Honeybee population dynamics: Integrating the effects of factors within the hive and in the landscape

Lead Research Organisation: Rothamsted Research
Department Name: Agro-Ecology

Abstract

There is currently widespread concern about the health and survival of honeybees in both Europe and North America, and there have been devastating declines in the number of colonies in several countries, which have been ascribed to a variety of causes (disease; management; pesticide exposure etc). Bees provide an essential pollination service for crops and wild plants in sustainable agriculture. Bee products, such as honey, wax and propolis also have a substantial international market. It is therefore essential that we develop a comprehensive understanding of bees' responses to diseases, parasites and the rapidly changing environment if we are to predict their future health and survival. This understanding is vital for informing hive and landscape management strategies to ensure that the sustainability of populations can be maintained. Bees living in agricultural landscapes must respond to sudden changes in forage availability over time and space whilst dealing with a variety of diseases, parasites and other potential stressors resulting from management of the landscape (such as exposure to pesticides). Most previous studies have focussed either on the effect of disease, parasites, or hive management on bees; or on the influence of foraging resources. This joint project, between Rothamsted and Warwick HRI in partnership with Syngenta, takes a novel ecological systems-based approach of combining the different factors that are likely to affect honeybee survival, using modelling tools to allow prediction in different landscapes and under different conditions, and allowing the exploration of interactions between factors. A) We will firstly do a systematic survey and assessment of patterns within the substantial datasets and models that are available to us on honeybee colony growth and survival in response to pathogens (e.g. viruses), parasites (e.g. Varroa destructor mites) and other pests. We will also collate and develop models that predict forager distributions. B) Focusing on the factors most likely to be important from the pattern analysis, we will then develop a new individual-based model to predict colony growth and survival by incorporating the potentially interacting effects of disease or parasite load, landscape type and resource availability. This integrated model will be built to test the hypothesis that honeybee colony growth and survival can be predicted from the combined influence of pathogens and parasites and the effects of landscape factors such as food availability. C) Field experiments designed to measure the interaction between disease and forage availability will be performed to allow the model to be tested and the outputs to be verified. The results of these experiments, and the modelling, will provide us with an insight into the varying significance of disease and resource-related factors on the survival of bees in arable landscapes, and allow us to predict the bees' response to changes in farming practices or disease thresholds. We are not alone in addressing the challenge of what is affecting honeybee populations across the world. In contrast to other studies - our proposal is to integrate the usually separate disciplines of studying foraging behaviour outside the hive with what is affecting the bees within the hive in order to provide a practical tool which should enable us to predict how bee colonies will respond in terms of foraging patterns and colony growth in a variety of cropped landscapes. This project aims to capitalise on previous BBSRC-funded work by the applicants, which has examined the effects of landscapes on bee foraging behaviour and survival. This work will substantially increase our ability to predict and manipulate the impacts of agricultural practices and beekeeping management on these essential and economically important pollinators.

Technical Summary

For Obj 1: Systematically scan existing datasets and models showing the effects of pathogens and parasites on honeybee colony growth and survival. This pattern analysis will identify key parameters and interactions for building a model of the effect of varroa, viruses, other diseases and hive management on colony development and survival. For Obj 2: Experimentally examine the distribution of honeybee foragers away from colonies with differing 'health' status (using mark-re-observation, waggle dance analysis and pollen analysis) to measure the effect of disease or parasite load on foraging behaviour patterns. Results will be used to build a forager model (Obj 3). For Obj 3: Compile existing data to build a model, based on energetic and behavioural parameters, to predict how honeybee foragers utilise the landscape when resources are patchy. This model can be used as a standalone output to predict the distribution of bees in the landscape; but it will also be used in Obj 4. For Obj 4: Develop a novel integrated model which combines effects of 'within hive' regulation (diseases etc) with the effects of landscape factors (forage availability) on the survival and strength of honeybee colonies. The model will be developed using an individual-based approach (IBM), using the colony model and forager model (from 1 & 3 above) and will provide a tool for predicting honeybee colony survival and resource utilisation under different conditions. For Obj 5: Experimentally test the relative importance of, and interaction between, disease load and food availability on honeybee colony growth and strength. Experiments will involve placing colonies of different known disease/parasite load in the field and giving them differential access to foraging resources. Colony development will be monitored through the season to examine which factors are most influential in affecting colony growth. Results will be used to validate the model from Obj 4.
 
