Future Pasts in an Apocalyptic Moment: A Hybrid Analysis of 'Green' Performativities and Ecocultural Ethics in a Globalised African Landscape

Lead Research Organisation: Bath Spa University
Department Name: School of Humanities

Abstract

This project investigates how different ideas of the past, in particular imagined past relationships between people and nature, are conditioning the futures being urgently created now in pursuit of 'sustainability' and the avoidance of 'environmental crisis'. It explores tensions between traditional, indigenous and local conceptions of human/nature relationships, on the one hand, and new conceptions underlying modern market-based methods for creating 'green' futures, on the other. We will do this through in-depth field research in western Namibia - where three of our team members have long-term research experience - and in collaboration with our local institutional partner, the National Museum of Namibia.

Problems such as 'environmental change' and 'sustainability' are complex and require analysis that crosses disciplinary boundaries. Our research, therefore, applies methods and theory from Cultural Geography, Ethnomusicology, Environmental History, Philosophy and Social Anthropology. Our field location encapsulates tensions present in many contemporary circumstances. Here, old and new conceptions of human/nature relationships are colliding spectacularly as resources such as uranium are extracted from land which is home to some of the oldest cultures on earth, as well as to highly valued (and endangered) animal and plant species.

Through engaging with diverse actors in corporate, state, NGO and local contexts, we will explore the environmental change understandings informing a range of new 'green' entities that are being created, marketed and exchanged so as to generate sustainability. We will juxtapose these 'sustainability objects' with ways that landscape and other species are conceived and remembered in local indigenous culture, as encoded in stories, song, dance and healing rituals. Our selected, interconnected and commodified 'green things' are, i) 'green uranium' (so-called because of its alleged contribution to low-carbon generation but also because the impacts of its extraction are to be 'offset'), ii) biodiversity offsets (in which environmental harm arising from development in one location is offset by conservation activity elsewhere), iii) natural products derived from indigenous plant knowledge, iv) animal hunting trophies, and v) KhoeSan rock art heritage.

This research will enhance humanities understandings of how new 'green' objects act, and are perceived to act, to 'perform sustainability', and thereby to transfer past social and environmental health forwards into the future. We will complement this by in-depth analysis of perceptions regarding environmental change, assisted by the collation and exhibiting of repeat landscape photographs. In these, contemporary photographs reveal how landscapes have changed (or not) since early archival images, dating back to the late 1800s, were made.

A key and iterative component of our project is the exhibiting of images, audio and video material from our research, both at the Museum in Windhoek and as mobile exhibitions in varied field contexts within Namibia. We intend this to stimulate open discussion regarding ideas of environmental change and sustainable futures, and thereby generate further research data. We will also foster public engagement through a project website with the URL www.futurepasts.net.

Results from these interconnected research strands will be synthesised and theorised in a further strand. This will examine the philosophical and ethical issues arising at the interfaces between different culturally-bound understandings of human/nature relations. Our work here will flesh-out a new cross-disciplinary domain of 'ecocultural ethics' that considers sustainability imaginaries as entwined with the cultural production of particular pasts, presents and futures. This juxtaposition of competing ethical principles underlying different sustainability perspectives will draw together the empirical material analysed in the rest of the project.

Planned Impact

Our project engages with diverse peoples with a range of interests in environmental change and sustainability in the geographical landscape of our research (western Namibia). They include local people (primarily Damara and Herero), NGOs (in environmental conservation and tourism), business leaders (in natural products industries, tourism lodge management, trophy hunting enterprises, and uranium mining), and Namibian representatives on national and international environmental policy bodies (such as the Business and Biodiversity Offsets Programme). We already have connections with a range of these actors, locations and organisations, which we will foster through this research.

As such, our research will be relevant for a range of potential beneficiaries with interests in projections of environmental change, perceptions regarding culture/nature relationships, and the ways these inform environmental understanding and sustainability policy solutions.

The project is designed to facilitate and emphasise public engagement activities in Namibia at specific moments during the research (see Work Package 5). These will enhance possibilities for both the sharing of our research material and the co-production of knowledge with diverse actors, as delineated above. Our public engagement activities and events will take place in a range of contexts. They will combine exhibitions both housed by the National Museum of Namibia in Windhoek, with travelling presentations that can take place in the specific sites of our research, including in local communities and at business operations such as mines and tourism sites.

We will also create a public project website, incorporating popular social media such as Facebook and Twitter. These online media are used in Namibia as elsewhere, and will enable interested parties, including non-academic users, to learn of and engage with our research. This will facilitate the creation of an online social network with interests in our research foci. Material published and made available online will be subject to ethical consideration, in accordance with our ethical policy.

Through these activities we intend to generate and reach a broad and expanding range of users of, and beneficiaries from, our research (see Pathways to Impact statement). We envisage that non-academic users of the research will derive benefits in the following ways:

- Exposure to a diversity of views and perspectives regarding environmental change and sustainability possibilities will foster greater understanding regarding the contemporary environmental moment and the concerns and desires of different groups of people.

- Public exhibitions and events in varied Namibian contexts that are designed to foster creative sharing and community memory regarding environmental change and sustainability trajectories, will enhance community and public knowledge regarding diverse perspectives on environmental issues.

- The creative and cultural industries in Namibia, via our collaborations with the National Museum of Namibia and with Mamokobo Film and Production, will benefit from the generation of content for public exhibitions and presentation events.

- Environmental policy-makers in all sectors will benefit from enhanced engagement and information regarding public understanding of environmental change and sustainability trajectories. All members of the research team already contribute to public policy development and debate (see CVs) and we will extend such activities through the proposed research.

Our public engagement activities will be accompanied by regular possibilities for feedback and evaluation by participants so as to facilitate the assessment and reporting of impacts. This will also permit us make improvements to our public engagement activities as the project progresses.

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
AH/K005871/1 01/10/2013 31/12/2013 £797,108
AH/K005871/2 Transfer AH/K005871/1 01/01/2014 31/07/2019 £766,260
 
Title 'Re-presenting photography in Namibia' (Rohde) 
Description Rohde assisted the director of the Annual Visual Art Museum Programme (AVAMP) 2015 at the National Art Gallery of Namibia in Windhoek, to contextualise and caption photographic work from west Namibia that he curated during the 1990s (Matida Sida ra Mûgu: How We See Each Other). This work was re-shown as part of the exhibition 'Re-presenting photography in Namibia' (May - August 2015). 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The exhibition sought to give a concise overview of the development of photography in Namibia, and more so regarding the changing view of the lens in the past years. Showing a selection of historical, documentary and fine art photography, including photos from the colonial era through to the dawn of Namibia's Independence, as well as contemporary works of today. The exhibition attracted broad audiences as well as write-ups in the media, e.g. http://www.namibian.com.na/index.php?id=137470&page=archive-read 
URL http://www.staytoday.com.na/events/avamp-exhibition-re-presenting-photography-in-namibia
 
Title Future Pasts exhibition Bath 44AD 
Description Our multi-media exhibition "Future Pasts: Landscape, Memory and Music in West Namibia" distils aspects of the Future Pasts research project - arts and humanities engagement with how ideas and assumptions about the past - particularly about past relationships between people and the natural world - affect the futures being created now in pursuit of 'sustainability'. The exhibition uses photography, video and audio to journey through a selection of themes we have explored through our research: "place", "music", "healing", "change", "landscape", "memory" and "mining". We close by making reference to the complex Dama / ?Nukhoen ancestor-hero-trickster character of Haiseb, who reminds us of the mysterious and unpredictable, as well as the often unfathomable and funny, natures of existence. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The exhibition was visited by several hundred people, many of whom left comments recorded in our comments-book at https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/5ba6bf_357a1b24e8dc4db0878c23ea3da3eba3.pdf It was selected as 'Pick of the Week' by the regional arts network Visuals Arts South West, who stated in their review that: "The collaborative and multi-disciplinary exhibition is underpinned by an academic rigour that enhances the power of the themes of 'sustainability, identity and displacement'. . . This exhibition powerfully, yet peacefully, demonstrates the beauty of the country whilst highlighting issues pertinent to the people whose home it is." The exhibition formed a focus for student visits associated with the Association of Commonwealth Universities summer school in August 2017, and student and practitioner visitors through a 'Curating research as practice' workshop held in July at Bath Spa University. The private view of the exhibition was visited by the Mayor of Bath amongst other local dignitaries and artists, as well as invited guests. Composite images from the section on 'Memory' have been returned locally in Namibia, to participants in the research as well as for exhibiting at the Save the Rhino Trust resource centre, the Sesfontein Conservancy office, and to the Museums Association of Namibia for inclusion their archive. 
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/gallery-44ad-bath-july-august-2017
 
Title Haiseb - a video of research progress 
Description A short video describing one aspect of my research for the project. The video concerns the KhoeSan folk figure, Haiseb. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Scholars and members of the public can easily access our research work. The video can be developed as a product for the local people it concerns. 
URL https://vimeo.com/202618340
 
Title Radio programme on the 2016 Damara King's Festival 
Description Partnered with BBC radio presenter, Robin Denselow to produce programme on the 2016 Damara King's Festival (Okombahe, Namibia 2016) for Radio 3 "World on Three" 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The programme was the first-ever documentation of the annual Damara King's festival, and will be rebroadcast in Namibia in the forthcoming year. Impact based on public dissemination of information about Damara history and music. 
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b009vs65
 
Title Short films from Sorris Sorris Storytelling event in 2016 
Description For more information please see research blog at www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/03/14/Storytelling-at-Sorris-Sorris 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact These films have just gone online so it's too early to say. 
URL http://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/03/14/Storytelling-at-Sorris-Sorris
 
Title The Damara King's Festival film 
Description This film presents highlights from the 2016 Damara King's Festival, an annual event taking place in the village of Okombahe in west Namibia. Now in its 37th year, Damara/?Nukhoen people gather at the festival to sing, dance, eat, and receive counsel from their king, Justus |Uruhe ||Garoëb. Lineages from all over the country arrive dressed in the emblematic blue, green and white of the Damara nation. Women wear long Victorian dresses and shawls that mimic the attire of influential colonial missionaries whilst men are adorned in matching T-shirts and remnants of colonial and WWI military paraphernalia. Others remember their pre-colonial pasts by wearing costumes made of skins of the wild animals that supported their forebears. In 2016 the festival took place at the end of an intense three-year drought. Calling for rain formed a major focus of the festival which, in a potent moment of relief and gratitude, was blessed by the first showers of the season. Overall, the festival is an annual ritual of renewal enabling performers and audience alike to 'think aloud' about their identities, histories and imaginaries for the future. It is not staged for outside consumption. The Namibian film organisation Mamokobo, through the AHRC-funded research project Future Pasts and in collaboration with the Damara King's Festival Organising Committee, is therefore privileged to have made the first filmed record of this event. The performative and participatory ethos of festivals gives voice to cultural identities, vividly conveying people's sense of community, place and belonging. Having been profoundly displaced by German colonialism (1884-1915) and by seven decades of discriminatory South African rule, this film offers an intimate portrait of one community's diverse celebration of itself. The complexity of expression distilled in our film refracts development trajectories that may simplify cultural identities and concerns. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Shown as an integral part of our project exhibition in July-August 2017 (https://www.futurepasts.net/gallery-44ad-bath-july-august-2017). Shortlisted for AHRC Research in Film awards, category 'International Development: Mobilising Global Voices'. Reported in The Namibian newspaper https://www.namibian.com.na/171747/archive-read/Damara-film-in-top-10-at-British-film-awards. Request by the Museums Association of Namibia (MAN) for DVDs of the film to be sponsored and distributed as part of their 2017 School Clubs and Museums Exhibition (SCAMX) Competition (12-15 September 2017), intended to enhance innovation and transformative development, as well as heritage awareness, amongst Namibian young people. Sixteen schools throughout Namibia who applied to participate in the competition were reached through the distribution of films by Future Pasts. 
URL https://vimeo.com/224051477
 
Description The five-year AHRC Care for the Future (Environmental Change and Sustainability) project 'Future Pasts' is both a fieldwork and theory intensive Environmental Humanities research project. Future Pasts started in October 2013, and draws on the context of the globalised African landscape of west Namibia in a cross- and trans-disciplinary exploration of perceptions and approaches to sustainability. We are now in the final year of our project. By way of achievements to date, we have:

* conducted a total of 24 months field research in Namibia (Sullivan 16 months; Hannis 5 months; Impey 6 months; Low 2 months; Rohde 2,5 months);

* brought to completion 46 academic publications, with others in press and at varying stages of preparation;

* given 19 invited keynotes or plenaries;

* shared Future Pasts research in 91 public engagements, including multiple talks and the establishment of an online presence for our project through:
- a project website at www.futurepasts.net with a research blog at https://www.futurepasts.net/blog,
- social media activity on twitter (@Future_Pasts), facebook (https://www.facebook.com/futurepastsAHRC/), and instagram (https://www.instagram.com/futurepastsahrc/),
- vimeo and soundcloud accounts for sharing video and audio material deriving from our research (at https://vimeo.com/futurepasts and https://soundcloud.com/futurepasts respectively)

* established a Future Pasts Working Papers series, with our first 9 working papers available to download at https://www.futurepasts.net/future-pasts-working-papers;

* curated a project exhibition, held at 44AD Art Gallery in Bath in July-August 2017 (see https://www.futurepasts.net/gallery-44ad-bath-july-august-2017 and exhibition booklet at https://www.futurepasts.net/exhibition-booklet);

* worked with Mamokobo Film and Research (Namibia) on a series of film collaborations, available at our vimeo site at https://vimeo.com/futurepasts, of which one film - The Damara King's Festival - was nominated for the 2017 AHRC Research in Film awards (category 'International Development - Mobilising Global Voices');

* developed 14 collaborations and partnerships, with primarily Namibian organisations;

* held 6 project meetings;

* shared background research documentation and literature review through an online set of updatable 'Historical Sequences of References to Peoples and Places of West Namibia' as a resource of perspectives and sources that can be referred to in other Future Pasts publications and resources (see https://www.futurepasts.net/timeline-to-kunene-from-the-cape). Many of the places and encounters mentioned in the reviewed texts here are also being mapped online using googlemaps - see https://www.futurepasts.net/maps-1.


