Harriet Sutcliffe. Concept by Catrin Huber, Dr Thea Ravasi, Dr Harriet Sutcliife.These educational resources are created for Key Stage 2 pupils (aged from 7 - 11; years 3,4,5 and 6).

As part of Expanded Interiors Catrin Huber developed three large-scale installations that responded to and were in dialogue with the interior decorations, wall paintings, and architecture of two Roman houses: the House of the Cryptoporticus at Pompeii and the House of the Beautiful Courtyard in Herculaneum. This teaching material aims to creatively engage pupils with Roman interior decoration both in Italy and the UK, while linking it to their present day life. Pupils will also discover how a contemporary artist responded to an archaeological site, and will be encouraged to do their own artworks in response. Please note that the resource pack has been launched in February 2022 and has been published on data.ncl under the following licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. 2 (with 34 views and 13 downloads on the 11.03.22). We have had very positive feedback on the educational resource packs at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day that brought together artists, heritage and education professionals. Further impact will need to be reported next year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/resources/
 
Description Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition tours with the lead artist Catrin Huber and commissioned artist Rosie Morris 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact These were two small group tours (due to Covid19 restrictions) with lead artist Catrin Huber and commissioned artist Rosie Morris of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition at the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle. They were offered to curators of regional and national art organisations, as well as independent curators. These allowed for in-depths discussion of the artists' ideas, research and installations, and raised interesting questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/newsevents/smallexhibitiontours.html
 
Description Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop / sharing day for artists, heritage and education professionals. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop and sharing day introduced participants to the project's events and activities, and was an opportunity to launch our educational resource pack for KS2 children that links Expanded Interiors' research done in Italy with the Roman history in the UK. Artists, education and heritage professionals shared past, current, and future projects that have or will creatively engage with Roman history in the North-East. PI and artist Catrin Huber talked about Expanded Interiors and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged, commissioned artist Rosie Morris discussed her installation for the project, Dr Harriet Sutcliffe introduced Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's educational resource packs, and members of Laing and Hatton Gallery's L-Ink group discussed their Young People's Guide and shared their journey and experiences.
Matthew Butcher (Associate Professor in Architecture, Bartlett School of Architecture) talked about his The Mansio project on Hadrian's Wall, Penelope Sexton (Creative Programme Manager for English Heritage) discussed Creative Commissioning at Housesteads, artist Dr Henna Asikainen (D6 Culture in Transit resident) shared her projects relating to Hadrian's Wall. Andrew Parkin, the Keeper of the Roman collection at GNM: Hancock, introduced their recent work with VR, and Dr Dan Johnston (developer, Animmersion) presented and discussed 'Light Trap', the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged 3D real-time environment (VR).
Using the Expanded Interiors Re- Staged exhibition and visual and digital documentation of the original research project as its starting point, this workshop aimed to generate interdisciplinary knowledge exchange around the potential for contemporary Fine Art practice and VR technologies to facilitate fresh public engagement with Roman archaeological heritage. The sharing day resulted in intense and fruitful discussions, especially around questions of 1. how contemporary art encourages different or alternative engagement with particular sites and histories; 2. How organizations ensure long-term legacy / impact at a site, after a contemporary art project has finished at an organisation or heritage site and whether this is desirable; 3. What artists can bring to working with hard to reach audiences. Comments and feedback at the end of the day included: 'Just a comment on this very stimulating event - that this project brings to the fore and exemplifies the continuum of our desire and our ability to imagine and represent other realities - the Romans, it seems to me, in their wall paintings were creating virtual realities to take them beyond the confines and limitations of their own actual physical spaces.'; 'Thanks you all for today, it's been most fascinating and insightful...';'Thank you everyone for a fascinating and stimulating Saturday'; 'Thank you all for today, it's been most fascinating and insightful - it was a pleasure to be part of it...';'Great opportunity to listen and develop my own thinking'; 'That was all totally fascinating. What a wonderful project integrating many disciplines'; ' Really engaging and stimulating presentations and conversations...'; ' It's been brilliant!'; 'Thank you so much for this fascinating day!';'Very interesting to get an insight into all the phases of this large, ambitious and multi sited project. Very interested in hearing how Catrin worked with the various partners and collaborators'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/newsevents/expandedinteriorsre-stagedsharingwor...
 