Description Current widespread concerns about honeybee health and survival mean it is essential that we develop a comprehensive understanding of their responses to diseases, parasites, forage and pesticides if we are to predict and manage their health and survival. This joint project between Rothamsted and Warwick, in partnership with Syngenta, took a novel ecological systems-based approach, using models and experiments, to explore and predict the relative importance of, and interactions between, the multitude of factors that affect colony strength and survival in arable landscapes. We integrated the usually separate disciplines of foraging behaviour studies outside the hive with what affects bees within the hive.

BEEHAVE:
We evaluated published honeybee models: none considered the multitude of important environmental variables - and this was published as a review (Becher et al 2013).

We designed and built a new integrated model, BEEHAVE, incorporating 1) honeybee colony dynamics, 2) varroa mite and virus dynamics, 3) foraging dynamics and 4) a spatially explicit representation of the landscape. BEEHAVE can be used to predict the survival and strength of a colony over time in response to different levels of disease, forage availability or pesticide exposure (for example). It is based on difference equations and the foraging sub-module is agent-based. Full sensitivity analyses and validation have been done. BEEHAVE with a detailed model description and user manual will be published with open access to the code (Becher et al 2014). It is a practical tool with a user-friendly interface that is available to scientists, beekeepers and other stakeholders to compare scenarios of management and environmental change.

We collected experimental evidence of the interacting effects of varroa load, viral load and forage availability on honeybee colony survival in arable landscapes. We demonstrated that varroa load had the greatest effect on survival, although access to forage also affected colony growth, and could mitigate the effects of high varroa loads.

We have achieved the aims of the project: providing insight into the significance of disease and resource-related factors on bee survival, and a model to predict bee's responses to changes in farming practices or disease thresholds. In summary, BEEHAVE simulations and landscape scale experiments show that 1) of the factors tested so far, varroa load is most critical to colony health; 2) if colonies in UK arable farmland do not "capitalise" on major nectar flows, then their chances of survival through winter are low; 3) availability of plentiful forage can potentially mitigate against the effects of varroa.

Scientific outputs include a review of honeybee models (Becher et al 2013); publication of the BEEHAVE model (Becher et al 2014), a book chapter (Grimm et al 2014); a commentary on multi-factorial bee stressors (Osborne 2012); co-authorship on a paper indirectly linked to this project, measuring immune function and disease susceptibility in honeybees (Bull et al 2012), and a subsequent paper using BEEHAVE to simulate the effects of forage availability on bee colonies (Horn et al 2015).
Exploitation Route Since completing the project, the BEEHAVE model is being used by industry, academia, educators, beekeepers and regulatory bodies to develop its potential for prediction of the effects of multiple stressors on honeybee colonies.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment

URL http://www.beehave-model.net
 
Description We utilised a systems ecology approach to produce the BEEHAVE model (Becher et al 2014), to be used by scientists, beekeepers, industry and landowners to explore the effects of land management and disease on honeybee colonies, with the aim that it would become a central tool in the consideration of evidence in the topical debate about how to improve and sustain the health of pollinator populations. The project has resulted in substantial public engagement; liaison with political decision-makers and good interactions with industrial stakeholders, all of which increase the impact of the outcomes amongst groups who make decisions about policy and land management, as well as those keeping honeybee colonies. The publication of the Becher models has resulted in the following impact so far: 1) Regulators BEEHAVE was presented to the Pesticide Working Group of EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) in 2015, who carried out "a stepwise evaluation of the BEEHAVE simulation model with a view to assessing its suitability for use in a regulatory context and for risk assessment of multiple stressors at the landscape level." The 90 page report (EFSA Journal, 2015) stated that "The Panel recommends that BEEHAVE should be adopted as the basis for modelling the impact on honeybee colonies of pesticides and other stressors". The EPA (Environment Protection Agency) in USA is also considering use of BEEHAVE for pesticide regulation. 2) Industry BEEHAVE is being used by three agrochemical industries to explore and model exposure of bees to pesticides (Syngenta, Bayer, BASF) 3) Beekeepers We ran three workshops for beekeepers, teaching them how to use BEEHAVE; loaded a bespoke beekeeper interface to the website; developed the BEEMAPP app for their use and publicised the work in the national bee press. Several beekeepers are now advocates. 4) Education BEEHAVE is being used as a virtual classroom in two courses in higher Education Colleges in the USA. 5) Academics in the USA, France, Germany and the UK are using BEEHAVE and the Facebook group has over 100 followers keen to use it to test different scenarios of honeybee hive management. 6) Policy-makers and land managers: These key stakeholder groups have highlighted the need for tools to demonstrate how land management options impact on pollinators, so future development of the models will be for use by those advising on, and implementing, habitat management in policy and practice. For this impact work we were awarded the BBSRC Innovator of the Year Award for Social Impact in 2017
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Citation in EFSA publication on importance of BEEHAVE model in building regulatory framework on multiple stressors for bees
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Improving the regulatory environment for pesticides and other environmental stressors by incorporating a systems modelling approach. BEEHAVE is being used as the basis of the EFSA conceptual model
URL http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0048969716320587/1-s2.0-S0048969716320587-main.pdf?_tid=18c0f7dc-04b0-11e7-af...
 
