EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Faculty of Engineering

Abstract

The EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing will create a sustainable and multidisciplinary body of expertise that will act as a UK and international focus - the 'go to' place for additive manufacturing and its applications. The Centre will undertake a user-defined and user-driven programme of innovative research that underpins Additive Manufacturing as a sustainable and value-adding manufacturing process across multiple industry sectors.Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the direct production of end-use component parts made using additive layer manufacturing technologies. It enables the manufacture of geometrically complex, low to medium volume production components in a range of materials, with little, if any, fixed tooling or manual intervention beyond the initial product design. AM enables a number of value chain configurations, such as personalised component part manufacture but also economic low volume production within high cost base economies. This innovative approach to manufacturing is now being embraced globally across industry sectors from high value aerospace / automotive manufacture to the creative and digital industries. To date AM research has almost exclusively focused upon the production of single material, homogeneous structures (in polymers, metals and ceramics). The EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing will move away from single material, 'passive' AM processes and applications that exhibit conventional levels of functionality, toward the challenges of investigating next generation, multi-material active additive manufacturing processes, materials and design systems. This transformative approach is required for the production of the new generation of high-value, multi-functional products demanded by industry. The Centre will initially explore two themes as the centrepieces of a wider research portfolio, supported by a range of platform activities. The first theme takes on the challenge of how to design, integrate and effectively implement multi-material, multi-functional manufacturing systems capable of matching the requirements of industrial end-users for 'ready-assembled' multifunctional devices and structures. Working at the macro level, this will involve the convergence of several approaches to increase embedded value to the product during the manufacturing stage by the direct printing / deposition of electronic / optical tracks potentially on a voxel by voxel basis; the processing and bonding of dissimilar materials that ordinarily require processing at varying temperatures and conditions will be particularly challenging. The second theme will explore the potential for 'scaling down' AM for small, complex components, extending single material AM to the printing of optical / electronic pathways within micro-level products and with a vision to directly print electronics integrally. The platform activities will provide the opportunity to undertake both fundamental and industry driven pilot studies that both feed into and derive from the theme-based research, and grow the capacity and capability of the Centre, creating a truly national UK Centre and Network that maintains the UK at the front of international research and industrial exploitation in Additive Manufacturing.

Planned Impact

Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the direct production of end-use component parts made using additive layer manufacturing technologies. AM enables the manufacture of geometrically complex, low to medium volume production components in a range of materials, with little, if any, fixed tooling or manual intervention beyond the initial product design. It enables a number of value chain configurations, such as personalised component part manufacture but also economic low volume production within high cost base economies. The concept of 'active' AM is to use the layer wise approach to add value to a component part during manufacture. This could be by embedding electronic interconnects or optical pathways into the parts during production, or by using different materials in the same part to add functions that cannot be achieved in a single manufacturing step using conventional processes. This might be the production of parts with dissimilar mechanical or thermal properties, the production of parts with different functional surface coatings or the production of parts with new materials that exhibit increased mechanical, electrical or thermal properties. AM provides a basis for long-term innovation within UK manufacturing and in particular, the concept of 'growing' entire components offers significant benefit to the high-value manufacturing sector, based on innovative design solutions. Though AM is already cross-sectoral in nature, with the development of the multi-functional AM components envisaged comes the opportunity to engage with new product sectors, such as the optical and electrical devices industries, thus reaping the ultimate benefits and impact of this research. The current AM market place for machine tools, materials and services (such as software) is valued at just over $1-billion. However, it must also be acknowledged that as an enabling technology, AM adds the greatest value in its application, through design freedoms, production flexibility and supply chain economics. From this applications perspective (medium to long term), the opportunities of active or intelligent AM are significant and diverse and characterised by the value added to a component and potential compression of the supply chain. It is this high value added opportunity that the Centre's industrial partners want to enable, through the development of multifunctional AM processes, materials, software tools and supply chains. It can thus be seen that there will be multiple beneficiaries from the Centre's research. The Centre's partners represent a variety of end user industries - both multinational and SMEs - together with the equipment and systems manufacturers and suppliers representing the value chain. The benefits from the new technology and processes will enable new product and market opportunities in diverse manufacturing sectors, and economies in production of existing components and systems. Our early research is already being taken up by industry; the timescales for further benefits from the Centre's research will range from short (1-2 years) for results of the early industry pilots, through to the longer term (8-10) years for full realisation of multifunctional AM at the meso/micro scale. From a wider perspective, the UK will benefit through increased competitive advantage of its manufacturing industries, and the public will gain through new products at economic costs. From a societal view, the advantages AM offers in the weight reduction of multifunctional components, and the efficiencies inherent in their production, will lead to the environmental gain of lower carbon footprints - particularly in the aerospace and automotive industries.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50

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Abdi M. (2012) X-FEM based topological optimization method in SIMULTECH 2012 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications

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Aboulkhair N (2014) Reducing porosity in AlSi10Mg parts processed by selective laser melting in Additive Manufacturing

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Aboulkhair N (2017) Selective laser melting of aluminum alloys in MRS Bulletin

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Aboulkhair N (2015) On the Precipitation Hardening of Selective Laser Melted AlSi10Mg in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A

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Alghamdi A (2014) Creep Resistance of Novel Polyethylene/Carbon Black Nanocomposites in International Journal of Materials Science and Engineering

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Aremu A (2013) The effects of bidirectional evolutionary structural optimization parameters on an industrial designed component for additive manufacture in Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture

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Babu S (2015) Additive manufacturing in Materials Science and Technology

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Baumers M (2016) The cost of additive manufacturing: machine productivity, economies of scale and technology-push in Technological Forecasting and Social Change

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Bidare P (2018) Fluid and particle dynamics in laser powder bed fusion in Acta Materialia

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Brennan-Craddock J (2012) The design of impact absorbing structures for additive manufacture in Journal of Physics: Conference Series

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Capel AJ (2013) Design and additive manufacture for flow chemistry. in Lab on a chip

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
EP/I033335/1 01/10/2011 30/06/2012 £5,973,220
EP/I033335/2 Transfer EP/I033335/1 01/07/2012 31/03/2017 £5,618,008
 
Description The EPSRC Centre has, through the unique funding mechanism, enabled a critical mass of focused research activity on a new area of multifunctional additive manufacturing. This is leading to the discovery of new manufacturing processes, materials and computational methods for the manufacture of multifunctional devices in one build operation. This activity, though nascent, has the potential transform manufacturing enterprises for a range of sectors (aero/auto, consumer, pharma, etc).
Exploitation Route As an example, please see quote from HP:
"As additive manufacturing matures, technologies will evolve to transform the ways in which engineers design and fabricate parts. My research team, within the printing group, recently evaluated additive manufacturing research groups around the world and identified the Additive Manufacturing Research Group at the University of Nottingham as a world leader.. I believe the proposed use of 3D Printing to fabricate multi-functional parts is revolutionary
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Chemicals,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Energy,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology,Retail,Transport

URL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/CfAM
 
Description We have engaged with multiple industries through the purpose-created spin out Added Scientific Ltd
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Chemicals,Education,Environment,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description AM Strategy (P Dickens). The AM Strategy has been cited in the Made Smarter Review 2017 and submitted a response to the Industrial Strategy Consultation Process
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/made-smarter-review
 
Description DSTL Future Manufacturing for Defence Applications
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
 
Description Development of UK Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - instigated by Prof Phill Dickens, continuing with BEIS, ongoing
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Evidence paper commissioned by Foresight, Government Office for Science, London in 2013. Dickens, P. Kelly, M. and Williams, J. 'What are the significant trends shaping technology relevant to manufacturing'
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/future-of-manufacturing
 
Description Lead of Expert Mission to Taiwan
Geographic Reach Australia 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description PD - Advanced Manufacturing Symposium, Beijing, 2-3 March 2015
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description TSB Special Interest Group on Additive Manufacturing
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://connect.innovateuk.org/documents/2998699/3675986/UK+Review+of+Additive+Manufacturing+-+AM+SI...
 
Description 3D Printing of polysiloxanes
Amount £16,000 (GBP)
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2013 
End 02/2016
 
Description 3DP-RDM: Defining the research agenda for 3D printing enabled re-distributed manufacturing- feasibility study funding competition
Amount £41,548 (GBP)
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description AFOSR: INTERNATIONAL - EOARD: Nanoscale manufacturing by combining two-photon photoreduction
Amount £115,578 (GBP)
Organisation European Office of Aerospace Research & Development (EOARD) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2014 
End 10/2015
 
Description ALSAM - Aluminium Lattice Structures via Additive Manufacturing
Amount £229,586 (GBP)
Funding ID 11700-72213 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2013 
End 04/2015
 
Description AMOTEM - Additive Manufacturing of Tailored Electro-Magnetic Materials
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Funding ID CDE27117 
Organisation Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2012 
End 03/2013
 
Description AWE - Metaljetting
Amount £618,848 (GBP)
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2015 
End 06/2018
 
Description AWE- Jetting of Silicones
Amount £462,009 (GBP)
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 08/2018
 
Description AWE- Powder Bed Fusion of Syntactic Foams/ Silicone Jetting
Amount £142,122 (GBP)
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 03/2017
 
Description Ann McLaren fellowship ( Nesma Aboulkhair)
Amount £75,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2020
 
Description Automation of 3D cell model assembly by additive printing (EPSRC Research Topic Classifications: Design & Testing Technology, Tissue engineering)
Amount £80,876 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/M506849/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 12/2015
 
Description BAE Systems- Canning Town project
Amount £95,320 (GBP)
Organisation BAE Systems 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2012 
End 12/2014
 
Description BMW Group funded PhD in Laser Sintering Materials Development
Amount £33,051 (GBP)
Organisation Bayerische Motoren Werke (BMW) 
Sector Private
Country Germany
Start 12/2011 
End 11/2014
 
Description Capital funding for the eight great technologies
Amount £2,717,669 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2013 
End 09/2014
 
Description Centre for Doctoral Training
Amount £4,779,340 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/L01534X/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2014 
End 09/2022
 
Description Complex Materials for Advanced Device Fabrication Through the Combination of Holographic Optical Tweezers and Multiphoton Absorption
Amount $146,700 (USD)
Organisation United States Air Force 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 03/2017 
End 02/2018
 
Description Confidential subject GSK
Amount £652,196 (GBP)
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) 
Sector Private
Country Global
Start 11/2014 
End 09/2018
 
Description Confidential subject PPG
Amount £77,529 (GBP)
Organisation PPG Industries, UK. Ltd 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2014 
End 09/2017
 
Description Creativity @ Home
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2013 
End 07/2013
 
Description DSTL Centre for Defence Enterprise - 3DPV
Amount £99,091 (GBP)
Funding ID CDE28222 
Organisation Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2012 
End 06/2013
 
Description DSTL Centre for Defence Enterprise- SMART3D Project
Amount £36,239 (GBP)
Organisation Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2013 
End 11/2013
 
Description EOARD USAF
Amount $125,000 (USD)
Organisation United States Air Force 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 02/2014 
End 11/2014
 
Description EPSRC Early Career Research Block Grant ( N Aboulkhair, M Simonelli)
Amount £60,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 10/2019
 
Description EPSRC Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectrometer
Amount £699,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/M008509/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
 
Description EU DIGINOVA
Amount € 50,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission 
Department Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 08/2012 
End 07/2013
 
Description Enabling Next Generation Additive Manufacturing Programmne Grant
Amount £5,852,466 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P031684/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2022
 
Description Foresight Fellowship in Manufacturing - The Future of Additive Manufacturing
Amount £198,235 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N009088/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2015 
End 06/2017
 
Description Functional Lattices for Automotive Component (FLAC)
Amount £368,286 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2016 
End 06/2019
 
Description Future Formulation
Amount £3,800,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N024818/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2020
 
Description Future Formulation- Formulation for 3D printing: Creating a plug and play platform for a disruptive UK industry.
Amount £3,531,769 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N024818/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2020
 
Description GSK Additive Printing
Amount £850,000 (GBP)
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) 
Sector Private
Country Global
Start 11/2015 
End 11/2019
 
Description HITEA2 (Highly Innovative Technology Enablers for Aerospace 2) - ALMER project
Amount £197,966 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2014 
End 02/2017
 
Description HITEA2 (Highly Innovative Technology Enablers for Aerospace 2) - ASID project
Amount £132,774 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2014 
End 12/2016
 
Description Hermes Fellowship programme administered through the University of Nottingham (Dr Ian Maskery)
Amount £25,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2018 
End 07/2018
 
Description Hermes Fellowship programme administered through the University of Nottingham (Dr Yinfeng He)
Amount £25,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Nottingham 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2017 
End 07/2017
 
Description IDEAS Factory Sandpits - Wearable soft robotics
Amount £324,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/M026388/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2015 
End 06/2018
 
Description In Jet Interferometry for Ultra Precise Electrolyte Jet Machining (Co- Investigator)
Amount £26,808 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2015 
End 04/2018
 
