Susceptibility

Lead Research Organisation: John Innes Centre
Department Name: Contracts Office

Abstract

Plant recognition and response processes are modulated so that plants become susceptible to colonisation. To promote colonisation, pathogens and pests produce virulence factors, called effectors, which interact with specific plant targets to re-programme plant pathways, a process referred to as effector-triggered susceptibility. Effectors include proteins, mimics of plant hormones and non-proteinaceous toxins28. Some effectors induce dramatic developmental changes in plants, such as pustules, galls and witch’s brooms that provide a local habitat for the pests or pathogens and that promote their dispersal. In other cases, particularly in beneficial symbiotic associations, signal exchange between the microbe and the plant activates developmental processes that facilitate colonisation of the host plant. With the knowledge that we have already generated on effectors, their targets and associated signalling processes, we are in a unique position to investigate the specificities of effector-target interactions and the signalling pathways activated to regulate downstream processes that eventually promote plant colonisation.

Research on effectors has not only led to a better understanding of the biology of colonisers, but has also uncovered important plant processes. For example, effectors led to the discovery of plant factors that mediate cell identity and cell division31-34, identification of plant transcription factors with dual roles in plant development and plant defence responses and the elucidation of novel components of intra- and intercellular trafficking processes. We will investigate the functions of these plant factors targeted by effectors and use this new knowledge to manipulate the balance between defence responses and yield, resistance to necrotrophic versus biotrophic pathogens, and responses to harmful versus beneficial organisms.

We have shown that a wide range of factors have major impacts on the outcome of plant-biotic interactions. For example, higher temperatures can increase susceptibility to pathogens and affect interactions with beneficial non-symbiotic diazotrophic soil bacteria. In addition, soil Pseudomonas spp. modulate plant defence responses that directly and indirectly affect plant interactions with pathogens, pests and symbionts and plant growth. However, it is not clear how signals from the environment ultimately define the outcome of plant-biotic interactions. Uncovering these mechanisms will be important for understanding how alterations in the environment, such as climate change, will impact on susceptibility to plant pathogens and pests and the ability of plants to establish interactions with symbionts.

Organisations

Publications

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publication icon
Rosas-Diaz T (2018) A virus-targeted plant receptor-like kinase promotes cell-to-cell spread of RNAi. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

publication icon
Rosas-Diaz T (2018) A virus-targeted plant receptor-like kinase promotes cell-to-cell spread of RNAi. in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

 
Title A biologist's poem 
Description This 'real and singular thing'. A piece of code in its own genome. A copy from the past, multipliable, repeatable, yet mutable. You couldn't help feeling that you had stolen this sequence from its owner. You had transferred a piece of life into the human consciousness. with apologies to Wim Wenders /w @SaskiaHogenhout 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Positive feedback on social media 
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/170774045435/a-biologists-poem
 
Title I Will Survive (biotroph remix) 
Description A plant pathology inspired song. I Will Survive (biotroph remix) [with apologies to Gloria Gaynor] Oh, no, not I I will survive Oh, as long as I know how to infect you I'll stay alive I've got all my life to live I've got all my spores to give And I'll survive I will survive, hey, hey 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact >15K impressions on social media and ~250 engagements 
URL https://twitter.com/KamounLab/status/1098214166723215361
 
Description Obj. 3.1. Discovery and specificity of effector-target interactions:
We made excellent progress achieving this objective for divergent plant pests and symbionts, including viruses, bacteria, oomycetes and aphids.
- We used the geminivirus C4 protein (effector) to identify that the host receptor-like kinases BAM1 and BAM2 mediate the cell-to-cell transport of small RNAs.
- Wee found that 14 effectors of the obligate bacterial pathogen Phytoplasma interact with a range of plant transcription factors that have fundamental roles in regulating plant development.
- Plant targets of 4 aphid effectors were identified. These plant targets have as yet unknown functions in plants.
- The Irish potato famine pathogen, an oomycete, targets the plant autophagy machinery; these interactions take place at the pathogen-host membrane interface.
- We have determined the crystal structure of a complex between an allele of the M. oryzae effector protein AVR-Pik and its host cell target, sHMA1 (small Heavy Metal Associated domain protein 1) using X-ray crystallography. Further, we have determined the binding affinities of AVR-Pik effector alleles for the target protein, establishing that all bind in the nano-molar range. A manuscript on these interactions is being drafted.
- We have determined the crystal structure of host (rice) Exo70, a component of the Exocyst machinery, in complex with the M. oryzae effector protein AVR-Pii. This work defines the interface between these proteins, and will be the subject of mutagenesis to validate the interaction and investigate protein affinities. Further, the structure of AVR-Pii establishes a zinc-finger fold as a scaffold for plant pathogen effectors. We will investigate the extent to which proteins may adopt this fold in fungal plant pathogen secretomes, to establish its prevalence.

Obj. 3.2. Mechanisms of establishment and maintenance of plant-biotic interactions:
We used discoveries of obj. 3.1 to better understand how the divergent pests colonize plants.
- For the geminivirus, we showed that the C4 protein targets these receptors at plasmodesmata during an infection and interferes with the movement of siRNAs, thus suppressing host defense against the virus.
- For Phytoplasma, we demonstrated that the phytoplasma effector SAP05 is part of a large effector family present in divergent phytoplasmas. The SAP05 family members differentially degrade two families of plant transcription factors via interactions with a ubiquitin receptor. The latter is required for symptom development by Phytoplasma. Phytoplasma effector degradation of one of the two transcription factor families promotes fecundity of Phytoplasma insect vectors. This important because an increase in the number if insect vectors is likely to promote phytoplasma spread.
- In the aphid project, we made progress with the characterization of the aphid effector targets and elucidated plant processes not described previously and that affect aphid colonization of leaves. Moreover, for one target we have evidence of its involvement in plant interactions with other sap-feeding insects, including whitefly, psyllids, leafhoppers and planthoppers.
- Finally, for the oomycete, we showed that host autophagy machinery is diverted to the pathogen interface to mediate focal defense responses against the Irish potato famine pathogen.

Beyond building on achievements of Obj. 3.1, we uncovered plant pathways involved in colonization by bacteria (Rhizobium) and symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza).
- For Rhizobium, we identified two plant genes encoding vacuolar iron transporters that are important for establishing the symbiosis between the model legume Medicago and Rhizobium bacteria. One gene (VTL4) is expressed early during symbiosis and affects the infection process, whereas the other gene (VTL8) is expressed later and is critical for the bacteria to obtain nitrogen-fixing competency. We also found that the electron transport components from plant organelles can functionally replace their electron transfer counterparts in bacteria to support nitrogenase activity. This may simplify our synthetic biology approach to engineer nitrogen fixation in plants, since endogenous electron transport chains present in plant organelles can function to transfer electrons to nitrogenase.
- For mycorrhiza, we identified three Mlo homologues induced by mycorrhiza in barley. Working with barley, wheat and Medicago truncatula, we have confirmed the bifunctional role of mlo in both powdery mildew and mycorrhizal interactions. We are currently performing transcriptomics to evaluate potential conserved mechanisms influenced by mlo during parasitism and symbiosis.

Progress was made with investigations of bacterial and fungal pathogens, as follows:
- For studying Pseudomonas bacteria, we established a collaboration with Xiufang Xin (CEPAMS) to examine the role of bacterial EPS in facilitating 'water soaking' during early-stage Pto infections. Moreover, we defined the regulation of the osmo-/desiccation stress molecules trehalose and alpha-glucan during plant association.
- For a fungal pathogen, we discovered that a QTL for increased susceptibility to infection by Fusarium is coincident with that for the presence of trichomes on the spikelets of Brachypodium. We had previously shown that trichomes act as sites for initial infection and the new finding supports the role of these structures as points of entry for the fungus. We have identified a very promising candidate gene that we believe is controlling trichome development and are in the process of cloning this.
- Finally, using biochemical analysis and proteomics, we showed that the hemiparasite Viscum album (mistletoe) is the first reported multicellular eukaryote that lacks respiratory complex I, an iron-rich protein complex in the mitochondria. A decreased capacity for mitochondrial ATP production is compensated by increased glycolytic carbon flux, which is likely an adaptation to its parasitic life style (Maclean et al 2018 Current Biology).


Obj. 3.3: Environmental factors impacting plant-biotic interactions:
- We investigated the modulation of plant immunity by seasonal signals. We found that a common signalling module act to coordinate growth and defense responses in response to light and temperature cues.
- We also found evidence that Chevallier and Tipple barley cultivars recruit phenotypically distinct populations of Pseudomonas bacteria. Subsequently, we have developed methods to compare barley root colonisation by distinct P. fluorescens genotypes. Gene loci involved in selective colonisation by P. fluorescens are currently being mapped in a Chevallier x Tipple barley F7 population.


Obj. 3.4: Applications for improved crop performance:
- Investigations of the plant targets of aphid effectors as described above are being pursued in collaboration with the industrial partner SESVanderHave. Promising leads to improve sugar beet resistances to insects were identified. This knowledge is being exploited for obtaining resistance to aphids in other crops via a parallel project funded by the KEC Innovation Fund. The writing of patent applications has started.
- We generated CRISPR/Cas9 mutations in candidate blast fungus susceptibility S genes in barley and wheat, and initiated pathogenicity assays on the mutant plants.
- The requirement to maintain balanced expression of a large number of gene products represents a major challenge to the engineering of nitrogen fixation in cereal crops. We have explored a polyprotein strategy to reduce gene numbers and achieve balanced expression of protein components required for nitrogenase biosynthesis and activity. This strategy has potential advantages, not only for transferring nitrogen fixation to plants, but also the engineering of other complex systems of profound agronomic and ecological importance.
Exploitation Route As described in Obj. 3.4 above, we employ various strategies to improve crop resistance to plant pathogens and pests and we actively collaborate with the seed breeding industry to exploit our findings. We also collaborate with various agrochemical companies to identify novel ways to reduce pathogen and pest spread.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Retail

 
Description We have a LINK-award and iCASE studentship with SESVanderHave, an Industrial Partnership Award with Syngenta and an iCASE studentship with Oxitec. Knowledge generated in these projects have contributed to the development of technologies to obtain crop resistance to insect-transmitted pathogens and insect pests. The research has informed future directions in the companies involved in the projects. Some of our findings are being used for patent applications. The findings on mistletoe were reported in the New Scientist, Science online and several national newspapers in the UK and other European countries. Our work in theme 3 of the Plant Health ISP has led to two successful InnovateUK grants with a start-up company (Folium Science) to develop CRISPR-guided vector-based antimicrobial treatments against plant pathogenic bacteria. Folium currently employ two PDRAs supported by the InnovateUK funding, with a third due to begin in May. The company anticipates a further expansion into a dedicated lab on the NRP site in the next 10-15 months. The potential role of trichomes in Fusarium head blight susceptibility has been discussed with breeding companies and the identification of potential target genes provides a route to increase resistance to FHB and thereby reduce the risk of mycotoxins entering the food chain. Based on expertise of JIC scientists in insect-transmitted plant pathogens (e.g. Phytoplasma), sap-feeding insects (e.g. aphids and leafhoppers) and invasive fungi (ash dieback and wheat rusts), project leaders of this ISP were asked to lead a large consortium, named BRIGIT, that has the goal to mitigate the risk of outbreaks of the insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa in the UK. This pathogen was introduced into Europe and is destroying many plants, including trees, in Italy and France. The pathogen has been detected in several other European countries and there is a worry that it may destroy gardens and forests in the UK. BRIGIT is a transdisciplinary consortium involving scientists across the spectrums of genomics and social sciences, plant pathology and entomology, and molecular biology and ecology of 9 diverse UK research organisations, including the John Innes Centre, Forest Research England and Scotland, Fera Science Ltd., Royal Horticultural Society, Universities of Sussex, Salford and Sterling, National Museum of Wales, the NERC Centre of Ecology & Hydrology and Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA). The project employed an Impact and Engagement Manager at 0.8 FTE who is at the JIC and interacts with industry (e.g. nurseries), policy makers and assesses how the project outputs can inform these stakeholders and policy. Our work on applying gene editing to deliver blast fungus resistance in wheat involves close collaboration with Bangladeshi scientists. We organized a workshop on gene editing in Dhaka in February 2019 that was attended by ~50 scientists from 22 organizations, and led a series of public engagement events, including interviews and a meet the press event.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Retail
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description AHDB
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Advisory Committee Chair, International Congress of Plant Pathology (ICPP18) in Boston, MA
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact ICPP 2018 adopted the theme "Plant Health is Earth's Wealth" for ISPP 2013-2018 recognising that plant pathogens don't just threaten food security and well-being. They also affect, forest and fibre systems, natural ecosystems, biodiversity and environmental harmony, and impede trade and market access. And, phytopathology research has also been a central focus for discovery and development in biotechnology and plant-microbial molecular biology. For our profession - people are the pivotal element, and while in the coming years, the ISPP will maintain a focus on plant disease impacts on food security, it should and will also foster attention to all facets of our profession through our Congresses, subject matter committees and our website, newsletter and Journal. In this light, the ISPP taskforce on global food security which has more than achieved it objectives will now become a Commission working in the same way as other ISPP Subject Matter Committees. https://www.isppweb.org/newsletters/pdf/48_8.pdf One of the major outcomes was the proposal for a code of ethics for plant health emergencies: * to foster ethical conduct * to support communication and collaboration * to ensure that decisions are based on the best available evidence See https://www.isppweb.org/newsletters/pdf/48_12.pdf
URL https://www.isppweb.org/newsletters/pdf/48_8.pdf
 