Description EFSA Report: Evaluation of BEEHAVE model for use in assessing the effects of multiple stressors, including pesticides, on bees
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/4125
 
Description Expert advice at Bee Health Summit on the National Pollinator Strategy, Westminster
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The National Pollinator Strategy has been published and is being implemented over the next 5 years to promote and conserve pollinator communities
 
Description Invited Experts EFSA Workshop on assessing BEEHAVE as a tool for risk assessment
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Pollinator for Policy Workshop, London 2012
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact This workshop contributed to the development of the National Pollinator Strategy for the UK
 
Title BEEHAVE model 
Description BEEHAVE integrates colony dynamics, population dynamics of the varroa mite, epidemiology of varroa-transmitted viruses and allows foragers in an agent-based foraging model to collect food from a representation of a spatially explicit landscape. It is hoped that BEEHAVE has the potential to predicting colony dynamics and potential losses with and without varroa mites under different foraging conditions and under pesticide application. BEEHAVE offers a valuable tool for researchers to design and focus field experiments, for regulators to explore the relative importance of stressors to devise management and policy advice and for beekeepers to understand and predict varroa dynamics and effects of management interventions. We expect that scientists and stakeholders will find a variety of applications for BEEHAVE, stimulating further model development and the possible inclusion of other stressors of potential importance to honeybee colony dynamics. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2013 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The BEEHAVE model is being used by regulators, policy makers, industry, beekeepers and academics for a variety of purposes. In particular it has been evaluated for us in the regulatory framework for assessing environmental risk to honeybees by EFSA. In USA the EPA are also evaluating it. 
URL http://www.beehave-model.net
 
Title BEESCOUT model 
Description BEESCOUT is a spatially explicit model, to theoretically examine how bees might explore a landscape and distribute their scouting activities over time and space. An image file can be imported, which is interpreted by the model as a "forage map" with certain colours representing certain crops or habitat types as specified by the user. BEESCOUT calculates the size and location of these potential food sources in that landscape relative to a bee colony. An individual-based model then determines the detection probabilities of the food patches by bees, based on parameter values gathered from the flight patterns of honeybees and bumblebees. Various "search modes" describe hypothetical search strategies for the long-range exploration of scouting bees. The resulting detection probabilities of forage patches can be used as input for the recently developed honeybee model BEEHAVE, to explore realistic scenarios of colony growth and death in response to different stressors. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Still in progress 
URL http://www.beehave-model.net
 
Description IPA partnership: Industrial Partner 
Organisation Syngenta International AG
Department Syngenta Ltd (Bracknell)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution I was the PI of this Industrial Partnership Award, and we designed and carried out the research, and published it.
Collaborator Contribution Syngenta contributed funds towards the project, and ideas on design and implementation. They benefited from the results and are still using the BEEHAVE model that was created
Impact Becher et al (2013) J Applied Ecology Becher et al (2014) J Applied Ecology
Start Year 2009
 