Description Expanded Interiors Summer Children's Activity organised by the Hatton Gallery 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Hatton Gallery's educational officer had put together a fun-filled and popular Expanded Interiors Summer activity pack for children. They were picked up from the Hatton Gallery throughout the summer in 2021. Children were encouraged to design their own wall decoration, inspired by Huber's wall paintings for a Roman house in Pompeii.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/newsevents/summeractivitypack.html
 
Description Facebook @ExpandedInteriors 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We use Facebook to disseminate previews and information about our activities, events, exhibitions, research, and engagement activities. By February 2022 we have 174 followers and 267 likes. Our post (64) reach engagement has been 12316 and we have had 678 reactions, comments and shares.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019,2020,2021,2022
URL https://www.facebook.com/expandedinteriors/
 
Description Instagram #expandedinteriors 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We use Instagram to disseminate previews and information about our activities, events, exhibitions, research, and engagement activities. By February 2022 we have had 57 posts, 226 followers, 1259 Likes, 46 comments, and 74 posts featuring #expandedinteriors with 3145 likes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019,2020,2021,2022
URL https://www.instagram.com/expandedinteriors/?hl=en
 
Description Interpretation guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The interpretation guide was designed in a fold-out format which included an introduction to the project and context of the exhibition and creative texts written by lead artist Catrin Huber and commissioned artist Rosie Morris in response to their work and research, to guide the visitor around the gallery (floor plan) and accompany them on their experience of each room and installation. The intention of the guide was to encourage imaginative and interpretative responses to the works, while linking the research / exhibition to Hadrian's Wall and relevant local museums (e.g. Segedunum, Hancock Museum). The guide was available in physical form in the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition at the Hatton Gallery. It is also available in digital format on Expanded Interiors Re-Staged's website and has been published on data.ncl. 50.56% of visitors who answered the feedback questionnaire to the exhibition rated the Information leaflet 5 or 4 on the rating scale, 5 being excellent through to 1 being poor. Those that commented predominantly considered the leaflet as well produced and that it had made a positive impact on their understanding and experience of the exhibition. The benefit of having two guides, with a different approach taken in the Young People's Guide, was also appreciated by some visitors: 'Written Beautifully! So engaging and helped deepen my understanding and appreciation a great deal. Thank You!'; 'Liked how the interpretation leaflet guided you through the exhibits. Had detailed and thought-provoking interpretations.'; 'Really interesting to read the notes before entering the room'; 'Very informative and explained well the layout and walkway plan of the exhibition.'; 'Really helped me understand the exhibition.'; 'Very useful and informative and aesthetically pleasing.'; 'Amazing! Brilliant!!'; 'Ties in well to the concept of the show.'; 'It gave a great deal of useful information.'; 'I really loved the writing in the interpretation leaflet - brought even more info to the work in the exhibition. And it was really nice to have the thoughts about colour and music from the young peoples guide.';
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/resources/
 
Description L-INK group Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the L-INK group (Ella Nixon, Remy Harkensee, Angelica Jones, Caitlin Milne, Caroline Reeves, Naomi Harrison) researched, developed and designed a Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. It was the first time that such a guide was produced for an exhibition at the Hatton Gallery. It represented an opportunity for the group to give voice to their perspectives as young adults, and to find fresh ways to engage their peers with the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged research and exhibition. The guide was available as a handout at the exhibition in both a concertina, fold-out card format and in an accessible format, containing text, images and links to music downloads. It is also available in digital format on the Hatton Gallery and Expanded Interiors Re-Staged websites, and it has been published on data.ncl.
Visitor feedback to the exhibition indicated that the Young People's Guide had provided an alternative and welcome way for visitors to experience, interpret and think about the exhibition. Comments included: 'Particularly liked the Spotify sound clip suggestions within the youth group's booklet', and '....And it was really nice to have the thoughts about colour and music from the young peoples guide', 'Young peoples (guide) better for non-experts'.
The L-INK Group of young people who were involved in developing the guide were paid for their work and gained real-life experience of being a valued part of the exhibition project team, participating in meetings and gaining insights into the artists' working methods and intentions. The participating L-ink members commented in the post-Focus group meeting on the benefits of having been involved in the project, and how this experience had changed their understanding of, for example, research and artistic process, Roman history, and the relationship between art and archaeology: 'I think as well, the artistic processes that go into it, I found really interesting. About the idea of, like, all of the research. And then like hearing Catrin, like the conversations, which has fascinated us all, I think. And how that kind of like influenced how you created the art. That was like a real learning process,...', 'And also Segedunum - l went to Segedunum as well, not necessarily because of this but while we were making this and, yeh - looked at a lot of the Roman artefacts there. And, I suppose doing this project gave it a different perspective, one that I wouldn't have considered If I'd just sort of showed up, just for a day out.', and 'It was very, just so interesting and like you know if you study a lot of art history you, sometimes it's hard to actually see it from like a different angle 'cos you're so busy like looking at books and then you see like the finished products of the exhibitions. So it was like a completely different perspective that I just feel you don't get at when you are learning about art in schools or, even university the history of art.'.