Our project responds to four core research questions:

Q1. How are 'the past' and constructions of 'pastness' being fashioned into new green materialities that act to perform 'green economy' responses to ecological crisis?

Q2. How do these new green materialities intersect with differing cultural conceptions of environmental change and sustainability?

Q3. How can archival and repeat landscape photographs anchor understandings of environmental change, constructions of environmental pasts, and visionings of environmental futures?

Q4. What normative assumptions underpin contemporary sustainability technologies and innovations, and what are the philosophical implications of juxtaposing these with other(ed) 'ecocultural' ethical frameworks?

We provide detail below regarding our progress to date in responding to these key questions, and also outline developments in our research and key associated outputs. A fully referenced and fleshed out conceptual framework for our research is available in our first Future Pasts Working Paper ('Future Pasts? Sustainabilities in west Namibia - a conceptual framework for research', Sullivan, Hannis, Impey, Low, Rohde, online at https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp1-sullivan-et-al-2016). Accessible information regarding Future Pasts can also be found in the booklet accompanying our project exhibition (online at https://www.futurepasts.net/exhibition-booklet).


RESEARCH AND FINDINGS IN RELATION TO OUR FOUR CORE RESEARCH QUESTIONS (project publications referred to are listed below):

Q1. How are 'the past' and constructions of 'pastness' being fashioned into new green materialities that act to perform 'green economy' responses to ecological crisis?

Enduring fear that the landscape of west Namibia is on the brink of ecological collapse and catastrophe - associated with 'desertification', climate change, species loss and industrial development - creates specific apocalyptic frames that invite innovative sustainability interventions. The landscape of west Namibia is entwined with a key international concern to generate a global 'green economy' that seeks to produce both economic growth and environmental sustainability. The specific combination of ways in which this is unfolding in the geographical context of west Namibia provides a rich setting for exploring in detail the productions of 'green economy' discourses, policies and interventions (Sullivan, Hannis, Impey, Low and Rohde 2016; Hannis 2016, 2017a; Sullivan 2016a, 2017a-d). Key dimensions include drawing into the open the versions of past relationships between people, landscapes, and associated organic and inorganic entities on which these interventions are built, as well as elucidating the versions of future relationships that interventions seek to amplify. Simultaneously, the sometimes rather 'other' understandings of 'sustainability' and culturenature relationships embodied in what is becoming known as the intangible cultural heritage (ICH) of some of the region's variously indigenous inhabitants can be brought further into dialogue with these interventions.

Opening up the circumstances through which particular green economy and sustainability proposals (have) become uttered and established can thereby deepen understandings of the historicity - the actuality of contexts and events, as well as their inclusions and exclusions - structuring the unfolding of conditions in the present and into the future. In this dimension of Future Pasts research, then, we are exploring how exactly environmental 'sustainability' is understood to be generated through the production and circulation of particular commodities produced in west Namibia and asserted to be 'green'. Relevant sources of information include discourse analysis of policy and other texts, interviews with key actors, and participant observation. Through this, we clarify and juxtapose proposals by different actors associated with the west Namibia landscape for generating 'sustainability' into the future. Completed and in process elements of research include:

i. Ethnographic engagement with the unfolding of Community-Based Natural Resources Management as a powerful instrument of market-based 'improvement' in environmental and economic spheres, highlights historically and culturally embedded appropriations, frictions and resistances (Sullivan 2016a, 2017a, 2018a). Local desire for land and natural resources is set within a complex history of eviction of peoples from ancestral homes in the course of mapping and manufacturing areas of the west Namibian landscape as a 'world-class pristine, unspoilt wilderness', valued especially for its unique population of desert-dwelling black rhino (as considered in a new Future Pasts Working Paper by the CEO of of Save the Rhino Trust, !Uri?khob 2019). Memories of peoples' different relationships with landscapes prior to eviction linger and thus haunt the present, constituting a basis for on-site oral history research through journeys to places formerly experienced and remembered as homes by elders now living on the periphery of tourism concessions and conservation areas. A range of Future Pasts publications are currently emerging that explore the emotional geographies of such former dwelling places and the broader cultural landscape, and their continuing resonances for people in the present (Sullivan and Hannis 2016; Sullivan 2016a, 2017d; Ganuses and Sullivan in prep.; Rohde and Sullivan in prep.; Impey in prep. a). This oral history research is set within a time-depth of historical record going back several hundred years that traces the enrolment of this landscape and peoples into global networks of trade, commerce and eventually colonial administration (See 'Historical Sequence of References' at https://www.futurepasts.net/timeline-to-kunene-from-the-cape).

ii. In this context of a general marketisation of biodiversity conservation, the commercialised hunting of selected animal wildlife species and individuals is promoted as one route towards conserving regional populations of wild animal species, at the same time as contributing to economic growth. Hunted trophies - parts of animals (heads, skins, horns, ivory, bodies) that become tangible reminders of a hunted charismatic animal - constitute paradoxical sustainability objects. Viewed and promoted as supporting biodiversity conservation through the controversial killing of individuals of valued species, they effectively signal a radically consequentialist ethic of 'killing for conservation' (theorised in Hannis 2016), often in tension with socio-cultural dimensions of local and indigenous values regarding fauna in the area (Sullivan and Hannis 2016; Hannis and Sullivan 2018a).

iii. Indigenous plant species and associated regional ethnobotanical knowledge and ICH have also been developed and commercialised into exported natural products linked discursively with enhancements of the economic value of local biodiversity, and a fostering of 'economic development' through associated income generation. We have begun to connect these processes with alternative cultural histories of connection and association with selected plant species, particularly the endemic cucurbit and food plant Acanthosicyos horridus or !nara, through a collaborative project conducted with researchers associated with the Namibian Gobabeb Research and Training Centre. '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib' (Sullivan, S. Ganuses, W.S., ||Hoëb, F., Ganaseb, N., Tauros, C., Ganaseb, M., |Nuas, H. and |Nuab, F. 2019) thus reinscribes the environmental histories and cultural landscapes of inhabitants of the northern Namib in a context of historical and contemporary marginalisation of these histories, as well as historicising the circumstances leading to an entrenching of particular histories of association and development regarding this species.

iv. Access to the wealth of rock art heritage and other cultural monuments in the region is similarly commercialised so as to foster conservation through enhancing the market value of indigenous cultural heritage. The west Namibia landscape is replete with rock art objects and places, and access to this art is marketed in terms of supporting future preservation through heritage and cultural tourism. This involves commodifications and repackagings of KhoeSan rock art heritage in productive ways that can be in tension with the subtle cultural ontologies of extant peoples whose contemporary lifeworlds may provide windows into the thinking informing production of the art (Sullivan and Low 2014; also Low 2017a on San healing practices specifically).

v. Beyond the tourism and heritage related commodifications described above, are moves to wrap significant regional economic developments in innovative sustainability policies. A proliferation of uranium mining activities in west Namibia (Hannis 2017b; Hannis and Sullivan 2018b,c) thus claims to contribute to environmental sustainability, in part through celebrations of uranium as fuelling low-carbon energy production globally, as well as by its proposed use of 'biodiversity offsetting'. Through discourse analysis of the emergence of influential biodiversity offsetting policy in northern contexts, Sullivan and Hannis (2015) find that optimistic claims that the desired objective of 'no net loss' of 'biodiversity' can be achieved through offsetting risk occluding possibly intractable 'value struggles' between groups embracing and contesting this new conservation technology (discussed further in Sullivan 2017a; Sullivan and Hannis 2017).

We draw theoretically on new humanities discussions of 'materiality', 'value', speech act theory and performativity to consider the performative implications of these new 'green' materialities. We suggest that the mineral, biological and heritage assemblages outlined above are being mobilised in accordance with linear temporal dynamics and dominant sustainability imaginaries that may be unpredictably 'destabilised' through both the 'liveliness' of the 'actants' of which they are constituted, and the contextual frictions within which they are being developed (Hannis 2017b). In particular, since these particular green economy performativities of necessity prefigure and/or preclude specific environmental futures, they can have significant ethical, as well as ecological, implications, leading to our second guiding research question, namely:


Q2. How do these new green materialities intersect with differing cultural conceptions of environmental change and sustainability?

As hinted at above, developmentalist green 'materialities' and 'performativities' jostle with a range of alternative understandings of environmental change and sustainability, as well as with conceptions of human endeavour that might be perceived as differently entrained and embedded with natural rhythms and cycles. Such alternative understandings can be infused by rather different conceptions of ecological and temporal dynamics, of the sources of agency (see Sullivan and Hannis 2016; Hannis and Sullivan 2018a), and of the practices constituting appropriate present behaviours in terms of caring for both pasts and futures. These become alterities that haunt the green economy appropriations described above. Their traces remain as 'othernesses' that embody ambiguities and pluralities of value regarding bodies, places and artefacts, as well as the flows and networked relationships between which these entities are (perceived to be) connected.

The prevalence of references to birds in the songs and stories collected by Impey from elderly Khoekhoegowab speakers in the Erongo and Kunene regions has led to new research by Impey on the significance of birds in Damara culture as guides, weather forecasters, and signifiers of metaphysical events. Correspondingly, bird naming practices in Khoekhoegowab emulate the vocalising and behavioural patterns of birds, acting thus as a phonological and performative mirror of the natural soundscape and reinforcing functional and metaphorical interactions between birds and people. This is revealing important information about Damara dependence on avian phenology (bird activity in relation to seasonal climatic changes) to survival in the harsh desert landscape).

In pursuing ethnographic research regarding the productions and performances of sustainability in west Namibia we have drawn on the opportunity for three of us (Sullivan, Rohde, Low) to revisit and interview individuals, families and communities known in west Namibia through earlier in-depth ethnographic and ethnoecological study. Through this updating of biographical information and the generation of 'written portraits' we are able to better understand sociocultural, economic and environmental changes since the early 1990s (Ganuses and Sullivan in prep.; Rohde in prep. a). Pursuing threads from previous oral history research in the area regarding peoples' pasts and particularly their past relationships with places in the broader landscape, new field research has now been conducted by Sullivan with a number of Khoe-speaking elders to map places and cultural histories that have been erased from official discourses regarding land where they used to live (see 'cultural landscapes journey mapping at https://www.futurepasts.net/journey-mapping). Through visiting former dwelling sites in this landscape with people who remember living there, memories are prompted, both of past ways of living and the associated autonomous enacting of shared values, and of direct experiences of past injustice through which people were constrained to leave places they considered to be home (Sullivan 2016a, 2017a, b, d, Sullivan 2018b).

This on-site oral history and journeying methodology has enabled participation in relevant practices as well as ongoing conversations regarding peoples' histories of association with places, their past movements through landscapes, their remembered experiences of living there and of the pressures that required them to leave. A few such experiences and associated temporalities will be mentioned here. The first is the practice of 'tse-khom', which involves talking to ancestors, in this case those buried at and associated with numerous places throughout the Palmwag tourism concession and beyond. 'Tse-khom' introduces travellers to the ancestors - or 'kai khoen', i.e. 'big or old people' as they are known. In 'tse-khom' ancestral agencies are requested to act in the present to open the road so that travellers can see the best way to go. They are asked to mediate the activities of potentially dangerous animals such as lions, who are viewed very much as other ensouled beings who assert their own agencies and intentionality. They are asked for guidance regarding the most appropriate ways to do things, practices that have eco-ethical effects. In 'tse-khom', the ancestors are souls whose ontological reality means that they can assert various kinds of agency in the present, sometimes over other kinds of agency, such as that of animals (for more detail see Sullivan 2016a, 2017a; Sullivan and Hannis 2016).