Description MTC_Metal powder bed
Amount £72,000 (GBP)
Organisation Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2013 
End 09/2017
 
Description Multiphase models for blood flow, Healthcare and Biosciences iNet Collaborative Research and Development (CRD)
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Funding ID RC4568 
Organisation East Midlands Medilink 
Department Healthcare & Bioscience iNet
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2012 
End 02/2013
 
Description NC3R Automation of 3D cell model assembly by additive printing
Amount £134,000 (GBP)
Funding ID TS/M00323X/1 
Organisation TSB Bank plc 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 12/2015
 
Description NSF-EPSRC A Transatlantic Institute for Volumetric Powder Bed Fusion
Amount £254,060 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R02460X/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2020
 
Description Next Generation Biomaterials Discovery (co-Investigator)
Amount £320,364 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N006615/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2015 
End 11/2020
 
Description PPG- Reactive Jetting of Polymers
Amount £31,359 (GBP)
Organisation PPG Industries, UK. Ltd 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2013 
End 02/2014
 
Description SABIC resins for reactive additive manufacturing processes
Amount £80,529 (GBP)
Organisation Saudi Basic Industries Corporation 
Sector Public
Country Saudi Arabia
Start 10/2014 
End 09/2017
 
Description Silicone Jetting
Amount £356,477 (GBP)
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 01/2021
 
Description UK Quantum Technology Hub for Sensors and Metrology (Co-Investigator)
Amount £87,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/M013294/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2014 
End 11/2019
 
Description Wolfson Trust - Clean room for AM new building
Amount £1,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Wolfson Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2016 
End 04/2018
 
Description Y He- Visiting Researcher Fellowship (University of Seville)
Amount € 9,000 (EUR)
Organisation University of Seville 
Sector Academic/University
Country Spain
Start 10/2018 
End 11/2018
 
Description 3D Printing of Biologically and Mechanically Functional Tissue Engineering Structures 
Organisation University of Newcastle
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Ricky Wildman and Dr Chris Tuck.
Collaborator Contribution A key limitation of many biofabrication strategies for load bearing applications has been low strength and stiffness of the structures which can be created whilst co-processing cells and biomaterials. The overall aim of this project was to evaluate approaches to 3D printing of biologically functional structures which would allow for a structural biopolymer to be generated in the same processing step. The project was multi-disciplinary, with contributions from chemistry, biomaterials science, engineering and biology. The main achievements have been: -The development of a process which allows stable bio-inks to be prepared. A piezoelectrically actuated drop-on-demand printing system (Jetlab iv) has been used to deposit electrostatically stabilised cells from a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS), and the effectiveness of a polyelectrolyte cell encapsulant to maintain cell dispersion within a bio ink was assessed. Cells were coated with a number of thicknesses of a cationic poly-l-lysine (PLL) encapsulant and their ability to release studied over 7 days. Results indicated the dispersion and printability of coated cells was significantly better than that of uncoated cells. It is concluded that electrostatic stabilisation of bio-inks could provide a solution to cell aggregation, increasing viable printing time and decreasing poor yields due to orifice obstruction. -The development of a process for printing acrylate monomers and light curing them. Hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) was printed, using the Jetlab vi with a drop on demand printhead, with camphorquinone (CQ) as a photoinitiator, and a nitrogen shielding atmosphere. Blue light at 470 nm was used to cure the printed material, and 20 layers of material (0.7 mm height) have been deposited, with blue light curing under nitrogen shielding after each pass. -The creation of hard/soft composite biomaterial structure using a combined inkjet and microvalve approach. Using the HEMA system described above rigid 2D scaffold structures were produced which included wells for the introduction of a bio-ink analogue, the aim being to demonstrate that stacking the 2D slices could create a rigid 3D scaffold which could be pre-seeded with a bio-ink. The wells were then back filled with a blue stained, low viscosity bio-ink analogue, using a micro-valve deposition system. The implication of this works was: - The ability to formulate bioprinting inks in which suspensions of cells and other biological materials can be maintained, without affecting biological response, is crucial in producing robust printing strategies for tissue engineering. The encapsulation process we have developed provides a new and potentially widely applicable approach to doing this. - Cell/material co-processing with hard and soft materials, using processes which are scalable, opens up new possibilities in terms of the range of products and devices which can be made using a biofabrication approach. HEMA is a load bearing material commonly used in dentistry, and by showing that printing of HEMA alongside valve deposition of gels is possible the project has opened up a new route to the manufacture of cell/material composite structures, using two technologies which are automated and scalable.
Impact Conference contributions: - Benning, M and Dalgarno, K; "Stabilisation of Bio-ink Suspensions for Inkjet Printing"; poster presented at the Manufacturing the Future Conference 2014, held in Glasgow, on the 23rd-24th September, 2014. - Benning, M & Dalgarno, K; "Electrostatic Stabilisation of Drop on Demand Bio-Ink through the Cationic Encapsulation of Cells", presented at the Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium 2014, held in Austin, Texas on August 4-6th, 2014. - Benning, M. "Electrostatic Stabilisation of Bio-Ink through the Cationic Encapsulation of Cells for Piezo Drop On Demand Inkjet Printing", Tissue and Cell Engineering Society (TCES) Conference, held in Newcastle, 2nd - 4th July, 2014. The cell/material co-processing approach needs further development before publication, but conference papers and journal publications will also be prepared on the basis of this work.
Start Year 2013
 
Description AWE Contract Research 
Organisation Atomic Weapons Establishment
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided contract research capabilities to work on a number of projects based on additive manufacturing. These initial projects have led to AWE becoming a formal partner in our newly awarded Centre for Doctoral Trainging and further contract research currently being negotiated expected to be worth in the region of £1.1Million
Collaborator Contribution AWE provided an initial brief and additional testing capabilities for the materials developed
Impact These projects were multi-disciplinary in nature requiring expertise in manufacturing, chemistry and materials science.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Assessment of Organometallic-based Inks for Printing Conductive Silver Interconnects 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The aim of the initial feasibility project was to develop a flexible manufacturing route for interconnects, applicable to a number of metallic materials. The project can be differentiated from previous inkjet ink research, as it exploits the chemistry developed for atomic layer deposition (ALD) to form the basis of a new generation of low temperature ink formulations, capable of depositing metal films without the need for subsequent heat treatments.
Collaborator Contribution The project can be differentiated from previous inkjet ink research, as it exploits the chemistry developed for atomic layer deposition (ALD) to form the basis of a new generation of low temperature ink formulations, capable of depositing metal films without the need for subsequent heat treatments. The silver precursor was dissolved in a solvent, and investigated as the ink base. A systematic study of the ink injection characteristics, such as viscosity and surface tension of the metal solution
Impact The main outcome of this collaboration has been a successful EPSRC project at the University of Liverpool with the results being integrated into the EPSRC Centre (EPSRC Grant reference: EP/K008633/1).
Start Year 2012
 
Description Generation of Compound Microdrops 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initiation and start of the EPSRC Centre funded research project: Generation of Compound Microdrop. The project will be carried out by Prof Yulii Shikhmurzaev at Birmingham and James Sprittles at Oxford. The project has started on March 1st and the duration is 6 months. It is managed at the EPSRC Centre by Prof Ricky Wildman.
Collaborator Contribution The project is a feasibility study aimed at demonstrating theoretically that one can generate compound microdrops using coaxial jetting and developing the framework for the subsequent detailed simulation of the process. The study examined theoretically the possibility of forming compound microdrops, with different materials for the core and the carrier drop, using a co-axial jetting technique. The Team developed a novel computational modelling tool, based on the finite element method, to capture the initial stages in the formation of both a single and a compound microdrop.
Impact The project formed the theoretical part of a feasibility study into the generation of compound microdrops intended to result in a full-scale cross-disciplinary research proposal to be submitted to the EPSRC. The aim of this feasibility study was to demonstrate computationally that one can generate compound microdrops using a co-axial jetting technique and to develop this computational framework for any subsequent detailed simulation of the process. Future grant-funded research will enable both the modelling and the computational techniques, whose power has been demonstrated in this feasibility study, to be extended to allow the topological change (the actual break up of the liquid compound jet) to be captured. By mapping the (eight-dimensional) parameter space for compound microdrop formation in a fast, flexible and economic manner, the resulting software will be unique in its ability to guide the EPSRC Centre at Nottingham in the development of the next generation of complex additively manufactured products.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Generation of Compound Microdrops 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initiation and start of the EPSRC Centre funded research project: Generation of Compound Microdrop. The project will be carried out by Prof Yulii Shikhmurzaev at Birmingham and James Sprittles at Oxford. The project has started on March 1st and the duration is 6 months. It is managed at the EPSRC Centre by Prof Ricky Wildman.
Collaborator Contribution The project is a feasibility study aimed at demonstrating theoretically that one can generate compound microdrops using coaxial jetting and developing the framework for the subsequent detailed simulation of the process. The study examined theoretically the possibility of forming compound microdrops, with different materials for the core and the carrier drop, using a co-axial jetting technique. The Team developed a novel computational modelling tool, based on the finite element method, to capture the initial stages in the formation of both a single and a compound microdrop.
Impact The project formed the theoretical part of a feasibility study into the generation of compound microdrops intended to result in a full-scale cross-disciplinary research proposal to be submitted to the EPSRC. The aim of this feasibility study was to demonstrate computationally that one can generate compound microdrops using a co-axial jetting technique and to develop this computational framework for any subsequent detailed simulation of the process. Future grant-funded research will enable both the modelling and the computational techniques, whose power has been demonstrated in this feasibility study, to be extended to allow the topological change (the actual break up of the liquid compound jet) to be captured. By mapping the (eight-dimensional) parameter space for compound microdrop formation in a fast, flexible and economic manner, the resulting software will be unique in its ability to guide the EPSRC Centre at Nottingham in the development of the next generation of complex additively manufactured products.
Start Year 2013
 
Description GlaxoSmithKline 
Organisation GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The EPSRC Centre and the skills developed within it have created a platform of knowhow and facilities that have enabled this collaboration.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and ambition in the field of pharmaceutical production.
Impact None yet.
Start Year 2014
 
Description High Resolution Jet Printing for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation Queen Mary University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for underpinning scientific activity in other fields. The High Resolution Jet Printing for Additive Manufacturing project is funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing and overseen by Prof Richard Hague and Dr Chris Tuck.
Collaborator Contribution In inkjet based AM processes one of the major limiting influences on resolution and quality is the size of the ink drops used. Conventional inkjet systems are typically operated in the drop volume range 1 pl to 500 pl yielding surface features typically greater than~20 µm. Electrostatic inkjet printing has the potential to deposit significantly smaller volumes of material, using fluids having a viscosity range several orders of magnitude broader than from conventional inkjet and hence potentially obtain improved surface feature definition and reduce surface roughness in AM. The aim of the project was to use the high speed imaging capability at Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre to gain better understanding of the process of small droplet generation and deposition obtained via electrostatic printing, based on an approach developed at QMUL. The ability to use the technique to build a micron scale structure was also to be attempted.
Impact This research has advanced a better understanding of electrostatic inkjet processes. Techniques to investigate and print with small high velocity jets and drops have been refined and can be applied to this and other processes in the future. One of the composite images obtained during this collaboration is to be featured on the front cover of Abstracts given to delegates attending the IoP 2014 specialist meeting Science of Inkjet and Printed Drops.
Start Year 2014
 
Description High Resolution Jet Printing for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for underpinning scientific activity in other fields. The High Resolution Jet Printing for Additive Manufacturing project is funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing and overseen by Prof Richard Hague and Dr Chris Tuck.
Collaborator Contribution In inkjet based AM processes one of the major limiting influences on resolution and quality is the size of the ink drops used. Conventional inkjet systems are typically operated in the drop volume range 1 pl to 500 pl yielding surface features typically greater than~20 µm. Electrostatic inkjet printing has the potential to deposit significantly smaller volumes of material, using fluids having a viscosity range several orders of magnitude broader than from conventional inkjet and hence potentially obtain improved surface feature definition and reduce surface roughness in AM. The aim of the project was to use the high speed imaging capability at Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre to gain better understanding of the process of small droplet generation and deposition obtained via electrostatic printing, based on an approach developed at QMUL. The ability to use the technique to build a micron scale structure was also to be attempted.
Impact This research has advanced a better understanding of electrostatic inkjet processes. Techniques to investigate and print with small high velocity jets and drops have been refined and can be applied to this and other processes in the future. One of the composite images obtained during this collaboration is to be featured on the front cover of Abstracts given to delegates attending the IoP 2014 specialist meeting Science of Inkjet and Printed Drops.
Start Year 2014
 