Description CABANA External Advisory Committee
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact What is CABANA? CABANA is a capacity strengthening project for bioinformatics in Latin America. It aims to accelerate the implementation of data-driven biology in the region by creating a sustainable capacity-building programme focusing on three challenge areas - communicable disease, sustainable food production and protection of biodiversity. CABANA is orchestrated by an international consortium of ten organisations - nine in Latin America and one in the UK. CABANA is funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) - part of the UK Aid Budget - from October 2017 to December 2021.
URL http://www.cabana.online
 
Description Comment on Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruling-Organisms obtained by mutagenesis are GMOs and are, in principle, subject to the obligations laid down by the GMO Directive
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact This ruling ignores advances in plant bioediting that make this technology more precise than so-called "conventional mutagenesis". Bioediting can be also be used to recapitulate natural variations into cultivated varieties of crops. This ruling closes the door to many beneficial genetic modifications such as breeding of disease resistant plants that require much less pesticide input. A sad day for European plant science. Disseminated via Science Media centre and social media.
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/176262512395/comment-on-court-of-justice-of-the-european-union
 
Description Food safety
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology Science Advisory Board
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The GMI is part of the Vienna BioCenter (VBC), one of the leading international biomedical research centers worldwide that has established itself as the premier location for life sciences in Central Europe.
URL https://www.oeaw.ac.at/gmi/
 
Description Inst. Plant and Microbial Biology (IPMB), Academia Sinica, Taiwan, Science Advisory Board.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Academia Sinica is Taiwan's premier government-supported academic research institution, with 31 institutes and centers representing a wide range of disciplines in the sciences and humanities. It is located in the Nankang district, on the outskirts of metropolitan Taipei. One of the Life Sciences Institutes, The Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology (IPMB) has 26 fellows (professor equivalents) whose research follows one of two central themes: the mechanisms of plant functioning or plant-microbial interactions. Some 300 support staff consisting of specialists, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, Research Assistant and administrative personnel work under the research fellows. IPMB has modern infrastructure and equipment. An active education program is also set up, with Ph.D. students from the Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, or from their adjunct programs with National Taiwan University and National Central University. IPMB research fellows have previously made landmark discoveries in such areas as rice breeding and genomics, regeneration via tissue culture, virus satellite RNA, microbial circadian rhythm, etc. For a long time goal, we aim to improve the quality and quantity of research performance and achieve visibility in international scientific community. Over the past decade, IPMB has undergone a major reorganization and rejuvenation, and has added a number of outstanding junior fellows.
 
Description Journals 2.0: a roadmap to reinvent scientific publishing
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Promoted preprints and open science and a different, more sustainable, form of scientific publishing therefore accelerating the dissemination of science and reducing the exorbitant costs of scientific publishing. This vision describes a radically different publishing model that would reinvent the concept of a scientific journal into a live and open forum of scientific debate and analysis. This model centers on a full integration of the preprint ecosystem into the journal interface. The journal would only accept submission of articles that have been posted as preprints. All evaluations and commissioned reviews of submitted articles would be published as soon as received on the journal website and linked to the preprint version. Editors would operate as always sifting through submitted papers and seeking external reviewers when necessary. But they will also consider author-led and community crowdsourced reviews, which would be appended to the preprint. As the reviews accumulate and revisions are submitted, the journal editors would initiate a consultation process, and when satisfied with a given version promote it to a formal article. The editor's role becomes more akin to moderator than gatekeeper. The process doesn't have to be static. As the community further comments on the article and follow-up studies are published, editors may decide to commission synthetic review or commentary articles to address emerging issues. I would also envision that the paper is linked to related articles in a "knowledge network" database, and that article tags are revised to reflect new knowledge, e.g. "independently validated". The journal would therefore become less of a static repository of scientific articles, and more of a moderated forum of scientific discussion.
URL https://zenodo.org/record/1466784#.XH2SPi2cawQ
 
Description Point of view: wither pre-publication peer review to reinvent scientific publishing
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Promoted open science and preprints among the research community therefore resulting in more rapid dissemination of scientific findings.
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/178573217080/point-of-view-wither-pre-publication-peer-review
 
Description Project Leader of BRIGIT, a UK-wide consortium to mitigate the risks of Xylella fastidiosa outbreaks in the UK
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact The BRIGIT consortium includes people from various layers of government, charities, research institutes and industry. The writing of the BRIGIT proposal and activities within BRIGIT so far increased the knowledge of the consortium members about the Xylella pathosystem and how Xylella fastidiosa may spread in the UK and harm the environment. This is likely to influence future regulations to maximize protection of the UK environment.
URL https://www.jic.ac.uk/brigit/
 
Description UK-Canada Agrifood workshop
Geographic Reach North America 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact A research framework document for joint UK-Canada research projects was established for the Agrifood sector. This will result in joint funding opportunities and engagement with stakeholders. Additionally, a reciprocal workshop in Canada is currently being planned
 
Description Assess sugarbeet resistance to aphids
Amount £9,870 (GBP)
Organisation Sesvanderhave 
Sector Private
Country Belgium
Start 02/2019 
End 02/2020
 
Description BBSRC-IPA grant
Amount £1,316,000 (GBP)
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2021
 
Description CEPAMS Collaborative Grant
Amount £95,066 (GBP)
Organisation John Innes Centre 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 07/2020
 
Description Cash contribution to IPA grant
Amount £131,700 (GBP)
Organisation Syngenta International AG 
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2021
 
Description ERC Advanced Investigator
Amount € 2,500,000 (EUR)
Funding ID BLASTOFF 743165 
Organisation European Research Council (ERC) 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2022
 
Description Future Leader Fellowship awarded to Thomas Mathers
Amount £317,000 (GBP)
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 04/2021
 
Description Innovate UK Industrial Research grant
Amount £176,438 (GBP)
Funding ID 6921 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Institute Innovation Funds
Amount £124,000 (GBP)
Organisation John Innes Centre 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 12/2020
 
Description Novel blast resistant wheat varieties for Bangladesh by genome editing
Amount £603,518 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/P023339/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 04/2019
 
Description Plasmid manipulation of bacterial gene regulatory networks
Amount £485,682 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/R018154/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 09/2021
 
Description Productive and sustainable crop and ruminant agricultural systems
Amount £909,984 (GBP)
Funding ID 26527 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2019 
End 04/2021
 
Description The Royal Society International Exchanges Cost Share 2017 Japan (JSPS) award for overseas travel between collaborators in the UK and Japan
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Royal Society 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 03/2020
 
Description Zespri PhD Studentship
Amount $157,934 (NZD)
Organisation Zespri Group Limited 
Start 07/2018 
End 06/2021
 
Title Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) staining for Rubisco is an appropriate loading control for western blots from plant material 
Description Background - Having an adequate loading control for a western blot is essential for the interpretation of the results. There are two common loading control methods for western blots of proteins from plant material: (i) using specific antibodies to detect for a reference protein, such as actin, tubulin, or GAPDH (Li et al. 2011); and (ii) treating the membrane with Ponceau or Coomassie stains to assay the levels of a constitutively expressed protein, such as Rubisco (Zhang et al. 2017; Lim et al. 2018; Zhuo et al. 2014). Comparative studies in the mammalian biology field have determined that these loading control methods-antibody detection versus staining-are roughly equivalent in their linearity (Romero-Calvo et al. 2010; Wilender and Ekblad, 2011), and thus serve as comparable quality controls. In the plant biology field, it is sometimes debated as to whether staining for Rubisco is an appropriate loading control, due to the high abundance of this protein in the cell. Results - We undertook an experiment to determine whether the range of detection of staining for Rubisco is similar to that of antibody-based detection of a reference protein. We loaded total protein extract from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves transiently expressing GFP into a gel at a range of effective sample volumes, and the resulting western blot was treated with anti-GFP antibodies as well as stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) (Fig. 1a). Quantification of the GFP bands in the western blot and the Rubisco bands in the CBB stained membrane indicated that these detection methods have similar linear correlations between the loading volumes of total protein extract and the detectable band intensities (Fig. 1b). In addition, quantification of a random protein of lower abundance in the CBB stained membrane also showed similar linearity (Fig. 1b). Conclusions - These results indicate that CBB staining for Rubisco can be an appropriate loading control for western blots from plant material. This representative experiment is consistent with results from other western blot experiments that we routinely perform in our laboratory. 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Feedback from social media indicates it is useful to many others. 
URL https://zenodo.org/record/2557821#.XH2gji2cbYI
 
Title Golden-Gate compatible Magnaporthe oryzae transformation vectors 
Description Golden-Gate compatible vectors for Magnaporthe oryzae transformation. 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact 1/ Pennington, H.G., Youles, M., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Golden-Gate compatible Magnaporthe oryzae protoplast transformation vectors. Figshare. 2/ Pennington, H.G., Youles, M., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Golden-Gate compatible Magnaporthe oryzae protoplast transformation vectors. Figshare. Plasmids are available via AddGene. 
URL https://www.addgene.org/Sophien_Kamoun/
 
Title Insect cell based expression system 
Description We successfully setup insect cell (Sf9 cells)-based protein production system using the baculovirus bac-to-bac method. Different purification methods were tried out to obtain enough protein for crystallography. 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact At least two labs at JIC and TSL are using the system. 
 
Title Integrated analysis of global genetic datasets 
Description Reductive analysis of individual signalling pathways is inherently limited in its ability to fully explain the implications of e.g. environmental change on the global regulatory network of microorganisms. In order to enable a deeper understanding of these complex signalling networks we have developed a bioinformatic pipeline that enables the simultaneous consideration of several regulatory layers, at the whole-cell scale. Using the Hfq transcriptional/translational regulatory network in the model bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens as a test case, we used extensive 'omic-analyses to assess how hfq deletion affects mRNA abundance, translation and protein abundance. The subsequent, multi-level integration of these datasets enabled us to highlight discrete contributions by Hfq to gene regulation at different regulatory levels. This integrative approach to global signalling may be used to dissect individual signalling networks, or to understand how bacterial cells adapt to changes in their environments to a far greater resolution than is available using conventional molecular microbiology or individual 'omic analyses. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This analytical approach has been published (Analyzing the Complex Regulatory Landscape of Hfq-an Integrative, Multi-Omics Approach, L Grenga, G Chandra, G Saalbach, CV Galmozzi, G Kramer, JG Malone, Frontiers in microbiology 8, 1784), and is currently being adapted to examine the RimABK pathway, which forms the main focus of this project. This follow-on work will be published in 2018. 
URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2017.01784/full
 
Title Protein-protein interaction assays 
Description Protein-protein interaction assays to identify effector-host protein interactions 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Petre, B., Win, J., Menke, F.L.H., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Protein-protein interaction assays with effector-GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. In "Wheat Rust Diseases: Methods and Protocols", S. Periyannan, ed. Methods in Molecular Biology, 1659:85-98. 
 