Sometimes, 'tse-khom' includes mention of a key ancestor hero known in this area as Haiseb, who features in broader KhoeSan folklore as Haitsi-Aibeb. The Haitsi-Aibeb/Haiseb cluster of stories and practices are inscribed on the landscape through large cairns found throughout the drylands of south-west Africa, from the Cape in the south to Kunene Region in the north. Haiseb/Haitsi-Aibeb cairns have featured in colonial records since the 1650s, interpreted, probably erroneously, as symbolically marking the graves of an always resurrecting Haitsi-Aibeb. As part of our intention to trace and theorise particular amodern conceptions and experiences of the west Namibia landscape we are currently triangulating several sources of information - mapped and recorded encounters with cairns, colonial records, national monuments listings, databases of cairn sites, and ethnographic encounters with local people - to better understand the Haiseb cairns and their meanings, both past and present. We have mapped and photographed Haiseb cairns in the west Namibian landscape (for example see cairns mapped at https://www.futurepasts.net/journey-mapping), and recorded and transcribed a number of stories and songs documenting Haiseb's antics and associated storytelling practices (Low 2017b, and the film 'Haiseb in the landscape' at https://vimeo.com/202618340). Haiseb and other key ?Nukhoen motifs are also a key focus of filmed story-telling events facilitated by Low in collaboration with one of our Namibian partners, Mamokobo Film and Research (see, for example, https://vimeo.com/258603577 and blog introducing these films at www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/03/14/Storytelling-at-Sorris-Sorris).

An additional focus here is consideration of creative encodings of land, the elements, and specific other-than-human-natures in the contemporary sounds (songs), gestures (dances/embodiment) and poetic recitations (stories), through which relationships with places, landscapes and specific entities and events therein may be expressed using particular symbolic and/or metaphorical registers. We also ask how changes in expressive traditions may have occurred over time and places. One way through which this is being pursued is through recent articulations of Namibian cultural identities and histories through public spectacles, such as the annual Damara King's Festival (Impey in prep. a, and film at https://vimeo.com/224051477). This event offers significant insight into contemporary articulations of past values, and to medicinal and spiritual dimensions of the environment in particular. The collective effervescence of such socially structured spectacles, invoked in particular through songs, ritual performances and public oratory, tends to override everyday resistances demonstrated toward the 'old ways', particularly if the latter are understood to conflict with the teachings of the church. Detailed audio and video documentation of festival activities provide invaluable resources for both feedback analysis, helping to build narratives about the meanings of sounds, gestures and symbolic interactions, and to build the archive, which to date, remains relatively small. Feedback analysis has also provided the opportunity to rethink the concept of cultural identity, which is a somewhat over-rehearsed destination in anthropological (ethnomusicological) scholarship. Rather than a label, descriptor or even a structure of feeling (cf. Raymond Williams), comments invoked from intimate showings of the film indicate a more dynamic notion of identity via a sense of 'community of practice', emerging from a sense of shared history and repertoire of resources. This challenges the conception, so often promulgated in the sustainability discourse, that culture is associated exclusively with pastness and product, and makes evident that a necessary precondition for research on people's perceptions of environmental change, particularly in postcolonial contexts such as Namibia where the colonial legacy looms large, is a politics of self-recognition, and a belief in one's right and capacity to speak out.

A second way in which we are exploring changes in expressive traditions is through engagement with records and recordings housed in a variety of archives (especially the National Archives of Namibia and the Resource Centre of the Basler Afrika Bibliographien), and recordings by Future Pasts researchers in the course of past ethnographic engagements in the area. Of particular note is our access to the entire collection of master recordings of Namibian music made in the 1990s and early 2000s by French ethnomusicologist, Emmanuelle Olivier. Through Future Pasts this archive of more than 100 DAT tapes plus images and metadata has been collected from France by Impey, and deposited for digitisation in the British Library Sound Archives, where it will be available as part of the World and Traditional Music - Africa collections (collection no. C1709). Following this digitisation process, we aim to repatriate recordings and images to appropriate Namibian contexts, as well as being mobilised as memory prompts in current research. We seek in particular to explore the mnemonic potential of this archive of historical and contemporary song and dance material for the recovery of oral narratives concerning socioecological health, the dynamics of change, and the historical relationships that individuals and groups may have had with different times and places (Impey in prep. b). To support this research we commissioned a literature review called 'Navigating soundscape research' which we have published as a working paper (Yount 2018, with a foreword by Impey).

One piece arising in connection with the Olivier recordings concerns a form of polyphonic music (i.e. music in which texture is built from two or more independent melodic lines being played simultaneously) played by ensembles of male flautists accompanied by song-stories sung primarily by women. This musical form has been noted historically for Khoe peoples in southern Africa for more than 500 years (see review of sources at https://www.futurepasts.net/khoe-nama-flute-music). Fragmented and disrupted through the dramatic changes wrought by the expanding frontier of the Cape Colony, and later in Namibia through colonial and apartheid administrations, it appears likely that the last place this flute music was played was Sesfontein / !Nani|aus in north-west Namibia. Our paper 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein: histories, continuities, possibilities', co-presented at the conference on Namibian Heritage Past, Present and Future in Windhoek in August 2018 and written up as Sullivan and Ganuses (2019) incorporates audio and images to share something of what we are learning through returning the music and images from Olivier's 1990s research to the context in which they were made; as well as exploring connections between the recent Sesfontein flute music and Khoe / Nama flute music in time and space more broadly.

Further to this, working in collaboration with the British Library Sound Archives, Impey is undertaking the systematic recording, annotation and documentation of the entire personal corpus of songs of Michael Doeseb, leader of the famed Khorixas-based traditional Damara dance group, Abas ||Khoab. In addition to preserving the collection, this work will form the basis of a journal article on memory, identity and sonically-mediated sense of time and space.

Q3. How can archival and repeat landscape photographs anchor understandings of environmental change, constructions of environmental pasts, and visionings of environmental futures?

As noted above, narratives of impending ecological crisis are prominent in environmental discourse in Namibia. Future scenarios based on climate models have predicted increasing aridity and drought, leading to degradation, loss of productivity and biodiversity declines. In general, this 'future catastrophe anxiety' posits an expansion of desert and arid shrubs into present grassland savannas and a reduction in net primary productivity and economic potential (Hoffman, Rohde and Gillson 2018). In Future Pasts we have opened up and complemented such narratives through a unique opportunity to mobilise and extend a large dataset of repeat landscape images for west Namibia gathered by one of us (Rohde), dating back to the late 1800s. These images form the basis for analysis of the historical ecology of the arid and hyper-arid areas of west Namibia using a repeat landscape photography and comparative survey methodology developed over the last two decades by Rohde (Rohde, Hoffman, Jack and Sullivan 2017; Rohde et al. in press 2019).

Bringing together archival landscape photographs from the past, with repeat photographs of these same scenes in the present, can provide surprising empirical (re)assessments of the materialities of environmental change. One hundred landscape repeat photograph sites (with 125 distinct vegetation units) have now been identified and surveyed across the broader Namib and pro-Namib landscapes, and evaluated for change in woody vegetation cover serving as a proxy for changing climatic conditions. These sites extend 160 km inland from the coast and cover three degrees of latitude (330km). The average time-lapse between the date of the original image and the repeat is eighty years and every decade between 1870 and 1990 is represented in this collection.

Presently Rohde is collaborating with academics at the University of Cape Town, including Timm Hoffman, Sam Jack and Zander Venter from the Department of Biological Sciences and Ian Durbach from the Department of Statistical Sciences in order to establish the complex analysis of the relationships between variables such as vegetation type, growth form, percentage change per annum, distance from coast, altitude and climatic averages (e.g. precipitation, fog days, temperature, insolation etc.) (Scott, Rohde and Hoffman 2017; Hoffman, Rohde and Gillson 2018; Rohde et al. in press 2019). Vegetation change is used here as a proxy for climate change since very few long-term climate records exist from which to establish climatic trends. Preliminary assessments of the vegetation surveyed at these repeat photo sites indicate a steady increase in woody vegetation across almost all habitat types apart from the Grass/shrublands.

A specific Future Pasts collaboration arising from this thread of our research is with the FogLife research programme, a long-term monitoring initiative established recently by one of our Namibian partner organisations - Gobabeb Research and Training Centre - to explore how fog-dependent species of the Namib Desert are responding to global environmental change. Over half of all the repeat photograph sites are situated within the Namib fog zone (up to 75km from the coast). Changes to fog dependent vegetation in this area is directly correlated with changes in fog frequency and density. Fog, in turn is correlated to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the cold eastern boundary upwelling system of the Benguela Current. Hence, the results of our analysis within the fogbelt will reveal recent (< 100 years) trends of change related to e.g. the southeast Atlantic high pressure zone, tropical temperate troughs and regional atmospheric circulation patterns generally.

Three distinct vegetation units between the Atlantic coast and the inland Savanna biome were identified: the coastal Fogbelt, the inland Savanna transition and the Grass/shrubland zone between the two. Sites located within azonal Large ephemeral rivers that span all three vegetation/climatic zones were also surveyed. Historical and mean values for precipitation, temperature Humidity and transpiration were derived from GLDAS (Google Earth Engine Team, 2015) between 1948 and 2017. Rainfall has increased only in the savanna transition, whereas temperature has increased significantly across all sites.

The results display a complex pattern of change:
• Significant increases in woody cover occurred across all zones apart from the Grass/shrublands.
• Temperature has increased across all zones but change in woody vegetation cover is not responding any differently in areas that are generally hotter versus areas that are generally cooler.
• A significant increase in woody cover in the coastal fogbelt (<40km from the coast) is correlated with increased humidity.
• A significant increase in woody cover can also be observed in the eastern Grass/shrubland unit due to increasing convective rainfall.
• There is a positive relationship between average precipitation and woody cover change across all sites (p=<0.001). MAP in the Savanna transition is significantly correlated with increases in woody vegetation.

Between the coastal Fogbelt and the Savanna transition an area of extreme climatic conditions characterised by very high temperatures, low air humidity and an almost total lack of precipitation from either fog, dew or rain that coincides with and overlaps these vegetation units. The Minimum Zone can also be defined as an area with extremely low woody vegetation cover so that climate and vegetation become interchangeable as indicators of extreme hyper-arid conditions.

We suggest that the Minimum Zone has contracted in its western and eastern reaches due to changing climatic conditions over the course of the last 70 to 100 years. Evidence from repeat photographs indicate that historically the Minimum Zone spanned the entire Fogbelt, the western Grass/shrublands and part of the western Savanna transition (9km up to 110km from the coast). Today, the Minimum Zone is smaller, starting from mid-way in the Fogbelt (40km from the coast) and ending in the eastern Grass/shrubland (90km from the coast) where savanna species have become established.

This evidence supports recent research related to the Benguela Upwelling System and the local effects of global warming. Climate change is apparent, but our evidence suggests that increased temperatures have resulted in higher specific humidity at the coast producing more fog precipitation up to 40km inland; a steeper temperature gradient between the coast and the inland Savanna driving the Benguela upwelling winds and increased rainfall in the eastern Grass/shruglands and Savanna transition gradient, possibly related to Benguela Niño events. These findings of historical climate trends contradict most Regional GCM predictions of future aridification and ongoing desertification in the Pro-Namib and Namib Desert.

The ephemeral rivers are very dynamic although the repeat photos from these riverine sites show an interesting divergence between the Kuiseb and Swakop rivers in relation to change: the Kuiseb is highly disturbed showing rapid turn-over of phreatic vegetation (i.e. vegetation influenced by availability of underground water sources), whereas the Swakop is much more stable and shows less overall cover in the main channels. This is possibly related to the upstream damming of the Swakop, affecting the magnitude of flood events and alluvial aquifer recharge.

In developing and expanding our research regarding historical ecologies of the Namib and perceptions of environment change we have opened up an additional research thread involving assessments of the specific role that a single species - Aloe dichotoma - is playing in the generation of understandings of climate change in west Namibia. Regarding the latter, and as Rohde and colleagues are arguing, repeat photographs can be used to illuminate the dynamics of specific Aloe dichotoma populations stretching northwards from the Cape to the Brandberg in west Namibia, and are requiring a radical rethink of received wisdoms regarding climate change understandings in southern Africa (Jack, Hoffman, Rohde, Durbach and Archibald 2014; Jack, Hoffman, Rohde and Durbach 2016). This species is often cited as an example of poleward species migration in response to anthropogenic warming. Furthermore, supposed harsher conditions in the equatorward populations (between Keetmanshoop and Brandberg) are leading to die-offs in this long-lived tree aloe. In particular, Rohde and colleagues find that there is no evidence that the effects of global warming are evident in the demographic patterns of this species and that previous studies do not take account of the phenotypic plasticity of this species in response to the two different climate regimes that occupy their range across 10 degrees of latitude: stochastic precipitation conditions in the northern summer rainfall zone/reliable and more plentiful winter rainfall in the south. These more arid conditions in the north result in much longer intervals between recruitment events than in the south. Given that A. dichotoma live for up to 300 years, recruitment of new individuals need only take place once or twice a century in order that the population persists. This fact accounts for the different population dynamics that have previously been wrongly interpreted as recent evidence of anthropogenic climate change.