Description In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Dr Chris Tuck and Dr Adam Clare.
Collaborator Contribution The feasibility study evaluated complementary experimental and modelling techniques, which have the potential to provide a step change in understanding in this area. The specific objectives were to: -determine if in-situ flash x-ray imaging can be used to monitor powder bed melting and the generation of gas bubbles and pores within the melt pool; -investigate discrete element method modelling to simulate the powder spreading in the SLM process and the effect of powder morphology on packing density variability; -use ex-situ high resolution x-ray tomography to characterise the powder packing in the bed and the retained defects in melted layers, to support the experiments and modelling. As the feasibility study was of a relatively short duration, the emphasis was on discovering the potential of combining the higher risk in-situ imaging experiments with the lower risk modelling and ex-situ validation. The project has been very useful for the project partners to apply their existing research expertise in this new area and learn about the capabilities of the other partners for possible future AM research. The open-architecture powder bed platform developed by Heriot-Watt could potentially prove very valuable for a range of experiments that involve in-situ monitoring of the build process, or that involve work with non-standard laser parameters or materials. For example, the ISIS neutron source has an interest in the additive manufacturing of neutron-absorbing materials such as boron, and in-situ neutron measurement of the variation in residual stress during the build process.
Impact Presentations: A.J. Moore et al., "In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading", International Conference on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing, Nottingham University, 7-9 July 2015 A.J. Moore, "Open-architecture system for in-situ x-ray imaging during selective laser melting (SLM)", AILU Additive Manufacturing Workshop, 22 March 2016 (Cranfield, UK) Publication: P. Bidare, R.R.J Maier, R.J. Beck, J. D. Shephard and A. J. Moore, "Open-architecture SLM system for in-situ flash x-ray imaging", In preparation
Start Year 2014
 
Description In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading 
Organisation STFC Laboratories
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Dr Chris Tuck and Dr Adam Clare.
Collaborator Contribution The feasibility study evaluated complementary experimental and modelling techniques, which have the potential to provide a step change in understanding in this area. The specific objectives were to: -determine if in-situ flash x-ray imaging can be used to monitor powder bed melting and the generation of gas bubbles and pores within the melt pool; -investigate discrete element method modelling to simulate the powder spreading in the SLM process and the effect of powder morphology on packing density variability; -use ex-situ high resolution x-ray tomography to characterise the powder packing in the bed and the retained defects in melted layers, to support the experiments and modelling. As the feasibility study was of a relatively short duration, the emphasis was on discovering the potential of combining the higher risk in-situ imaging experiments with the lower risk modelling and ex-situ validation. The project has been very useful for the project partners to apply their existing research expertise in this new area and learn about the capabilities of the other partners for possible future AM research. The open-architecture powder bed platform developed by Heriot-Watt could potentially prove very valuable for a range of experiments that involve in-situ monitoring of the build process, or that involve work with non-standard laser parameters or materials. For example, the ISIS neutron source has an interest in the additive manufacturing of neutron-absorbing materials such as boron, and in-situ neutron measurement of the variation in residual stress during the build process.
Impact Presentations: A.J. Moore et al., "In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading", International Conference on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing, Nottingham University, 7-9 July 2015 A.J. Moore, "Open-architecture system for in-situ x-ray imaging during selective laser melting (SLM)", AILU Additive Manufacturing Workshop, 22 March 2016 (Cranfield, UK) Publication: P. Bidare, R.R.J Maier, R.J. Beck, J. D. Shephard and A. J. Moore, "Open-architecture SLM system for in-situ flash x-ray imaging", In preparation
Start Year 2014
 
Description In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading 
Organisation University of Leeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Dr Chris Tuck and Dr Adam Clare.
Collaborator Contribution The feasibility study evaluated complementary experimental and modelling techniques, which have the potential to provide a step change in understanding in this area. The specific objectives were to: -determine if in-situ flash x-ray imaging can be used to monitor powder bed melting and the generation of gas bubbles and pores within the melt pool; -investigate discrete element method modelling to simulate the powder spreading in the SLM process and the effect of powder morphology on packing density variability; -use ex-situ high resolution x-ray tomography to characterise the powder packing in the bed and the retained defects in melted layers, to support the experiments and modelling. As the feasibility study was of a relatively short duration, the emphasis was on discovering the potential of combining the higher risk in-situ imaging experiments with the lower risk modelling and ex-situ validation. The project has been very useful for the project partners to apply their existing research expertise in this new area and learn about the capabilities of the other partners for possible future AM research. The open-architecture powder bed platform developed by Heriot-Watt could potentially prove very valuable for a range of experiments that involve in-situ monitoring of the build process, or that involve work with non-standard laser parameters or materials. For example, the ISIS neutron source has an interest in the additive manufacturing of neutron-absorbing materials such as boron, and in-situ neutron measurement of the variation in residual stress during the build process.
Impact Presentations: A.J. Moore et al., "In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading", International Conference on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing, Nottingham University, 7-9 July 2015 A.J. Moore, "Open-architecture system for in-situ x-ray imaging during selective laser melting (SLM)", AILU Additive Manufacturing Workshop, 22 March 2016 (Cranfield, UK) Publication: P. Bidare, R.R.J Maier, R.J. Beck, J. D. Shephard and A. J. Moore, "Open-architecture SLM system for in-situ flash x-ray imaging", In preparation
Start Year 2014
 
Description In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Dr Chris Tuck and Dr Adam Clare.
Collaborator Contribution The feasibility study evaluated complementary experimental and modelling techniques, which have the potential to provide a step change in understanding in this area. The specific objectives were to: -determine if in-situ flash x-ray imaging can be used to monitor powder bed melting and the generation of gas bubbles and pores within the melt pool; -investigate discrete element method modelling to simulate the powder spreading in the SLM process and the effect of powder morphology on packing density variability; -use ex-situ high resolution x-ray tomography to characterise the powder packing in the bed and the retained defects in melted layers, to support the experiments and modelling. As the feasibility study was of a relatively short duration, the emphasis was on discovering the potential of combining the higher risk in-situ imaging experiments with the lower risk modelling and ex-situ validation. The project has been very useful for the project partners to apply their existing research expertise in this new area and learn about the capabilities of the other partners for possible future AM research. The open-architecture powder bed platform developed by Heriot-Watt could potentially prove very valuable for a range of experiments that involve in-situ monitoring of the build process, or that involve work with non-standard laser parameters or materials. For example, the ISIS neutron source has an interest in the additive manufacturing of neutron-absorbing materials such as boron, and in-situ neutron measurement of the variation in residual stress during the build process.
Impact Presentations: A.J. Moore et al., "In-Situ Imaging of Particle-Beam Interactions in SLM and Modelling of Powder Spreading", International Conference on Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing, Nottingham University, 7-9 July 2015 A.J. Moore, "Open-architecture system for in-situ x-ray imaging during selective laser melting (SLM)", AILU Additive Manufacturing Workshop, 22 March 2016 (Cranfield, UK) Publication: P. Bidare, R.R.J Maier, R.J. Beck, J. D. Shephard and A. J. Moore, "Open-architecture SLM system for in-situ flash x-ray imaging", In preparation
Start Year 2014
 
Description Investigating electrochemical deposition from a light assisted system - Additive Manufacturing (AM) 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens, Prof Ricky Wildman and Dr Adam Clare.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the project was to explore the electrodeposition of a metallic structure in a jet configuration using energy input to accelerate the deposition process. Two different approaches designed to control and understand the deposition of metals for a 3D printing application have been developed initially. In the first system there have been employed an IR laser coupled to an electrode through a fibre optic cable. This study has shown that reductions in the uncompensated resistance of an electrode was possible through laser excitation of the system. In addition this local heating effect was shown to enhance the rate of mass transfer of material to an electrode surface. These effects were beneficial to the development of a fibre coupled electrodeposition system. Deployment of the system within a flowing jet system was also investigated. Under the conditions employed, heating effects were minimal suggesting that further refinement of the system is necessary. In the second system we developed a 'hot jet' plating system. This was found to improve plating rates and hence the potential speed at which a deposit could be generated. This technique in tandem with a thorough understanding of the electrochemical cell within this environment shows promise as a versatile and cheap technology for the electrodeposition of 3D structures on a suitable substrate. This technique was able to produce rapid growth of an electrodeposit on the surface of an electrode. The work has shown that electrodeposition under appropriate control and with careful experimental design is a versatile technology for the deposition of many different materials. This is not limited to materials with the ability to directly absorb laser light (e.g. 514 nm as described in the literature), but other highly reflecting materials. This is as a result of the novel approaches adopted where either the solvent is locally heated through the careful choice of laser wavelength and fibre optic technology or a hot jet approach where the liquid in the jet is rapidly heated and then ejected onto the electrode surface. Both of these approaches shows significant promise and require further investigation. In addition structures have been deposited at rates approaching those reported in the literature. However, the added versatility and simplicity of the new techniques suggest that these approaches show significant promise.
Impact The development of new concepts and academic output should be considered. Further grant support will be sought to continue the work and fully develop the possible impact the work suggests.
Start Year 2014
 
Description JFE steel corporation, Japan 
Organisation JFE Steel Corporation
Country Japan 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Centre for Additive Manufacturing at UoN will produce a demonstrator made of tin on a copper substrate using the droplet-on-demand technology Metaljet. The demonstrator is to be fabricated from Sn will be the JFE steel corporation logo. This logo will be printed on a 50*40 mm2 substrate. The research team will produce a report detailing the experimental conditions and results (droplet, velocity, etc). Photos (observation result of droplet collision behaviour) will be included.
Collaborator Contribution The collaborator provides the financial support for the study by taking responsibility for all the expenses for the experiments.
Impact The output from this study will be the demonstrator that will be provided to the sponsor.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Metaljet with Canon Oce 
Organisation Océ Holding
Country Netherlands 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have established an exclusive relationship with Canon Oce in the Netherlands to be their research partner in turning their proprietary metaljetting technology in to a Additive Manufacturing system.
Collaborator Contribution Supply of their proprietary metaljet technology
Impact Award of EPSRC funds for "Eight Great Technologies" for specialist metaljetting equipment
Start Year 2013
 
