Art Maps - Telling Tales of Engagement

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Horizon Digital Economy Research

Abstract

Art Maps - Telling Tales of Engagement aims to further 'tell the story' of the impact of the Art Maps research project to a wider and differentiated audience.

Art Maps is a collaborative research project between Horizon Digital Economy Research (University of Nottingham), Tate (Tate Learning, Tate Online and Tate Research) and the Centre of Intermedia at the University of Exeter, exploring art, place and mobile technology.

About one third of the Tate collection, comprising almost 70,000 works, has been indexed with information about locations, typically the site represented. For some works this information is quite specific but in many cases it is quite general, referring only to a city, region or major geographical feature. The Art Maps project aims to improve the quality of the geographical data relating to these works, with members of the public contributing information, as well as to gain new insights into how people use mobile technology to understand their environment through art, and art through their personal histories in relation to location and mapping. By looking at a site in relation to artworks, users become more familiar with both the site and the art, explore how artworks relate to or differ from the sites they represent, how sites have changed over time, and how sites have been represented and experienced by different artists.

Over the course of 2012, Art Maps web and a mobile application were developed, allowing people to relate artworks to the places, sites and environments they encounter in daily life. Importantly, the new software enables audiences to explore ideas of site, place and location, environment, representation and memory, both on their own and collaboratively (for example, families, friends and schools). Art mapping, as audience engagement mechanism, was investigated through two workshops, held respectively in April and in October 2012 at Tate Britain in London. The preliminary results seem promising, and suggest a value for a further dissemination of the project to a wider and differentiated audience.

So, to further 'tell the story' of Art Maps, and through the support of Art Maps applications, we plan: to organise online events targeted at digital audiences, as well as Tate in-gallery activities (e.g. in the context of the "Looking at the View" exhibition); to co-design art-trails with the public; to involve the research community through interactive events. Broader public engagement will be also attained through the Art Maps presentation to other events (e.g. Science Festivals).

Planned Impact

In order to maximise the impact, the project undertook a series of activities in 2012, grouped into: 1. Public engagement events at Tate Britain; 2. Publication of papers in conferences and journals; 3. Promotion through Art Maps partners' media and networks (e.g. Art Maps blog on Tate website; project abstract on Horizon and University of Exeter websites).

To further 'tell the story' of Art Maps, in 2013/14, we will: organise online events targeted at digital audiences and Tate in-gallery activities; co-design art-trails with the public; interactively engage the research community and the general public during academic conferences and science festivals.

We plan to create a direct impact on the use of digital resources, especially of 'peripheral' artworks, which are less accessed, as well as to support alternative paths of public participation. In fact, a priority of the National and European digitisation agenda (e.g. JISC Rapid Digitisation and Enriching Digital Resources programmes, EU portal Europeana) is to create new forms of public engagement through digital assets. In the research library and archive sector, it is reported that at least £ 130 million of UK public money has been spent in digitisation in a decade [1]. Despite the significant expenditure, it is hard to find 'evidence of use' of the digitised resources [2], and research shows that about 1/3 of the digital resources in the humanities are not accessed [3].
So, cultural institutions are progressively exploring alternative paths of collaboration with their digital audiences (e.g. Your Paintings; Transcribe Bentham; Pin a Tale). Art Maps represents an attempt to take art out of the institutional walls, supported by the capability of mobile technologies, and to create new ways to explore the Tate digital collections, as well as to discover new artworks and new artists, and thus to surface the many works from the collection that are not viewed online as often as they deserve to be. Therefore, we are lanning both the organisation of online events for digital audiences, Tate in-gallery activities, and the implementation of art trails by the public with the support of Art Maps applications.

Furthermore, Art Maps platform is open source and can be repurposed by other institutions. It can support two activities in a way that requires minimal management by a system administrator: support for crowd-sourcing geographic information about a 'thing' (in Art Maps the things are artworks, but it could be something else); support for tracking user interaction with the system and activities undertaken by the users through blogging (users are encouraged to use their own blogs to write about their activities; the core system provides a centralized place to keep track of all of these blogs). Art Maps technology is implementable for other purposes and/or by other institutions. So, we plan to have an indirect impact through the dissemination of the platform in scientific events and through its potential adoption by other institutions for similar/different functions.