Title The RenSeq method 
Description Sequence capture of R genes (RenSeq) is being broadly applied across multiple plant species to expand knowledge of plant immune repertoires. In updated methodology, we combined RenSeq with PacBio sequencing to achieve even better definition of angiosperm immune receptor repertoires 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Many genes that confer stem rust resistance in wheat have been cloned using this method. There was also a recent submission to Bioarxiv detailing the pan NLRome of Arabidopsis thalian- the corresponding paper has now been submitted to Cell - see https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/537001v1 
 
Description Aphid 
Organisation International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We sequenced and assembled the genome of the banana aphid, which is a big pest on banana in Kenya.
Collaborator Contribution The ICIPE partners provided banana aphid samples for sequencing.
Impact Genome sequences of banana aphid and other aphid species will be compared. There is an agreement of how to write this up for a publication.
Start Year 2017
 
Description BASF 
Organisation BASF
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Knowledge on pathways involved in resistance and susceptibility to Fusarium head blight (FHB). Knowledge on the use of model plant species to study FHB
Collaborator Contribution Knowledge on fungicide testing systems and high through put phenotyping
Impact Two iCASE studentships
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with Anna-Maria Botha-Oberholster 
Organisation University of Stellenbosch
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will sequence and annotate the genome of one clone of Diuraphis noxia, a serious pest of wheat in South Africa and many other countries worldwide
Collaborator Contribution Contributed frozen materials for D. noxio aphids
Impact We generated a genome assembly of D. noxia.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with Dr. Glen Powell 
Organisation East Malling Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We are sequencing and annotating the genome of the woolly apple aphid, a serious pest of apple trees
Collaborator Contribution The collaborator provided frozen aphids for genome and RNA sequencing
Impact We will obtain the complete genomes and transcriptomes of the woolly apple aphid, which is in a distinct clade in the aphid phylogenetic tree and useful for comparative genome analyses among aphids.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with Prof. Ryohei Terauchi 
Organisation John Innes Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise. Exchange of visits. The collaboration includes Mark Banfield, John Innes Centre.
Collaborator Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise. Exchange of visits.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration: genetics, plant pathology, plant biology, biochemistry, biophysics, genomics, bioinformatics. Royal Society International Exchanges. 2018. "Retooling rice immunity for resistance against rice blast disease". £12,000 Varden, F.A., Saitoh, H., Yoshino, K., Franceschetti, M., Kamoun, S., Terauchi, R., and Banfield, M.J. 2019. Cross-reactivity of a rice NLR immune receptor to distinct effectors from the blast pathogen leads to partial disease resistance. bioRxiv, doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/530675. Valent, B., Farman, M., Tosa, Y., Begerow, D., Fournier, E., Gladieux, P., Islam, M.T., Kamoun, S., Kemler, M., Kohn, L.M.8., Lebrun, M.H., Stajich, J.E., Talbot, N.J., Terauchi, R., Tharreau, D., Zhang, N. 2019. Pyricularia graminis-tritici is not the correct species name for the wheat blast fungus: response to Ceresini et al. (MPP 20:2). Molecular Plant Pathology, 20:173-179. De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Maqbool, A., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Kamoun, S., and Banfield, M.J. 2018. Polymorphic residues in rice NLRs expand binding and response to effectors of the blast pathogen. Nature Plants, 4:576-585. Bialas, A., Zess, E.K., De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Pennington, H.G., Yoshida, K., Upson, J.L., Chanclud, E., Wu, C.-H., Langner, T., Maqbool, A., Varden, F.A., Derevnina, L., Belhaj, K., Fujisaki, K., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Banfield, M.J., and Kamoun, S. 2018. Lessons in effector and NLR biology of plant-microbe systems. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, 31:34-45. Fujisaki, K., Abe, Y., Kanzaki, E., Ito, K., Utsushi, H., Saitoh, H., Bialas, A., Banfield, M., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2017. An unconventional NOI/RIN4 domain of a rice NLR protein binds host EXO70 protein to confer fungal immunity. bioRxiv, doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/239400. Kobayashi, M., Hiraka, Y., Abe, A., Yaegashi, H., Natsume, S., Kikuchi, H., Takagi, H., Saitoh, H., Win, J., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2017. Genome analysis of the foxtail millet pathogen Sclerospora graminicola reveals the complex effector repertoire of graminicolous downy mildews. BMC Genomics, 18:897. Bialas, A., Zess, E.K., De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Pennington, H.G., Yoshida, K., Upson, J.L., Chanclud, E., Wu, C.-H., Langner, T., Maqbool, A., Varden, F.A., Derevnina, L., Belhaj, K., Fujisaki, K., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Banfield, M.J., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Lessons in effector and NLR biology of plant-microbe systems. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Tamiru, M., Natsume, S., Takagi, H., White, B., Yaegashi, H., Shimizu, M., Yoshida, K., Uemura, A., Oikawa, K., Abe, A., Urasaki, N., Matsumura, H., Babil, P., Yamanaka, S., Matsumoto, R., Muranaka, S., Girma, G., Lopez-Montes, A., Gedil, M., Bhattacharjee, R., Abberton, M., Kumar, P.L., Rabbi, I., Tsujimura, M., Terachi, T., Haerty, W., Corpas, M., Kamoun, S., Kahl, G., Takagi, H., Asiedu, R., and Terauchi, R. 2017. Genome sequencing of the staple food crop white Guinea yam enables the development of a molecular marker for sex determination. BMC Biology, 15:86. Wu, C.-H., Abd-El-Haliem, A., Bozkurt, T.O., Belhaj, K., Terauchi, R., Vossen, J.H., and Kamoun, S. 2017. NLR network mediates immunity to diverse plant pathogens. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 114:8113-8118. Yoshida, K., Saunders, D.G., Mitsuoka, C., Natsume, S., Kosugi, S., Saitoh, H., Inoue, Y., Chuma, I., Tosa, Y., Cano, L.M., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2016. Host specialization of the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is associated with dynamic gain and loss of genes linked to transposable elements. BMC Genomics, 18:370.
 
Description Collaboration with Prof. Ryohei Terauchi 
Organisation University of Kyoto
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise. Exchange of visits. The collaboration includes Mark Banfield, John Innes Centre.
Collaborator Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise. Exchange of visits.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration: genetics, plant pathology, plant biology, biochemistry, biophysics, genomics, bioinformatics. Royal Society International Exchanges. 2018. "Retooling rice immunity for resistance against rice blast disease". £12,000 Varden, F.A., Saitoh, H., Yoshino, K., Franceschetti, M., Kamoun, S., Terauchi, R., and Banfield, M.J. 2019. Cross-reactivity of a rice NLR immune receptor to distinct effectors from the blast pathogen leads to partial disease resistance. bioRxiv, doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/530675. Valent, B., Farman, M., Tosa, Y., Begerow, D., Fournier, E., Gladieux, P., Islam, M.T., Kamoun, S., Kemler, M., Kohn, L.M.8., Lebrun, M.H., Stajich, J.E., Talbot, N.J., Terauchi, R., Tharreau, D., Zhang, N. 2019. Pyricularia graminis-tritici is not the correct species name for the wheat blast fungus: response to Ceresini et al. (MPP 20:2). Molecular Plant Pathology, 20:173-179. De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Maqbool, A., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Kamoun, S., and Banfield, M.J. 2018. Polymorphic residues in rice NLRs expand binding and response to effectors of the blast pathogen. Nature Plants, 4:576-585. Bialas, A., Zess, E.K., De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Pennington, H.G., Yoshida, K., Upson, J.L., Chanclud, E., Wu, C.-H., Langner, T., Maqbool, A., Varden, F.A., Derevnina, L., Belhaj, K., Fujisaki, K., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Banfield, M.J., and Kamoun, S. 2018. Lessons in effector and NLR biology of plant-microbe systems. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, 31:34-45. Fujisaki, K., Abe, Y., Kanzaki, E., Ito, K., Utsushi, H., Saitoh, H., Bialas, A., Banfield, M., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2017. An unconventional NOI/RIN4 domain of a rice NLR protein binds host EXO70 protein to confer fungal immunity. bioRxiv, doi:https://doi.org/10.1101/239400. Kobayashi, M., Hiraka, Y., Abe, A., Yaegashi, H., Natsume, S., Kikuchi, H., Takagi, H., Saitoh, H., Win, J., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2017. Genome analysis of the foxtail millet pathogen Sclerospora graminicola reveals the complex effector repertoire of graminicolous downy mildews. BMC Genomics, 18:897. Bialas, A., Zess, E.K., De la Concepcion, J.C., Franceschetti, M., Pennington, H.G., Yoshida, K., Upson, J.L., Chanclud, E., Wu, C.-H., Langner, T., Maqbool, A., Varden, F.A., Derevnina, L., Belhaj, K., Fujisaki, K., Saitoh, H., Terauchi, R., Banfield, M.J., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Lessons in effector and NLR biology of plant-microbe systems. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions Tamiru, M., Natsume, S., Takagi, H., White, B., Yaegashi, H., Shimizu, M., Yoshida, K., Uemura, A., Oikawa, K., Abe, A., Urasaki, N., Matsumura, H., Babil, P., Yamanaka, S., Matsumoto, R., Muranaka, S., Girma, G., Lopez-Montes, A., Gedil, M., Bhattacharjee, R., Abberton, M., Kumar, P.L., Rabbi, I., Tsujimura, M., Terachi, T., Haerty, W., Corpas, M., Kamoun, S., Kahl, G., Takagi, H., Asiedu, R., and Terauchi, R. 2017. Genome sequencing of the staple food crop white Guinea yam enables the development of a molecular marker for sex determination. BMC Biology, 15:86. Wu, C.-H., Abd-El-Haliem, A., Bozkurt, T.O., Belhaj, K., Terauchi, R., Vossen, J.H., and Kamoun, S. 2017. NLR network mediates immunity to diverse plant pathogens. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 114:8113-8118. Yoshida, K., Saunders, D.G., Mitsuoka, C., Natsume, S., Kosugi, S., Saitoh, H., Inoue, Y., Chuma, I., Tosa, Y., Cano, L.M., Kamoun, S., and Terauchi, R. 2016. Host specialization of the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is associated with dynamic gain and loss of genes linked to transposable elements. BMC Genomics, 18:370.
 
Description Collaboration with Prof. Tofazzal Islam 
Organisation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University
PI Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise.
Collaborator Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise. Professor Islam's group is working on genomic and postgenomic analyses of wheat blast fungus, which recently emerged as a devastating pathogen of wheat in Bangladesh. He is leading a dream project titled "Mining biogold from Bangladesh"where they identified more than 600 plant probiotics potential for using as biofertilizer and biopesticides. Another important focus of Prof. Islam's group is to analyze the genomes of a number of plant probiotic bacteria potential for biocontrol of major phytopathogens and biofertilization of rice and wheat. In collaboration with Prof. Sophien Kamoun, Prof. Islam is dedicated to the promotion of open science and open data sharing (e.g., open wheat blast www.wheatblast.net) which they think very critical for rapidly addressing the emerging plant diseases.
Impact #OpenWheatBlast http://openwheatblast.net https://twitter.com/search?q=%23OpenWheatBlast&src=typd Win, J., Chanclud, E., Reyes-Avila, C.S., Langner, T., Islam, T., and Kamoun, S. 2019. Nanopore sequencing of genomic DNA from Magnaporthe oryzae isolates from different hosts. Zenodo, http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2564950. Valent, B., Farman, M., Tosa, Y., Begerow, D., Fournier, E., Gladieux, P., Islam, M.T., Kamoun, S., Kemler, M., Kohn, L.M.8., Lebrun, M.H., Stajich, J.E., Talbot, N.J., Terauchi, R., Tharreau, D., Zhang, N. 2019. Pyricularia graminis-tritici is not the correct species name for the wheat blast fungus: response to Ceresini et al. (MPP 20:2). Molecular Plant Pathology, 20:173-179. Gupta, D.R., Reyes Avila, C., Win, J., Soanes, D.M., Ryder, L.S., Croll, D., Bhattacharjee, P., Hossain, S., Mahmud, N.U., Mehebub, S., Surovy, M.Z., Rahman, M., Talbot, N.J., Kamoun, S., and Islam, T. 2018. Cautionary notes on use of the MoT3 diagnostic assay for Magnaporthe oryzae Wheat and rice blast isolates. Phytopathology, in press. Islam, T., Croll, D., Gladieux, P., Soanes, D., Persoons, A., Bhattacharjee, P., Hossain, S., Gupta, D., Rahman, Md.M., Mahboob, M.G., Cook, N., Salam, M., Surovy, M.Z., Bueno Sancho, V., Maciel, J.N., Nani, A., Castroagudin, V., de Assis Reges, J.T., Ceresini, P., Ravel, S., Kellner, R., Fournier, E., Tharreau, D., Lebrun, M.-H., McDonald, B., Stitt, T., Swan, D., Talbot, N., Saunders, D., Win, J., and Kamoun, S. 2016. Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae. BMC Biology, 14:84.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with the Lab of Frank Takken 
Organisation University of Amsterdam
Department Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise
Collaborator Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise
Impact Publication in New Phytologist
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with the Lab of Paul Birch 
Organisation James Hutton Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise
Collaborator Contribution Exchange of materials/expertise
Impact N/A at this time
Start Year 2012
 