Description Optimising Impact Protection Through Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Ricky Wildman and Prof Ian Ashcroft.
Collaborator Contribution The project's aim was to develop a method for establishing the topologically optimized microstructure of cellular materials, for use within high strain-rate (i.e. impact) scenarios. The project brought together expertise of topology optimisation (Kim), impact materials and modelling (McShane) and experimental characterisation of impact performance (Theobald). The objectives are listed below: 1. To develop topology optimisation for impact 2. To determine candidate optimum material design 3. To investigate the performance of the optimum materials for impact Topology optimisation was developed to generate optimum solutions based on the existing literature under dynamic conditions. Careful investigations revealed that the plasticity and change in loads during optimisation need to be properly accounted for in the sensitivity formulation. The resulting optimum solutions were manufactured using additive manufacturing with hyperelastic material and investigated experimentally and found to be heavier but more compliant than a benchmark polymer foam. However, optimisation did not consider maximum acceleration as a constraint, thus there is a scope for reformulating topology optimisation to deliver improved performance at reduced weight. As a first attempt at realising cellular solution that satisfies the acceleration constraint, an analytical model was developed for an elastomeric cellular solid. This was also manufactured and tested experimentally and found to be significantly more compliant than the topologically optimised solutions. This indicates that the topological optimum solutions would not pass the acceleration criteria, further motivating the need for the revised formulation. In addition, the analytical solution was still found to underperform some established energy absorbing materials such as polymer foams. The analytical approach has a reduced design space and limits the optimum performance cellular materials can achieve. In conclusion, this project identified the key challenges in the topology optimisation formulation that need to be addressed to optimise materials for impact.
Impact The results of the projects form the basis for substantial future research, by clarifying the key challenges in the formulation parameters for optimisation for impact material. The conference paper that rigorously identify the research challenges form the basis and trackrecord for a collaborative proposal. The results of the work have been accepted for oral presentation: Kim HA, Duro J, McShane GJ, Theobald PS (2015) "Topology optimisation of additively manufactured impact resistant structures," Proceedings of the 23rd UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, April This research also provided opportunities to widen industrial contacts and to discuss future research with companies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Optimising Impact Protection Through Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Ricky Wildman and Prof Ian Ashcroft.
Collaborator Contribution The project's aim was to develop a method for establishing the topologically optimized microstructure of cellular materials, for use within high strain-rate (i.e. impact) scenarios. The project brought together expertise of topology optimisation (Kim), impact materials and modelling (McShane) and experimental characterisation of impact performance (Theobald). The objectives are listed below: 1. To develop topology optimisation for impact 2. To determine candidate optimum material design 3. To investigate the performance of the optimum materials for impact Topology optimisation was developed to generate optimum solutions based on the existing literature under dynamic conditions. Careful investigations revealed that the plasticity and change in loads during optimisation need to be properly accounted for in the sensitivity formulation. The resulting optimum solutions were manufactured using additive manufacturing with hyperelastic material and investigated experimentally and found to be heavier but more compliant than a benchmark polymer foam. However, optimisation did not consider maximum acceleration as a constraint, thus there is a scope for reformulating topology optimisation to deliver improved performance at reduced weight. As a first attempt at realising cellular solution that satisfies the acceleration constraint, an analytical model was developed for an elastomeric cellular solid. This was also manufactured and tested experimentally and found to be significantly more compliant than the topologically optimised solutions. This indicates that the topological optimum solutions would not pass the acceleration criteria, further motivating the need for the revised formulation. In addition, the analytical solution was still found to underperform some established energy absorbing materials such as polymer foams. The analytical approach has a reduced design space and limits the optimum performance cellular materials can achieve. In conclusion, this project identified the key challenges in the topology optimisation formulation that need to be addressed to optimise materials for impact.
Impact The results of the projects form the basis for substantial future research, by clarifying the key challenges in the formulation parameters for optimisation for impact material. The conference paper that rigorously identify the research challenges form the basis and trackrecord for a collaborative proposal. The results of the work have been accepted for oral presentation: Kim HA, Duro J, McShane GJ, Theobald PS (2015) "Topology optimisation of additively manufactured impact resistant structures," Proceedings of the 23rd UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, April This research also provided opportunities to widen industrial contacts and to discuss future research with companies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Optimising Impact Protection Through Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Ricky Wildman and Prof Ian Ashcroft.
Collaborator Contribution The project's aim was to develop a method for establishing the topologically optimized microstructure of cellular materials, for use within high strain-rate (i.e. impact) scenarios. The project brought together expertise of topology optimisation (Kim), impact materials and modelling (McShane) and experimental characterisation of impact performance (Theobald). The objectives are listed below: 1. To develop topology optimisation for impact 2. To determine candidate optimum material design 3. To investigate the performance of the optimum materials for impact Topology optimisation was developed to generate optimum solutions based on the existing literature under dynamic conditions. Careful investigations revealed that the plasticity and change in loads during optimisation need to be properly accounted for in the sensitivity formulation. The resulting optimum solutions were manufactured using additive manufacturing with hyperelastic material and investigated experimentally and found to be heavier but more compliant than a benchmark polymer foam. However, optimisation did not consider maximum acceleration as a constraint, thus there is a scope for reformulating topology optimisation to deliver improved performance at reduced weight. As a first attempt at realising cellular solution that satisfies the acceleration constraint, an analytical model was developed for an elastomeric cellular solid. This was also manufactured and tested experimentally and found to be significantly more compliant than the topologically optimised solutions. This indicates that the topological optimum solutions would not pass the acceleration criteria, further motivating the need for the revised formulation. In addition, the analytical solution was still found to underperform some established energy absorbing materials such as polymer foams. The analytical approach has a reduced design space and limits the optimum performance cellular materials can achieve. In conclusion, this project identified the key challenges in the topology optimisation formulation that need to be addressed to optimise materials for impact.
Impact The results of the projects form the basis for substantial future research, by clarifying the key challenges in the formulation parameters for optimisation for impact material. The conference paper that rigorously identify the research challenges form the basis and trackrecord for a collaborative proposal. The results of the work have been accepted for oral presentation: Kim HA, Duro J, McShane GJ, Theobald PS (2015) "Topology optimisation of additively manufactured impact resistant structures," Proceedings of the 23rd UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, April This research also provided opportunities to widen industrial contacts and to discuss future research with companies.
Start Year 2014
 
Description PEL Collaboration 
Organisation Printed Electronics Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided printing services of electronic materials for 3D devices
Collaborator Contribution Provided training facilities to learn nuances of 3D printing and enabled development of new print methodologies.
Impact Multidisciplinary, chemistry, materials and inkjet printing
Start Year 2011
 
Description PPG Collaboration 
Organisation PPG Industries, UK. Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provding contract research services and consultancy to PPG for materials development tuned to their chemistries
Collaborator Contribution PPG provide raw material synthesis and know-how to develop new materials for 3D printing, as well as providing mentoring for a currently funded studentship.
Impact These projects have been multidisciplinary, encompassing chemistry, materials science and manufacturing
Start Year 2013
 
