Platform: Understanding and Improving Corrosion-Resistance in Structural Coated Metals

Lead Research Organisation: Swansea University
Department Name: School of Engineering

Abstract

Coated metal products are of ubiquitous importance to each and every one of us. With the introduction of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) directive in 2004 it is now becoming impossible to use traditional pre-treatments and primers based on hexavalent chromium, which is both toxic and carcinogenic, in electronic goods. Increasingly, as the End of Life Vehicles (ELV) directive comes into full force by 2006, the same will be true in the automotive sector. This critical environmental legislation is being rolled out to other market sectors and will inevitably encompass all metallic products in all sectors including construction materials and aerospace. This makes establishing high performance chromium free coating technologies one of the most important research areas in corrosion. The importance of the work carried out at UWS to this industry sector is clear from the significant levels of government, industry and development agency funding attracted from 2002 to the present time. In order that UK steel manufacturing industry maintains and internationally leading position on coated products chromium free coating development must be combined with novel alloy coatings and coating technologies. This Platform proposal underpins consolidation and growth of the Corrosion and Coatings Research Group at UWS / which has already achieved a world-leading research reputation. Undoubtedly the key strength of the Group lies in the quality and experience of its Research Staff and the Platform Grant (in conjunction with current and anticipated Research Grants) will provide a secure base whereby four of these may be retained in continuous employment over a five year period. This will allow the Group to adopt a more ambitious research strategy and participate in potentially risky and adventurous collaborative programmes with leading university and industry groups world-wide. Core activities will include the development of powerful new combinatorial methodologies for the generation of metal alloy, conducting polymer and ion-exchange ceramic anti-corrosion coating component libraries. Also, the development of high-throughput, parallel, corrosion screening techniques based on scanning electrochemical instrumentation. These will permit the rapid evaluation of individual coating components, identify synergistic interactions between components and provide a wealth of fundamental kinetic and mechanistic information. State-of-the-art electron backscatter diffraction techniques will be also used to obtain a new and fundamental understanding of relationships between microstructure, grain orientation and corrosion resistance in metal and metal-alloy coatings. Scoping studies will include: mechanistic investigations of the interplay between photochemistry and electrochemistry in environmentally driven organic coating degradation, coating deposition using self-assembled conducting-polymer nanofibres, computational modelling of corrosion-driven coating failure, interphase engineering of coatings and investigating the practicality of PVD for metallic coil-coatings on steel. The management infrastructure already in place at UWS will ensure the programme delivers high-quality, technologically-relevant research, new materials and new methodologies which will be widely applicable.

Publications

10 25 50

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Coleman A (2007) Inhibition of Filiform Corrosion on AA6111-T4 Using In-Coating Phenylphosphonic Acid in Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters

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Garcia-Vergara S (2012) Enrichment of Alloying Elements in Aluminum: A Scanning Kelvin Probe Approach in Journal of The Electrochemical Society

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Loveridge M (2013) Chrome free pigments for corrosion protection in coil coated galvanised steels in Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology

 
Description 1. A wide range of environmentally friendly, smart-release, ion-exchange corrosion inhibitor pigments for use in corrosion resistant organic coatings applied to steel, zinc and aluminium based metallic surfaces. These are intended to replace toxic chromate-based pigments.
2. A proper understanding of how and under what circumstances electrically conducting polymers such as polyaniline can protect metal substrates from corrosion.
3. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms underlying certain types of atmospheric corrosion (occurring in humid air) such as filiform corrosion.
4. A proper understanding of how the surface microstructure of alloys (particularly zinc-magnesium-aluminium alloys used for galvanizing and structural aluminium based alloys) can influence resistance to atmospheric corrosion.
5. A a range of robust methodologies for the rapid and quantitative assessment of corrosion resistance (corrosion kinetics) in the laboratory. Based on advanced instrumentation such as the Scanning Vibrating Electrode (SVET) and Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP) these methodologies provide insight into both the rate and mechanism of corrosion and corrosion-driven coating failure phemonena.
Exploitation Route 1) By developing smart-release corrosion-inhibitor pigments as commercial products capable of replacing chromate.
2) By taking note of alloy formulation / surface condition requirements to avoid high susceptibility to atmospheric corrosion.
3) By a more widespread adoption of methodologies providing proper mechanistic and kinetic insight into well defined corrosion phenomena rather that simple "corrosion tests".
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Chemicals,Construction,Education,Environment,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Transport

 
Description Critical to the success and impact of the program have been the teams of research associates, fellows and students dedicated to the work and the active involvement of partner industries and universities. Four key related impacts are detailed below and all build on key scientific and mechanistic understanding. Industrial Impact statements Impact 1: Our 40 year corrosion warranties are at the heart of or premium products success.... this comes directly from an understanding of corrosion and photodegradation led by Swansea (Kevin Bygate, Technology and Innovation Director Tata Steel Colors, Nick Brown CTO Europe BASF Coatings) Impact 2: ... we had been unable to solve the chromium free treatment of our electrical steels. We invested £250k on a new coater solution and we are now producing ~60% grade 1 appearance standard compared to ~10% prior to the work with SPECIFIC (Dr Laura Baker Technical Manager, Cogent, Newport) Impact 3: New products in the construction require lifetime and function; already work on pigmentation at Swansea has improved the efficiency of our transpired solar collectors being fitted to buildings in the UK. This basic function is driving development work of our next generation of coatings at the SPECIFIC IKC (Paul Jones Innovation Manager Tata Steel) Impact 4: The graduates that come from our EngD partnership are the life blood of our technical and management sections. Their research outputs directly affect our business competitiveness and the large number that work in our supply chain continue to add value after they have left the University. I should know as I was one of the first batch of graduates in 1996! (Dr Martin Brunnock, Technical Director Tata Steel Strip Products) Sources to corroborate these impact statements. Impact 1: Contact Mike Coppack; Manager Tata Steel Shotton, Deeside, CH2 4NL, Mike.Coppack@tatasteel.com Impact 2: Dr Laura Baker, Technical Manager, Orb Electrical Steels , Cogent Power, Newport, NP19 0RB laura.baker@tatasteel.com Impact 3: Contact Kevin Bygate, Director of Innovation, Tata Steel Colors, Baglan Bay Innovation Centre, Central Avenue, SA12 7AX Kevin.bygate@tatasteel.com Impact 4: Contact Dr Martin Brunnock, Technical Director, Tata Steel Europe, Port Talbot Works, SA13 2NG, martin.brunnock@tatasteel.com
First Year Of Impact 2007
Sector Chemicals,Construction,Education,Energy,Environment,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Transport
Impact Types Economic

 
Description EPSRC
Amount £255,901 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/H007008/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £5,012,105 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/I019278/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £255,901 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/H007008/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £1,248,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/I015507/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £88,340 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/F030819/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £88,340 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/F030819/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £307,934 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/E035205/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Welsh European Funding Office
Amount £3,905,787 (GBP)
Funding ID 80339 
Organisation Government of Wales 
Department Welsh European Funding Office
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Welsh European Funding Office
Amount £3,905,787 (GBP)
Funding ID 80339 
Organisation Government of Wales 
Department Welsh European Funding Office
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Welsh European Funding Office
Amount £14,341,737 (GBP)
Funding ID 80380 
Organisation Government of Wales 
Department Welsh European Funding Office
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Welsh European Funding Office
Amount £14,341,737 (GBP)
Funding ID 80380 
Organisation Government of Wales 
Department Welsh European Funding Office
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start