Description Conservation agriculture collaboration 
Organisation Shimpling Park Farm
PI Contribution We visited Shimpling Park Farms to see how conservation agriculture practises were being used to add value to farming
Collaborator Contribution Owner of Shimpling Park Farms contributed to the development of a subsequent workshop on Conservation Agriculture
Impact A workshop was held at the John Innes Centre involving farmers and researchers, including scientists from the USA
Start Year 2017
 
Description Formal Research collaboration - Rafael Rivilla, Marta Martin and Jacob Malone 
Organisation Autonomous University of Madrid
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution My research group has provided technical advice and support for the biochemistry of cyclic-di-GMP signalling analysis in Pseudomonas, including protein-nucleotide binding assays, ITC, nucleotide quantificaiton by LC/MS. We have hosted two researchers for summer visits to JIC
Collaborator Contribution My research partners are conducting molecular microbiology experiments into Pseudomonas fluorescens plant colonisation, that are informed by the biochemistry from my lab.
Impact One paper has been published so far from this collaboration: Muriel C., Arrebola E., Redondo-Nieto M., Martínez-Granero F., Jalvo B., Pfeilmeier S., Blanco-Romero E., Baena I., Malone J. G., Rivilla R., Martín M. (2018) AmrZ is a major determinant of c-di-GMP levels in Pseudomonas fluorescens F113. Scientific reports 8 p1979
Start Year 2015
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. Ana Perez-Sierra, Dr. Mariella Marzano and Dr. Sietse van der Linde 
Organisation Forest Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I involved colleagues at Forest Research in the BRIGIT project
Collaborator Contribution Dr. Ana Perez-Sierra leads Work Package 1 (WP1) of the BRIGIT project. The main aims of WP1 are to develop activities to involved citizen scientists and stakeholders in the BRIGIT project and develop databases with information on various aspects of Xylella fastifiosa and its insect vectors. Dr. Sietse van der Linde is involved in WP2 of the BRIGIT project. WP2 is focused on developing diagnostics for X. fastidiosa and is lead by colleagues at Fera. Dr. Mariella Marzano is involved in developing the social sciences aspect of WP4 of the BRIGIT project; WP4 is lead by Dr. Steven White (CEH).
Impact Planning of citizen scientist and stakeholder activities have started.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. Daniel Chapman 
Organisation University of Stirling
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I involved Dr. Chapman in the BRIGIT project.
Collaborator Contribution Dr. Chapman participates in Work Package 4 (WP4) of the BRIGIT project. The aim of WP4 is to model the potential pathways of spread of Xylella fastidiosa in the UK. WP4 is lead by Steven White (CEH).
Impact Collating data for starting the modelling of WP4 of BRIGIT has started.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. David Kenyon, Dr. Fiona Highet and Dr. Karen Fraser 
Organisation Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I involved colleagues at SASA in the BRIGIT project
Collaborator Contribution Colleagues at SASA are involved in Work Package (WP) 2 and 3 of the BRIGIT project. WP2 is aimed at optimizing and further developing technologies for diagnostics of Xylella fastidiosa within BRIGIT, and WP3 is aimed at better understanding the migration of X. fastidiosa insect vectors in the UK. WP2 is lead by Fera and WP3 by JIC (myself).
Impact Work on WP2 and WP3 have started
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. Gerard Clover 
Organisation Royal Horticultural Society
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I involved the Royal Horticultural Society in the BRIGIT project.
Collaborator Contribution Dr. Gerard Clover and colleague Sarah Plummer develop a database of plant species susceptible to Xylella fastidiosa.
Impact Dr. Gerard Clover has been hired as the Engagement Officer for the BRIGIT project and works 4 days per week at the JIC
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. John Elphinstone, Dr. Jenny Tomlinson, Dr. Glyn Jones, Dr. Chris Malumphy and others 
Organisation Fera Science Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution I involved colleauges at Fera in the BRIGIT project
Collaborator Contribution Dr. Elphinstone and Dr. Tomlinson lead Work Package 2 (WP2) of the BRIGIT project. The main goal of WP2 is to optimize and improve technologies for diagnostics of Xylella fastidiosa in diverse plant species, including trees. Dr. Chris Malumphy is involved in WP3 of the BRIGIT project. The main goal of WP3 is to better understand the migration patterns of X. fastidiosa insect vectors in the UK. WP3 is lead by Saskia Hogenhout (me). Dr. Glyn Jones in is involved in the social sciences aspect of WP4 of the BRIGIT project. The main goal of WP4 is to model the potential pathways of spread of X. fastidiosa in the UK. WP4 is lead by Steven White (CEH).
Impact Protocol optimization for diagnostics of Xylella fastidiosa has started.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. Stephen Parnell 
Organisation University of Salford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I involved Dr. Parnell in the BRIGIT project.
Collaborator Contribution Dr. Parnell participates in Work Package (WP4) of the BRIGIT project. WP4 is modelling the potential pathways of spread of Xylella fastidiosa in the UK. WP4 is lead by Steven White (CEH).
Impact Collation of data for the modelling of WP4 has started.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Dr. Steven White 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council
Department Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I involved Dr. Steven White in the BRIGIt project
Collaborator Contribution 1. Leads Work Package 4 of the BRIGIT project; 2. Models the potential pathways of spread of Xylella fastidiosa in the UK
Impact Started to collate data from project partners to do the modelling and interacts with scientists in Europe to help develop the model.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Prof. Alan Stewart 
Organisation University of Sussex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I involved Prof. Alan Stewart in the BRIGIT project
Collaborator Contribution Prof. Alan Stewart contributes Entomology expertise to the BRIGIT project
Impact 1. Funding of the BRIGIT project by UKRI Strategy Priority Fund. 2. Access to UK database of amateur and professional entomologists to collect candidate insect vector species of Xylella fastidiosa.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Formal collaboration with Sita Ghmire and Chris Jones (BecA, Nairobi, Kenya) 
Organisation International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We provide information on phytoplasma effectors and how they interact with plant targets. This will help the identification of resistance in Napier grass and other crops susceptible to phytoplasmas.
Collaborator Contribution The BecA team provided information on Napier grass germ plasm and genomics resources that will be mined for phytoplasma effector targets and polymorphisms in these targets that lead to insusceptibility to phytoplasma effectors.
Impact Two members of the Hogenhout group (a research assistant and PhD student) have visited BecA and ICIPE for several days. They joined a symposium and presented talks about their researcj in this symposium. They exchanged knowledge and resources.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Abdullah Al-Sadi, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. 
Organisation Sultan Qaboos University
Department Department of Crop Sciences
Country Oman 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided intellectual input into investigating an important pathogen of lime trees in Oman, and hosted Ali Al-Subhi, PhD student at Sultan Qaboos University, to conduct molecular research on the pathogen for 6 months in 2015/2016 and 3 months in 2017.
Collaborator Contribution Provided funding for research conducted by the visiting PhD student and hosted me to visit phytoplasma-infected lime orchards and vegetable farms in Oman.
Impact Co-authored scientific publications, including Al-Subhi et al., 2017. BMC Microbiol. 17: 221.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Chih-Horng Kuo, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 
Organisation Academia Sinica
Department Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology
Country Taiwan, Province of China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I provided intellectual input into the development of the research question, approaches and methodology. My team provided knowledge about the biology of the organisms, collected biological material, extracted DNA and generated raw reads of genome sequence data.
Collaborator Contribution The partner assembled the genome reads into contigs and annotated the genomes.
Impact Several co-authored publications, for example: Orlovskis et al., 2017. Ann Bot. 119: 869-884.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Cock van Oosterhout, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Department School of Environmental Sciences UEA
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our time provides knowledge, resources and materials for the insect-plant interaction research system.
Collaborator Contribution The Van Oosterhout team provides knowledge on evolutionary biology and population genetics.
Impact We obtained two BBSRC-IPA collaborative grants with Syngenta. We co-supervise postdoctoral researchers and PhD students. We are co-authors on Mathers et al., 2017. Genome Biology, and a paper that is being submitted this month. We assisted postdoctoral researcher Thomas Mathers with the writing of a Future leader fellowship application, which was succesful (starts Apr 2018).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Formal research collaboration with David Swarbreck, Earlham Institute, Norwich, UK 
Organisation Earlham Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our time provides knowledge, resources and materials for the insect-plant interaction research system.
Collaborator Contribution The Swarbreck team provides knowledge on bioinformatics and genomics, including genome and transcriptome assembly pipelines and genome annotations.
Impact We obtained two BBSRC-IPA collaborative grants with Syngenta. We co-supervise postdoctoral researchers and PhD students. We are co-authors on Mathers et al., 2017. Genome Biology, and a paper that is being submitted this month. We assisted postdoctoral researcher Thomas Mathers with the writing of a Future leader fellowship application, which was succesful (starts Apr 2018).
Start Year 2010
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Henryk Pospieszny, Institute of Plant Protection, Poznan, Poland 
Organisation Institute of Plant Protection, National Research Institute
Country Poland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution My lab hosted Agnieszka Zwolinska, a PhD student at the Institute of Plant Protection, Oct 2016 - Mar 2017. Agnieszka conducted work on the HFSP collaborative project.
Collaborator Contribution The team in Poznan collects plant and insect samples in northern and southern regions of Poland for the HFSP project; the samples are assayed for the presence of phytoplasma strains and effector genes.
Impact We wrote a HFSP project proposal together that was funded. We hold regular Skype meetings (in average, once in the 6 weeks) to discuss progress and results.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Joao Spotti-Lopes, University of Sao Paolo - College of Agriculture (ESALQ) 
Organisation University of Sao Paulo
Department College of Agriculture
Country Brazil 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided intellectual input into development of a collaborative research proposal, expertise in specific research methodologies and trained staff in molecular biology methods. Members of the partner team visited my team to gain experience with molecular biology techniques and discuss project progress. These included: - Visit of JSL to Hogenhout lab, 11-18 Sep. 2013. - Visit of JSL to Hogenhout lab, 20-24 Oct. 2014. - Visit of postdoctoral researcher Maria Cristina Canale from JSL lab, March - Dec, 2014.
Collaborator Contribution Provided intellectual input into development of a collaborative research proposal, expertise in specific research methodologies and trained and hosted staff for conducting field-based experiments. Members of my team visited the partner lab for field trips and collection of MBSP isolates and leafhoppers from infected maize fields. These included: - Field trip and processing of samples in Brazil of a PhD student in my team, 18 May - 8 June, 2013. - Visit of Hogenhout to partner lab, 28-31 Oct, 2013. - Field trip and processing of samples in Brazil, 6-21 June, 2014. - Visit and processing of samples in Brazil, 19-23 Oct, 2015.
Impact We published several papers together, e.g. Orlovskis et al., 2017. Ann. Bot. 119: 869-884, and are working on a few other manuscripts.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Lan-Qin Xia and Ju-Lian Chen, CAAS, Beijing, China 
Organisation Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution My group provides aphid genomics information to the project.
Collaborator Contribution CAAS contributed aphid samples and transgenic wheat to achieve plant-mediated RNAi of aphids to the project
Impact We sequenced the genomes of many wheat-colonizing aphid species. The genomes have been assembled. Annotation pipeline for the genomes is under construction.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Oxitec 
Organisation Oxitec Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution My group provides knowledge, data and resources on whiteflies and other hemipteran insects.
Collaborator Contribution Oxitec provides information on insect transformation technologies and design of transformation plasmids.
Impact Obtained a iCASE PhD student fellowship. Hired PhD student Rebecca Corkill. Rebecca is making good progress with the project.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Richard Immink, Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands 
Organisation University of Wageningen
Department Department of Plant Sciences
Country New Zealand 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We provided knowledge on phytoplasma virulence proteins that interfere with plant development and involved the Wageningen team into a interdisciplinary project proposal that received funding from HFSP.
Collaborator Contribution The Wageningen team provided expertise on plant transcription factors targeted by phytoplasma effectors and helped us with interpretation of the plant developmental phenotypes. They are co-investigators on our HFSP grant.
Impact We received funding for a HFSP research project. We co-published a paper: MacLean et al., 2014. PLoS Biol. 12(4):e1001835. We co-supervise postdoctoral researchers. We hold regular Skype meetings (in average once per 6 months) for the past 3 years.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Russel Groves, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA 
Organisation University of Wisconsin-Madison
Department Department of Entomology
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We involved the University of Wisconsin team into a HFSP research proposal that got funded.
Collaborator Contribution The University of Wisconsin team collects phytoplasma-infected plant and leafhopper samples from all over the USA for the HFSP-funded project.
Impact We received funding for collaborative HFSP project. We hold regular progress meeting (in average once/6 weeks). We co-supervise postdoctoral researchers and PhD students. We are writing up a manuscript.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with SESVanderHave 
Organisation Sesvanderhave
Country Belgium 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution My research group has provided advise on strategies to obtain aphid resistant sugar beet, exchanged knowledge on research progress in plant-insect interactions of the lab, and wrote BBRSC-LINK award to fund research.
Collaborator Contribution SESVanderHave provides access to sugar beet breeding lines, genome sequence resources for these lines and insecticide-free field sites for collection of aphid populations in UK and Europe. They also funded a postdoctoral researcher in my group for one year, contributed 50% in-kind funds for the BBSRC-LINK award and funds a iCASE studentship in my group. PhD student Roland Wouters was recruited for the iCASE project. Roland is making good progress.
Impact Generated knowledge on plant-insect interactions. Organized visits of the SESVanderHave team to JIC (two times per year) and my group at JIC to SESVanderHave headquarters in Tienen, Belgium (two times per year). Organized regular Skype calls to discuss research progress and ideas for future research.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Syngenta 
Organisation Syngenta International AG
Department Syngenta Ltd (Bracknell)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provide information about aphid biology and genomics, and mechanisms involved in aphid adjustment to diverse plant species and pesticides.
Collaborator Contribution Contributed 10% cash towards two BBSRC-IPA projects (2014-2017; 2017-2020) and advised on how to conduct pesticide applications. Provided aphid clones for sequencing and analyses.
Impact Made progress with understanding processes involved in aphid adjustments to plants and pesticides. This collaboration resulted in a publication: Mathers, Chen et al., 2017. Genome Biol. 18: 27. As well, the collaboration was renewed with follow-up funding, that is a BBSRC-IPA grant commencing April 2018. Held regular meetings to discuss progress, including visits of my group to Syngenta and collagues of Syngenta to JIC, and Skype and phone conference meetings.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Tracey Chapman, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Department School of Biological Sciences UEA
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am secondary supervisor on a Oxitec co-funded iCASE PhD studentship of Tracey.
Collaborator Contribution Tracey is secondary supervisor on a Oxitec co-funded iCASE PhD studentship of my group.
Impact We exchange knowledge about insect pests. We will start holding monthly journal club meetings starting Apr 2018. DIscussions to apply for research funding together are ongoing. We discuss research on the identification of sex-determination genes accross hemipteran insect species.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Formal research collaboration with Yongping Huang, SIPPE, CAS, Shanghai, China 
Organisation Chinese Academy of Sciences
Department Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution My group provides knowledge, resources and materials, and (genome/gene) sequence information of various species of aphids.
Collaborator Contribution Huang's group provides information on insect transformation methods, insect sex determination genes, baculovirus and insect cell-based expression systems.
Impact We excnahed visits and attended (CEPAMS) meetings to discuss research progress. Qun Liu, Yazhou Chen and Weijie Huang, former postdoctoral researchers and PhD students at SIPPE, are currently postdoctoral researchers in the Hogenhout group.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Limagrain wheat blast 
Organisation Limagrain
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution knowledge on genetics of wheat blast resistance
Collaborator Contribution germplasm
Impact iCASE studentship funded
Start Year 2017
 