It also changed their ideas of what an interpretation leaflet is: 'Yeh, I suppose it has (changed) because, sort of like, I think, I guess in the past I was thinking more of an exhibition guide as being more of (...) kind of more factual 'cos obviously ours was like, what we wrote was like factual in like a certain sense but I feel like ours was more of a more different way to interpret the things or had, like more of kind a creative process, which was really interesting and yet completely different to what I'd seen before at exhibitions.' and 'Yeh, it really made me think about an exhibition guide as like a creative thing'.

The exhibition officer of the Hatton Gallery who worked closely with the L-ink group commented on the L-Ink Young People's Guide: "They've never had anything like this before - they've never had the responsibility of putting together a guide like this that other people will actually want to pick up and see and feeling like the research that they have done matters to that.' and 'When they saw everything in print for the first time they were really happy about it and so proud, so pleased with what they had managed to achieve. So I think It's been quite an overwhelming experience and really positive for them.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/l-ink%20group/
 
Description L-Ink group (young adults) meeting with artist Catrin Huber and project manager Harriet Sutcliffe in preparation for their presentation at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a meeting with project manager Dr Harriet Sutcliffe and PI Catrin Huber with members of the L-Ink group who had designed the L-INK Guide for Young adults in preparation of their talk for the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/l-inkgroup/
 
Description L-Ink group (young adults) meeting with artist Catrin Huber and project manager Harriet Sutcliffe to brief the young adults on the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project and Young People's Guide 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was an initial meeting to brief the L-Ink group (Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adult group) participants on the Expanded Interiors project and the Young People's Guide. it sparked interesting discussions and questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://laingartgallery.org.uk/about-us/l-ink
 
Description Meeting of L-Ink group members with commissioned artist Rosie Morris 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the L-Ink group (Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adult group) met with commissioned artist Rosie Morris to discuss her plans for her Expanded Interiors Re-Staged commission. Rosie gave insights into her artistic processes and inspirations, and shared models and sketches. This resulted in an engaged discussion with interesting questions and suggestions raised. In the post-Focus group meeting, members of the group commented on how beneficial these meetings with the artists had been: 'Yeh, they (the meetings) were really useful 'cos they just gave, well, yeh they just gave us a completely different idea about the artistic processes involved, because obviously when you're usually visiting an exhibition you just kind of see what's there and you can then go and research of course afterwards or even beforehand but still it was like kind of a real insider's view and it was just so fascinating to hear all the different facets and then at the end to see how it just all fits together. I think it adds like a real excitement to the art as well 'cos you are kind of taken on a journey...'and 'Like that kind of different things that the artist was thinking, that you wouldn't maybe like immediately see, I mean, without the talks and stuff like that and also again I'd say like seeing the inside of Rosie's sketchbooks'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/
 
Description Meeting of L-Ink group members with one of the directors and a developer from Animmersion Ltd - a digital media company 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The L-Ink group members met with the director and a developers of Animmersion Ltd, a leading digital media company. They were taken on a tour through Animmersion's offices (due to Covid19 restrictions this was done on Zoom) and were shown examples of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR). The developer from Animmersion and artist Catrin Huber also shared insights and developing process for Catrin Huber's 3D real-time environment (VR) 'Light Trap'.
The developer showed them processes and tools 'behind the scene'. The members also had the chance to question the developer and the artist on the VR element of the exhibition.In the post-Focus group meeting, members of the group commented on how beneficial this meeting had been: 'One of the most surprising things I think for me was when we went to see - I can't remember what it was called, when we had a video call with the man in the office (developer from Animmersion), like the technology?...It was so interesting to see how like that technology - how it could be used in contemporary art to kind of like give it a completely different dimension. And then when I looked around the exhibition it was so interesting to kind of apply that view, to see art in a different way. I'm kind of so used to seeing it like from a different perspective and so it was great to combine the two and see how the meaning changed altogether.' and '...and also the VR talk again, that stood out to me again, so yeh, I think they (meetings with artists and VR developer) were really good.'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.animmersion.co.uk/
 