Title BEEHAVE 
Description BEEHAVE integrates colony dynamics, population dynamics of the varroa mite, epidemiology of varroa-transmitted viruses and allows foragers in an agent-based foraging model to collect food from a representation of a spatially explicit landscape. It is hoped that BEEHAVE has the potential to predicting colony dynamics and potential losses with and without varroa mites under different foraging conditions and under pesticide application. BEEHAVE offers a valuable tool for researchers to design and focus field experiments, for regulators to explore the relative importance of stressors to devise management and policy advice and for beekeepers to understand and predict varroa dynamics and effects of management interventions. We expect that scientists and stakeholders will find a variety of applications for BEEHAVE, stimulating further model development and the possible inclusion of other stressors of potential importance to honeybee colony dynamics. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2013 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Two papers, three presentations, several workshops on the application of BEEHAVE. EFSA review (2015) of whether BEEHAVE is suitable to develop for risk assessment of multiple stressors. Concluded that it should be developed for such use. 
URL http://beehave-model.net/
 
Title BEEMAPP 
Description An App for mapping the location of bee forage resources in a landscape, around an apiary or farm 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Used to encourage beekeepers and farmers to examine how useful the landscape is for bee foraging. Results can be used as data input files in the BEEHAVE honeybee colony dynamics model. 
URL http://beehave-model.net
 
Description BEEHAVE validation meeting UFZ 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact A meeting of BEEHAVE users from industry (Bayer, Syngenta, BASF) and academia to discuss the validation of the model with existing data set and future changes to the model.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description BEEHAVE workshop for key stakeholders, supported by NERC Impact Accelerator 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact highly interactive workshop training people to use BEEHAVE model. Sparked numerous enquiries about further workshops and development of model for policy making

Workshop has stimulated discussion on future use of the model in policy making, education, and beekeeping
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://beehave-model.net
 
Description Bee Craft article: Knapp, J (Feb 2015). 'Virtual Beekeeping!', BeeCraft, Vol 97 No 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An article in Bee Craft explaining our BEEHAVE model of honeybee colony dynamics to the beekeeping community. It resulted in several people attending our workshop at the Annual Beekeepers Spring Convention, to learn how to use this too.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description EU CREAM Workshop: Model clinic 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Matthias Becher ran a model clinic - workshop for attendees of the EU CREAM workshop - a Marie Curie Training Network on 'Mechanistic Effect Models for Ecological Risk Assessment of Chemicals'. Some of the attendees have continued to use the BEEHAVE model after the event
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description EURBEE 2014: BEEHAVE: modelling multifactorial causes of honeybee colony losses 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented talk and interactive workshop, as part of the 'effects of stressors on the behaviour of bee pollinators' at the 6th EurBee Conference; Murcia Spain. Enthusiastic academic participants keen to use BEEHAVE in future research

None to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description EURBEE 2014: Foraging efficiency driving the impacts of stressors on honeybee (Apis mellifera) colony performance: insights form the integrated model BEEHAVE? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented talk as part of the 'advancing bee health' section at the 6th EurBee Conference, Murcia, Spain

Invitations to collaborate on using BEEHAVE for applied purposes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description EURBEE 5: Presentation at 5th European Conference of Apidology, 2012, Halle, Germany (1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Matthias Becher gave presentation at EURBEE 5 conference entitled 'BEEHAVE: a model integrating colony dynamics, foraging and parasites.' Considerable interest in BEEEHAVE model for academic use
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description EURBEE 5: Presentation at 5th European Conference of Apidologie, 2012, Halle Germany (2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Pete Kennedy gave presentation at EURBEE 5 conference entitled 'The combined effects of Varroa and forage availability on honeybee colony development and survival'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description European Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology, Nottingham, July 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The activity was a presentation on BEEHAVE, Bumble-BEEHAVE and Beescout. Purpose was to showcase the models to a mathematical modelling audience and gain specialist feedback. The results were that the talk in a parallel session attracted 30 participants, raising questions and discussions and the abstract would have reached 850 participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.ecmtb2016.org/
 
Description Hands-on demonstration to joint Cornwall & West Cornwall Beekeepers' convention (BOAD) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A hands-on demonstration & stand introducing the BeeHave model to explore the impact of multiple stressors on honeybee colony development & survival. Encouraging direct participation and exploration of the model at the joint Cornwall & West Cornwall Beekeepers convention (BOAD 2014) and equipping the audience to utilise the model at their leisure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Host: South West Bee Disease and Husbandry Day May15 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Busy and full day of training sessions, workshops and talks delivered by Bee Inspectors. My Research Team showed posters and hosted the event, explaining research from various projects to 65 beekeepers