Description Partnership award with Matthew Baylis, University of Liverpool, UK. 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Department School of Veterinary Science Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provide information on vector-borne diseases of plants.
Collaborator Contribution Provide information of vector-borne diseases of humans and animals.
Impact We won a US Partnering Award: Vector-borne diseases in the UK & US: common threats and shared solutions" [Matthew Baylis, PI (PI, University of Liverpool), Saskia Hogenhout (co-PI, JIC) and Simon Carpenter (co-PI, The Pirbright Institute)] BBSRC £50k, and co-organized visits of US colleagues to the UK (Dec 2016) and UK group members to the University of California, Davis (Oct 2017). We applied for a GCRF VBD network grant (£4M) together; the pre-proposal for this was selected for submission of a full proposal, and we were invited for an interview with BBSRC based on our full proposal submission. The proposal was ranked 5th out 12 proposals, and only the top 3 were funded. Finally, we are co-organizing Vector-Borne Diseases in the UK meeting, 3-4 Dec 2018 that will be hosted at the JIC.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Plasmid manipulation of translational regulation in bacteria 
Organisation University of Reading
Department School of Biological Sciences Reading
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In addition to intellectual input, my lab provides specialist resources and research skills in molecular microbiology, protein biochemistry and plant-microbe interaction to this collaboration.
Collaborator Contribution Sheffield University (Brockhurst lab) are providing skills in evolutionary microbiology, soil microbiology and mathematical/statistical modelling. Reading University (Jackson lab) are providing intellectual input and know-how relating to bacterial genetics and microbiology. Both partners are funded by a companion grant to this one.
Impact None so far
Start Year 2018
 
Description Plasmid manipulation of translational regulation in bacteria 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In addition to intellectual input, my lab provides specialist resources and research skills in molecular microbiology, protein biochemistry and plant-microbe interaction to this collaboration.
Collaborator Contribution Sheffield University (Brockhurst lab) are providing skills in evolutionary microbiology, soil microbiology and mathematical/statistical modelling. Reading University (Jackson lab) are providing intellectual input and know-how relating to bacterial genetics and microbiology. Both partners are funded by a companion grant to this one.
Impact None so far
Start Year 2018
 
Description RAGT 
Organisation RAGT Seeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Knowledge of genetics of disease resistance in wheat including new sources of resistance and associated genetic markers
Collaborator Contribution germplasm, DNA marker information, breeder know-how
Impact iCASE PhD studentship and scientific publications
 
Description Secobra 
Organisation Secobra Recherche
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution information on the relationship between plant height and disease susceptibility
Collaborator Contribution Germplasm and field trial testing of populations
Impact new sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight
Start Year 2012
 
Description UCD 
Organisation University College Dublin
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution tools for using model plant species to investigate genetics of resistance to root diseases
Collaborator Contribution coordinating programme and liaising with the European Commission
Impact Identification of candidate genes involved in resistance to root diseases in cereals
Start Year 2014
 
Description #OpenWheatBlast 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Wheat blast is a fearsome fungal disease of wheat. It was first discovered in Paraná State of Brazil in 1985. It spread rapidly to other South American countries such as Bolivia, Paraguay, and Argentina, where it infects up to 3 million hectares and causes serious crop losses. Wheat blast was also detected in Kentucky, USA, in 2011. Wheat blast is caused by a fungus known as Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae). There is a risk that wheat blast could expand beyond South America and threaten food security in wheat growing areas in Asia and Africa.

In February 2016, wheat blast was spotted in Bangladesh- its first report in Asia. Wheat is the second major food source in Bangladesh, after rice. The blast disease has, so far, caused up to 90% yield losses in more than 15000 hectares. Scientists fear that the pathogen could spread further to other wheat growing areas in South Asia.

The Twitter hashtag #openwheatblast serves as a communication tool to provide the latest on this fearsome disease and update a broad audience of news related to the ongoing pandemic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018,2019
URL https://twitter.com/search?q=kamounlab%20openwheatblast&src=typd
 
Description A biologist's poem 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A poem to inspire about biology
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/170774045435/a-biologists-poem
 
Description A taste of Genetic Diversity: demonstration activity for the John Innes Centre open day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A demonstration of our research was performed at an open day at the John Innes Centre, involving hands on activities and discussion on the theme of 'a taste of genetic diversity. The activities involved showing how brassicas were used in baby leaf salads, and how heritage barley varieties were used in brewing beer
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description A view from the lab - blog interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview for a science blog - A View From The Lab.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description ActualFruitVeg: Los tomates y la diversidad 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact News article in Spanish magazine about genome edited tomato Tomelo.

Sophien Kamoun, estudia las enfermedades de las plantas en el Laboratorio de Sainsbury en Inglaterra, y en marzo su equipo publicó un documento que describía un tomate que habían modificado. Utilizando la técnica de edición de genes Crispr / Cas9 , el grupo de Kamoun cortó un trozo de un gen llamado Locus O resistente a los hongos, o Mlo. Esa eliminación hace que el tomate sea resistente al mildiu polvoriento, un grave problema agrícola que requiere una gran cantidad de productos químicos para controlar.

El "Tomelo" de Kamoun se parece mucho a un tomate natural, un mutante con la misma resistencia. "Al menos en las plantas de tomate que tenemos, no hubo diferencia detectable entre el mutante y el tipo salvaje", dice Kamoun.

El trabajo de Kamoun está detenido. Las regulaciones europeas convierten a las plantas genéticamente modificadas en ilegales. Los investigadores como Kamoun pueden tener conocimientos y hacer ensayos científicos para modificar la genética de las plantas pero no pueden llevarlos a ensayarlos en el campo. No pueden registrar estas plantas y comercializar variedades de tomates genéticamente modificados. En EEUU hay más oportunidades en ésta actividad científica. En Europa hay un gran signo de interrogación; "estoy muy frustrado por esto, tengo que ser honesto. Científicamente, esta planta, el "Tomelo" no es diferente de cualquier mutante que obtengamos de la reproducción tradicional o la mutagénesis tradicional, explica Kamoun
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://actualfruveg.com/2018/06/09/los-tomates-y-la-diversidad/
 
Description AgroSight 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Hosted and discussed potential research project on phytoplasma pathogens of oil palms in Columbia with Mayke Santos, AgroSIght, Cambridge, UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description BASF visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation to BASF scientists involved in plant protection and biotechnology on current research on fusarium head blight and opportunities for collaboration with scientists at JIC across a broad spectrum of plant and microbial research relevant to the area of crop protection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BBC Farming Today Interview 25th October 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview for BBC Farming Today on the CJEU ruling on Genome Editing as a form of genetic modification, subject to the same regulation as transgenic crops, and the likely effect of this ruling on agricultural innovation in Europe. The interview covered genome editing technologies, the potential for crop improvement, the details of the ruling, the contrast with other international jurisdications, and the potential effect on agriculture in Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BBC Look East Interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was interviewed about the potential impact of Brexit on scientific research at The Sainsbury Laboratory and the Norwich Research Park. The interview covered the type of research carried out across the NRP, the degree of international collaboration, and the importance of European Commission funding to research projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BBC Radio Norfolk Interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was interviewed on the potential effects of Brexit on research at The Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre and across the Norwich Research Park. The interview covered the type of research underway across the institutes, the international nature of research at TSL and JIC and the importance of European Commission funding to research programmes in Norwich.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BBRO 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Discussed opportunities for collaboration with BBRO with Mark Stevens (Centrum Building, NRP, Norwich, UK).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Bangladesh wheat blast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion with primary Bangladesh wheat researcher on wheat blast resistance
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BecA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact GCRF project discussions with Sita Ghimire (BecA, Nairobi, Kenya)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Breeder day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentations to invited individuals from the wheat breeding and food/feed beverage supply chain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description CONNECTED 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Attended and participated in network discussions of CONNECTED UK Launch conference, Bristol, UK (hosted by Gary Foster, Neil Boonham and Nicola Spence), 29-31 Jan '18.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Chair of Insectary Platform Steering Committee 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Chair of committee that ensures that the JIC Insectary/Entomology Technology Platform is well managed, proactive, effective, state of the art and resourced to meet the Institutes' science needs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019
 
Description Chair of Technical Platform Oversight Committee (TPOC) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Chair the committee that ensures that all JIC Technology Platforms are collectively well managed, proactive, effective, state of the art and resourced to meet the Institutes' science needs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019
 
Description Contributed an 'Accessible Science Talk' for the Research and Support Staff Voice (RSSV) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The JIC Research and Support Staff Voice (RSSV) organised a day (9 Oct 2018) of talks as part of the JIC Annual Science Meeting, delivered by top scientists from JIC and TSL. Every talk was accessible to a wide audience including scientists, support and partnership staff and communicates the great work carried out at JIC and TSL, presented in a manner that will be understandable and interesting for all.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Contribution of two lectures for BIO-3C20 Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions course 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Postdoctoral researcher Adi Kliot in my lab will contribute two lectures in the BIO-3C20 Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, Spring Semester, University of East Anglia, March 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description CropLife FoodHeroes Series: What inspires plant scientists and why is their job so important? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Why did you want to be a plant scientist?