Description Meeting of L-Ink group with lead artist and Professor in Fine Art Catrin Huber 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the L-Ink group (Hatton and Laing Art Gallery's young adult group) met with lead artist Catrin Huber to discuss her plans for the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. Catrin gave insights into her artistic processes and inspirations, shared models/sketches, and showed her studio (via Zoom due to Covid19 restrictions). This resulted in an engaged discussion with interesting questions and suggestions raised. In the post-Focus group meeting, members of the group commented on how beneficial these meetings with the artists had been: 'Yeh, they (the meetings) were really useful 'cos they just gave, well, yeh they just gave us a completely different idea about the artistic processes involved, because obviously when you're usually visiting an exhibition you just kind of see what's there and you can then go and research of course afterwards or even beforehand but still it was like kind of a real insider's view and it was just so fascinating to hear all the different facets and then at the end to see how it just all fits together. I think it adds like a real excitement to the art as well 'cos you are kind of taken on a journey...'and ' I think as well, the artistic processes that go into it, I found really interesting. About the idea of, like, all of the research. And then like hearing Catrin, like the conversations, which has fascinated us all, I think. And how that kind of like influenced how you created the art. That was like a real learning process...'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/exhibition/
 
Description Meetings of L-INK group members to work on the Young People's Guide 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the L-Ink group had a series of meetings - supported by the Hatton Gallery team - to develop their own Young People's Guide to the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition, building on all the meetings with the Expanded Interiors team, artists and the Animmersion developer. The exhibition officer of the Hatton Gallery who worked closely with the L-ink group commented on their working together on the L-Ink Young People's Guide: "In terms of their skills, I definitely feel that once they'd decided on the format that they wanted their work to take, they started having to think really about their editing process, about what was feasible and what would fit and to have discussions about their ownership of that solid space as well - so it's a learning curve for anybody when you have to let other people have some control over the thing that you are doing, so there was a lot of give and take and a lot of discussion. I feel very proud of the way they approached that.' and 'They've never had anything like this before - they've never had the responsibility of putting together a guide like this that other people will actually want to pick up and see and feeling like the research that they have done matters to that.' and 'When they saw everything in print for the first time they were really happy about it and so proud, so pleased with what they had managed to achieve. So I think It's been quite an overwhelming experience and really positive for them.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/l-ink%20group/
 
Description Post-exhibition focus group discussion with members of the L-Ink group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a post-exhibition focus group and de-briefing meeting with participating members of the L-INK group. The purpose of the meeting was to get feedback from the group regarding their involvement and experiences in creating the Young People's Guide and being part of the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project. We also wanted to find out what they might have learned or gained from their participation in the project. The responses from both pre- and post-exhibition focus group meetings allowed us to evaluate the Impact the project had on the participants. The L-INK group members expressed benefits and learning from their collaboration and participation, and of working with contemporary art, new technologies and heritage. Their involvement in the project changed their perception of artistic practice, installation art, the gallery environment and the format and role of exhibition guides and information provision in the visitor experience. Comments included:'they just gave us a completely different idea about the artistic processes involved, because obviously when you're usually visiting an exhibition you just kind of see what's there and you can then go and research of course afterwards or even beforehand but still it was like kind of a real insider's view and it was just so fascinating to hear all the different facets and then at the end to see how it just all fits together.'; 'I think research is such a big part of contemporary art, now for me.'; 'So it was like a completely different perspective that I just feel you don't get at when you are learning about art in schools or, even university the history of art.'; 'It was so interesting to see how like that technology - how it could be used in contemporary art to kind of like give it a completely different dimension.'; 'I guess in the past I was thinking more of an exhibition guide as being more of, em - lots of, I don't know how to word it - but kind of more factual 'cos obviously ours was like, what we wrote was like factual in like a certain sense but I feel like ours was more of a more different way to interpret the things or had, like more of kind a creative process, which was really interesting and yet completely different to what I'd seen before at exhibitions.'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/
 
Description Pre-exhibition focus group discussion with members of the L-Ink group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was an initial focus group meeting with members of the L-INK group that were interested in creating the Young People's Guide for the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition. The purpose of the meeting was to get to know the group and to find out what they already knew about art, heritage, Roman history, Roman wall paintings, installation practice, exhibition-making, exhibition guides, and the Expanded Interiors project. It sparked interesting discussions and questions, which would be followed-up in later meetings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/l-ink%20group/
 