Finally, these empirical findings will provide comparative counter-balance to the downscaled global circulation models that posit present and future trends of change. As such, Future Pasts historical ecology research forms one of the few studies in Namibia based on historical evidence in relation to anthropogenic global warming.


Q4. What normative assumptions underpin contemporary sustainability technologies and innovations, and what are the philosophical implications of juxtaposing these with other(ed) 'ecocultural' ethical frameworks?

As can be seen, Future Pasts is pursuing multiple lines of enquiry to explore, interrogate and become resonant with different understandings and embodiments of sustainability and environmental change, both within the specific geographical and temporal contexts of our field research and at a more conceptual level. Given our various disciplines, approaches and influences, bringing together the different elements of our project to create analytical and theoretical coherence is potentially challenging. One key way we seek to meet this challenge is by drawing on approaches in environmental ethics and moral philosophy to flesh out and theorise what we are calling 'ecocultural ethics', an ethical approach that foregrounds cultural variability in ethical assumptions regarding human relationships with natures-beyond-the-human. We see this as a cross-disciplinary domain that more explicitly theorises sustainability imaginaries as entwined with the cultural production of particular pasts, presents and futures. We are using the term 'ecocultural ethics' because we are interested in the ethical assumptions and tendencies underying different culturally-inflected perspectives regarding both beyond-human-natures, and ways of knowing these natures.

In this component of our research we have conducted theoretical and interpretive work that combines elements of the empirical and textual material generated in pursuit of our other research objectives with established theoretical frameworks in environmental philosophy, including ethical theory (descriptive and normative), concepts of sustainability and substitutability, and imaginaries of past, present and future human/nature relationships. Through this research thread, then, we have conducted a more formal philosophical enquiry into the ethical assumptions and framings underlying contemporary 'green economy' policies and practices, in juxtaposition with those that might be seen to be embodied in the knowledges and practices highlighted in other components of our research. Synthesising relevant insights from capabilities, rights and virtue ethics approaches in particular, we have explored ecocultural differences regarding underlying assumptions and judgements about what kinds of relationships between humans and 'the rest of the world' are required for flourishing human lives, and therefore considered sufficiently valuable to be deliberately protected and facilitated for future generations. Our research queries the apparent hegemony of utilitarian approaches in 'green economy' and 'natural capital' orientations to environmental decision-making (Sullivan and Hannis 2015; Sullivan 2016a, 2017a-c, 2018a,c, in press 2019), asking why calculative approaches are apparently considered less problematic in this context than in others such as medical ethics (Hannis 2016). It has also examined tensions between 'sustainability' understood as the continued possibility of flourishing lives, and understood (as in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development) as the maintenance of particular development trajectories and resource inventories (Hannis 2017b). We instead propose linking human and nonhuman flourishing by way of a eudaimonist environmental virtue ethics (Hannis 2015, 2016, 2017b, 2019; Hannis, Sullivan and Cottine 2018), and find that there are overlaps between this kind of approach and the ways in which local stories and practices may connect the flourishing of human and nonhuman agencies (Sullivan and Hannis 2016; Hannis and Sullivan 2018a). We have also brought ethical approaches from moral philosophy into conversation with a range of terms mobilised in anthropological and cultural geography, and have to this end been pursuing ethnographical and theoretical work to explore and connect concepts of ontology, affect, mimesis, embodiment and alterity (see Sullivan 2016a-d).


Referenced project publications:
Ganuses and Sullivan in prep. Personal cultural histories of Sesfontein.
Hannis, M. 2015 Freedom and Environment: Autonomy, Human Flourishing and the Political Philosophy of Sustainability. London: Routledge (Environmental Politics).
Hannis, M. 2016 Killing nature to save it? Ethics, economics and rhino trophy hunting in Namibia. Future Pasts Working Papers 4 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp4-hannis-2016
Hannis, M. 2017a "Uranium burns a hole in forever": temporalities, ethics and the nuclear fuel cycle. Presentation at Digital Ecologies and the Anthropocene Symposium, Bath Spa University, April 2017. [and forthcoming as a Future Pasts Working Paper]
Hannis, M. 2017b. After development? In defence of sustainability. Global Discourse 17(1): 22-38.
Hannis, M. 2019 'Virtue is good for you: the politics of ecological eudaimonism' in Ecological Virtues, Heesoon Bai & Dave Chang (eds.), University of Regina Press
Hannis, M. and Sullivan, S. 2018a Relationality, reciprocity and flourishing in an African landscape. in Hartman, L.M. (ed.) Flourishing: Comparative Religious Environmental Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
Hannis, M. and Sullivan, S. 2018b Mining the desert. The Land 22: 46-49 (also see Hannis, M. and Sullivan, S. 2018c Extraction old and new: mining the desert in southwestern Africa. https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/03/04/Extraction-Old-and-New).
Hannis, M., Sullivan, S. and Cottine, C. in press Dialogue, in Hartman, L.M. (ed.) Flourishing: Comparative Religious Environmental Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
M. Timm Hoffman, Rick F. Rohde and Lindsey Gillson 2018 Rethinking catastrophe? Historical trajectories and modelled future vegetation change in southern Africa. Anthropocene 25: 2213-3054.
Impey, A. in prep. a The politics and spectacle of renewal in the Damara King's Festival. Future Pasts Working Papers
Impey, A. in prep. b Listening in, sounding out: reflections on ethnomusicological approaches to soundscape ecology in western Namibia. Future Pasts Working Papers
Jack, S.L., Hoffman, M.T., Rohde, R.F., Durbach, I. and Archibald, M. 2014 Blow me down: A new perspective on Aloe dichotoma mortality from windthrow. BMC Ecology 14(7): Doi:10.1186/1472-6785-14-7
Jack, S.L., Hoffman, M.T., Rohde, R.F. and Durbach, I. 2016. Climate change sentinel or false prophet? The case of Aloe dichotoma. Diversity and Distributions 22(7): 745-757.
Low, C.H. 2017a Human physiology, San shamanic healing and the 'cognitive revolution', pp. 224-247 in Power, C., Finnegan, M. and Callan, H. (ed.) Human Origins: Contributions from Social Anthropology. New York: Berghahn.
Low, C.H. 2017b Tracking Haiseb in west Namibia. https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/02/05/Tracking-Haiseb-in-west-Namibia
Rohde, R.F. Hoffman M.T., Jack S. Sullivan, S. 2017. Climate change complexity: repeat pandscape photographs of the Pro-Namib and Namib Desert. https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/07/03/Climate-change-complexity-repeat-landscape-photographs-of-the-Pro-Namib-and-Namib-Desert
Rohde R.F., Hoffman M.T., Durbach I., Venter Z. and Jack S. in prep.
Vegetation and climate change in the Namib Desert based on repeat photography: insights into climatic trends. Science of the Total Environment
Rohde, R.F. in prep. a. An ethnography of time: biographies of Damara informants, 20 years on. Future Pasts Working Papers
Rohde, R.F. and Sullivan, S. in prep. Haunted landscapes: the emotional geography of dispossession and memory in Scottish and Namibian history. Future Pasts Working Papers
Scott, S.L., Rohde, R.F. and Hoffman, M.T. 2017 Repeat landscape photography, historical ecology and the wonder of digital archives in Southern Africa. African Research & Documentation 131: 35-47.
Sullivan, S. 2016a What's ontology got to do with it? Nature, knowledge and 'the green economy'. Future Pasts Working Papers 3 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp3-sullivan-2016
Sullivan, S. 2016b What's ontology got to do with it? On the knowledge of nature and the nature of knowledge in environmental anthropology, pp. 155-169 in Kopnina, H. and Shoreman-Ouimet, E. (eds.) Routledge International Handbook of Environmental Anthropology. London: Routledge.
Sullivan, S. 2016c (Re-)embodying which body? Philosophical, cross-cultural and personal reflections on corporeality, pp. 119-138 in Thomas-Pellicer, R., de Lucia, V. and Sullivan, S. (eds.) Law, Philosophy and Ecology: Exploring Re-Embodiments. London: GlassHouse Books, Routledge Law, Justice and Ecology Series.
Sullivan, S. 2016d Beyond the money shot; or how framing nature matters? Locating Green at Wildscreen. Journal of Environmental Communications. Special issue on 'Spectacular Environmentalisms/Environments'.
Sullivan, S. 2017a What's ontology got to do with it? On nature and knowledge in a political ecology of 'the green economy'. Journal of Political Ecology 24: 217-242, Special section entitled 'Political Ecology, the Green Economy, and Alternative Sustainabilities'.
Sullivan, S. 2017b On 'natural capital', 'fairy-tales' and ideology. Development and Change 48(2).
Sullivan, S. 2017c Noting some effects of fabricating 'nature' as 'natural capital'. The Ecological Citizen 1(1): 65-73,
Sullivan, S. 2017d 'Our hearts were happy here' - recollecting acts of dwelling and acts of clearance through oral histories in west Namibia. https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/03/19/'Our-hearts-were-happy-here'---recollecting-acts-of-dwelling-and-acts-of-clearance-through-oral-histories-in-west-Namibia
Sullivan, S. 2018a Dissonant sustainabilities? Politicising and psychologising antagonisms in the conservation-development nexus. Future Pasts Working Papers 5 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp5-sullivan-2018
Sullivan, S. 2018b Crossing continents with Future Pasts: a tale of three continents. https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/10/16/Crossing-continents-with-Future-Pasts-a-tale-of-three-conferences
Sullivan, S. 2018c Making nature investable: from legibility to leverageability in fabricating 'nature' as 'natural capital'. Science and Technology Studies 31(3): 47-76.
Sullivan, S. in press 2019 Reading 'Earth Incorporated' through Caliban and the Witch in Barbagallo, C., Beuret, N. and Harvie, D. (eds.) Commoning with Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis. London: Pluto Press.
Sullivan, S. in prep. b. Maps and memory: on colonial exploration and indigenous cultural landscapes in west Namibia. Future Pasts Working Papers
Sullivan, S. with Ganuses, W.S. 2019 Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein: memories, histories, possibilities. Future Pasts Working Paper Series 9 https://www.futurepasts.net/future-pasts-working-paper-9
Sullivan, S. Ganuses, W.S., ||Hoëb, F., Ganaseb, N., Tauros, C., Ganaseb, M., |Nuas, H. and |Nuab, F. 2019 !Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: retrieving disrupted socioecological pasts through on-site oral histories. Future Pasts Working Papers 8
Sullivan, S. and Hannis, M. 2015 Nets and frames, losses and gains: value struggles in engagements with biodiversity offsetting policy in England. Ecosystem Services 15: 162-173, special issue on 'Biodiversity Offsets as MBIs? From discourses to practice'.
Sullivan, S. and Hannis, M. 2016 Relationality, reciprocity and flourishing in an African landscape: perspectives on agency amongst ||Khao-a Dama, !Narenin and ||Ubun elders in west Namibia. Future Pasts Working Papers 2 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp2-sullivan-hannis-2016
Sullivan, S. and Hannis, M. 2017 'Mathematics maybe, but not money': on balance sheets, numbers and nature in ecological accounting. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal 30(7): 1459-1480 special issue on 'Ecological accounts: making non-human worlds (in)visible during moments of socio-ecological transformation'.
Sullivan, S., Hannis, M., Impey, A., Low, C. and Rohde, R. 2016 Future pasts? Sustainabilities in west Namibia - a conceptual framework for research. Future Pasts Working Papers 1 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp1-sullivan-et-al-2016
Sullivan, S. and Low, C. 2014 Shades of the rainbow serpent? A KhoeSan animal between myth and landscape in southern Africa - ethnographic contextualisations of rock art representations. The Arts 3(2): 215-244 (special issue on World Rock Art).
!Uri?khob, S 2019 Attitudes and perceptions of local communities towards the reintroduction of black rhino (Diceros bicornis bicornis) into their historical range in northwest Kunene Region, Namibia: a Masters Dissertation from 2004. Future Pasts Working Papers 7 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp7-uri-khob-2019
Yount, R. 2018 Navigating soundscape research: a review of literature at the intersection of sound and environmental studies. Future Pasts Working Paper 6 https://www.futurepasts.net/fpwp-6-yount-2018
Exploitation Route Please see responses to RCUK narrative impact.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.futurepasts.net
 