References
[1] Bultmann, B., Hardy, R., Muir, A., & Wictor, C. (2005). Digitised Content in the UK Research Library and Archives Sector. JISC/CURL Report.
[2] Warwick, C., Terras, M., Huntington, P., & Pappa, N. (2008). 'If You Build It Will They Come?' The LAIRAH Study: Quantifying the Use of Online Resources in the Arts and Humanities Through Statistical Analysis of User Log Data. Literary and Linguistic Computing , 23 (1), 85-102
[3] Warwick, C., Terras, M., Huntington, P., & Pappa, N. (2006). The LAIRAH Project:Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities. AHRC Report.

Publications

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Sinker R (2013) Art Maps - Mapping the Multiple Meanings of Place in International Journal of Art & Design Education

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Carletti L (2016) Participatory Heritage: Scaffolding Citizen Scholarship in International Information & Library Review

 
Title The Grand Tour in the Marche 
Description This ia an outdoor interactive trail created in collaboration with Tate and Museo Omero base on the visit of JWM Turner in Italy in 1819. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Visitors' extended engagement with Tate's collection; Use of technology for inclusive experiences trageting disabled visitors. 
URL https://wanderanywhere.com/portfolio/il-grand-tour-nelle-marche/
 
Description Audiences can be engaged in new and creative manners to crowd source many different interpretations. Primarily looking at location, Artmaps has explored how the general public of non experts can relate art to place.