Description Three Expanded Interriors Re-Staged workshops in two schools close to Hadrian's Wall 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact These were three workshops directed at pupils aged 7-11 and their teachers, aiming to connect the original research with the local heritage context of the North-East, while facilitating links between contemporary life and Roman culture. The three workshops took place in two primary schools in the North-East of England whose locations are in the vicinity of Hadrian's Wall. A presentation by the lead artist Catrin Huber on Expanded Interiors and its research, and the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged exhibition was followed up by hands-on design activity, working with shoe boxes, paint and collage to design wall decorations for participants' homes.
The impact of the workshops on the students and teachers' experience, knowledge and understanding of Roman art, archaeology and contemporary art and the connection with local Roman heritage was gathered through written feedback from participants on questionnaires which were given out at the end of each workshop.
From the teachers' viewpoint the workshops and their use of creative arts practice had changed the way the teachers looked at archaeology, history and heritage and how they would now incorporate art practice to teach in a new way or use it as a means of supporting their existing teaching. They also believed that the workshops had changed the way their pupils looked at the connections between local history and the history of Pompeii and Herculaneum and between Roman and contemporary visual culture. Comments include: 'It has change [sic] the way I will look at and teach history'; 'I will incorporate more art into my teaching through also using the book 'A street through time'';
'They (the students) could make links between the use of decor and colour.'. The pupils' response to the workshops was overwhelmingly positive - they all contributed opinions, describing how the activity gave them the opportunity to create designs and learn about colour and texture and as being 'fun', 'cool', 'amazing', 'interesting' 'fascinating' and 'different'. For some it generated the wish to learn more about the subject and visit the sites: 'I think it was amazing and fun to build and learn new facts.'; 'It was very interesting and fascinating to learn about different colours and places'; 'very interesting because of the Textures'; 'I thought it was very interesting and clever - makes me want to go there and learn more'. The workshop impacted on how they made links between the history of Herculaneum and Pompeii and that of their local Roman sites. For some, the activities of making and designing, for example through learning about the use of illusions, helped make connections between Roman and contemporary art and life and made history more interesting and understandable: 'I think the links between them are very good because about the volcanoes it's very good to see the difference'; 'The links are great because they built many stuff in the north east'; 'it made me realise the things they did over 2000 years ago'; 'fun to build Roman stuff. It makes history more interesting'; 'it makes history more intreting [sic] and its [sic] easier to understand because im [sic] making it out of art.' For some pupils the impact of the workshop was on stimulating their creative thinking and for some the experience evidenced how using art and making things to explore history had the impact of benefiting their well-being: 'interesting because art can be anything'; 'I think about happy things'; 'I think it would be really interesting to paint an actual sculpture of it.'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/newsevents/
 
Description Twitter @ExpandedIN 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We use twitter to disseminate previews and information about our activities, events, exhibitions, research, and engagement activities. By March 2022 we have had 286 470 impressions,130 posts, 390 retweets, and 982 likes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019,2020,2021,2022
URL https://twitter.com/ExpandedIN
 
Description Website for Expanded Interiors (in English and Italian) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Expanded Interiors website provides thorough information and context about the Expanded Interiors project and the archaeological sites. It is aimed at a general public as well as specialised audience. It contains a blog section as well as podcasts, and a resource page, with additional information that can be downloaded. The website is available in English and Italian. We have had over 2800 users, with the largest numbers coming from the UK (50.58%), US (13.95%), and Italy (11.48%), the remaining users came from 51 countries, including Australia, Germany, Canada, United Arab Emirates, Romania, China, Uganda, Brazil, Indonesia, South Africa, Japan: the overall sessions are recorded as 4760 sessions. Overall page views: 14 684.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriors/
 
Description Website for Expanded Interiors Re-Staged 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Expanded Interiors Re-Staged website provides thorough information, documentation, and context about the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged project and links to the Expanded Interiors project and website. It aims at the general audience as well as specialised audiences. It contains among other things a L-INK group and a resource section, with additional information and educational resources that can be downloaded.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/
 
Description Workshop presentation by L-INK group members about their work, experiences, and development of the Young People's Guide 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Ella Nixon, Remy Harkensee, and Naomi Harrison from the L-INK group presented at the Expanded Interiors Re-Staged workshop and sharing day, introducing their Young People's Guide and sharing their experiences and working processes. This resulted in an engaged discussion and raised interesting questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://research.ncl.ac.uk/expandedinteriorsrestaged/newsevents/expandedinteriorsre-stagedsharingwor...