Description We have developed several mechanisms to extend the beyond-academic reach and impact of our Future Pasts research. 1. We have established an online presence through: - a public-facing project website at www.futurepasts.net presenting full details of our research and outputs; - a research blog with 14 posts to date (at https://www.futurepasts.net/blog); - social media - a twitter account @Future_Pasts, a project facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/futurepastsAHRC/, and an instagram account at https://www.instagram.com/futurepastsahrc/ - posts are being engaged with and shared by a diversity of users; - a vimeo account (https://vimeo.com/futurepasts) and soundcloud account (https://soundcloud.com/futurepasts) for sharing video and audio material deriving from our research. 2. We have created a Future Pasts Working Papers series, as a means of sharing work in progress, as well as creating an outlet for research by Future Pasts associates. Our first 9 working papers are available to download at https://www.futurepasts.net/future-pasts-working-papers with more in preparation for publication. We are also sharing published work through Namibia's Environment Information Service at http://www.the-eis.com/. 3. A key strategy for enhancing research impact has been through a collaboration with the Namibian film and production company, Mamokobo Film and Research (Namibia), with whom we have embarked on a series of film collaborations. The first of these films, The Damara King's Festival, was shortlisted in 2017 for an AHRC Research in Film Award (category International Development: Mobilising Global Voices) and reported in the Namibian national newspaper (see https://www.namibian.com.na/171747/archive-read/Damara-film-in-top-10-at-British-film-awards). BBC Radio presenter Robin Denselow also accompanied Future Pasts researcher Impey to the festival in 2016, making two radio programmes concerned with the Damara King's Festival that were broadcast to large audiences on Radio 3 and Radio 4 in late 2016 and early 2017 respectively. Future Pasts has since responded to a request by the Museums Association of Namibia (MAN) for DVDs of the film to be sponsored and distributed as part of their 2017 School Clubs and Museums Exhibition (SCAMX) Competition (12-15 September 2017), intended to enhance innovation and transformative development, as well as heritage awareness, amongst Namibian young people. Sixteen schools throughout Namibia who applied to participate in the competition were reached through the distribution of films by Future Pasts. We have also recently made publicly available a series of short films made with the Sorris Sorris community of west Namibia, focusing on 'landscape', 'plants' and 'celebration and healing' (see Sorris Sorris films uploaded March 2018 at https://vimeo.com/futurepasts). 4. A major public engagement event has been curation of a multi-media exhibition from Future Pasts research held at 44AD Art Gallery in Bath, UK, in July and August 2017. Called 'Future Pasts: Landscape, Memory and Music in West Namibia', the exhibition distils aspects of the Future Pasts research project - an arts and humanities engagement with how ideas and assumptions about the past, and particularly about past relationships between people and the natural world - affect the futures being created now in pursuit of 'sustainability'. The exhibition used photography, video and audio to journey through a selection of themes we have explored through our research: place, music, healing, change, landscape, memory and mining. We closed by making reference to the complex Dama / ?Nukhoen ancestor-hero-trickster character of Haiseb, who reminds us of the mysterious and unpredictable, as well as the often unfathomable and funny, natures of existence. The exhibition was visited in Bath by several hundred people, many of whom left comments recorded in our comments-book (online at https://www.futurepasts.net/comments-book-gallery-44ad-2017). The exhibition was selected as 'Pick of the Week' by the regional arts network Visuals Arts South West, who stated in their review that: 'The collaborative and multi-disciplinary exhibition is underpinned by an academic rigour that enhances the power of the themes of "sustainability, identity and displacement". . . This exhibition powerfully, yet peacefully, demonstrates the beauty of the country whilst highlighting issues pertinent to the people whose home it is.' The exhibition also formed a focus for student visits associated with the Association of Commonwealth Universities summer school in August 2017, and student and practitioner visitors through a 'Curating research as practice' workshop held in July at Bath Spa University. The private view of the exhibition was visited by the Mayor of Bath amongst other local dignitaries and artists, as well as invited guests (see blog at https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/07/20/Future-Pasts-exhibition-hosts-private-view). Composite images from the section on 'Memory' have been returned locally in Namibia, to participants in the research as well as for exhibiting at the Save the Rhino Trust resource centre, the Sesfontein Conservancy office, and to the Museums Association of Namibia for inclusion their archive. The Future Pasts project is currently exploring further possibilities for curating the exhibition in Namibia. The full exhibition can be viewed online at https://www.futurepasts.net/gallery-44ad-bath-july-august-2017). 5. We have also shared perspectives and material from Future Pasts through various invited beyond-academia speaking engagements, most recently through a public lecture to an audience of more than 100 at the Swakopmund Museum in Namibia (Sullivan and Ganuses '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: retrieving disrupted socio-ecological pasts through on-site oral histories', 13th September 2018). Other public talks include: in May 2015 Sullivan gave a RGS-IBG Annual Public Lecture hosted by Bath Spa University on 'Maps and memory: on colonial exploration and indigenous cultural landscapes in west Namibia'; in November 2015 Hannis was an invited member of a high-level panel debating the ethics of Natural Capital approaches at the World Forum on Natural Capital in Edinburgh (www.naturalcapitalforum.com); in May 2016 Sullivan and Hannis were invited participants at the public Earthwatch debate at the Royal Geographical Society (http://eu.earthwatch.org/events/2016/02/09/earthwatch-debate-does-nature-come-with-a-price-tag-); in June 2016 Hannis was invited by the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste to address an international audience of policy-makers and practitioners at a seminar entitled Ethical Perspectives on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (http://www.karnavfallsradet.se/en/seminars/seminars); Hannis gave public lectures for Bath Spa University's Centre for Environmental Humanities on 'Killing Nature to Save It? Economics, Ethics and the Trophy Hunting of Black Rhinoceros' (December 2017) and Mining the Skeleton Coast: Nature, Capital and History (November 2018); and in January 2018 Sullivan gave a talk followed by a panel discussion for the keynote lecture series for researchers, policy-makers and practitioners organised by the NERC-funded Valuing Nature Programme (http://valuing-nature.net/news/keynote-lecture-series-making-nature-investable-considering-some-outcomes-coupling-nature). 6. Other miscellaneous beyond-academia engagements include contributing to the development of a retrospective exhibition of photographic material in Windhoek as well as supplying landscape images to support various events (Rohde, see 'engagement activities' for more information). Sullivan was invited to contribute information on specific harvesting practices in the northern part of our study area for the indigenous and endemic !nara plant (Acanthiosicyos horridus) for a policy-oriented publication on natural products of Namibia (The Commercialisation of Indigenous Natural Plant Products in Namibia, 2014). Low has contributed to a BBC World Service series, 'Living with Nature' (broadcast 2018) where he describes the role of natural sounds in the lives of Namibian desert dwellers. We are also exploring possibilities for the repatriation of archived recordings, particularly through acquisition by Impey of prior recorded material associated with our field research areas (currently being digitised as part of the British Library's Sound Archives - World and Traditional Music, Africa collections, collection no. C1709).
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Creative Economy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Accelerated Impact Fund, SOAS University of London
Amount £4,500 (GBP)
Organisation School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
End 11/2016
 
Description Disrupted Histories, Recovered Pasts: A Cross-Disciplinary Analysis and Cross-Case Synthesis of Oral Histories and History in Post-Conflict and Postcolonial Contexts
Amount £79,794 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N504579/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2016 
End 10/2018
 
Title "To Kunene from the Cape" 
Description Ongoing mapping of several centuries of information recorded in early European travel accounts in the south-western corner of Africa, starting from the emerging Cape colony of the 1600s. The focus is on locating geographically the earliest journeys northwards to the territory that became known as Namibia (the routes of key travellers are indicated with different coloured markers), emphasising approximate locations of European colonial interactions with indigenous Khoe and San peoples, as recorded in the various journals and texts studied. As well as reading early journals and other documents for this period in southern Africa's history, this mapping work has been assisted by a journey northwards to Kunene Region (Namibia) from Cape Town by Sian Sullivan and Mike Hannis in Aug-Oct 2017. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact To early to say. 
URL https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?hl=en&mid=1yeJbGvTlmsXVR6ifnwxpTbe1AlE&ll=-28.031073376654376...
 
Title rePhotoSA 
Description Archival database of landscape imagery from southern Africa including over 1000 repeat photographs with associated searchable keywords and information. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact enhancement of environmental history research potential in the southern African region 
 
Description !khwa ttu 
Organisation !Khwa ttu
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Low is curating a new museum at the !khwa ttu San Cultural and Educational Centre that concerns the history and cultural of San people, who dwelled historically and in prehistory throughout west Namibia. San people and their history (and its representations) thus are important and relevant to the AHRC Future Pasts project. Working with !khwa ttu is introducing Low to new networks which are important to the Future Pasts project, and is supporting the development of new skills in GIS and community outreach which are relevant to our research and impact activities.
Collaborator Contribution !khwa ttu is supporting Low's networking and skills development.
Impact Outputs and outcomes are multi-disciplinary, relating to historical mapping, community development and participatory community processes regarding the development of museum displays that respect and tell San versions of their history and culture.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Arts Association 
Organisation Arts Association Heritage Trust (Namibia)
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution environmental history and critical art history research
Collaborator Contribution Access to Namibian landscape painting and photography archive.
Impact None yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Arts Association Heritage Trust (Namibia) 
Organisation Arts Association Heritage Trust (Namibia)
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Environmental history and critical art history research.
Collaborator Contribution Access to Namibian landscape painting and photography archive.
Impact This collaboration will support forthcoming outputs in environmental history and historical ecology.
Start Year 2014
 
Description CCA 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Department Centre for Curating the Archive
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Outsider photography from rural southern Africa
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration in publishing, exhibiting outsider photography
Impact None since 2013
Start Year 2010
 
Description Centre for Curating the Archive 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Outsider photography from rural southern Africa.
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration in publishing. Exhibitions of outsider photography.
Impact None since 2013, but future outputs planned.
Start Year 2010
 
Description FogLife 
Organisation Gobabeb Training and Research Centre
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Planned collaboration
Collaborator Contribution Planned collaboration
Impact None yet
Start Year 2014
 
Description Gobabeb Research and Training 
Organisation Gobabeb Training and Research Centre
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Gobabeb Research and Training Centre is a research organisation located in west Namibia, i.e. with detailed and historical expertise in the specific geographical region of our research. We have given a number of presentations at the Centre (by Rohde, Sullivan and Hannis - see 'public engagements'), and Rohde and Impey developed a research project in collaboration with a specific programme of research being developed by Gobabeb and partners (see collaboration entry entitled 'FogLife'). By invitation by Gobabeb's Director, Sullivan also contributed material for an entry on indigenous harvesting practices for !nara (Acanthosicyos horridus) for a 2014 text for policy makers on commercialised plant products in Namibia (see narrative on 'impact'). In recent visits to the Centre (by Sullivan in March 2018 and by Sullivan and Hannis in September 2018) presentations delivered have included 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein: histories, continuities, possibilities' (Sullivan with Welhemina Suro Ganuses, Sept. 2018), ''Exploring multispecies interactions through seed gathering from harvester ant nests: contemporary and historical practices by Damara / ?Nukhoen in west Namibia' (Sullivan, Sept. 2018), '"Our hearts were happy here": recollecting acts of dwelling and acts of clearance through mapping on-site oral histories in west Namibia' (Sullivan, March 2018) and 'Mining the Namib coast: nature, capital and history' (hannis, Sept. 2018). In 2018 Sullivan became an Associate of Gobabeb Research and Training Centre.
Collaborator Contribution Gobabeb contributed a formal endorsement letter for our research early in 2014 to add to our research permit dossier for submission to the Ministry of Home Affairs. Specific support by Gobabeb for the research being developed by Rohde and Impey regarding repeat landscape photographs and sound ecology is detailed under the entry 'FogLife'. Sullivan has been supported to gain Ministry of Environment & Tourism research permits through her involvement as a co-investigator in a research project led from Gobabeb (see below).
Impact Sullivan has become a co-investigator to contribute ethnographic and oral history dimensions to a cross-disciplinary research project led from Gobabeb (Principal Investigator Dr Gillian Maggs-Kolling) called 'The significance of the Namib Desert endemic !nara (Acanthosicyos horridus) as a keystone species in ecology, phenology, culture and horticultural potential'.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Plant Conservation Unit 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Social science component of environmental history research in arid and semi-arid regions of southern Africa.
Collaborator Contribution Botanical and ecological components of environmental history research in arid and semi-arid regions of southern Africa.
Impact Several publications prior to 2013
 