INTRODUCTION
The Telling Tales of Engagement (TToE) Award was granted in 2012 to the ArtMaps project - a collaborative initiative involving Horizon, Tate, and the University of Exeter - aiming to investigate the relation between location and artworks from the Tate collection, through the development of a crowdsourcing platform, and the involvement of the users both in the development process and in public engagement events.
The aim of the TToE Award is to capture, promote and expand the impact of digital economy research to a wider non-academic audience.
To meet this objective, we extended the activities planned and implemented within the ArtMaps project, by:
1. Exploring the ArtMaps platform as engagement tool for digital audiences (Work-Package 1);
2. Involving the public to create art trails, supported by the ArtMaps concept (Work-Package 2);
3. Engaging the research community through interactive experiences, supported by the ArtMaps platform (Work-Package 3).
Within our project, we aimed at understanding: Alternative directions to exploit online tools developed by Horizon (ArtMaps and WanderAnywhere platforms); and Novel ways to reimagine and reuse existing digital assets to engage new audiences or traditional ones in novel ways. There is a rich literature in the HCI community on visitors' interaction with technologies. This is largely focused on situated interactions in the physical space; whereas the design of experiences solely for online audiences seems still an underexplored territory. The ArtMaps online events (WP1) showed that there is value to further investigate how to reuse digital assets to create meaningful online experiences, thus reaching global audiences, otherwise impossible to engage on-site (e.g. people from other continents who might never visit Tate in the UK). Differently, the experiences of the Art Trails (WP2) demonstrated how new opportunities of public engagement can be opened by taking the digital collections out of the museum walls. Original artworks are mostly experienced indoors (with exceptions, e.g. sculptures, site-specific art, etc.). By designing outdoor experiences connecting artworks and location, we decontextualize the artwork - even if only in its digital form - from its known context (e.g. museum, galleries), providing the public with a space for new connections and associations. Those alternative ways of accessing art might also appeal a different public, who normally does not attend museum, exhibition, etc. Finally, the interactive experiences (WP3) delivered for researchers and practitioners aimed at provoking the debate around alternative use of online tools, as well as to raise attention around the need of exploiting creatively existing technologies. This last set of activities was specifically aimed at indicating how both social and technological innovations have to be targeted in parallel. Delivering technological innovation should imply enabling people to make use of that technology.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
WP1 - Digital Public Engagement
Two main activities were organised: an installation of ArtMaps kiosks at Tate Britain; Three online events.
Between February and June 2013, we explored spontaneous interactions of Tate visitors with ArtMaps through an on-site installation at the Tate Britain, Gallery 61, in connection with "Looking at the View" exhibition. Close to the exhibition area, we made available two computer stations, a short documentary about earlier public engagement events (run in April and October 2012), and three pieces of written interpretation. Our findings confirmed that personal experiences and memories of a certain place have the potential of empowering users to contribute their specialist knowledge to Tate's records and to the wider community, and potentially foster in them a sense of place and belonging. They have also demonstrated that the task of locating an artwork, far from being an objective endeavour, can prompt a personal connection where users look at artworks more closely to try to interpret them spatially, or even in time.
Between April 2013 and April 2014, we organised three online events, involving between 40 and 50 people from different Countries (Australia, Italy, New Zealand, Romania, UK, USA). The participants were invited to accomplish online tasks by interacting with artworks from the Tate collection through the ArtMaps platform. At the end of the events, the participants were asked to complete an optional online questionnaire about their overall experience. The responses by 33 people on the experience with the technology provided us insights into the further development of the platform; whereas the responses by 21 people on the interaction with the content offered us insights into the design of Web-based public engagement experiences. During the ArtMaps development process, the complexity of the relation between an artwork and the multiple locations - which might be associated with it - emerged as one of the focal finding both from the research team's reflective practice, from the online events, and from other user studies. From the technology side, this led to a further develop the platform (for instance by defining and embedding location categories such as 'the subject of the artwork'; 'where the artwork was created'; 'personal connections'), and to frame design recommendations for art mapping interfaces aimed at the Human-Computer-Interaction community. From the public engagement side, we experimented an intersubjective meaning making approach. We created tasks by building short narratives around Tate artworks, and by reimagining and reusing Tate collections' online information and media (e.g. extracts from the online catalogue; videos). The approach showed to be quite effective from the people's responses. 95% agreed that the experience facilitated new ways of exploring the Tate collection, and also that it enabled them to learn something new. 85% agreed that the experience facilitated new ways of engaging with locations and artworks.
WP2 - Art Trails Co-creation
Two main events were organised: the 'Wandering Ruins' workshop; and 'The Grand Tour in the Marche' trail. For these two events, the ArtMaps concept of relating place and art was mediated and delivered through WanderAnywhere, a free blogging platform developed by Horizon researchers. WanderAnywhere is a tool for museum, galleries, archives, as well as for individuals, to create multimedia collections (e.g. text, images, videos and audio clips) bound to locations, and to have those collections delivered to the end-users through their mobile devices, depending on their location.
In March 2014, Tate organised 'Wandering Ruins', a four-day workshop inspired by the 'Ruins Lust' exhibition at Tate Britain. The workshop was led by artist Ania Bas and Tate Curators, with our support. The participants were introduced to ArtMaps, and WanderAnywhere, then invited to select an artwork from the 'Ruin Lust' exhibition, as the initial inspiration to design and deliver a trail by the end of the workshop by using WanderAnywhere. The 14 participants formed four groups, each providing a trail in different parts of London. The last day of the workshop, each group experienced a trail designed by another group, and a final focus group with the participants closed the event. The four-day workshop proved to be quite demanding in terms of time and commitment. Despite that, the participants showed a high level of engagement by interacting online and/or by meeting beyond the workshop, as well as by delivering rich and complex (e.g. use of multimedia) trails. This pilot initiative demonstrated that there is an interest from the public to co-design and co-create experiences within the institutional framework, and that there is space for novel and composite forms of collaboration between cultural institutions and their audiences, enabled by new media and technologies.
In June 2014, we used WanderAnywhere to design and deliver an interactive trail in the city of Ancona (Italy) using artworks from the Tate collection, and other resources. 'The Grand Tour in the Marche' was a one-off experience staged in collaboration with the State Tactile Museum Omero in Ancona, Italy. Using WanderAnywhere to play audio reproductions of travel journal entries and digitisations of sketches, the experience took walkers along Ancona sea-front to sights that inspired Joseph Mallord William Turner and his contemporaries on their tour of the city and region. The walk was led by an expert tour guide and complemented by tactile representations of Turner's sketches for partially-sighted participants. The concept was to blend on-site and online information delivered on location to support public engagement. The feedback from the 12 participants were positive: 'It was interesting, because it happens to me very often - when I visit a museum - that I see a landscape and I wonder how is that place today. So, it was very interesting to see the artworks, and at the same time, to be in the place that they represent'; 'It was fascinating to see the city through the eyes of an artist. Surely, it made me want to go back to the Tate, and to see Turner's sketches'.
WP3 - Interactive Experiences and Other Events
The ArtMaps platform is open source and can be repurposed by other institutions. So, we planned to engage the research community, as well as museum, galleries, and other potential interested organisations, not only through academic papers, but through bespoke designed interactive experiences. We demoed ArtMaps at CHI2013 and at EVA-London2014. The demo entailed in-conference interactions with the ArtMaps application, as well as outdoor activities using ArtMaps to connect artworks and location, respectively in Paris for CHI2013 and in London for EVA2014. In May 2013, we organised an activity targeted at families with children at the May Fest 2013, promoted by the University of Nottingham. The ArtMaps activity 'Mapping the University Park Landscapes' was linked to the 'Looking at the View' exhibition at Tate Britain in London. Leaflets with Tate landscapes on them were distributed to prompt the families to look at the landscapes at the University Park, take and share pictures. We also organised a demo at the 'V&A Digital Futures' event in London (July 2014). Those activities led to expand our network, and to explore future collaborations on the use of ArtMaps for other collection (e.g. National Trust) and/or for other purposes (e.g. learning tool at the University of Saint Petersburg, Russia).
As a result of ArtMaps project implementation, in 2014, we organised two international workshops, within ACM CSCW2014, on the evolving landscape of collaboration between organisations and their public, and at ACM GROUP2014 on the impact of crowdsourcing on organisations. In both workshop, a presentation of ArtMaps was and will be included.

