Pervasive Computing Support for Market Trading

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sussex
Department Name: Sch of Engineering and Informatics

Abstract

Much commerce in the UK happens in more informal marketplaces than in High Street shops, such as flea markets, record and antique fairs, and auctions. Our aim is to investigate how we decide to trust in an interaction within these marketplaces, and using this information, build technologies and software to support these interactions, ranging from techniques to allow easy tracking of inventories through to enabling participation in distributed auctions. By studying how trust is used in these arenas, we believe we can make a fundamental contribution to how we can build pervasive computing technology that both is, and shows itself to be trustworthy.

Publications

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Krukow K (2008) A logical framework for history-based access control and reputation systems in Journal of Computer Security

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Stanier J (2010) Can we use trust in online dating? in Journal of Wireless Mobile Networks, Ubiquitous Computing, and Dependable Applications

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Krukow K (2008) Trust models in ubiquitous computing. in Philosophical transactions. Series A, Mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences

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ElSalamouny E (2009) An analysis of the exponential decay principle in probabilistic trust models in Theoretical Computer Science

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Naicken S (2012) Trust Management VI

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Robinson J (2008) Trust Management II

 
Description This project developed and showed how trust can be instantiated in spatially located software to help the development of effective commerce. We developed and deployed a handheld software for deployment within farmers' markets, where QRCodes on the stalls could be used to locate the information relevant to that vendor. This was deployed in Farmers' Markets in Hove and Lewes, and was shown to be effective. Further work on the deployment of a kiosk for directing shoppers around a local shopping area further deepened our understanding of trust. Finally we developed a well-grounded mechanism for using trust in the construction of publish/subscribe trees.
Exploitation Route The evolution of handheld computing has overtaken our original approach of using QRCodes to locate information. However, our approach to building trusted pub/sub trees remains sound, and we look forward to picking this up again in the development of continuing work on DTNs for phones.
Sectors Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism

 
Description King's College London 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2006
 
Description University College London 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
Start Year 2006