Description Save the Rhino Trust (SRT), Namibia 
Organisation Save the Rhino Trust (SRT)
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Save the Rhino Trust is an NGO that has been operating since at least the 1990s in the southern Kunene region of our study area. Its trackers and staff members have an immense wealth of knowledge of this area and the organisation currently employs a key field assistant / translator (Welhelmina Suro Ganuses) with whom both Sullivan and Low have worked in the course of conducting ethnographic research since the early 1990s. For Future Pasts Sullivan has formalised an arrangement to second Suro from SRT for assistance with periods of ethnographic field research as part of Future Pasts. This is part of a developing collaboration to draw out elements of cultural landscape relationships that have been obscured by contemporary conservation and tourism concession designations, and that are relevant to the areas that SRT currently works in.
Collaborator Contribution SRT is providing logistical (e.g. possibility of camping at times at SRT base-camp) support as well as releasing one of its staff members to work with Sullivan as a field assistant for Future Pasts research, as well as sharing knowledge regarding Damara cultural landscapes and key informants.
Impact Currently this collaboration primarily relates to field logistics for ethnographic components of our research in southern Kunene Region. This is a key element in making possible academic research outputs from this part of the project. At the same, it is intended that through generating 'outreach' documents and other routes for local uptake of research material, routes towards broader impact of the research will be fostered through this collaboration. SRT staff are also now contributing material to Future Pasts Working Papers, with collaborative papers in development.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Sullivan, S. Steering Group collaboration for 'Utopias, Futures and Temporalities' conference, Bristol, May 2015 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sian Sullivan was a member of the academic steering group for this event, made up of researchers in the AHRC's Care for the Future and Connected Communities themes, under the leadership of Keri Facer, Leadership Fellow (Connected Communities). She also led a collaborative Roundtable proposal for this event, entitled Temporalities / Communities / Sustainabilities: Frictions and Frissons in the making of Utopian Futures and involving herself and Mike Hannis from the Future Pasts research team, and two researchers from the Hydrocitizenship research project under the AHRC's Connected Communities theme.
Collaborator Contribution to do
Impact to complete. Papers presented by Future Pasts researchers at the Roundtable initiated by Sullivan were entitled 'Conservation utopias and temporalities of sustainability: notes from west Namibia' (Sullivan - working paper to be prepared with this title) and 'Crisis, utopia, and future generations' (Hannis).
Start Year 2014
 
Description University of Namibia (UNAM) 
Organisation University of Namibia
Department Department of Geography, History and Environmental Studies
Country Namibia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We approached UNAM for official endorsement for our research in 2014 and discussed the content of our research with the Head of the Dept. of Geography, History and Environmental Studies, Dr Martha Akawa, who in 2017 visited Bath Spa University as a visiting lecturer for the Association of Commonwealth Universities summer school hosted by the university. In 2018 UNAM became an institutional member of the GALA (Global Academy of Liberal Arts) network, led from Bath Spa University. Dr Selma Lendelvo, Head of the Life Sciences Division of the university's Multi-disciplinary Research Centre, will make a short research visit to Bath Spa University in 2019 at the invitation of the GALA network and Future Pasts.
Collaborator Contribution The Head of the Dept. of Geography, History and Environmental Studies at UNAM contributed a formal endorsement letter for our research early in 2014 to add to our research permit dossier for submission to the Ministry of Home Affairs. In 2019 Dr Selma Lendelvo, Head of the Life Sciences Division of the university's Multi-disciplinary Research Centre contributed a supporting letter for a Ministry of Environment and Tourism research permit for Sullivan and field research team.
Impact UNAM has becoming part of the Global Academy of Liberal Arts (GALA) (http://gala.network/), led from Bath Spa University.
Start Year 2014
 
Description "Reading sound and silence as territorial redress in west Namibia" (Paper presented on SOAS School of Arts panel entitled 'Working with music in marginalised communities: questions of voice and vocality' (January 16, 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Paper presented on SOAS School of Arts panel entitled "Working with music in marginalised communities: questions of voice and vocality". Event was intended to open discussion about research impacts, with specific view to considering impacts of arts-based research activities in relation to public awareness raising and policy change. Panel attracted staff and students from SOAS and wider London ethnomusicology/anthropology community, and invited lively debate about the politics of self-recognition, research intervention and ethical responsibilities, and knowledge co-production.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib' - Invited seminar for Research Colloquium at Institut für Ethnologie, Hamburg University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A presentation on '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: retrieving disrupted socio-ecological pasts through on-site oral histories' was given as part of Hamburg University's Research Colloquium at Institut für Ethnologie in July 2018. Stimulating discussion followed, as well as ongoing communication with the seminar organiser.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ethnologie.uni-hamburg.de/ueber-das-institut/aktuelles/ethnologisches-kolloquium-plakat-...
 
Description '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib' - public lecture, Swakopmund Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A talk called '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: retrieving disrupted socio-ecological pasts through on-site oral histories' was given as a public lecture at the Swakopmund Museum, Namibia, in September 2018. There were around 100 people in the audience, including family members of research participants and representatives of third sector organisations. A lively discussion ensued, plus requests for further information and research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://scientificsocietyswakopmund.com/events/event/nara-harvesters-of-the-northern-namib/
 
Description '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib' - seminar at Gobabeb, Namibia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact A talk on '!Nara harvesters of the northern Namib: retrieving disrupted socio-ecological pasts through on-site oral histories' was given at Gobabeb Research and Training Centre, Namibia, reflecting on the ethnographic and oral history component of collaborative research with researchers at the Centre. Stimulated lively discussion focusing on ongoing and future collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 'Crisis, Utopia, and Future Generations' - presentation at AHRC Symposium Bristol May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The panel was well attended and there was lively discussion of issues raised in the paper.

Introducing insights from environmental ethics to scholars of 'Utopia' from other disciplines.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://connected-communities.org/index.php/events/event/utopias-futures-and-temporalities-critical-...
 
Description 'Exploring multispecies interactions' - presentation at Gobabeb, Namibia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact A seminar presentation on 'Exploring multispecies interactions through seed gathering from harvester ant nests: contemporary and historical practices by Damara / ?Nukhoen in west Namibia', was given in September 2018 at Gobabeb Research and Training Centre, Namibia. A lively discussion followed and participants reported changes in perspective and interest in the subject.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/10/16/Crossing-continents-with-Future-Pasts-a-tale-of-t...
 
Description 'Exploring multispecies interactions' - presentation at the Southern Deserts Conference 5, Karratha, Australia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A presentation on 'Exploring multispecies interactions through seed gathering from harvester ant nests: contemporary and historical practices by Damara / ?Nukhoen in west Namibia' was given in teh panel 'Shaping the Desert' at the 5th Southern Deserts Conference, for which Sullivan was also on the organising committee. The presentation explored a specific harvesting practice documented through research in west Namibia and that has parallels in Australian contexts. Lively discussion and sharing of research material followed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/10/16/Crossing-continents-with-Future-Pasts-a-tale-of-t...
 
Description 'Future Pasts? Sustainabilities in West Namibia', Care for the Future 'Debating Time' blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a blog post written for the AHRC's Care for the Future 'Debating Time' blog and assisted discussion especially amongst other Care for the Future grant recipients, as well as helping to strengthen the vision of Future Pasts amongst our team members.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://careforthefuture.exeter.ac.uk/2015/02/future-pasts/
 
Description 'Natural capital accounting' panel organised 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Co-organised Double panel on 'Natural capital accounting' co-organised with Rob Fletcher at international conference on The Value of Life: Measurement, Stakes, Implications, Centre for Space, Place and Society, Wageningen University, June 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://centreforspaceplacesociety.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/book-of-abstracts1.pdf
 
Description 'Nature' or 'Natural Capital'? A question of value(s)', presentation at Bath Spa University Nature and Wellbeing Workshop. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk given on "'Nature' or 'Natural Capital'? A question of value(s)" for interdisciplinary academic and practitioners Nature and Wellbeing Workshop at Bath Spa University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://culturenaturewellbeing.wordpress.com/events/
 
Description 'Our hearts were happy here' for panel on 'Cultural maps and hunter-gatherers' being in the world', CHAGS12 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation called '"Our hearts were happy here"': recollecting acts of dwelling and acts of clearance through mapping on-site oral histories in west Namibia' given for a panel on 'Cultural maps and hunter-gatherers' being in the world', at the 12th international Conference on Hunter-Gatherer Societies (CHAGS12) in Penang Malaysia. A lively discussion followed the panel and new research collaborations are now being explored with the panel organiser Dr Ute Dieckmann (Univ. of Cologne).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://chags.usm.my/
 
Description 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein' - conference presentation, Windhoek, Namibia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A presentation called 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein: histories, continuities, possibilities' was given with Namibian collaborator Welhemina Suro Ganuses, at the international conference on The Past, Present and Future of Namibian Heritage, held at the University of Namibia, Windhoek in August 2018. A lively panel discussion followed and continuing engagement with the Museums Association of Namibia, one of the organisers of the conference, is taking place. The talk is specifically mentioned in the review at the URL below which states that 'The Conference also sought to break barriers by engaging the Namibian art sector with the museum community. Presenters supported the idea of the Museum of Namibian Music as a way of discussing, celebrating and preserving our `intangible' musical heritage. For example, there was a presentation by Ms Welhemina Suro Ganuses and Dr Sian Sullivan about the fading tradition of flute music amongst the community of Sesfontein.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.museums.com.na/124-thinking-about-namibian-heritage
 
Description 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein' - seminar presentation at Gobabeb, Namibia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A presentation called 'Tasting the lost flute music of Sesfontein: histories, continuities, possibilities' was given with Namibian collaborator Welhemina Suro Ganuses to researchers, students and staff at the third sector organisation Gobabeb Research and Training Centre in Namibia on 5th September, sparking lovely discussion and reported new interest in the themes explored.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/10/16/Crossing-continents-with-Future-Pasts-a-tale-of-t...
 
Description (Rohde) Paper presentation CEAD conference, November 16, 2016; Cape Town 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation title: "Outsider photography/insider ethnography - writing ourselves out of the picture?" Paper presented at the 4th international conference Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines (CEAD) 'Ethnographic Imaginings: Place, Space, and Time'; Cape Town 15-18 November 2016. Abstract retrieved from http://cead.org.nz/Site/Ethnography_conference/Programme.aspx

This paper describes two experiments in writing ethnography using photography. The so-called ethnographic 'subjects' from rural Namibia and Namaqualand were given cameras and the results were exhibited in national galleries (Namibia and South Africa) and published in two books as photo essays.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://cead.org.nz/Site/Ethnography_conference/Programme.aspx
 
Description A shared history: repatriating, researching and curating San photographs with San communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk given with project colleague Rick Rhode. The subject was a joint endeavour with !Khwa ttu and the Pitt Rivers Museum wherein I took colonial photographs of Bushmen that were in the archives of the Pitt Rivers Museum, back to a group of Bushmen to establish their response and whether the photographs might be valuable to them.
Returning photographs to communities is also a key part of the Future Pasts project. The CEAD conference involved many Maori, Australian Aboriginal and other indigenous peoples. The conference provided a place to explore our Future Pasts and !Khwa ttu methodologies. Our wider framing of our session concerned the role outside researchers might have in community outreach work and anthropology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://cead.org.nz/Site/Ethnography_conference/default.aspx
 
Description AHRC Heritage Priority Area Case Study 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact AHRC Heritage Priority Area Case Study blog based on Future Pasts project, and shared on social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://heritage-research.org/case-studies/future-pasts-apocalyptic-moment-hybrid-analysis-green-per...
 
Description AHRC Workshop at the intersection of 'Care for the Future' and 'Translating Cultures' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an invited presentation for an AHRC Workshop called 'On the (un)translatability of "coming to terms with the past": at the intersection of 'Care for the Future' and 'Translating Cultures''. It enabled practitioners of AHRC research involved with the 'Care for the Future' and 'Translaiting Cultures' research to share research and reflections, encouraging stimulating discussions and sparking following engagements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description AVAMP (Rohde) 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This year the Annual Visual Art Museum Programme (AVAMP) 2015, which is a joint collaboration between the NAGN and the Art Association Heritage Trust (AAHT), will have a photography exhibition theme titled : ' Re-presenting photography in Namibia'.

The exhibition seeks to give a concise overview of the development of photography in Namibia, and more so regarding the changing view of the lens in the past years. The AVAMP 2015 exhibition aspires to show a selection of historical, documentary and fine art photography, featuring photos from the colonial era through to the dawn of Namibia's Independence, as well as contemporary works of today.

Rohde contributed images from a former exhibition of work by non-professional photographers from Okombahe (his fieldwork area 1994-6).


This activity is ongoing until August 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.nagn.org.na/event_registration.php?evt_id=47
 
Description BBC Radio documentary on the Damara King's Festival (Namibia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Partnered with BBC radio journalist to produce radio programme for BBC Radio 3 on the political and cultural history of a little-known annual Damara festival. This has laid the foundation for further research on the history of Damara cultural landscapes, with the view to creating further film and radio-based programmes for the Namibian public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Blog about Future Pasts exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Blog publicising research exhibition at art gallery and highlighting exhibition private view. Shared further via project facebook site.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/07/20/Future-Pasts-exhibition-hosts-private-view
 
Description Blog on Future Pasts website and Facebook (Rohde & Sullivan) Summarising CEAD presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Text and images summarising the presentation at CEAD conference 2016 "Outsider photography/insider ethnography - writing ourselves out of the picture?"
https://www.futurepasts.net/blog
https://www.facebook.com/futurepastsAHRC/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Bonding Nature(s) talk, conference on The Value of Life: Measurement, Stakes, Implications, Centre for Space, Place and Society, Wageningen University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation given as part of the well-attended panel on 'Natural capital accounting' at international conference on The Value of Life: Measurement, Stakes, Implications, Centre for Space, Place and Society, Wageningen University, July 2017. Sparked very lively discussion and subsequent correspondence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://centreforspaceplacesociety.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/book-of-abstracts1.pdf
 
Description Climate change complexity blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Blog to communicate findings from repeat landscape photography research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/07/03/Climate-change-complexity-repeat-landscape-photog...
 