I became a scientist because I grew up being extremely curious about the natural world. I wanted to know how living organisms function. How they became the way they are. Plant pathology came later after realized that I may as well study a field of biology that is important to the human condition. This inspires me to narrow the gap between fundamental and applied research. My aim is to perform cutting-edge research and significantly advance knowledge on economically important plant pathogen systems. In contrast, much research focuses on model systems and is therefore further steps away from practical applications.

Can you explain what your job involves?

As an academic scientist, I am in the business of knowledge. My job is to generate new knowledge to advance science, and to influence others to pursue new directions, generate more knowledge and apply it to address practical problems. My job is also to communicate scientific knowledge and discoveries to my peers and to a broader audience, including the general public.

What are the plant diseases that you are working on?

I work primarily on blight and blast diseases. Throughout my career, I have worked primarily on the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans. More recently, I was inspired by the sense of urgency brought upon by the February 2016 Bangladeshi wheat blast epidemic to expand my research to blast fungi. I aim to apply the concepts and ideas I developed throughout my career to a problem with an immediate impact on global food security.

Can you describe how damaging these diseases can be for farmers?

Plant diseases are a major constraint for achieving food security. Losses caused by fungal plant pathogens alone account for enough to feed several billion people. Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of blast disease of cereals, is among the most destructive plant pathogens, causing losses in rice production that, if mitigated, could feed up to 740 million people. This pathogen has emerged since the 1980s as an important pathogen of wheat seriously limiting the potential for wheat production in South America. In 2016, wheat blast was detected for the first time in Asia with reports of a severe epidemic in Bangladesh. The outbreak is particularly worrisome because wheat blast has already spread further to India, and is threatening major wheat producing areas in neighboring South Asian countries. Global trade and a warming climate are contributing to the spread and establishment of blast diseases as a global problem for cereal production and a present and clear danger to food security.

Why is your profession important in the challenge to feed the world?

Plant pathology delivers science-driven solutions to plant diseases. In particular, genetic solutions through disease resistant crop varieties can be sustainable and environmentally friendly.

What inspires you about your job?

Knowledge and people. The thrill of learning something new every day is addictive. Sharing the experience with others -be they students, colleagues, stakeholders or members of the public - is priceless.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://croplife.org/industry-profile/sophien-kamoun/
 
Description Developing Markets for Heritage Malts 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation at the Great Lakes Hop and Barley Conference, Detroit, Michigan. The audience comprised farmers, maltsters, brewers, researchers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Dhaka Tribune: Fighting the fungi that destroy wheat 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Newspaper article following interview by Bangladeshi science reporter Reaz Ahmed.

The article was on the front page of the Dhaka Tribune.

Scientists in UK, Bangladesh join hands in applying genome editing to develop a novel variety capable of withstanding the fearsome fungal disease - wheat blast


An international scientific collaboration is employing genome editing techniques to develop novel blast resistant wheat to save the second most important food crop in South Asia from a future devastation.

The move comes at a time when authorities in Bangladesh and in the Indian state of West Bengal are pursuing 'wheat holiday' policy - restricting wheat cultivation for a stipulated time in targeted areas - in a desperate attempt to curb the spread of deadly wheat blast disease.

This fungal disease has long been confined largely within the wheat growing regions of South America. But in 2016, it struck wheat fields of Bangladesh, in its first outbreak in Asia, causing colossal crop damage and sending alerts in bordering regions of India.

Scientists from United Kingdom and Bangladesh, involved in the process of developing blast resistant wheat through genome editing, told Dhaka Tribune that they have already identified the wheat gene where they are going to apply 'molecular scissors' and do the editing, thereby effectively driving away the fungi responsible for the blast in wheat fields.

"Once we're done with the task in our laboratory (in UK), hopefully by the end of this year we'll be sending the edited version to Bangladesh for Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) lab to do the necessary probing prior going for field test," Prof Dr Sophien Kamoun, Group Leader, Sophien Kamoun Group at the UK's The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) told this correspondent on Tuesday.

Tunisian-born Dr Sophien, a British Royal Society Fellow, made the science jargons easy for a layman's understanding as he explained, "The fungi hold a key and wheat has a lock and every time fungi get favourable weather they apply the key to unlock wheat thereby feasting on the plant. What essentially we'll do is fortify the lock system failing fungi's key in opening it."

Dr Sophien, a former plant pathology professor of Ohio State University, had joined hands with his TSL colleague Prof Nicholas J Talbot and other co-scientists in discovering the genome sequence of pathogen responsible for wheat blast when it first struck in Asia invading eight major wheat growing districts in Bangladesh in 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/agriculture/2019/03/02/fighting-the-fungi-that-destroy-wheat
 
Description Dutch students 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of work on importance of research on disease resistance
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
 
Description Engagement with BBSRC as part of the BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Have weekly meetings with policy makers at BBSRC about new policies that may be developed to reduce the risk of Xylella fastidiosa outbreaks in the UK
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Engagement with Defra, Forest Research and APHA as part of the BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Have weekly meetings with policy makers at Defra about new policies that may be developed to reduce the risk of Xylella fastidiosa outbreaks in the UK
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Engagement with Fera as part of the BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Have weekly meetings with Fera about status of Xylella fastidiosa diagnostics that may influence new policies for reducing risk of X. fastidiosa outbreaks in the UK
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Engagement with Oxitec 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Regular meetings with Neil Morrison for supervisory meetings and discussing research progress of the iCASE studentship.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018,2019
 
Description Engagement with SV 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Three-monthly meetings with industrial collaborators
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019
 
Description Engagement with Syngenta 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Regular meetings with colleagues at Syngenta, Jealott's Hill, UK, and Switserland and USA to discuss project proposals and research progress on aphids.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010,2011,2012,2013,2014
 
Description Engagement with the Royal Horticulticultural Society as part of the BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Have weekly meetings with staff member of RHS to develop a stakeholder engagement plan for BRIGIT
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description European Fusarium Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Over 200 delegates from across the globe attended the meeting. My presentation sparked many questions and further discussions on the implications of our findings for improving the resistance of wheat to FHB and reducing the risk of mycotoxins accumulating in grain and posing a threat to consumers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description European Research Council@10: the impact on science and scientists 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Scientists at the John Innes Centre and The Sainsbury Laboratory reflect on the success of the ERC over the last ten years and the impact that ERC grants have had on their science and their careers. Category: Science & Technology
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://youtu.be/qEgjYaMG0tQ
 
Description FSOV 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discuss wheat disease resistance genetics with members of a consortium of French Breeding companies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Frequent meetings with Oxitec 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We meet four times with colleagues at Oxitex for the supervisory meeting of the PhD student. The student contributes a presentation with the latest progress on the project. We exchange knowledge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018,2019
 
Description GCRF visit with Nepalese Researchers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A fact-finding mission to Nepal was undertaken with the aim of developing new collaborations for potential GCRF projects
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Grain that gives good head 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Podcast about the heritage barley project with Dewing Grain Ltd
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.dewinggrain.co.uk/podcast-item/?id=37
 
Description Growing the Future-a UK Plant Sciences Federation and a Royal Society of Biology report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Growing the future is a report from the UK Plant Sciences Federation (UKPSF), a special advisory committee of the Royal Society of Biology. Launched in January 2019, the report highlights to policymakers and others the excellence of plant science in the UK, and its importance to the biosciences, the economy, and society both at home and around the world. In Growing the future, the UKPSF describes the potential of plant science to improve fundamental knowledge, enable better diet quality, increase crop productivity, enhance environmental sustainability and create new products and manufacturing processes.

The report section on Plant health highlighted our research on potato late blight which dates back to the 1990s and has established the fundamental knowledge that has now enabled commercialisation of the first GMO potato plants among various applications.

The report also highlighted our work on gene editing in tomato, notably the development of the fungus resistant tomato line Tomelo, which was highlighted by a picture taken from our publication Nekrasov, V., Wang, C., Win, J., Lanz, C., Weigel, D., and Kamoun, S. 2017. Rapid generation of a transgene-free powdery mildew resistant tomato by genome deletion. Scientific Reports, 7:482.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://www.rsb.org.uk/policy/groups-and-committees/ukpsf/about-ukpsf/growing-the-future-report
 
Description Horizon The EU Research and Innovation Magazine: AGRICULTURE--Can CRISPR feed the world? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact As the world's population rises, scientists want to edit the genes of potatoes and wheat to help them fight plant diseases that cause famine.

By 2040, there will be 9 billion people in the world. 'That's like adding another China onto today's global population,' said Professor Sophien Kamoun of the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK.

Prof. Kamoun is one of a growing number of food scientists trying to figure out how to feed the world. As an expert in plant pathogens such as Phytophthora infestans - the fungus-like microbe responsible for potato blight - he wants to make crops more resistant to disease.

Potato blight sparked the Irish famine in the 19th century, causing a million people to starve to death and another million migrants to flee. European farmers now keep the fungus in check by using pesticides. However, in regions without access to chemical sprays, it continues to wipe out enough potatoes to feed hundreds of millions of people every year.

'Potato blight is still a problem,' said Prof. Kamoun. 'In Europe, we use 12 chemical sprays per season to manage the pathogen that causes blight, but other parts of the world cannot afford this.'

Plants try to fight off the pathogens that cause disease but these are continuously changing to evade detection by the plant's immune system.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://horizon-magazine.eu/article/can-crispr-feed-world_en.html
 
Description Horizon The EU Research and Innovation Magazine: Expect exoplanet atmospheres, organs with new functions and fewer traffic jams in 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We asked a selection of European scientists which scientific breakthroughs they'd like to see in 2018.

Gene-editing to improve crop immunity

For Professor Sophien Kamoun at Sainsbury Laboratory in the UK, a breakthrough would be to adapt plant immune systems to defend them against a wider range of diseases. 'One approach would be to design improved immune receptors that can then be edited into crop genomes. This approach requires a better biochemical and biophysical understanding of how plant receptors detect pathogens and activate immunity. It also necessitates a better knowledge of pathogen diversity and (their ability to evolve). Ultimately, we require a framework to rapidly generate new disease resistance traits and introduce them into crop genomes. Only then we can keep up with rapidly evolving pathogens.'

Read also: Can CRISPR feed the world? https://horizon-magazine.eu/article/can-crispr-feed-world_en.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://horizon-magazine.eu/article/expect-exoplanet-atmospheres-organs-new-functions-and-fewer-traf...
 