Description Sabic Collaboration 
Organisation Saudi Basic Industries Corporation
Country Saudi Arabia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Providing PhD level research on to new materials for AM
Collaborator Contribution SABIC provide materials formulation and aspects of processing to develop new materials for inkjet printing
Impact Multidisciplinary research - chemistry, materials science and manufacturing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Self-assembling hybrid jetting inks for regenerative medicine 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This feasibility project sought to explore and expand the capability of current 3D inkjet printing technologies, particularly in the field of regenerative medicine. New ink formulations were targeted that possess desirable physical characteristics for jetting and that can produce the next generation of temporary templates (scaffolds) for tissue regeneration. Current jetting inks are not suitable for tissue scaffolds and adapting current biomaterials for jetting is not sufficient. The key objective of this feasibility study was to synthesise a new hybrid ink that can be jetted. Another objective of this project was to generate sufficient preliminary data to enable a larger proposal to be written that will explore candidate hybrid inks for optimal scaffold production for different tissues.
Collaborator Contribution Novel supramolecular polyurethanes (SPUs) have been designed, synthesised and tested for application in a 3D printer to generate features which represent the first steps towards biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine. A biodegradable polymer mid-block was reacted with a suitable diisocyanate in the bulk to yield a pre polymer which could then be end-capped with a series of weakly hydrogen bonding moieties yielding SPUs with self-assembling properties. From these polymers, the four best film forming polymers were prioritised for inkjet printing. Preliminary studies developed two waveforms and printing parameters which facilitated the deposition of all polymers. A benzylamine terminated polymer was observed to produce the best printed features on glass slides with respect to image resolution and was thus selected to take forward in hybrid material studies. Silica particles were loaded into the benzylamine terminated SPU and formulation at a number of different weight to volume ratios and formulations of with 5% silica (w/v) or 7.5%% (w/v) were successfully deposited. Analysis of these printed features allowed further understanding of the properties generated by the inclusion of hybrid particles in the printed features. The biocompatibility of the SPUs was also tested. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the polymers were non-toxic in accordance with ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12, where in the cells cultured did not fall below 70% of those cultured on a blank or a negative (non-toxic) controls. Cell attachment was also examined, revealing cell attachment was not affected by the addition of hydrogen bonding motifs to the biocompatible poly(caprolactone) polymer mid-block, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. This proof of concept study has demonstrated promising results towards the use of polymer hybrid materials which may be 3D printed to form biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine and there is excellent scope to further explore this concept.
Impact The long term aim of this collaborative study is to develop new jetting inks that will allow the manufacture of the next generation of scaffolds for bone and cartilage regeneration. The primary objective of this feasibility study was to assess the feasibility of jetting new hybrid inks containing supramolecular polymer networks and functionalised nanoparticles. The thermoreversible characteristics of supramolecular polymer networks featuring functionalised nanoparticles will also offer the capability to realise the first ink-jetted healable 3D structure. The findings from this report will be published in the form of a communication in the near future. Furthermore, an oral presentation will be delivered at the Additive Manufacturing Conference being held in Nottingham in July 2015.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Self-assembling hybrid jetting inks for regenerative medicine 
Organisation University of Reading
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This feasibility project sought to explore and expand the capability of current 3D inkjet printing technologies, particularly in the field of regenerative medicine. New ink formulations were targeted that possess desirable physical characteristics for jetting and that can produce the next generation of temporary templates (scaffolds) for tissue regeneration. Current jetting inks are not suitable for tissue scaffolds and adapting current biomaterials for jetting is not sufficient. The key objective of this feasibility study was to synthesise a new hybrid ink that can be jetted. Another objective of this project was to generate sufficient preliminary data to enable a larger proposal to be written that will explore candidate hybrid inks for optimal scaffold production for different tissues.
Collaborator Contribution Novel supramolecular polyurethanes (SPUs) have been designed, synthesised and tested for application in a 3D printer to generate features which represent the first steps towards biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine. A biodegradable polymer mid-block was reacted with a suitable diisocyanate in the bulk to yield a pre polymer which could then be end-capped with a series of weakly hydrogen bonding moieties yielding SPUs with self-assembling properties. From these polymers, the four best film forming polymers were prioritised for inkjet printing. Preliminary studies developed two waveforms and printing parameters which facilitated the deposition of all polymers. A benzylamine terminated polymer was observed to produce the best printed features on glass slides with respect to image resolution and was thus selected to take forward in hybrid material studies. Silica particles were loaded into the benzylamine terminated SPU and formulation at a number of different weight to volume ratios and formulations of with 5% silica (w/v) or 7.5%% (w/v) were successfully deposited. Analysis of these printed features allowed further understanding of the properties generated by the inclusion of hybrid particles in the printed features. The biocompatibility of the SPUs was also tested. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the polymers were non-toxic in accordance with ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12, where in the cells cultured did not fall below 70% of those cultured on a blank or a negative (non-toxic) controls. Cell attachment was also examined, revealing cell attachment was not affected by the addition of hydrogen bonding motifs to the biocompatible poly(caprolactone) polymer mid-block, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. This proof of concept study has demonstrated promising results towards the use of polymer hybrid materials which may be 3D printed to form biomedical scaffolds for regenerative medicine and there is excellent scope to further explore this concept.
Impact The long term aim of this collaborative study is to develop new jetting inks that will allow the manufacture of the next generation of scaffolds for bone and cartilage regeneration. The primary objective of this feasibility study was to assess the feasibility of jetting new hybrid inks containing supramolecular polymer networks and functionalised nanoparticles. The thermoreversible characteristics of supramolecular polymer networks featuring functionalised nanoparticles will also offer the capability to realise the first ink-jetted healable 3D structure. The findings from this report will be published in the form of a communication in the near future. Furthermore, an oral presentation will be delivered at the Additive Manufacturing Conference being held in Nottingham in July 2015.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Smart Photoreactive Materials for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens and Dr Ruth Goodridge.
Collaborator Contribution Automated deposition of materials in a layer-by-layer fashion according to a three-dimensional pattern, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a transformative manufacturing technique, but the palette of materials for use in AM is limited. One area that has been identified as requiring new approaches is the development of robust ceramic AM processes using materials such as ultra-high temperature ceramics, bioceramics for tissue engineering (hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates), or perovskites for fuel cell cathodes. The collaborators proposed to develop particulate material formulations that exist as a stable dispersion (initially repulsive), but aggregate upon irradiation via electrostatically driven self-assembly (surfactant reveals an attractive component upon UV irradiation). This photo-initiated gelling mechanism could be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden), and materials engineering (Claeyssens, Garcia-Tunon Blanca, Leigh, Rawson). This project aimed to contribute to the current challenges by using a new formulation strategy. It was proposed to design and produce photo switchable surfactants that, when used with ceramic particles would initially stabilise particles suspensions but yield controlled, electrostatic self-assembly into a ceramic particle network upon UV irradiation. This photo-initiated binding mechanism can be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. Regarding continuous extrusion, the aim was to formulate a ceramic photosensitive system with low viscosity that could flow through very narrow nozzles, but could switch rheological behaviour upon UV irradiation to comply with the requirements for the 3D deposition process (stiff and strong filaments). To achieve this ambitious goal the project was divided into 2 distinctive work packages: (i) the synthesis of a set of bifunctional charged molecules which would able to anchor to the ceramic particle. The original concept is to decorate particles with an equal mixture of surfactants that display a permanent positive charge and photo-switchable surfactants which switch from hydrophobic to negatively charged upon irradiation with UV light (~346 nm) at pH>7. The release of the complementary charge is expected to lead to agglomeration of the particles. To enable this study a library of different surfactants (eight non-commercially available target compounds) were synthesised. The produced surfactants were further evaluated on their capabilities to stabilise ceramic suspensions. This work focused on the assessment of the functionalization and attachment of the surfactants to the surface of particles and ability to bind them into a network. The particles used in the assessment were SiC, Al2O3 and SiO2 particles. We studied both glutaric acid (GA) and guanidinobutyric acid (GBA). GA was not a good dispersant for Al2O3 particles, although both GA and GBA significantly reduced the water contact angle of a surface coated with the Al2O3 particles. Wit was further studied the rheological properties of the nanoparticle/surfactant mixtures. The mixtures should ideally exhibit shear thinning behavior and should be viscoelastic, with a high elastic component. The produced mixtures exhibit shear thinning but do not have the viscoelastic behavior required for slurry extrusion. Finally the team explored binding molecules to link the GBA and GA to the nanoparticles. The linker molecule they investigated was aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). This molecule is a good binding molecule for crosslinking with carboxylic acid moieties, and potential future work will be focused on covalently linking GA and GBA to the nanoparticle surfaces. It has been identified a route to functionalise ceramic slurries so that they set via photochemical activation. This route could be applicable for a host of applications, e.g. novel filler materials for dentistry and bone defects. In this project a potential photoactive ceramic resin was investigated, and it was synthesised a photo-activated form of glutaric acid. Furthermore it was investigated the potential of GA and GBA as dispersants for Al2O3, SiO2 and SiC nanoparticles. Neither of the surfactant molecules acted as an appropriate dispersant of the nanoparticles. To follow on from this the team investigated the use of silanes (APTES) as a covalent linker molecule in between the nanoparticle surface and the surfactant. It was found that APTES functionalises the nanoparticle surfaces in an adequate way, and in future they will investigate covalent binding of the surfactant to the nanoparticle surface.
Impact This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden- University of Nottingham/Chemistry), and materials engineering (Claeyssens- Sheffield University, Garcia-Tunon Blanca- Imperial College, Leigh- University of Warwick, Rawson- University of Nottingham/Pharmacy ). The jumpstart funding route helped to establish research links and partnerships which were almost impossible to establish otherwise. The members of the research team do intend to further collaborate via joined proposals to RCUK. The jumpstart process is a good vehicle to rapidly establish research collaborations.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Smart Photoreactive Materials for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens and Dr Ruth Goodridge.
Collaborator Contribution Automated deposition of materials in a layer-by-layer fashion according to a three-dimensional pattern, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a transformative manufacturing technique, but the palette of materials for use in AM is limited. One area that has been identified as requiring new approaches is the development of robust ceramic AM processes using materials such as ultra-high temperature ceramics, bioceramics for tissue engineering (hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates), or perovskites for fuel cell cathodes. The collaborators proposed to develop particulate material formulations that exist as a stable dispersion (initially repulsive), but aggregate upon irradiation via electrostatically driven self-assembly (surfactant reveals an attractive component upon UV irradiation). This photo-initiated gelling mechanism could be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden), and materials engineering (Claeyssens, Garcia-Tunon Blanca, Leigh, Rawson). This project aimed to contribute to the current challenges by using a new formulation strategy. It was proposed to design and produce photo switchable surfactants that, when used with ceramic particles would initially stabilise particles suspensions but yield controlled, electrostatic self-assembly into a ceramic particle network upon UV irradiation. This photo-initiated binding mechanism can be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. Regarding continuous extrusion, the aim was to formulate a ceramic photosensitive system with low viscosity that could flow through very narrow nozzles, but could switch rheological behaviour upon UV irradiation to comply with the requirements for the 3D deposition process (stiff and strong filaments). To achieve this ambitious goal the project was divided into 2 distinctive work packages: (i) the synthesis of a set of bifunctional charged molecules which would able to anchor to the ceramic particle. The original concept is to decorate particles with an equal mixture of surfactants that display a permanent positive charge and photo-switchable surfactants which switch from hydrophobic to negatively charged upon irradiation with UV light (~346 nm) at pH>7. The release of the complementary charge is expected to lead to agglomeration of the particles. To enable this study a library of different surfactants (eight non-commercially available target compounds) were synthesised. The produced surfactants were further evaluated on their capabilities to stabilise ceramic suspensions. This work focused on the assessment of the functionalization and attachment of the surfactants to the surface of particles and ability to bind them into a network. The particles used in the assessment were SiC, Al2O3 and SiO2 particles. We studied both glutaric acid (GA) and guanidinobutyric acid (GBA). GA was not a good dispersant for Al2O3 particles, although both GA and GBA significantly reduced the water contact angle of a surface coated with the Al2O3 particles. Wit was further studied the rheological properties of the nanoparticle/surfactant mixtures. The mixtures should ideally exhibit shear thinning behavior and should be viscoelastic, with a high elastic component. The produced mixtures exhibit shear thinning but do not have the viscoelastic behavior required for slurry extrusion. Finally the team explored binding molecules to link the GBA and GA to the nanoparticles. The linker molecule they investigated was aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). This molecule is a good binding molecule for crosslinking with carboxylic acid moieties, and potential future work will be focused on covalently linking GA and GBA to the nanoparticle surfaces. It has been identified a route to functionalise ceramic slurries so that they set via photochemical activation. This route could be applicable for a host of applications, e.g. novel filler materials for dentistry and bone defects. In this project a potential photoactive ceramic resin was investigated, and it was synthesised a photo-activated form of glutaric acid. Furthermore it was investigated the potential of GA and GBA as dispersants for Al2O3, SiO2 and SiC nanoparticles. Neither of the surfactant molecules acted as an appropriate dispersant of the nanoparticles. To follow on from this the team investigated the use of silanes (APTES) as a covalent linker molecule in between the nanoparticle surface and the surfactant. It was found that APTES functionalises the nanoparticle surfaces in an adequate way, and in future they will investigate covalent binding of the surfactant to the nanoparticle surface.
Impact This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden- University of Nottingham/Chemistry), and materials engineering (Claeyssens- Sheffield University, Garcia-Tunon Blanca- Imperial College, Leigh- University of Warwick, Rawson- University of Nottingham/Pharmacy ). The jumpstart funding route helped to establish research links and partnerships which were almost impossible to establish otherwise. The members of the research team do intend to further collaborate via joined proposals to RCUK. The jumpstart process is a good vehicle to rapidly establish research collaborations.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Smart Photoreactive Materials for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens and Dr Ruth Goodridge.
Collaborator Contribution Automated deposition of materials in a layer-by-layer fashion according to a three-dimensional pattern, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a transformative manufacturing technique, but the palette of materials for use in AM is limited. One area that has been identified as requiring new approaches is the development of robust ceramic AM processes using materials such as ultra-high temperature ceramics, bioceramics for tissue engineering (hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates), or perovskites for fuel cell cathodes. The collaborators proposed to develop particulate material formulations that exist as a stable dispersion (initially repulsive), but aggregate upon irradiation via electrostatically driven self-assembly (surfactant reveals an attractive component upon UV irradiation). This photo-initiated gelling mechanism could be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden), and materials engineering (Claeyssens, Garcia-Tunon Blanca, Leigh, Rawson). This project aimed to contribute to the current challenges by using a new formulation strategy. It was proposed to design and produce photo switchable surfactants that, when used with ceramic particles would initially stabilise particles suspensions but yield controlled, electrostatic self-assembly into a ceramic particle network upon UV irradiation. This photo-initiated binding mechanism can be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. Regarding continuous extrusion, the aim was to formulate a ceramic photosensitive system with low viscosity that could flow through very narrow nozzles, but could switch rheological behaviour upon UV irradiation to comply with the requirements for the 3D deposition process (stiff and strong filaments). To achieve this ambitious goal the project was divided into 2 distinctive work packages: (i) the synthesis of a set of bifunctional charged molecules which would able to anchor to the ceramic particle. The original concept is to decorate particles with an equal mixture of surfactants that display a permanent positive charge and photo-switchable surfactants which switch from hydrophobic to negatively charged upon irradiation with UV light (~346 nm) at pH>7. The release of the complementary charge is expected to lead to agglomeration of the particles. To enable this study a library of different surfactants (eight non-commercially available target compounds) were synthesised. The produced surfactants were further evaluated on their capabilities to stabilise ceramic suspensions. This work focused on the assessment of the functionalization and attachment of the surfactants to the surface of particles and ability to bind them into a network. The particles used in the assessment were SiC, Al2O3 and SiO2 particles. We studied both glutaric acid (GA) and guanidinobutyric acid (GBA). GA was not a good dispersant for Al2O3 particles, although both GA and GBA significantly reduced the water contact angle of a surface coated with the Al2O3 particles. Wit was further studied the rheological properties of the nanoparticle/surfactant mixtures. The mixtures should ideally exhibit shear thinning behavior and should be viscoelastic, with a high elastic component. The produced mixtures exhibit shear thinning but do not have the viscoelastic behavior required for slurry extrusion. Finally the team explored binding molecules to link the GBA and GA to the nanoparticles. The linker molecule they investigated was aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). This molecule is a good binding molecule for crosslinking with carboxylic acid moieties, and potential future work will be focused on covalently linking GA and GBA to the nanoparticle surfaces. It has been identified a route to functionalise ceramic slurries so that they set via photochemical activation. This route could be applicable for a host of applications, e.g. novel filler materials for dentistry and bone defects. In this project a potential photoactive ceramic resin was investigated, and it was synthesised a photo-activated form of glutaric acid. Furthermore it was investigated the potential of GA and GBA as dispersants for Al2O3, SiO2 and SiC nanoparticles. Neither of the surfactant molecules acted as an appropriate dispersant of the nanoparticles. To follow on from this the team investigated the use of silanes (APTES) as a covalent linker molecule in between the nanoparticle surface and the surfactant. It was found that APTES functionalises the nanoparticle surfaces in an adequate way, and in future they will investigate covalent binding of the surfactant to the nanoparticle surface.
Impact This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden- University of Nottingham/Chemistry), and materials engineering (Claeyssens- Sheffield University, Garcia-Tunon Blanca- Imperial College, Leigh- University of Warwick, Rawson- University of Nottingham/Pharmacy ). The jumpstart funding route helped to establish research links and partnerships which were almost impossible to establish otherwise. The members of the research team do intend to further collaborate via joined proposals to RCUK. The jumpstart process is a good vehicle to rapidly establish research collaborations.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Smart Photoreactive Materials for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens and Dr Ruth Goodridge.
Collaborator Contribution Automated deposition of materials in a layer-by-layer fashion according to a three-dimensional pattern, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a transformative manufacturing technique, but the palette of materials for use in AM is limited. One area that has been identified as requiring new approaches is the development of robust ceramic AM processes using materials such as ultra-high temperature ceramics, bioceramics for tissue engineering (hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates), or perovskites for fuel cell cathodes. The collaborators proposed to develop particulate material formulations that exist as a stable dispersion (initially repulsive), but aggregate upon irradiation via electrostatically driven self-assembly (surfactant reveals an attractive component upon UV irradiation). This photo-initiated gelling mechanism could be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden), and materials engineering (Claeyssens, Garcia-Tunon Blanca, Leigh, Rawson). This project aimed to contribute to the current challenges by using a new formulation strategy. It was proposed to design and produce photo switchable surfactants that, when used with ceramic particles would initially stabilise particles suspensions but yield controlled, electrostatic self-assembly into a ceramic particle network upon UV irradiation. This photo-initiated binding mechanism can be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. Regarding continuous extrusion, the aim was to formulate a ceramic photosensitive system with low viscosity that could flow through very narrow nozzles, but could switch rheological behaviour upon UV irradiation to comply with the requirements for the 3D deposition process (stiff and strong filaments). To achieve this ambitious goal the project was divided into 2 distinctive work packages: (i) the synthesis of a set of bifunctional charged molecules which would able to anchor to the ceramic particle. The original concept is to decorate particles with an equal mixture of surfactants that display a permanent positive charge and photo-switchable surfactants which switch from hydrophobic to negatively charged upon irradiation with UV light (~346 nm) at pH>7. The release of the complementary charge is expected to lead to agglomeration of the particles. To enable this study a library of different surfactants (eight non-commercially available target compounds) were synthesised. The produced surfactants were further evaluated on their capabilities to stabilise ceramic suspensions. This work focused on the assessment of the functionalization and attachment of the surfactants to the surface of particles and ability to bind them into a network. The particles used in the assessment were SiC, Al2O3 and SiO2 particles. We studied both glutaric acid (GA) and guanidinobutyric acid (GBA). GA was not a good dispersant for Al2O3 particles, although both GA and GBA significantly reduced the water contact angle of a surface coated with the Al2O3 particles. Wit was further studied the rheological properties of the nanoparticle/surfactant mixtures. The mixtures should ideally exhibit shear thinning behavior and should be viscoelastic, with a high elastic component. The produced mixtures exhibit shear thinning but do not have the viscoelastic behavior required for slurry extrusion. Finally the team explored binding molecules to link the GBA and GA to the nanoparticles. The linker molecule they investigated was aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). This molecule is a good binding molecule for crosslinking with carboxylic acid moieties, and potential future work will be focused on covalently linking GA and GBA to the nanoparticle surfaces. It has been identified a route to functionalise ceramic slurries so that they set via photochemical activation. This route could be applicable for a host of applications, e.g. novel filler materials for dentistry and bone defects. In this project a potential photoactive ceramic resin was investigated, and it was synthesised a photo-activated form of glutaric acid. Furthermore it was investigated the potential of GA and GBA as dispersants for Al2O3, SiO2 and SiC nanoparticles. Neither of the surfactant molecules acted as an appropriate dispersant of the nanoparticles. To follow on from this the team investigated the use of silanes (APTES) as a covalent linker molecule in between the nanoparticle surface and the surfactant. It was found that APTES functionalises the nanoparticle surfaces in an adequate way, and in future they will investigate covalent binding of the surfactant to the nanoparticle surface.
Impact This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden- University of Nottingham/Chemistry), and materials engineering (Claeyssens- Sheffield University, Garcia-Tunon Blanca- Imperial College, Leigh- University of Warwick, Rawson- University of Nottingham/Pharmacy ). The jumpstart funding route helped to establish research links and partnerships which were almost impossible to establish otherwise. The members of the research team do intend to further collaborate via joined proposals to RCUK. The jumpstart process is a good vehicle to rapidly establish research collaborations.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Smart Photoreactive Materials for Additive Manufacturing 
Organisation University of Warwick
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the terms of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, the Centre is entitled to support research activities external to the Centre, either at other AM Centred research groups or for supporting activity in other fields. The project is overseen by Prof Phill Dickens and Dr Ruth Goodridge.
Collaborator Contribution Automated deposition of materials in a layer-by-layer fashion according to a three-dimensional pattern, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a transformative manufacturing technique, but the palette of materials for use in AM is limited. One area that has been identified as requiring new approaches is the development of robust ceramic AM processes using materials such as ultra-high temperature ceramics, bioceramics for tissue engineering (hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates), or perovskites for fuel cell cathodes. The collaborators proposed to develop particulate material formulations that exist as a stable dispersion (initially repulsive), but aggregate upon irradiation via electrostatically driven self-assembly (surfactant reveals an attractive component upon UV irradiation). This photo-initiated gelling mechanism could be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden), and materials engineering (Claeyssens, Garcia-Tunon Blanca, Leigh, Rawson). This project aimed to contribute to the current challenges by using a new formulation strategy. It was proposed to design and produce photo switchable surfactants that, when used with ceramic particles would initially stabilise particles suspensions but yield controlled, electrostatic self-assembly into a ceramic particle network upon UV irradiation. This photo-initiated binding mechanism can be exploited to additive manufacturing of 3D structures via continuous extrusion or stereolithography. Regarding continuous extrusion, the aim was to formulate a ceramic photosensitive system with low viscosity that could flow through very narrow nozzles, but could switch rheological behaviour upon UV irradiation to comply with the requirements for the 3D deposition process (stiff and strong filaments). To achieve this ambitious goal the project was divided into 2 distinctive work packages: (i) the synthesis of a set of bifunctional charged molecules which would able to anchor to the ceramic particle. The original concept is to decorate particles with an equal mixture of surfactants that display a permanent positive charge and photo-switchable surfactants which switch from hydrophobic to negatively charged upon irradiation with UV light (~346 nm) at pH>7. The release of the complementary charge is expected to lead to agglomeration of the particles. To enable this study a library of different surfactants (eight non-commercially available target compounds) were synthesised. The produced surfactants were further evaluated on their capabilities to stabilise ceramic suspensions. This work focused on the assessment of the functionalization and attachment of the surfactants to the surface of particles and ability to bind them into a network. The particles used in the assessment were SiC, Al2O3 and SiO2 particles. We studied both glutaric acid (GA) and guanidinobutyric acid (GBA). GA was not a good dispersant for Al2O3 particles, although both GA and GBA significantly reduced the water contact angle of a surface coated with the Al2O3 particles. Wit was further studied the rheological properties of the nanoparticle/surfactant mixtures. The mixtures should ideally exhibit shear thinning behavior and should be viscoelastic, with a high elastic component. The produced mixtures exhibit shear thinning but do not have the viscoelastic behavior required for slurry extrusion. Finally the team explored binding molecules to link the GBA and GA to the nanoparticles. The linker molecule they investigated was aminopropyltriethylsilane (APTES). This molecule is a good binding molecule for crosslinking with carboxylic acid moieties, and potential future work will be focused on covalently linking GA and GBA to the nanoparticle surfaces. It has been identified a route to functionalise ceramic slurries so that they set via photochemical activation. This route could be applicable for a host of applications, e.g. novel filler materials for dentistry and bone defects. In this project a potential photoactive ceramic resin was investigated, and it was synthesised a photo-activated form of glutaric acid. Furthermore it was investigated the potential of GA and GBA as dispersants for Al2O3, SiO2 and SiC nanoparticles. Neither of the surfactant molecules acted as an appropriate dispersant of the nanoparticles. To follow on from this the team investigated the use of silanes (APTES) as a covalent linker molecule in between the nanoparticle surface and the surfactant. It was found that APTES functionalises the nanoparticle surfaces in an adequate way, and in future they will investigate covalent binding of the surfactant to the nanoparticle surface.
Impact This investigation brought together researchers from the disciplines of chemistry (Dowden- University of Nottingham/Chemistry), and materials engineering (Claeyssens- Sheffield University, Garcia-Tunon Blanca- Imperial College, Leigh- University of Warwick, Rawson- University of Nottingham/Pharmacy ). The jumpstart funding route helped to establish research links and partnerships which were almost impossible to establish otherwise. The members of the research team do intend to further collaborate via joined proposals to RCUK. The jumpstart process is a good vehicle to rapidly establish research collaborations.
Start Year 2014
 