Description Contribution of repeat landscape images for the National Conference on Bush Encroachment and Value Addition in Namibia (Rohde). 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To be completed. . . .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.giz.de/en/worldwide/28648.html
 
Description Crossing continents with Future Pasts - research blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Research blog summarising project work presented by Future Pasts researchers Sian Sullivan and Mike Hannis and collaborators at a series of three international conferences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/10/16/Crossing-continents-with-Future-Pasts-a-tale-of-t...
 
Description Cultural Ecologies lecture, ACU Summer School 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Lecture entitled 'Cultural Ecologies', drawing on Future Pasts research, delivered to international students on Association of Commonwealth Universities Summer School held at Bath Spa University. Sparked animated discussion and further interest.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.acu.ac.uk/events/commonwealth-summer-school/commonwealth-summer-school-2017/
 
Description Curating the exhibition talk, BSU 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk and participation building on experience of curating Future Pasts research exhibition at Gallery 44AD in Bath, fostering collaboration and awareness regarding creative practice and exhibition possibilities in Bath.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bathspalive.com/researcherdevelopment/Online/default.asp?BOparam::WScontent::loadArticle...
 
Description Entitle blog, Feb2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Publication of an article in the blog series of 'ENTITLE' - a European network of research and training on political ecology that brings together scholars and fellows from a variety of institutions and disciplinary and geographical backgrounds. The intention of the blog was to raise awareness about current uses of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies for sourcing finance for environmental conservation initiatives, including in the global south. The blog was reblogged a number of times from the Entitle website as well as shared 111 times to Facebook from this site, as well as to Twitter. It was also discussed in a later article at http://www.redd-monitor.org/2018/02/08/the-kariba-redd-project-in-zimbabwe-from-carbon-credits-to-earth-tokens/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://entitleblog.org/2018/02/01/nature-3-0-will-blockchain-technology-and-cryptocurrencies-save-t...
 
Description Environmental Humanities Public Lecture at Bath Spa University, December 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture in a series organised by the BSU Research Centre in Environmental Humanities, presenting findings on ethical issues associated with trophy hunting of black rhinoceros in Namibia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Extraction old and new - research blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Research blog written to communicate issues in historical and present-day extractive industry in south-western Africa (South Africa and Namibia) in connection with conservation policies and initiatives focusing on biodiversity offsetting and restoration. Shared on social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2018/03/04/Extraction-Old-and-New
 
Description Extraction old and new blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Beyond-academia communication of research drawing on information mapped at https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?hl=en|=1yeJbGvTlmsXVR6ifnwxpTbe1AlE«=-28.495947201036447%2C17.60009765625&z=5
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/11/17/Extraction-Old-and-New
 
Description Filmed presentation on 'Exploring Re-embodiments' for the Symposium Bodily Undoing: Somatic Activism and Performance Cultures as Practices of Critique 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Video presentation for the Symposium "Bodily Undoing: Somatic Activism and Performance Cultures as Practices of Critique" at Bath Spa University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://vimeo.com/233887180
 
Description Foglife 2nd colloguium (Rohde) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion around alternative monitoring technologies.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gobabebtrc.org/index.php/component/content/article/1-latest-news/293-2nd-annual-foglife-c...
 
Description Future Pasts blog post - Notes on 'natural capital' and 'fairy-tales' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Future Pasts blog posts engaging with debates and policy on framing nature as 'natural capital' in combination with perspectives from ethnographic field research on sustainability perceptions and practices in west Namibia. The post was tweeted multiple times and stimulated discussion in the 'twittersphere'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2015/11/19/notes-on-natural-capital-and-fairy-tales-Sullivan...
 
Description Future Pasts blog post - Why are pastoralists poisoning lions in west Namibia? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Blog post based on field research observations and extending with more research detail a shorter article posted previously on The Conversation UK (https://theconversation.com/three-of-namibias-most-famous-lion-family-were-poisoned-why-64322).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/02/16/Why-are-pastoralists-poisoning-lions-in-west-Nami...
 
Description Future Pasts ethnomusicologist works with BBC journalist to create radio programme on Damara King's festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact First ever documentation of the Damara King's festival, which has brought attention to this important event, and in particular to its articulation of Damara history and cultural memory.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/blog
 
Description Future Pasts facebook site 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is a facebook site established so as to support the beyond-academia sharing of outputs from Future Pasts. The site was established in Feb 2017 and currently has more than 150 'followers' with comments and requests for clarification being shared on posts and via private messages. We expect and intend the site to contribute to broader discussion and interest regarding Future Pasts research activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.facebook.com/futurepastsAHRC/
 
Description Future Pasts instagram account 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In 2017 an instagram account for the Future Pasts project was created, initially to report on a research journey by Sian Sullivan and Mike Hannis to visit and document key sites of colonial encounter as welll as extractive industry from Cape Town to Kunene Region. The account has international reach and has stimulated engagement from diverse users.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.instagram.com/futurepastsahrc/
 
Description Future Pasts twitter account 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is the twitter account for Future Pasts which was established in 2014 but which is only now starting to be used at all significantly for sharing research outputs and activities. Posts tend to be reshared although not currently able to state exactly what the broader reach of these is.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://twitter.com/Future_Pasts
 
Description Future Pasts vimeo site 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is a vimeo site created for Future Pasts where we can share short videos made from our research material. It is a public site online. We will continue to add videos here that can be linked to in our website, facebook page and publications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://vimeo.com/futurepasts
 
Description Future Pasts website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact www.futurepasts.net is our project website, established during 2014. Through this website we share outputs and content from our research, including through a bespoke Future Pasts Working Papers series at https://www.futurepasts.net/future-pasts-working-papers and a project blog at https://www.futurepasts.net/blog.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.futurepasts.net
 
Description Googlemap locating historical encounters in southwestern Africa relevant as background research for Future Pasts 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is the first of a series of googlemaps being created to support Future Pasts research. The map is international in reach and editable on an ongoing basis. It is starting to be included as a reference source in Future Pasts blogs and publications. The map has only recently been made publicly viewable so it is too early to report significant impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?hl=en&mid=1yeJbGvTlmsXVR6ifnwxpTbe1AlE&ll=-28.493828820188824...
 
Description Historical timeline of references 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This 'Historical Sequence of References to Peoples and Places of West Namibia' has been created as a living online document of sources and perspectives that can be referred to in other Future Pasts publications and ressources. It consists of a series of embedded documents comprised of a collation of sources and observations for different time-periods from pre-history to the present. These documents are being updated on an ongoing basis by the Future Pasts PI, as new sources are read and integrated with many of the places and encounters mentioned in the reviewed texts also being mapped online. These documents have only recently been made publicly viewable and so it is too early for impact to be assessed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/historical-time-line-west-namibia
 
Description INTERSECTIONS Graduate workshop: Nature-society encounters: discussions with an environmental anthropologist and an environmental ethicist on conservation, capital and flourishing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Focused cross-disciplinary postgraduate workshop invited and hosted by The Dept. Geography and the Center for Ethics at the University of Toronto. Sparked discussion and exchange of contact details for further engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://geography.utoronto.ca/event/intersections-graduate-workshop-nature-society-encounters-discuss...
 
Description Interview for BBC World Service 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The interview has been recorded for a BBC series, 'Living with Nature'. The interview concerned the role of natural sounds in the lives of desert dwellers in Namibia
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited class presentation (Low), University of Vermont 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Chris Low was invited by university lecturer Mike Kessler to speak to students about life amongst contemporary KhoeSan. This is a collaboration that is leading to the development of course content regarding tracking in a range of educational settings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited colloguium poster (Rohde & Impey) Foglife, Gobabeb 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This meeting helped set up plans for a three year project and provided specific feedback on the proposal of myself and Angela Impey.

Received several feedback correspondence and increased collaborative associations with other environmental scientists
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.sasscal.org/foglife_col_nov2014_sasscal.php
 
Description Invited expert speaker (Sullivan) for Royal Society Public Dialogue on Ecosystem Services 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was the last in a series of dialogue events around the country designed to engage public participants with concepts and concerns constituting the basis of the UK's National Ecosystem Assessment. Sullivan's talk was intended as a stimulus presentation to introduce participants to a range of concerns regarding market-based approaches to environmental management.

The presentation informed discussion and shaped participants views, as reflected in verbal feedback and in the nature of the following small group discussions and debates.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://gtr.rcuk.ac.uk/project/9D267ED0-F45E-49BE-899A-1748BAB030B6
 
Description Invited presentation (Rohde) Association of Visual Arts Gallery, Cape Town 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This discussion stimulated thinking around concepts of landscape imagery, the issue of distance and ideology inherent in Paul van Schalkwy's aerial landscape photographs.

This activity provided a forum wherein practitioners from different disciplines were able to meet and create productive working relationships.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ava.co.za/a-pristine-land-interrupted-gallery-conversation/
 
Description Invited presentation (Rohde) Environmental History of the Namib 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Feedback from local experts and stimulation of discussion with national and international interns and students

Correspondence with local experts carried forward in collaborative research activities
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited presentation (Rohde): Environmental history research methods using repeat photography 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Discussions leading to further research collaboration.

Raised awaremness of importance of environmental history in understanding change in relation to climate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited seminar presentation (Sullivan), Goethe Institute, Frankfurt. Talk entitled 'The natural capital myth' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Around 100 postgraduate students and staff from the Goethe Institute attended the talk which generated discussion that continued in some cases by email after the event.

The seminar was filmed and posted online. Through this I was subsequently invited to give a plenary address at a workshop on 'Ecological accounts' at St. Andrews (in August 2014).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL https://electure-ms.studiumdigitale.uni-frankfurt.de/vod/playlists/scwuxOH7cC.html
 
Description Invited seminar presentation (Sullivan), Human Ecologies series, Univ. Canterbury 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Discussion arising from aspects of Future Pasts research which stimulated questions and discussions, especially with Anthropology and Conservation postgraduate students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/events/lectures-seminars/Human_Ecology_Seminar_Series/Human_Ecology_Semin...
 
Description Invited talk (Sullivan) for Geography research seminar on 'marketisation and nature', Durham University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was an afternoon's research seminar with three papers. The audience were postgraduate students and staff members at Durham, who in 2013-14 had adopted 'marketisation' as a theme for cross-research cluster collaboration in human geography. The seminar stimulated detailed discussion regarding issues of marketisation in relation to the natural environment.

The seminar stimulated ongoing email discussion and exchange of work, plus further invitations for presentation of work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.dur.ac.uk/geography/news/futureevents/?eventno=18270
 
Description Joint presentation with M. Hannis on 'Ontology after truth? Ethnography and ethics in an unraveling world' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of Future Pasts research as part of a panel on 'Onto-epistemologies and ethics' at the inaugural symposium of Bath Spa University's Research Centre in Environmental Humanities, entitled Environmental Humanities: Doing Interdisciplinarity with Depth. A very lively panel that sparked discussion and questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Lunch Talk (Sullivan): "'Future Pasts.' Introducing a historical cultural mapping project in western Namibia", BAB 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited research seminar given with Namibian collaborator Welhemina Suro Ganuses at the Namibia Resource Centre of the Basler Afrika Bibliographien in Basel, Switzerland. Sparked questions and discussions and led to further collaborative possibilities as well as to invitations to give a research seminar in Hamburg (in July 2018) and submit a paper to a panel on Cultural Mapping at the next Conference on Hunter-Gatherer Societies (also in July 2018).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://baslerafrika.ch/event/lunch-talk-future-pasts-introducing-a-historical-cultural-mapping-proj...
 
Description Mining the Desert, The Land 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Recently published magazine article drawing on research mapped at https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@-28.2476162,6.8429773,4z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!6m1!1s1yeJbGvTlmsXVR6ifnwxpTbe1AlE intended to communicate issues to beyond-academia audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.thelandmagazine.org.uk/articles/mining-desert
 
Description Online radio interview on dance and healing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited online radio interview concerning dance and healing, drawing on ethnographic field research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.mixcloud.com/artfulbadgeruk/badger-radio-totum-dance-meditation-special-featuring-christ...
 
Description Online radio show 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Invited interview for radio show communicating contemporary relevance of 'rites of passage' and drawing on ethnographic field research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.mixcloud.com/artfulbadgeruk/badger-radio-totem-rites-of-passage-feat-way-of-nature-uk-si...
 