Description Hosted Alexandra Kolodyazhnaya, BSc student Novosibirsk State University, Russia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Student did a research project in my lab as part of the JIC/TSL/EI International Undergraduate Summer School programme at JIC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Hosted Libby Hanwell, BSc student Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Hosted the student for a research project in the summer of 2018 and her BSc research project from Oct-Dec '18
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Hosted Luke Sherwin, MSc student Molecular Medicine at the University of East Anglia, UK. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact MSc project for BIO_6019Y course. Luke wrote a 3000-word project and did a research project Mar-Sep 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description IS-MPMI Interactions: Fat Cats Can Jump Over The Wall: Plant Biotic Interactions Workshop in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, China 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On a cloudy Norwich day in 2011, post-docs Sebastian Schornack, Sylvain Raffaele, and Tolga Bozkurt were having a typical British lunch of fish and chips with mushy peas with their supervisor Sophien Kamoun. Somehow, the discussion turned to the importance of sustained productivity. Kamoun, in his usual hyperbolic style, pointed out that now that each one of them had just published notable papers (Schornack et al., 2010; Raffaele et al., 2010; Bozkurt et al., 2011), they should beware of not behaving like "lazy fat cats" and think hard about their next papers. Not everyone left the lunch in the happiest mood. One day later, after discussion with another post-doc, Mireille van Damme, Schornack and colleagues decided to found the Lazy Fat Cat Club (#LFCats). Schornack drafted a chart and was appointed as Chairman Féi mao (fat cat in Mandarin). The #LFCats ethos is that productive research requires a significant amount of communication and knowledge exchange, and informally discussing research is a perfect way of solving roadblocks and laying paths for the future. Casual meetings took place on a regular basis at The Sainsbury Laboratory, mainly on afternoon coffee breaks. The club continued to loosely grow and several other researchers joined the #LFCats. As the members moved on to start their own labs, the #LFCats "brand" helped nurture a lasting bond. Suomeng Dong, now a professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at Nanjing Agricultural University, coined the Chinese proverb "Fat cats cannot jump over the wall" to challenge the #LFCats to work collaboratively to solve problems and "jump over the wall."

It should be noted that the #LFCats are neither lazy (well, maybe a bit sometimes) nor overweight (no comments...). Instead the club's name relates to the initial discussion and stands for the importance of moving out your comfort zone and looking forward to the next goal in science or in life. It also grew to reflect the importance of informal interactions as a means to enhance efficiency and creativity. To promote such interactions, Schornack organized the first #LFCats research meeting at the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University in 2013. Dong (Nanjing Agricultural University, China) and Ruofang Zhang (Inner Mongolia University, China) led a second meeting in August 2017 in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia. The local host, Zhang, is the director of the Potato Research Center at Inner Mongolian University and the Plant Protection section in the Chinese Modern Agricultural Industry Technology System. Indeed, the autonomous region of Inner Mongolia is the largest potato production area in China and has contributed to making this country the leading potato producer in the world.

In this report, we summarize the key findings presented at the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ismpmi.org/members/Interactions/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=165
 
Description IS-MPMI Interactions: InterViews: Sophien Kamoun by Jixiang Kong 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This InterView with Sophien Kamoun, John Innes Centre, was performed by one of the 2016 IS-MPMI student travel awardees, Jixiang Kong, Gregor Mendel Institute.

JIXIANG KONG: What led you to study biology? More specifically plant-pathogen interactions.

SOPHIEN KAMOUN: I grew up with a passion for nature. As a teenager I collected insects and became fascinated by their incredible diversity. Later I took this "hobby" more seriously and I specialized in studying tiger beetles. I even published a few papers on this topic.

After high school in Tunisia, I went to Paris with the firm intention of studying biology and becoming an entomologist. However, I was disappointed by how badly taught zoology was-too much emphasis on taxonomy and little mechanistic thinking. Instead, I became drawn to the more rigorous methods and approaches of molecular biology, and I ended up majoring in genetics. I reconciled this major with my natural history interests by taking multiple modules in evolution and reading a lot on the subject.

Plant pathology came later when I moved from Paris to the University of California-Davis for my Ph.D. The fellowship I received stipulated that I should study plant biology. It wasn't by choice but rather by accident. But I quickly became engrossed in molecular plant pathology and I really liked that this science involves interactions between multiple organisms. However, for many years I missed a direct connection between the lab work and the field.

JK: If you would not have chosen the topic of plant-pathogen interactions, what would you choose?

SK: Definitely, entomology. I'm still fascinated by insects, especially beetles. I feel we know so little about their biology, especially from a mechanistic angle. They are so diverse and yet most insect research focuses on a few species, such as Drosophila. There are so many fascinating questions, for example, about the evolution of insect behavior and the underlying genes. Also, insects can be important crop pests and disease vectors. This is a very fertile area of research that I highly recommend to early career scientists.

JK: How do you envision large-scale "omics" approaches in studying plant immunity?

SK: Omics are just another tool. They're powerful tools but they're still methods we use to answer questions. I advise everyone to frame their research based on questions and then look for the best methods to answer these questions.

This said, genomics has transformed biology in a fundamental way. It's a new way of doing business. We now have catalogs of plant and pathogen genes, so the challenge is to link genes to function rather than discovering the genes per se. Another key aspect is that genomics is a great equalizer. Model systems are less important than in earlier days. One can make a lot of progress with a genome and a few functional assays. For example, consider the progress made in discovering effectors in obligate parasites. This would have been almost unthinkable in the pre-genomics age. This is why I wish to see more early career scientists explore the diversity of pathogen systems rather than working on established model systems.

JK: Social media is changing the way of communication rapidly. However, the scientific communication on social media is just emerging. How do you see the direction of social media in the future regarding the impact on science? Will social media replace or minimize some conventional communication such as conferences?

SK: Communication is an essential function of being a scientist. We're not only in the business of producing new knowledge but it's also our obligation to communicate knowledge to our peers and the public. These days social media became a major medium for communication in science. It's an efficient way to filter through the incessant flow of information, stay up to date, and broadly broadcast new knowledge. It also enables us to expand our network way beyond traditional colleagues. I interact on Twitter with teachers, farmers, journalists, etc. I also use it, of course, to communicate with colleagues and share information and insights. I also find Twitter immensely entertaining. Scientists have a lot of humor.

I don't think social media will replace the need for direct contact and interaction between peers. I think we still would want to break off our daily routine and meet in person with colleagues. However, I wish we could start rethinking the format of scientific conferences. Both the fairly detailed oral presentations and poster sessions could be improved if they were combined with some sort of Internet interaction. Twitter is already transforming how scientists interact at conferences but we could do better.

JK: What advice would you provide to young researchers who are in their early scientific career?

SK: Don't follow the herd. Take chances. Look beyond the current trends both in terms of experimental systems and questions, and ask provocative questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ismpmi.org/members/Interactions/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=152
 
Description IS-MPMI organizing committee 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Local organizing committee for IS-MPMI 2019, Glasgow, UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Interview with Matthew Gudgin on BBC Radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sophien Kamoun's interview with Matthew Gudgin on BBC Radio following election as Fellow of the Royal Society. This includes a discussion of plant blindness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/173740235230/sophiens-interview-with-matthew-gudgin-on-bbc
 
Description Invited research seminar at 'When Development meets Stress' symposium, CRAG, Barcelona, Spain 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk on Phytoplasma at the 'When Development meets Stress' symposium, Center for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG), Barcelona, Spain, 2-4 Sep 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bdebate.org/en/forum/when-development-meets-stress-understanding-developmental-reprogram...
 
Description Invited research seminar at CAS institute 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a research seminar at IGDB, Beijing, China on 16 Mar 2018. Research fellow Thomas Mathers in my lab also contributed a talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited research seminar at iDiv, Leipzig, Germany 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited by PhD students to give a research presentation at the Integrative Biodiversity Research Institute (iDiv), Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Germany, 18 Apr 2018. I was hosted by Crispus Mbaluto, PhD student at iDiv.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited research seminar at the Max Planck Institute, Cologne, Germany 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to give a research seminar at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding, Cologne, Germany. Approximately 50 people, including PhD students, attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited research seminar at the XI European Congress of Entomology, Naples, Italy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a research seminar on Phytoplasma in a parallel session focused on insect-transmitted plant pathogens and plant-insect interactions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description JIC 50 Open day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Open Day to celebrate 50 years of the John Innes Centre in Norwich, where we exhibited a stand to show isolation of microbes from soil and their influence on plant growth.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description JIC50 Molecular Microbiology presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Contributed to the design and running of the molecular microbiology department stall at the JIC 50 year open day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Keynote Speaker, Agrinet, Chemical Biology Conference, Syngenta Jeallott's Hill, Bracknell (July 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Engagement with Syngenta scientists working on developing new chemical control methods for fungal pathogens. Ongoing engagement and funded research from 2005-2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Keynote lecture at ICPP 2018: The Edge of Tomorrow - Plant Health in the 21st Century 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact ICPP2018 International Congress of Plant Pathology Plenary Session - Plant Health is Earth's Wealth, Boston, USA, Monday, July 30, 2018

The talk was broadcast on a live stream and is available on YouTube https://youtu.be/MYysIKSYY_8
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/176385835530/the-edge-of-tomorrow-plant-health-in-the-21st
 
Description Le Professeur tunisien Sophien Kamoun intègre la prestigieuse Royal Society de Londres 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact News article in the North African media https://www.huffpostmaghreb.com
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.huffpostmaghreb.com/entry/le-professeur-tunisien-sophien-kamoun-integre-la-prestigieuse-...
 
Description Limagrain wheat disease 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Discussion led to Liamgrain supporting iCASE PhD proposal (successful)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
 
Description MBPP (Molecular Biology of Plant Pathogens conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact MBPP (Molecular Biology of Plant Pathogens) is a short, friendly meeting supported by BSPP but organized locally that provides an ideal platform for young researchers (typically PhD or post-doc) to network and gain their first experiences of giving a talk away from 'home base' in front of larger audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Member Scientific Resources Committee 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Member of a committee that decides on purchases of all types of scientific equipment and organization of JIC infrastructure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019
 
Description Microbes in Norwich symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Microbes in Norwich symposium showcased the wide variety of microbiological research taking place on the Norwich Research Park, improving links between researchers and research bodies and driving high quality research and open communication between scientists. Contributing institutions included the University of East Anglia, the John Innes Centre, The Sainsbury Laboratory, the Quadram Institute, the Earlham Institute and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. 240 participants ranging from undergraduates to project leaders took part in this one day event.

Seminar speakers included Nick le Brun (UEA), Nick Talbot (TSL), Alison Mather (QIB), Laura Lehtovirta-Morley (UEA), Marcelo Batista (JIC), Fred Warren (QIB), Richard Leggett (EI), Gemma Langridge (QIB), David Lea-Smith (UEA), Naiara Beraza (QIB). The Plenary Speaker was Nicole Dubilier, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany. There was also a poster competition and extensive discussion sessions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://microbesinnorwich.org/
 
Description Mistletoe press coverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Coordinated press releases on our research on mistletoe in the UK and Germany were picked up by many national newspapers (UK, Germany, Netherlands, Spain) and by New Scientist online, and by Science Magazine online. It also sparked a commissioned short article written together with professionals of science communication.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.thesciencebreaker.org/breaks/evolution-behaviour/the-mystery-of-mistletoe-mitochondria
 
Description Norwich Science Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lecture to the public as part of Norwich Science festival, explaining the science and relevance of plant-microbial interactions in the soil. Positive audience feedback including two people who expressed interest in the JIC as a potential future workplace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Organized and hosted a conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Member of organizing committee and host of Vector-Borne Disease in the UK 2018, JIC, Norwich, UK, 3-4 Dec 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description Organizing the satellite meeting 'Dynamics and Mechanism of Insect-Transmitted Pathogens' at the IS-MPMI 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This satellite meeting will be organized on Sunday 14th July, 8.30 - 15.00, and brings together scientists with an interest in studying the diverse aspects of insect-transmitted plant pathogen interactions with their plant hosts and insect vectors. These pathogens cause the most destructive diseases of plants and are often responsible for eradication of entire crop industries in countries or regions. Current examples include Olive Quick Decline Syndrome (Xylella fastidiosa), citrus greening (Candidatus Liberibacter sp.), Lime Witch's Broom and Grapevine Flavescence doree (Candidatus Phytoplasma) and Cassava mosaic (geminivirus). The meeting will cover (1) Recognition and induction of immunity, (2) Effectors and modulation of insect/plant processes, (3) Epidemiology and insect transmission and (4) Genomics and Evolution. If you would like to attend or contribute to the meeting, please contact Saskia Hogenhout, Silke Robatzek, Sheng-Yang He and Steven Lindow by 15 April 2019 at the very latest.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://www.ismpmi.org/Congress/2019/program/Pages/Satellite-Meetings.aspx
 