Title ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING 
Description A method (300) of fabricating an object by additive manufacturing comprises providing (310) a layer of polymeric material (100), said polymeric material (100) being in particulate form, and comprising linear polymer chains, selectively depositing (320) a reactive liquid (200) onto the layer of particulate polymeric material (100), said reactive liquid (200) comprising reactive units (210a) which are monomeric units, linear oligomeric units, linear polymeric units, or combinations thereof, wherein said reactive units (210a) have two or fewer reactive groups, and allowing (330) linear polymeric chains in said layer of polymeric material (100) to react with reactive units in said reactive liquid (200) so as to form extended polymeric chains that are linear, so as to provide a shaped layer of linear polymer. These steps (310, 320, 330) are repeated as required to form the object from successive shaped layers of linear polymer. 
IP Reference WO2018083500 
Protection Patent application published
Year Protection Granted 2018
Licensed No
Impact The market for AM reached US$5.165B p.a. in 2016 (Wohlers Report). However, market growth for polymeric AM was limited due to production costs, processing speed and narrow material choices. Our technique can overcome these limitations. Compared to the highly competitive metal AM market, there is less direct competition especially for a disruptive new technique which can overcome most of the limitations of existing AM techniques. Customers for a fully commercialized system based on our technique are likely to be: 1) large manufacturing companies seeking AM solutions in plastic products but put off by the high cost / low throughput and 2) designed companies looking for adaptable manufacturing techniques for bespoke products. They are currently serviced by the current machine vendors or 'bureau' companies providing parts by the hour. Our technology looks to disrupt this market through a significant change in material variety with relatively low-cost architecture and higher design freedom with the choice of manufacturing potentially a multi-functional product. A target market could be the sports shoe sector, with a global market of US$80billion in 2015. AM can achieve complex structures (e.g. lattices) that cannot be manufactured by traditional techniques. This provides the manufacturer the design freedom to introduce unique features (e.g. light weight, localized impact resist) into the product through material and structural design. AM also allows the manufacturer to customize the product without incurring additional manufacturing cost. Major brands have been looking to adopt AM in production. Nike started 3D printing shoes in 2014, whilst Adidas has AM factories 'Speedfactories' for producing premium product (100,000 pairs by end of 2018). Higher processing speed and lower facility cost provided by our proposed technique will reduce the production cost, which can open up a market supplying customized sports shoes for more customers at an affordable price. UoN has a long relationship with Nike (USA) both from a AM materials and design perspective.
 
Title The functional lattice generation package - FLatt Pack 
Description The Centre for Additive Manufacturing (CfAM) has developed software called the Functional Lattice Package (FLatt Pack) for internal research. It enables the design of 3D cellular structures for manufacture and analysis. Applications include component lightweighting, impact absorption, thermal management, vibration damping and medicine. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The software is used in Innovate UK - FLAC project and by the centre's PhD students. Ian Maskery's received a Hermes fellowship funded by the University of Nottingham based on the software. 
 
Company Name Added Scientific Ltd 
Description The academics involved in the EPSRC Centre identified a requirement to meet the needs of potential and active users of Additive Manufacturing technology toward building capability and understanding in this rapidly emerging field. To address this need they have spun out a commercial consultancy business in June 2015. With a collective 70 years of professional experience in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing between them, the founders of Added Scientific share a philosophy of bringing the highest standards of science and engineering to bear on the development and understanding of 3D printing for companies interested in how to best to implement the technology. The team provides consultancy on the future of 3D Printing machinery and techniques, on how to develop materials for Additive Manufacturing, offers services for the design of innovative products and the development of design tools. Added Scientific and provides know how and training so that companies can understand the science behind Additive Manufacturing processes and best exploit them for their business. Effectively, the goal of Added Scientific is to support industries keen to adopt and exploit one of the key technologies of the 21st Century. 
Year Established 2014 
Impact Added Scientific offers services in four distinct fields to its customers: -Facilitating understanding and training: Added Scientific provides technical reports and state of the art reviews for industry and government to enable long term strategic planning and technical roadmapping, coupled with performing comprehensive business analysis and developing the skills and working practises required. -Developing-on existing Additive Manufacturing equipment or bespoke system configurations: Added Scientific provides expertise in optimizing established processes, such as Laser Sintering, for specific materials and applications and in developing novel processes, such as multi-material and multi-functional ink jet printing. -Materials development and characterization: Added Scientific has considerable expertise in the processing of a wide range of materials, from high performance alloys for the aerospace industry to biological and pharmaceutical materials. Added Scientific can help develop and evaluate new materials that are optimized for specific additive manufacturing processes and their end-use applications. Design and design tools for next generation products: Added Scientific provides expertise in developing new design and optimization methods specifically for Additive Manufacturing design and also in the effective use of commercial design software.
Website http://www.addedscientific.com
 
Description Scientific Advances in AM: Understanding the science behind AM 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation keynote/invited speaker
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event brought together cutting edge research activity from across UK universities. The day comprised of presentations outlining projects focused on early stage research underpinning the science behind Additive Manufacturing. All projects are funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing. The research presentations improved stimulated thinking, start to build relationships with other researchers in the field.

Follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 3D Printing At The Collection (Lincoln) - C Tuck presentation: 3D Printing - The move to multifunctionality 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This presentation highlighted the AM and 3D printing research activities being undertaken at the EPSRC Centre of Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing hosted by the University of Nottingham. It provided a brief overview of a number of projects ranging from multi-material jetting of electronic and structural materials to initial work on 2-photon-based systems for the production of optical based sensors. It also provided a deeper look at work attempting to successfully inkjet bio-resorbable materials to enable new products in the pharmaceutical and medical implant industries.

Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing in Healthcare Special Interest Group (SIG) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact The SIG bring together researchers, healthcare professionals, industrialists and scientists to develop and explore the application of AM technologies to relevant clinical need.
The event examined how Additive Manufacturing has progressed to become an established technology in the Dental Industry, and how experiences gained can benefit development and uptake in other Healthcare sectors.
A second SIG meeting took place on 3D-Printing of Pharmaceuticals.

Led to collaborative talks between Univerity of Nottingham and delegates from potential industrial partners - currently exploring possibilities for collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description 3D Printshow- CEO Panel Session participation, Prof Richard Hague 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The CEO panel at the 3D Print Show was attended by decision makers in the 3D Printing industry. This panel meeting was held to allow the participants to exchange ideas, debate and network.

Follow on enquiries and engagement with governmental bodies in various countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description AM1a-0: Sheffield Metallurgical Engineering Association (SMEA) Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact David Brackett has been invited as speaker at the Sheffield Metallurgical Engineering Association (SMEA) Conference, session: Exploiting the design freedoms and constraints of additive manufacturing, June 17-18 2014, Sheffield, UK

Future skills development has been promoted and start to build relationships with other researchers in the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description ASTM F42 and ISO Standards Committee 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre played host to the American Standard's for Testing Materials (ASTM) F42 committee meeting, which was attended by almost fifty international delegates. The ASTM F42 is a global committee of industrialists and academics which meets twice per year to develop and ratify standards relating to Additive Manufacturing and3D Printing.

These standards play a preeminent role in all aspects of additive manufacturing technologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013,2014
 
Description Additive Manufacturing Europe, Healthcare, 28 June 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Prof R Hague was one the speakers at the Additive Manufacturing Europe, Healthcare Conference, 'Future focus panel discussion: where is it all headed?' session. The talk was about producing technologies for medium and high volume production, supporting faster refresh rates for products with innovative characteristics, working with a smaller supplier base.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing for Medical Applications - June 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The aim of the event was to bring together clinicians, researchers, healthcare providers and industrial experts to discuss the impact and potential of additive manufacturing (AM) for the current biomedical needs. Panel and open forum discussions along with research presentations focused on the requirement, development, clinical translation of AM for potential biomedical applications. The event included also a poster session exhibiting the research work that contributes to the medical AM theme.

TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Additive Manufacturing in Healthcare: Joint event with NUH 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The aim of the event was to bring together academics at the University of Nottingham with key stakeholders within NUH to discuss the potential impact of Additive Manufacturing and 3D-printing in the medical sector. It was intended as an opportunity for participants to explore current capabilities of the technology and contribute their own expertise of clinical needs, in addition to exploring further opportunities for collaborative work.

TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Advanced Engineering Show at the NEC, Birmingham, 11-12 Nov 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Ian Maskery gave a presentation to the Advanced Engineering Show at the NEC.
The EPSRC Centre had the opportunity to exhibit AM parts it the Enabling the Futures area at the exhibition. Jayasheelan Vathilingam and Luke Parry introduced the opportunities that lie within AM to a very enthusiastic audience.

Improved stimulated thinking and improve understanding of AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Appointment of Dr Chris Tuck as a Panel Member of the EPSRC Early Career Forum in Manufacturing Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact In July 2012 Dr Chris Tuck was appointed as a Panel Member of the EPSRC Early Career Forum in Manufacturing Research.

Development of skills.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Appointment of Dr Chris Tuck to the ASTM F42 Executive Committee 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Chris Tuck has been appointed to the ASTM F42 Executive Committee, which devises a set of standards for Additive Manufacturing.

Follow on enquiries and engagement with governmental bodies in various countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Appointment of Dr Chris Tuck to the BSi Standards Committee AMT/008 for Additive Manufacturing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Chris Tuck was appointed to the BSi Standards Committee Amt/008 for Additive Manufacturing in 2012. . Awarding Body - BSi Standards Committee, Name of Scheme - AMT/008 Additive Manufacturing

Development of Standards for AM
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description BAE Systems Graduate Exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The Centre for Additive Manufacturing run an exhibit for BAE Systems at their graduate scheme training completion ceremony. The exhibition stall had interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Babington Community College Workshop Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A series of sessions for students at a school in Leicester covering the fundamentals of AM&3DP, Concepts and Tools, Coding in the Design for AM and Designing for AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description British Science Week - Pathways to STEM Science 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact British Science Week - Pathways to STEM Science Fair - Mansfield Library - Engagement event for local school students to promote STEM subjects. Local activity which is part of a national event. The Centre for AM group ran an exhibition stall with interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts produced by AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cheltenham Science Festival 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In June 2013, the EPSRC Centre had the opportunity to exhibit with an own booth in the Discovery Zone. Dr Martin Baumers and Mr Jayasheelan Vathilingam introduced the opportunities that lie within AM to a very enthusiastic public audience and demonstrated the 3D printing process during the show using the EPSRC Centre's Makerbot Replicator 2 3D printer.

Improved stimulated thinking and improve understanding of AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Cheltenham Science Festival, public lecture by Prof Richard Hague 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On the 12th June 2012, EPSRC Centre Director Professor Richard Hague presented "3D printing live: Manufacturing the Future", a 90-minute interactive lecture in association with the EPSRC to a packed theatre of almost 400 members of the public, students and media at the Cheltenham Science Festival.

The event was exceptionally well received leading to a number of follow-on enquires to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2014
 
Description Co-host: Additive International Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Additive International is the premier summit for academic and industrial leaders in Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing. Since 2006, we have showcased next-generation technology and the latest thinking, providing a forum for practitioners to build their networks and drive innovation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.additiveinternational.com
 
Description Contribution to Article on FT.com- Technogeeks' licence to print 3D money 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The article explains the advantages of the 3D printing technology, listing a few of industry sectors where the technology is successfully used.
At the same time, it draws readers' attention to the constraints of the 3D Printing.


Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/dce6e0b4-48af-11e4-ad19-00144feab7de.html#axzz3H4M2rQAo
 
Description Creativity @ Home- Enhancing creative thinking in the Additive Manufacturing researcher community 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact In order to further the interdisciplinary approaches and research outcomes of the EPSRC Centre, a customized workshop series "Thinking New and Ahead" was designed and delivered. The workshop series consisted of two face-to-face workshops with senior researchers and staff from the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing. In between the face-to-face sessions, participants completed a set of inter-session tasks.
The chosen underpinning method and discovery philosophy for this workshop series was Appreciative Inquiry, a proven and well-documented method for studying and learning from the positive example.
Through their discussions about their own observations and data collected from their interviews the individual participants gained increased understanding of:
- Examples of creative approaches in action
- Examples of outstanding positive research impact
- Examples of great collaboration and inter-disciplinary efforts
- The enabling factors of all of these examples



Based on the shared conclusions, the participants prepared a final presentation with a set of recommendations. These recommendations included:
• How to improve methods for internal information sharing
• Establishing new both formal and informal meeting routines
• Continued education of the teams in specific creativity enhancing techniques such as "Six Thinking Hats
• How to pay better attention to and learn when a creativity mind-set vs. an innovation mind-set is appropriate
In addition to these takeaways and concrete actions, the chosen approach and content were in themselves example of innovative approaches and hence participants gained a first-hand experience of trying out and learning from using relatively novel approach and concepts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description EON Additive Manufacturing workshop and ideation session 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop upskilling EON on Additive Manufacturing

TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing Website - Launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Launch of the comprehensive EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing website, developed by external web developer Senior Media.



The site provides information on the EPSRC Centre, the team behind it, current projects, news, available jobs, industry engagement activities and available funding opportunities. In the EPSRC Centre, the web site has four administrators: Sophie Jones, Bochuan Liu, Mirela Axinte and Martin Baumers. The website will be complemented with the ADD3D partner site covering the EPSRC Centre's outreach activities.

Improved the understanding of the AM technology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Ehab Saleh- Committee member: Institute of Physics - Printing and Graphics Science Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Printing and Graphics Science Group promote the physics of printing and run meetings in the UK. Its focus is on making connections for students and early years researchers to help their careers.
2-3 national conferences are organised every year related to printing technologies. Usually 20-30 speakers present in each of the conferences throughout the conference period. Various topics are selected as themes for the conferences, ranging from specialised topics like Plastic Electronics printing to more generalised topics like Printing the Future conference.
The most common outcome from those conferences is exchanging scientific knowledge and making new contacts from the printing community. There has been a few discussions about building some future collaboration especially amongst the committee members.


TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Exhibitor to the 3DPrintshow, London and Paris 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre's outreach activities (under the National Centre umbrella) were featured in a dedicated part of the booth, providing an overview of AM and3DP research activities in the UK.

The attending EPSRC Centre researchers and staff led numerous discussions with industry members, researchers and the public highlighting the role of the EPSRC Centre as a research institution. Numerous demonstration parts were presented and publicity material was distributed.

The participation to the event led to follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description Faculty of Engineering Christmas Lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The Engineering Christmas lecture showcased the huge technological advances in Aerospace, Additive Manufacturing and Advanced Materials; taking maths and sciences from school and showing how these form the basis of innovations that impact the world around us. Alongside the fun and enlightening lecture, there were also foyer activities to take for the students to take part in.
The lecture was aimed at gifted & talented students at Key Stage 3 and 4, but open to year 8 upwards.
The Centre for Additive Manufacturing presented a lecture on "Material Transformations" covering a variety of topics regarding physical and chemical changes to materials with fun demonstrations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Family Discovery Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Open Day/Visit for families from local primary/secondary schools at UoN. Local activity. The Centre for AM group ran an exhibition stall with interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts produced by AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Farnborough Airshow 2012 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Between the 9th to the 15th July 2012 The Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing exhibited at the International Farnborough Airshow where a number of companies and private individuals were introduced to the concepts and benefits of Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing technology adoption.

The Centre was represented on two stands, the EPSRC Centres for Innovative Manufacturing stand and the Nottingham University stand. The event was divided into the Farnborough International Exhibition from Monday to Friday, and the Farnborough International Airshow on Saturday and Sunday.

Improved understanding of the AM technology amongst companies, private industrials and public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Fashion Showcase MAISON&OBJET - Inspirations 2015/2016 : Thème "MAKE"- Bionic arm 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The 3D Printed Bionic arm designed by the Centre's summer interns has been featured in the Inspirations MAKE Book from MAISON&OBJET Paris (image is courtesy of Science Museum). The 3D printed arm has been chosen for the TECHNO-MADE thematic of Vincent Gregoire.


Increase in requests for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Flemish - Strategic Initiative on Materials- Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Richard Hague's participation as panel member for the Flemish Strategic Initiative Materials funding body - . Awarding Body - SIM, Name of Scheme - SIM

Award of grants to overseas organisations
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Formal opening of the new Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Laboratory 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Formal opening of the new Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Laboratory, attended by 60+ participants from academia and industry.

To celebrate the establishment of the Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group (3DPRG) at The University of Nottingham, the new Chancellor of The University of Nottingham, Sir Andrew Witty, and the Vice-Chancellor, Professor David Greenaway, officially opened the lab on Tuesday 12th March 2013.

Improved the understanding of the Additive Manufacturing technology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Hong Kong Productivity Council (HKPC) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Twelve delegates from Hong Kong Productivity Council (HKPC) and Hong Kong 3D Printing Association (HK3DPA) visited the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing facilities with the aim to learn and understand the development of 3D Printing and its application.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Hu Q: Oral presentation - 2nd Mexican Workshop for AM, June 2015, Queretaro, Mexico 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The 2-day Workshop/seminar was aimed at the general public, students, practitioners, academics, industrialists and enthusiasts in general, that wanted to attend and listen to world-renowned experts in the fields of Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing and its exciting applications across various fields. Dr Qin Hu from the EPSRC Centre for IM in AM was invited to deliver oral presentation to the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description IET- 3D Printing A Differentiation Engine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.

Follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description IET- Sector Debate: Additive Manufacturing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Gordon Attenborough from IET conducted the Sector Debate session on Additive Manufacturing or 3D Printing Techonology.
The panel consisted of Dr Chris Tuck (Deputy Director at the EPSRC Centre for IM in AM), James Buchanan (Jaguar Land Rover), Phil Reeves (Econolyst), Chris Elsworthy (CEL UK).

Improved stimulated thinking, start to build relationships with other researchers in the field. Improved understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmPUfoj4etw
 
Description IOP PGS Conference: Printing for the future 2018, CfAM: co-organisers 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Institute of Physics (IOP) in collaboration with CfAM have organised Printing for the future 2018 conference. Dr. Ehab Saleh from CfAM is a committee member of the Printing and Graphics Science group (PGS) was a primary organiser of the event which attracted students and academic staff from across the UK presenting their latest research achievements in printing technologies. The main conference outcome was: New routes of collaborations were highlighted. This was significant in the Q&A sessions were speakers were invited to follow up their discussions during break, and dialogues progressed throughout the day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Industrial Outreach - Games Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Exploratory meeting with Games Workshop (headquartered in Nottingham) manufacturing executives discussing the possible adoption of Additive Manufacturing technologies.

Informed technology adoption decisions at Games Workshop
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description IntoUniversity scheme at UoN 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Open Day/Visit for students enrolled in the 'IntoUniversity' scheme at UoN which is a mentor scheme for Undergraduates. The Centre for AM group ran an exhibition stall with interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts produced by AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Investigators and leading participants in developing UK strategy for Additive Manufacturing with BIS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Letter signed by leading industry and presented to governmental minister.

BIS progressing UK AM Strategy
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invitation and Appointment of Dr Chris Tuck to the ESRC Expert Panel on AM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In March 2012 Associate Professor Chris Tuck was invited and appointed to the ESRC Expert panel on Additive Manufacturing. . Awarding Body - Economic and Social Research Council, Name of Scheme - ESRC Expert Panel on Additive Manufacturing

ESRC inclusion in TSB funding initiative
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Invitation and Appointment of Dr Chris Tuck to the ESRC Workshop of 3D Printing and Freight 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In April 2012 Dr Chris Tuck was invited and appointed as a Panel Member of the ESRC Workshop of 3D Printing and Freight. . Awarding Body - Economic and Social Research Council, Name of Scheme - ESRC Workshop of 3DP and Future of Freight

Award of ESRC funds to others
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Invited Keynote, IET Young Professionals, Royal Institution 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Very animated discussion with audience

interest from companies and individuals
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://tv.theiet.org/channels/news/17844.cfm
 
Description Invited Presentation - Cambridge University Inkjet centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact discussion with inkjet professionals

follow on meetings with participants
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited Presentation - Engineer Magazine Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Animated discussion of additive manufacturing amongst the audience

follow interaction with industry
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited keynote - LOPEC Conference, Munich 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact talk stimulated discussion amongst printed electronics practitioners new to additive manufacturing

Collaborative work with Canon Oce
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited keynote - Non-Impact Printing / Digital Fabrication Conference, Seattle, US 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lively debate with printed electronics community

Collaboration with Canon Oce, follow up communications with several companies, invitation to speak at another international conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.imaging.org/ist/conferences/df/
 
Description Invited presentation "Inside 3D Printing", New York, April 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact engaged audience

Follow up emails and potential collaborations with overseas companies
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited presentation, 3D Printshow, London and Paris, Oct 2013 & Nov 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

follow up discussions with individuals
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited presentation, University of Berkeley 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

potential collaboration with U Berkeley
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Invited presentation, Westminster Business Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact significant discussion with audience

influence of policy makers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Jumpstart funding event for supporting external Universities for underpinning science 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact "Jumpstart" funding event organised from EPSRC Centre for AM
~140 applicants, ~ 40 participants invited to attend, 10 projects submitted, 5 subsequently funded


5 externally funded, multi partner research projects funded
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Lecture and Workshop at Gloucester Academy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Lecture and workshop of AM&3DP and also STEM careers. The lecture covered a personal account of a journey through university and an early career in science as well as an introduction to AM&3DP in conjunction with an interactive activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Materialise World Summit in Brussels (Prof Richard Hague) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In April 2017, Prof Richard Hague was invited to the panel of the Materialise World Summit in Brussels. The panel's topic was: Are We Prepared for an Additive Future?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2008,2017
 
Description May Fest - The University's Open Day for the Community 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Annually, The University of Nottingham openits doors to the community for May Fest event, with free, interactive activities for all ages and interests.
During the event, the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing displayed 3D printed items, showcased the Makerbot and the Ultimaker and produced demonstration objects for visitors. The present researchers conducted outreach activities and informed the wider university community of the EPSRC Centre's capabilities and activities.

Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description NUAST- Design for 3D printing sessions 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Series of 3D Printing sessions were organised with NUAST (Nottingham University Academy of Science and Technology), focusing on design for 3D printing. The sessions covered a series of fundamental aspects along the way and consisted in introduction session and break out activities. The sessions delivered basic 3D design lessons and set a simple design challenge to the students in a competition format with the best design being printed off by SLS for display at the school.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Ningbo China fact finding mission 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Prof Phill Dickens and the National Centre Coordinator, Dr Phil Reeves, participated in a conference and panel session at The University of Nottingham's Ningbo Campus in China. The conference was organised to develop linkages between the UK AM/3DP science base and companies and universities within China.

The event provided a platform to better understand recent Chinese government investment initiatives centred on AM/3DP and to identify potential areas for future collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description OPAD - Cascade grant 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Talk by a Trauma and Orthopaedic surgeon on "Broken bones and the challenges they present". OPAD is a project that was started in 2016 within the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering. It is funded by Cascade and the Centre for Additive Manufacturing. OPAD is a project that exposes students to real life challenges and gives them the opportunity to work collaboratively in groups to create assistive devices. Students also get the chance to meet with volunteers to find out what specific needs they have and design an assistive device for them.
In March 2018 it was organised a Talk by a Trauma and Orthopaedic surgeon on "Broken bones and the challenges they present" as part of OPAD spring programme for students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
 
Description Pharmacy After School Science Club 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Pharmacy After School Science Club - Attended local primary school as a part of the School of Pharmacy's ongoing 'After School Club' initiative. The session consisted in short in lesson with interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts produced by AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Physics World Focus on: Optics and Lasers, May 2014, 3D Printing: the next step 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.

Future skills development has been promoted. Many young researchers and students looking to study additive manufacturing technologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Pint of Science, the international science festival in Nottingham 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Pint of Science, Nottingham - Engagement event for members of the public to attend.
The festival saw thousands of scientists simultaneously standing up and talking about their research. It brought a unique line up of talks, demonstrations and live experiments to city's favourite pubs and bars.Academics/PhD's did presentations on their research in addition to an exhibition stall with interactive and demonstration activities with a 3D printer and parts produced by AM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Pre-conference event "Industrial Realities of Additive Manufacturing". 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This one-day event was designed for companies who are looking to grasp the opportunities offered by Additive Manufacturing, whilst also helping them to avoid the pitfalls. Steering clear of sales pitches and hype, we selected speakers who brought extensive experience in implementing AM and who could provide clear insights into the industrial realities of the technology.
This event focused on the hidden challenges of Additive Manufacturing, covering a range of issues such as quality assurance, facility development, training and funding. The speakers discussed the challenges that they have faced and shared the lessons learned.
The day also included a session dedicated to the UK's National Strategy for Additive Manufacturing, led by Innovate UK. This provided insight into the work being done to support UK industry and gave details of opportunities available to UK companies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at a seminar organised by Deloitte in Birmingham - 3D Printing - Where the technology is and where it is going 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 10th Nov 2014, Prof Phill Dickens has been invited to present to the seminar organised by Deloitte in Birmingham, 3D Printing - Where the technology is and where it is going.
The presentation was followed by talks and discussions.

interest from companies and individuals
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at the IMI Technology Forum at The Belfry - The Use of 3D printing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact On 11th Nov 2014, Prof Phill Dickens was presenter at the IMI Technology forum working group - The use of 3D Printing.
The presentation has been followed by questions and discussion.

Improved understanding of the AM technology amongst participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at the LSES: 3-D PRINTING: UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Ian Ashcroft gave a presentation: 3D PRINTING: UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL at the Lichfield Science and Engineering Society (LSES).
The Society has well over 300 members including scientists, engineers, doctors, dentists and members of the public with an interest in scientific and engineering progress. LSES meets monthly in the Lichfield Garrick theatre with a regular attendance of over 150 attendees.


The talk has been very well received. After the presentation, the audience requested to visit the Additive Manufacturing Research Group facilities.
The lab tour took place in August 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.lses.org.uk/3-d-printing-unlocking-the-potential/
 
Description Press release: New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nov 2017: Press release: New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. Published also in The Engineer, TCT magazine and over 50 international science news websites.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/news/pressreleases/2017/november/new-method-developed-to-3d-print-fully...
 
Description Prof Richard Hague - Steering group member for EPSRC Centre for Ultra Precision 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Steering group member for EPSRC Centre for Ultra Precision . Awarding Body - EPSRC, Name of Scheme - Centre for Innovative Manufacturing

Progression of EPSRC Centre for Ultra Precision
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2012,2013,2014
 
Description Prof Richard Hague's participation in UK/India Advanced Manufacturing Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Joint workshop between EPSRC and Indian DST scoping workshop on Advanced Manufacturing.

Follow on enquiries and engagement with governmental bodies in various countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Project Reviewer for DFG (Germany) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Dr Chris Tuck has been selected as member of the project review panel for DFG (Germany).

Follow on enquiries and engagement with governmental bodies in various countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Project Reviewer for FWO (Belgium) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Dr Chris Tuck and Prof Richard Hague were members of project review panel for FWO (Belgium). Awarding Body - FWO, Name of Scheme - Research Foundation Flanders Reviewer

Follow on enquiries and engagement with governmental bodies in various countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Project Reviewer for NASA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Chris Tuck is member of project review panel for NASA. . Awarding Body - NASA, Name of Scheme - Research Educations Awards Program (REAP)

Award of funds by NASA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description R Hague- participation in workshop: Impact of Emerging Technologies and Systems on Future Defence Capabilities, Feb 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A study has being undertaken for the Ministry of Defence's Chief Scientific Adviser examining emerging technologies and systems and their potential impact on future force structure. Prof Richard Hague has been invited to make a presentation on Additive Manufacturing to MOD staff and a few external experts who understand the technology landscape and the likely extent/limits of what may have developed by 2035.


TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description RAE event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre Director and the National Centre Coordinator participated in a round table event at the Royal Academy of Engineering in London. The event was attended by the UK's leading industrial users of AM/3DP along with leading research group heads and funding bodies.

The outcome from the event was a positioning paper which highlights the UK's current position, competences and future needs to maintain and grow the AM/3DP industry and science base.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description RAE- Ingenia magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre Director, Prof Richard Hague and National Centre Coordinator, Dr Phil Reeves, wrote a detailed article published in the Royal Academy of Engineers Ingenia magazine. The article was focused on 'myth busting' and redressing the hype surrounding consumer and commercial 3D printing.

The article considered the current state of the art in AM/3DP but also considered the direction of university research and the potential future impact that this may have on industry and society. Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description RH and MB- Article in MWP-Advanced Manufacturing magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Prof Richard Hague and Dr Martin Baumers review the progress of additive manufacturing as a mainstream industrial process and examine the supply chain potential of multimaterial techniques.

Follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.advancedmanufacturing.co.uk/news/additive-advances
 
Description RH interview for the www.theengineer.co.uk- digital issue May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview and subsequent published article on the research activities of the group and EPSRC Centre for the Engineer Magazine

TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://digitaledition.theengineer.co.uk/te0515slj/files/1.html
 
Description Research article- Collaboration with Stanford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Dr Martin Baumers from EPSRC Centre and Natasa Mrazovic from Stanford University wrote an article for the: The Quarterly Journal of UKSPA, 3D printing opens up new horizons in manufacturing. Article is on page 54 of the following publication: http://www.scienceparks.co.uk.
This article forms the starting point and initial research output for a collaboration between the 3DPRG and Stanford University.


The article defines the application domain for 3D Printing processes is terms of physical space and will be used to gain traction for research in this direction at both University of Nottingham and Stanford.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.scienceparks.co.uk/
 
Description Richard Hague and Chris Tuck invited Forum at Alcoa Inc in USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited workshop for Alcoa Inc, US upskilling them on Additive Manufacturing for use in Alcoa

TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Ricky Wildman interview for- theengineer.co.uk- on 3D bioprinting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Prof Ricky Wildman and other leading researchers in the area answered questions received from public on 3D bioprinting: the use of additive manufacturing techniques to manipulate living cells so that they form tissues and vessels that can be implanted into the body.
The interview has been published in theengineer.co.uk


Follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Science Museum Exhibition- 3D: printing the future 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The one year long Science Museum (London) exhibition opened to the public in October 2013. The exhibition communicated that 3D printing is a way to produce physical objects from digital plans and investigate the potential of 3D printing to drive innovation.

Researchers at the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, helped create and sponsor a landmark exhibition at London's Science Museum to showcase a technology that is transforming manufacturing.

The 3D: printing the future exhibition, has been very successful at the Science Museum in London and the organisers decided to tour it to the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. The exhibition at MSMI has been opened in Oct 2014 for 6 months.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Science in Parliament, vol 71, no 3, Summer 2014- 3D Printing- A revolution in the making 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst public.

Follow-on enquiries to the EPSRC Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Stafford College visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 20 students from Stafford College visited the Additive Manufacturing Research Labs facilities.
The visit started with a background presentation in AM. During this session they were split into brainstorming sessions facilitated by PhD students in AM group, discussing the advantages/disadvantages of 3D printing.
The visit ended with the AM labs tour.
The pupils found it very interesting and worthwhile. The college staff expressed intention to participate in future similar activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Summer internships 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact During the summers of 2013, 2014 and 2015, cohorts of summer interns were supported by University funding to work within the EPSRC Centre at The University of Nottingham. Working in small teams and made up from a diverse range of undergraduates, the interns were tasked with innovative work in the field of novel additive processes and designs. The objective of the exercise was to demonstrate the attractiveness of AM as a potential postgraduate research topic to students, including those from non-engineering disciplines such as physics or chemistry.

Improved stimulated thinking and understanding of the AM technology amongst undergraduate students.
Many students are looking to study additive manufacturing technologies, some decided to pursue PhD studies in AM field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015
 
Description TSB SIG-AM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre Director and National Outreach Coordinator have participated on the advisory board of the TSB Special Interest Group on AM. In July 2012 the group published the report "Shaping our national competency in Additive Manufacturing", which lays out the barriers to technology adoption and the research requirements needed to bridge the technology innovation gap.

Resulting directly from this report, and the work of the SIG, TSB has now committed to invest up to £4.5-million in a dedicated AM research call.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
URL https://www.innovateuk.org/documents/1524978/1866952/Shaping%20our%20national%20competency%20in%20ad...
 
Description TV interviews with Sky News, featuring Prof Richard Hague 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In June 2012 Centre director Prof Richard Hague was interviewed by Sky News for a news piece looking at the current and future state-of-the art in 3D printing technology. The piece has led to a number of inquiries into the Centre.
Accompanying the news piece an article featuring interview material with Richard Hague and National Outreach Coordinator Dr Phil Reeves was made available on the sky news web site.
The presenter and the interviewee (Centre Director Richard Hague) introduce the viewer to the concept of Additive Manufacture, multifunctional Additive Manufacture and the Centre's research agenda.

Improved understanding of the AM technology amongst public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://news.sky.com/story/21494/3d-printing-revolution-could-re-shape-world
 
Description UK Delegation Leader on Expert Mission to Taiwan, Feb 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Engagement with Taiwan academics and industry in the field of additive manufacturing

Follow up enquiries from Taiwan looking to collaborate on AM research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Victoria and Albert museum panel session 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The EPSRC Centre Director and the National Centre Coordinator participated in a panel session at the Victoria and Albert museum in London. The session was focused on 'the future of 3D printing' and how the technology could be applied to improve society, from the environment and healthcare to education and security.

The panel discussed their views on 3D printing, addressing questions such as what is most exciting in 3D printing at the moment, and what may be possible in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Workshop at the Royal Society (RH) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In June 2017 Prof Richard Hague was invited to the Emerging technologies and economy workshop at the Royal Society
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017