Description Our hearts were happy here, blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Research blog post intended to communicate to a broad audience some findings from cultural landscape mapping research being conducted through Future Pasts. The blog has been discussed with Namibian research participants in the project and shared broadly with students and other academic researchers, leading in part to an invitation to contribute to a conference panel on cultural mapping at the Conference on Hunter Gather Societies in 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurepasts.net/single-post/2017/03/19/%E2%80%98Our-hearts-were-happy-here%E2%80%99-%E2%...
 
Description Paper given (Sullivan) at 'Landscape, wilderness and the wild' conference, Newcastle, March 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The paper given was entitled 'Wild game or soul mates? On humanist naturalism and animist socialism in composing socionatural abundance'. It stimulated interesting discussion afterwards, and has been followed by email correspondence with other conference participants. The paper has been uploaded to my page at academia.edu and is being bookmarked.

n/a to date (the paper was only delivered last week)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ncl.ac.uk/apl/news/events/thewild/
 
Description Photographic exhibition - Otterbein University 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Exhibition of photographs by Sophie Klaase, curated by R Rohde and S O'Connell hosted by Otterbein University, Department of Art, entitled 'Extra Ordinary Lives: Portraits from a divided land'. displayed in the Fisher Gallery, Roush Hall (first and second floors), 27 South Grove Street, Westerville, OH 43081. The exhibition runs from between August 21 to December 3, 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.otterbein.edu/public/About/Calendars/ArtScene/OpeningDoors.aspx
 
Description Political Ecology Seminar, University of Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited postgraduate seminar given to the newly formed 'Political ecology, pasts and presents: from science, myth and power to post-truth?', Political Ecology Seminar Series at the School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, 23 October. Lively discussion afterwards and continued communication with series conveners and students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://twitter.com/JamesR_Palmer/status/1054759621146148864
 
Description Premiered film, The Damara Kings Festival at SOAS, University of London (Angela Impey) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The premier of the film at SOAS, University of London was attended by the Namibian High Commissioner to London and a 10-member high-profile delegation from the Namibian High Commission. Senior academics of Namibian cultural and environmental history from the British Library were also in attendance, as were members of the UK Friends of Namibia Society, the media and members of the public. The film screening generated animated discussion about Damara cultural identity, and provided valuable direction to ways in which the film may be used within Namibia to encourage public debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation (Hannis, Sullivan) given at ISEE. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Vibrant discussion during and following the panel of which this paper was part. Correspondence with other academics participating in the event.

Paper developed into a book chapter for an Oxford University Press edited collection entitled 'Flourishing: Comparative Religious Environmental Ethics' (under contract).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.isee2015.uni-kiel.de/iseeinhalt/Conference-General.php
 
Description Presentation (Sullivan) Royal Geographical Society, Exeter. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentations sparked an animated discussion which included academics and third sector practitioners and policymakers.

Invitations to give seminars at Wageningen and Leeds University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Programme/Programm...
 
Description Presentation (Sullivan) at 2nd AHRC-LABEX Research Workshop 'Delving Back into the Past..', Royal Society, London, April 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion and stimulated further engagement with participants at the meeting, including a successful funding application under the AHRC/LABEX joint 2015 call for collaborative research projects.

Was invited to act as 'key listener' in the final workshop panel. Pursued discussion with other researchers at the workshop (from Hull University and French LABEX-PasP institutions), leading to submission of grant application to AHRC-LABEX joint funding scheme (http://careforthefuture.exeter.ac.uk/funding/) - outcome as yet unknown.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://careforthefuture.exeter.ac.uk/events/labex-collaboration/
 
Description Presentation (Sullivan) at AHRC Symposium, Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion and questions sparked by the presentation and the Roundtable this was part of.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://connected-communities.org/index.php/events/event/utopias-futures-and-temporalities-critical-...
 
Description Presentation (Sullivan) given at AHRC-LABEX workshop 'Exploring the past to understand the present...', Paris, January 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk encouraged discussion and has led to future conversation and engagement with participants, as well as reflection on and development of the material presented. A new research project developed from these encounters and subsequent discussions (AH/N504579/1).

I was successful in my application to participate in the second Franco-British research workshop held in London a few months later and have maintained contact with researchers I met at this first AHRC-LABEX research workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://careforthefuture.exeter.ac.uk/events/labex-collaboration/
 
Description Presentation (Sullivan) given at CHAGS, Vienna. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk stimulated discussion at the panel and led to subsequent meetings and correspondence.

None known as yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://chags.univie.ac.at/
 
Description Presentation at 'The Value of Life: Measurement, Stakes, Implications' conference, Wageningen, Netherlands, June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation entitled: 'Hunting Natural Capital? Economics, Ethics and the Reinvention of the Black Rhinoceros.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://centreforspaceplacesociety.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/book-of-abstracts1.pdf
 
Description Presentation at Digital Ecologies and the Anthropocene Symposium, Bath Spa University, April 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation entitled '"Uranium burns a hole in forever": temporalities, ethics and the nuclear fuel cycle.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/liberal-arts/research/media-convergence-research-centre/previous-symposium...
 
Description Presentation at Gobabeb Research and Training Centre, Namibia, 5 September 2018. Title: "Mining the Namib Coast: Phosphates, Capital and History." 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of Future Pasts research by M Hannis and S Sullivan, examining and historicising proposals for marine phosphate mining off the Namibian coast.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at International Society for Environmental Ethics, New York 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Paper presented on ethical issues associated with trophy hunting of black rhinoceros in Namibia. Well-received, lively discussion and requests for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation by M Hannis at international conference 'Southern Deserts 5', Karratha, Western Australia, 9 August 2018. Title: "Mining the Namib: Nature, Capital and History on a Desert Coast." 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of Future Pasts research by M Hannis and S Sullivan, examining and historicising extractive industry practices in coastal Namibia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.facebook.com/SouthernDeserts2018/
 
Description Presentation by Sullivan and Hannis at 'Capitalizing nature. Forms and strategies for economizing the environment, 19th to 21st century' conference, Paris June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation by Sullivan and Hannis entitled ''Mathematics maybe, but not money': on balance sheets, numbers and nature in ecological accounting'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://koyre.ehess.fr/index.php?2420
 
Description Presentation by Sullivan and Hannis at Inaugural Symposium of Bath Spa University Research Centre for Environmental Humanities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sullivan and Hannis Presented reflections on interdisciplinary working in the Environmental Humanities, drawing on experience of Future Pasts collaboration between an anthropologist and a philosopher.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/research-centres/research-centre-for-environmental...
 
Description Presentation made by Sullivan and Hannis at Namibian research and training centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Around twenty students, researchers and local employees attended this event on 9th March 2014, which was a series of talks by members of the Future Pasts team delivered at Gobabeb Research and Training Centre in Namibia. Sullivan and Hannis delivered a talk entitled 'Offsetting nature? Notes on the development of biodiversity offsetting policy in the UK and beyond...'. The talk stimulated a dynamic discussion regarding these policies and assisted in the Future Pasts programme of research being formally endorsed by this organisation. One Research Technician from the organisation described it as 'an amazing presentation'. Co-Investigator Rick Rohde also delivered a talk on 'Repeat photographs and environmental history'.

Members of Gobabeb Research and Training reported a stimulated interest in biodiversity offsetting policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presented paper at FILMING AFRICAN MUSIC: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY DAY ON AFRICAN MUSIC AND FILM / VIDEO, Bath Spa University, 18 November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a paper entitled 'Filming the Damara King's Festival as cultural documentation and political redress', followed by a screening of the film. Approximately 60-people were in attendance, which stimulated discussion about the value of film as a research tool, amongst a range of other issues. This has stimulated the organisation of a film tour to select Damara communities in Namibia (August 2018), the aim of which will be to stimulate public reflection about past identities, knowledge and senses of place, and the articulation of these aspects within contemporary Namibian society.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presidential panel on Activism, advocacy and community engagement in Ethnomusicology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented the opening paper on the Presidential Panel at the International Society for Ethnomusicology (Washington DC, 2016) on new perspectives on community engagement in Ethnomusicology. The panel was video-streamed and available to ethnomusicologists and interested cultural practitioners worldwide.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public Lecture hosted by Bath Spa Research Centre for Environmental Humanities, 13 December 2017. Title: Killing Nature to Save It? Economics, Ethics and the Trophy Hunting of Black Rhinoceros. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Public Lecture hosted by Bath Spa Research Centre for Environmental Humanities. Title: "Killing Nature to Save It? Economics, Ethics and the Trophy Hunting of Black Rhinoceros". Presentation of Future pasts research by M Hannis, exploring ethical issues arising from trophy hunting in Namibia. A well-attended talk to a mixture of academics and members of the general public, generating lively discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/research-centres/environmental-humanities/events/
 
Description Public Lecture hosted by Bath Spa Research Centre for Environmental Humanities. Title: Mining the Skeleton Coast: Nature, Capital and History. 14 November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Public Lecture hosted by Bath Spa Research Centre for Environmental Humanities.
Title: Mining the Skeleton Coast: Nature, Capital and History.
Presentation of Future pasts research by M Hannis and S Sullivan, exploring continuities and discontinuities between past and present extractive industries in coastal Namibia.
A well-attended talk to a mixture of academics and members of the general public, generating lively discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/research-and-enterprise/research-centres/environmental-humanities/events/
 
Description RAI Conference presentation (Rohde) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This international conference "Anthropology, Weather and Climate Change" took place at the British Museum 27-29 May 2016. My presentation (entitled 'The fog of historical ecology: vegetation change, sea-surface temperatures and climate change in the Namib desert') was attended by over 50 people, mostly researchers, academics and policy makers. This has led to further collaboration with other panel members and a publication on the panel theme is in the making.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Radical Anthropology Group talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact An invited talk to the RDICAL Anthropology Group. About 40 people from a variety of backgrounds attended. The talk is part of my ongoing co-operation with scholars associated with the Radical Anthropology Group. I have also been in contact with audience members wishing to know more about my work and interested in finding out more about the topic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://radicalanthropologygroup.org
 
Description Research seminar (Sullivan), !Nara harvesters of the northern Namib 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This was a research seminar presenting field data from Future Pasts to a cross-disciplinary academic audience that included anthropologists and archaeologists and that attracted a number of post-graduate students. The seminar stimulated discussion and questions, with a positive comments reported after the event. It resulted in the presenter being invited to serve as an examiner on a PhD committee in the department for new ethnographic research in Namibia (although unable to accept due to dates clash).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Rohde, R. Invited presentation of Future Pasts research project to CAS, University of Edinburgh, October 2, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation resulted in collaboration with researchers from CAS who are now working on similar projects in South Africa.

Several colleagues requested more information on my methodology of using photography as an ethnographic research tool.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.cas.ed.ac.uk/research/grants_and_projects/current/future_pasts
 
Description Scolma conference presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation given to the conference 'Document to Digital: how does digitisation aid African research?' National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh September 11, 2017. The title of the presentation: 'Repeat Landscape Photography, Historical Ecology and the Wonder of Digital Archives' to an audience of approximately 40 people from international backgrounds. Questions and contacts during the conference have led to further engagement activities including the publication of a paper in the journal 'African Research and Documentation'. A summary of the proceedings was published in the Plant conservation Unit of the University of Cape Town's online site: http://www.pcu.uct.ac.za/news/rick-rohde-attends-scolma-conference-scotland-11-september-2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://scolma.org/event/scolma-annual-conference-2017-document-to-digital-how-does-digitisation-aid-...
 
Description Sullivan, S., Invited seminar for the Human Ecology Research Group, Dept. Anthropology, University College London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Unknown as yet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/research/research_reading_groups/herg
 
Description The Conversation UK 'Nature is being reframed as 'Natural Capital' - but is it really the planet that will profit? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article reach and contribution to broader discussion indicated by 14,480 readers / republications of this article reported on The Conversation plus 249 tweets, 260 shares on facebook and 49 shares on LinkedIn. Themes in the article also discussd by readers through article comments thread.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theconversation.com/nature-is-being-renamed-natural-capital-but-is-it-really-the-planet-that...
 
Description The Conversation UK 'Three of Namibia's most famous lions were poisoned - why? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article published on The Conversation UK.
Reach = 61,104 reads and republications logged, plus 87 tweets and 177 shares on facebook. Discussion also sparked through comments thread on the article.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theconversation.com/three-of-namibias-most-famous-lion-family-were-poisoned-why-64322
 
Description Workshop at University of Toronto, 8th March 2018. "Nature-society encounters: discussions with an environmental anthropologist and an environmental ethicist on conservation, capital and flourishing." 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited workshop co-facilitated with Prof. Sian Sullivan at University of Toronto, Canada, reflecting on our collaborative interdisciplinary research practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://geography.utoronto.ca/event/intersections-graduate-workshop-nature-society-encounters-discuss...