Description Phillipines 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Communicated and wrote proposal for the Newton Afgham Programme with Karen Alviar, National Institute of Molecular Biology (BIOTECH), University of the Philippines, Los Banos. The objective was to investigate effector proteins of the cassava phytoplasma disease (CPD), which has caused massive outbreaks in the Philippines. Unfortunately, the application was considered to have eligibility problems for unclear reasons. An appeal letter was submitted (Jun 2017), but this did not help.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Novozymes 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact presentation of research to three representatives from Novozymes, a speciality chemicals company based in Denmark
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presented a talk at Monogram 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented a talk at Monogram, JIC, Norwich, UK, 24-16 Apr 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presented talk at JIC "Science for Innovation Showcase" event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presented a talk at the JIC "Science for Innovation Showcase" event, Norwich, UK, 7-8 Feb '18. I explored opportunities to collaborate with industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Press release to announce BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Engaged with JIC Public Engagement Officer to launch press release 'UK consortium to combat serious threat to plant health' to announce the start of the BRIGIT project and the BRIGIT project website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.jic.ac.uk/press-release/uk-wide-consortium-to-combat-serious-threat-to-plant-health/
 
Description Press release to announce new appointment for the BRIGIT project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Engaged with JIC Public Engagement Officer to launch press release 'New appointment for UK-wide Xylella pathogen consortium' for the BRIGIT project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.jic.ac.uk/news/new-appointment-for-uk-wide-xylella-pathogen-consortium/
 
Description Public Presentation, Café Scientifique, Phoenix Arts Centre, Exeter (June 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public presentation of the biology of rice blast disease, given to general public and arts undergraduates at Cafe Scientifique event for public understanding of science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Putting it together: How do plants sense and integrate seasonal signals? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk at: Institut de Biologie de l'École Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Paris, France. This has led to the establishment of a collaboration involving scientists from France and Spain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Re-introducing heritage barley: Science into practise 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited speaker at the RMI analytics Heirloom and Terrior Barley and Malt Symposium. The results of the projects including commercialisation of heritage malt were presented
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Roundtable debate on Genome Editing for Crop Improvement with Rt Hon Michael Gove MP, Secretary of State for the Environment. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Took part in round table debate with the Secretary of State for the Environment to discuss the CJEU ruling on Genome Editing and how this was a potential impediment to innovation in crop improvement. The debate was co-ordinated by Tom Allen-Stevens and the NFU on 11th February 2018. The meeting solicited views from the science community, the soil association, the organic farming movement, Beyond GM, plant breeders, the AgBiotech industry, and the broader farming community.

There is likely to be a follow-up discussion and ongoing work to advise government on genome editing and its potential use in crop improvement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description School teacher education 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The activity involved a presentation and discussion with school teachers on the importance and relevance of plant disease in a historical and current context. The activity is aimed at providing teachers who are not experts in plant pathology to effectively provide all the relevant information required within the A-level curriculum to their students
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Scoop.it page "Plants and Microbes" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Everything related to the science of plant-microbe interactions. Curated by Kamoun Lab @ TSL

>450K page views.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
URL https://www.scoop.it/topic/mpmi
 
Description SlideShare: Pathogenomics of emerging plant pathogens: too little, too late 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Slides: Pathogenomics of emerging plant pathogens: too little, too late. Presented at the conference "Building resilience against crop diseases: A global surveillance system", February 14, 2018, Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.slideshare.net/SophienKamoun/pathogenomics-of-emerging-plant-pathogens-too-little-too-la...
 
Description Stranger in a strange land: the experiences of immigrant researchers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Published in Genome Biology: Continuing with our Q&A series discussing issues of diversity in STEM fields, Genome Biology spoke with three researchers on their experiences as immigrants.

International collaborations are key to advancing scientific research globally and often require mobility on the part of researchers. Migration of scientists enables the spread of ideas and skills around the world, giving researchers the opportunity to follow the best resources. Of course, migration adds a new set of challenges to the already monumental task of starting and running a lab. Genome Biology spoke to Sophien Kamoun, Rosa Lozano-Durán, and Luay Nakhleh about their personal experiences.

What influenced your choice to move to your current country?

SK: There is this old German expression "wo die Musik spielt"-you go where it's happening, where the "music is played". I think that sums it up. When I was a student in the 1980s, almost everyone wanted to do a Ph.D. in the USA. I felt that to have the best training and to be among the best, I had no choice but to study in the USA. I think that was a pretty correct assessment of the state of affairs in the 1980s. Indeed, I had a fantastic experience at the University of California, Davis. Also, at that time, Europe wasn't really open to non-Western scientists, and international mobility wasn't recognized like it is today [1]. Later, I moved to the Netherlands and then back to the USA before landing in my current position at The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) in Norwich, UK. I moved to Norwich exactly 10 years ago, primarily because of the reputation of the laboratory as a center of excellence for plant pathology research and the generous support provided by David Sainsbury through the Gatsby Foundation. I have had a phenomenal time at TSL these past 10 years, where I have had the opportunity to work with outstanding scientists from perhaps about 30-40 countries. An interesting point is that when TSL was founded in 1988, all the group leaders were British [2], but currently our principal investigators are from all over the world [3]. I think TSL truly reflects the emergence of the #ScienceisGlobal movement on social media [4], which is so evident in the UK and other corners of Europe.

RL-D: Three years ago, having worked as a postdoctoral researcher for almost four years, I was eager to establish my own laboratory. I had known what I wanted to devote my research to for a long time and could not wait to get started. Unfortunately, the economic climate in Europe, where I am originally from and where I was working at the time, was not particularly propitious for science in academia, with research budgets being slashed and increasing competition-not the most favorable situation for new group leaders, I heard over and over again. My partner was also a scientist at the same career stage, and so we needed to find two positions, not just one, complicating matters even more. One day, just by chance, we came across a job advertisement for group leader positions at the Shanghai Center for Plant Stress Biology in China. We had heard about the place-a new institute with the ambition to become a powerhouse for plant sciences. I was very excited at the prospects of leading my own research group, and that excitement overrode any qualms or self-imposed geographical restrictions. I am also fortunate enough to have an incredibly supportive family and friends who unconditionally encouraged me to pursue my scientific career, even if that involved moving far away; they may not always understand the nitty-gritty details of what I do, but they know how important it is for me.
It was my first job application, and I was offered the position following an interview at the center. They were willing to support me and give me the freedom to develop my own research program-it was an unbeatable opportunity to start my independent career. And the fact that I would be living in Asia, with the immense chance to broaden my experience that entailed, added some extra appeal (despite the slight vertigo I also felt). There was not much to think about, really-it was a deal I simply could not turn down.

LN: I was born to a Christian Arab family in Israel and did my undergraduate studies at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology). Although I was an atheist by the time I started my studies at the Technion, I still considered myself to be "culturally" Christian, in that I celebrated Christmas and New Year with my family (eating and drinking, not going to church!). However, almost every year, my exams were scheduled on December 25th and January 1st (the Fall semester in Israel starts in October and ends in February). Being unable to take exams on different dates affected my performance in my studies and my interest in pursuing graduate studies at the same institution. Also, more generally, I was the only Christian Arab student in my class, and one of a handful of Arab students; I never felt comfortable at the time. So, I decided to pursue graduate studies in computer science outside Israel. The choice to come to the USA was an easy one because the USA had (and still has, in my opinion) the best graduate programs in computer science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-017-1370-4
 
Description Summerschool, Utrecht 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presented a talk and engaed with students at the 9th Utrecht PhD Summerschool Environmental Signaling in Plants, Utrecht, The Netherlands, 28-30 Aug 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Taproot Episode 1, Season 1: Extreme Open Science and the Meaning of Scientific Impact 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Taproot is the podcast that digs beneath the surface to understand how scientific publications in plant biology are created. In each episode, co-hosts Liz Haswell and Ivan Baxter take a paper from the literature and talk about the story behind the science with one of its authors.

This episode features Sophien Kamoun, a Senior Scientist at the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK. He was born in Tunisia, and got his Maitrise from Pierre & Marie Curie Univ., Paris, France. He then moved to the United States where he did both a Ph.D. and postdoc at the University of California, Davis. He then went to Wageningen University in The Netherlands, where he was a Senior Research Scientist for three years. Sophien started as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at Ohio State University, Wooster, where he rose through the ranks to Full Professor before moving in 2007 to the Sainsbury Lab where he has been ever since. During this time he was Head of the Laboratory for several years. He has received many awards, and is an elected member of AAAS and EMBO, and has served on many editorial boards.

In this episode, the hosts and Sophien discuss a recent collaborative paper (Islam et al., 2016, BMC Biology) that really embodies the concepts of open science. It addresses the source and characterization of a newly discovered wheat blast in Bangladesh. Wheat blast is a fungal disease that affects grasses that are a huge threat to food security. The authors report the geographical distribution of this new disease, characterize the disease symptoms of affected plants, and isolate and validate the causal fungus. Most strikingly, they performed RNA sequencing on symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves and show that RNA from these infected leaves aligns to the genome of a Brazilian wheat blast strain. They conclude that the Bangladesh isolate of wheat blast is phylogenetically related to the Brazilian wheat blast, rather than an unknown or new lineage.

Listen to this episode to hear Sophien, Ivan, and Liz discuss the science in this paper, how the project started, and how it developed into a peer-reviewed publication. Also discussed is the importance of redefining what is meant by scientific "impact", and new ways to do science in the plant pathology community and beyond
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://plantae.org/taproot-episode-1-season-1-extreme-open-science-and-the-meaning-of-scientific-im...
 
Description UK-US VBD network 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact UK-US Vector-borne disease network meeting, University of California, Davis, 15-17 Oct 2017. Co-organized UK-US VBD network meeting with Matthew Baylis (University of Liverpool, UK) at the University of California, Davis, USA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description What's up with preprints? And why I'm bothering with them. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact What's up with preprints? And why I'm bothering with them. A few answers to @hormiga post about why he's not bothering with preprints.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://kamounlab.tumblr.com/post/163409024195/whats-up-with-preprints-and-why-im-bothering
 
Description Wired: Who Wants Disease-Resistant GM Tomatoes? Probably Not Europe 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact ENGINEERING A TOMATO resistant to a pernicious fungal disease doesn't seem like it'd be the easiest part of a plant pathologist's job. But compared to getting that tomato to market? It's a snap.

At least, that's how Sophien Kamoun sees it. Kamoun studies plant diseases at the Sainsbury Laboratory in England, and in March his team published a paper describing a tomato they'd tweaked. Using the gene-editing technique Crispr/Cas9, Kamoun's group snipped out a piece of a gene called Mildew Resistant Locus O, or Mlo. That deletion makes the tomato resistant to powdery mildew, a serious agricultural problem that takes a lot of chemicals to control.

Kamoun's "Tomelo" actually looks a lot like a naturally occurring tomato, a mutant with the same resistance. "At least in the tomato plants we have, there was no detectable difference between the mutant and the wild type," Kamoun says. "Obviously we'd need to do more detailed field trials, but there was certainly nothing obvious."

But for now, that's where Kamoun's work stops. European regulations make the tomato essentially illegal-he and others can do the science, but probably can't get it to field trials, and certainly can't get it to market. "There's more clarity in the US. One could probably get approval. But in Europe, it's a big question mark," he says. "I'm very frustrated by this, I have to be honest. Scientifically this plant is no different from any mutant we'd get from traditional breeding or traditional mutagenesis. I really don't understand what the problem is."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.wired.com/2017/05/wants-disease-resistant-gm-tomatoes-probably-not-europe/?mbid=social_t...
 
Description YouTube: BLASTOFF - Keeping Up With A Cereal Killer 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Via UC Berkeley Events. Center for Emerging and Neglected Diseases (CEND) at UC Berkeley facilitates innovative solutions for infectious disease challenges. Berkeley, CA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://youtu.be/FCS5y_qX8n0
 
Description eyespot industry partners 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact informed wheat breeders on genetics of eyespot resistance and candidate resistance genes and potential trade-off between yield and protein content of grain
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description presentsation to the Flying Farmers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Flying farmers are a group of farmers interested to learn about the latest trends in research. the presentation involved talking to them about our work, and engaging in a discussion with them
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description school visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Delivery of the plant disease and host disease resistance components of the A level curriculum to A'level students. This was delivered alongside a presentation on the impact of plant disease on human civilisation throughout history and efforts to combat disease through plant breeding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description school visit (Wymondham) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentations on the history of plant disease and impact on society alongside plant disease and disease resistance information required for A level students
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018