Much better awareness of our research group at the ESI, Penryn. And our research team have better knowledge of regional beekeepers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description IUSSI: Presentation at XVI Congress of the International Union for the Study of Social Insects, Denmark 2010 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Matthias Becher gave presentation at IUSSI Congress entitled 'Honeybee population dynamics: finding the interactions between hive and landscape factors.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description Invited Seminar Talk at University of Guelph, Canada; 15.02.2018 Bumble-BEEHAVE: An agent-based population model for bumble bees and its application as a decision tool for farmers. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited seminar talk on modelling bees (BEEHAVE, Bumble-BEEHAVE, Bee-Steward) at the University of Guelph. Audience: Students and staff, ca. 20, plus video live stream
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.uoguelph.ca/ses/events/2018/02/ses-seminar-guest-dr-matthias-becher
 
Description Invited Seminar Talk at University of Ontario, Canada; 14.02.2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited seminar talk on modelling bees (BEEHAVE, Bumble-BEEHAVE, Bee-Steward) at the University of Ontario/Institute of Technology. Audience: Students and staff, ca. 20
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited Talk at APHA modelling symposium 25th January 2017, APHA Weybridge, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited talk at the APHA modelling symposium, addressing the use of the BEEHAVE honeybee model to simulate the potential impact of of the invasive Asian hornet. The presentation led to an intensive discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited talk at the Cornwall Beekeepers Association AGM on current bee research within our group. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk to the Cornwall Beekeeping Association on "Bee research on the Penryn campus" introducing the diversity of projects currently engaged in and stimulating discussion of the bee models developed & under development, multiple factors affecting bee survival & development in a changing & patchy landscape, and current concern about pesticides.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited talk at the West Cornwall Beekeepers Association AGM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An invited talk to the West Cornwall Beekeepers Association about the current bee research within our research group, including introduction of current bee models, their application, the impact of multiple stressors on colony survival and development, and how spatial & temporary heterogeneity in the landscape affects this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Online media article: Hortweek 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Online media article in response to publication of BEEHAVE model
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.hortweek.com/virtual-bees-help-understanding-colony-collapse-researchers-say/edibles/arti...
 
Description Online media article: 'New computer model could preserve the world's bee colonies' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact One of several sites that picked up the press release on publication of BEEHAVE
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113086906/honey-bee-colonies-preserved-computer-model-030414/
 
Description Online media article: 'Virtual Bees' Western Morning News 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Online media article in Western Morning News as a result of publication of BEEHAVE model
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Virtual-bees-help-unravel-complex-causes-colony/story-20745893-d...
 
Description Online media article: 'Virtual Bees' on Science Newsline 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Online media article after publication of BEEHAVE model
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.sciencenewsline.com/news/2014030414220004.html
 
Description Online media article: 'Virtual bees help to unravel microbial and other causes of colony decline' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Online article as a result of publication of BEEHAVE model
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.microbeworld.org/component/jlibrary/?view=article&id=12004
 
Description Online media article: 'Virtual bees help unravel complex causes of colony decline' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Online media article as a result of publishing BEEHAVE model
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304094843.htm
 
Description Presentation at the National Honey Show 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at the National Honey Show 2019 in Esher, audience: ca. 70 people, mainly beekeepers and researchers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.honeyshow.co.uk/
 
Description Press Release on launch of BEEHAVE model 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Press release by BBSRC, University of Exeter, Rothamsted Research and Syngenta when BEEHAVE model was published in Journal of Applied Ecology. Considerable interest from individuals and stakeholder organisatins
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140304-pr-virtual-bees-unravel-causes-of-decline/
 
Description RIFCON modelling workshop 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I had a three hours slot on a two days workshop on mechanistic effect modelling at the consulting company RIFCON (Germany) for a presentation and exercises on our bee models. There were 8 participants and ca. 6 employees involved.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.rifcon.de/en/workshop
 
Description Re-branding and design on the BEEHAVE website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The activity was the facilitation of the re-branding and design of www.beehave-model.net, along with monthly blogs on updates on the model, conferences and meetings and the latest research using the models (GTD). Purpose was to provide online information about the models (BEEHAVE, Beescout, Bumble-BEEHAVE), a place to download the models and their associated documentation and articles. Results were that the new website was launched in August 2016. impact was that since September 2016- 1,605 users and 4,573 page views 490 different users on the download page, Blogs on the News page 226 users and 368 page views. Views from all over the world.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL http://www.beehave-model.net
 
