Delivering sustainable water systems by optimising existing infrastructure via improved knowledge, understanding and technology - project NEPTUNE

Lead Research Organisation: Imperial College London
Department Name: Civil & Environmental Engineering

Abstract

Water service providers (WSPs) have obligations to supply drinking water to all consumers that meets increasingly stringent water quality regulations and minimum flow and pressure criteria. At the same time, WSPs are required to be ever more efficient to demonstrate value, moves to sustainable operation and also to be more profitable (even where the supplies are publicly provided). Worldwide, not only in the UK, suppliers of water increasingly have to meet a widening range of performance criteria that are expected to improve year-on-year. Other pressures include the growing costs and availability of energy needed to deliver water, especially through pumping, the increasing uncertainty caused by climate change and the drive to minimise water losses from supply networks. Traditionally the supply of water via networks, to the tap, has been provided by large scale engineering and low-risk, low-technology systems. These rely heavily on energy use for pumping etc. and often operate inefficiently, with more pumping than is needed and excessive pressures in networks, leading to higher than necessary levels of leakage. NEPTUNE intends, by advancing knowledge and understanding and introducing new IT and technological systems, to provide the means whereby water service providers in the UK (and elsewhere, where the systems are similar), can better integrate the operation of their supply systems, to more efficiently manage security at the tap, minimise leakage and the redundant and unnecessary transfer of water or storage, hence saving resources, especially costs and energy.

Publications

10 25 50
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Bicik J (2011) Pipe burst diagnostics using evidence theory in Journal of Hydroinformatics

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Ediriweera D (2010) Monitoring water distribution systems: understanding and managing sensor networks in Drinking Water Engineering and Science

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Farley B (2013) Development and Field Validation of a Burst Localization Methodology in Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management

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Ye G (2014) Study of Burst Alarming and Data Sampling Frequency in Water Distribution Networks in Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management

 
Description Development of a range of novel analysis tools for optimising and managing water distribution networks.
Exploitation Route Main findings were produced in collaboration with water utilities and system control supplier, who will incorporate research and tools in their future R&D activities.
Sectors Environment,Other

 
Description New knowledge and research tools incorporated into future R&D activities of water companies.
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £94,329 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/H500235/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description EPSRC
Amount £94,329 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/H500235/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Technology Strategy Board
Amount £132,000 (GBP)
Funding ID P2 210910 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Technology Strategy Board
Amount £163,000 (GBP)
Funding ID UIN1797 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Technology Strategy Board
Amount £131,000 (GBP)
Funding ID UIN1851 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start