Description Rolling out of School Lesson pack for Secondary Biology Key Stage 4 2017-2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact We have been rolling out of National Curriculum resources (GTD lead, RS and JK) Funded by Exeter using the bee-groups research.These are 2 double lesson school packs with resources, PowerPoint and lesson plan. One on "Interdependence in Ecosystems, and the role of pollinators in farmed landscapes" and one on "Land Campaign- what factors can influence decisions about allocating land usage and what is the environmental impact of this".The purpose was to link the bee-groups research to the national curriculum provide high quality and relevant resources for inspiring and engaging biology lessons.Results were that the lesson plan boxes being used as flagship resources across schools in the South-west. The most important impact was that copies of both lesson plan boxes created for outreach in Devon and Somerset delivered by Exeter Streatham Campus..Impact was that a great deal of interest in using the boxes for a range of activities. Used to showcase at teacher events and as the flagship lesson plan resource for the Next Steps South west widening participant program. Used for year 9th at Brannel School (23/11/2017) by the outreach team to ~100 pupils.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://nextstepssw.ac.uk/resource-boxes/
 
Description SETAC Conference: Presentation at North American 32nd Annual Meeting, Boston, USA 2011 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Dr Matthias Becher gave presentation at SETAC conference (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) entitled modelling honey bees: Colony dynamics, foraging and parasites. Considerable interest in BEEEHAVE model for risk assessment
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description SETAC World Congress: Presentation, Berlin, Germany 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Dr Matthias Becher gave presentation at SETAC conference (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) entitled 'The decline of the honey bee: A modelling approach'. Considerable interest in BEEEHAVE model for risk assessment
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Science Breakfast Seminar: for MEPs at European Parliament, Brussels, 2011 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Juliet Osborne was invited to give a Science Breakfast Seminar to Members of the European Parliament and their researchers; highlighting bee declines. She also had consultations with MEPS after the event to advise on policies affecting bee survival and pollination
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Science Correspondent for professional practioners' newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Recurring activity: Science Correspondent for beekeepers association newsletter writing regular pieces on recent research insights and current scientific literature.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Seminar Talk at Fields Institute, Toronto, Canada; 23.01.2018 Individual-based models to simulate the effects of multiple stressors in bees 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar talk at Mathematical Institute of the University of Toronto, audience ca. 20 (post-doctoral) fellows plus live stream on internet
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/talks/Individual-based-models-to-simulate-effects-multiple-stressors-b...
 
Description Talk at Enys Bee fayre, August 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The activity was a talk on using the cutting-edge computer models at the ESI for bee research. The purpose was to share the groups research with the local community and resulted in talk attracted participants from a range of backgrounds with questions and discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk at Newton Abbott Bee Keepers Association 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Rosalind Shaw gave a talk called "Bee research in Salisbury and beyond" including results from Wessex BESS WP4 looking at pollination in oilseed rape, and with a section on the BEEHAVE model. Fliers about BEEHAVE and how to download it were distributed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk at the National Honey Show 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk presented within the BeeCraft lecture programme at the National Honey Show 2013 on "Studying the effects of multiple stressors on honeybee colony development and survival".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Talk: Food and Health: Interactions between Honeybee Disease and Foraging Behaviour 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation keynote/invited speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk to the Dorset Beekeepers Association Annual Meeting

Awareness of research and importance of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk: Honeybee and Bumblebee Ecology and Pollination 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk to the Annual Meeting of the West Cornwall Beekeepers 'A bit of a Do'

Much great regional awareness of research and importance of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop on Bumble-BEEHAVE and Beescout at the ESI Showcase, May 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The activity was a workshop on the bee groups models BEEHAVE, Bumble-BEEHAVE and Beescout (MB, GTD, TP). The purpose was to showcase the groups models, advances in research and stakeholder engagement and to gain feedback from other academics and the public. The results were that we showed a range of participants the bee models with demos and discussion. The impact was that the models and its applications with stakeholder engagement showcased to Professor Nick Talbot (Deputy Vice chancellor of the University of Exeter) and Professor Dame Georgina Mace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.exeter.ac.uk/esi/news/title_517512_en.html