OUTCOMES
The main outcomes of these activities are: Two Journal articles; Two Conference papers; Three peer-reviewed conference abstracts; Two peer-reviewed workshops; Five invited talks; One How-to Session; Three blog posts; Press coverage.

CONSLUSIONS
The aim of the TToE Award is to capture, promote and expand the impact of digital economy research to a wider non-academic audience. Through the organisation of interactive online and on-site experiences targeted at different groups, we involved new audiences through novel forms of engagement by using available technologies, developed by Horizon, thus experimenting how to deliver social and technological innovation simultaneously.
Exploitation Route Our technology is open source and freely available for anyone to roll their own experience.

Our endeavours have been summarised and presented through academic papers, as well as through dissemination activities (e.g. blog posts; events). We also have been involving the stakeholders in a reflective process through workshops (one delivered at ACM CSCW2014, and one at ACM GROUP2014). The legacy of the TToE Award is therefore widely available, and can be appropriated by the different communities we targeted (e.g. researchers, museum practitioners), to deliver new experiences for the general public, as well as to further develop new tools.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.horizon.ac.uk/
 
Description Tate is adopting the underpinning Artmaps technology and is adopting a modern Web 2.0 API based approach to their webservices - together we are promoting this throughout the cultural sector to encourage visitin experience that extend beyond the walls of the galleries and museums to engage audiences in their environment. The Telling Tales of Engagement (TToE) Award was granted to the ArtMaps project in 2012 to promote the impact of digital economy research to a wider non-academic audience. Through this grant, the ArtMaps activities were expanded to reach new audiences or traditional ones in novel ways. Therefore, we planned to: Explore the ArtMaps platform as engagement tool for digital audiences; Involve the general public in designing and delivering location-based experiences; Engage the research community in interactive events. The main focus of our TToE project was to investigate ways to empower the stakeholders in using new technologies creatively, and to build paths and offer tools for the public in accessing digital resources. With the TToE Award, we experimented and reimagined the use of available technologies -developed by Horizon researchers - and of online content - delivered by Tate - in order to innovate the audience experience, and to go beyond the sole technological innovation. Through interactive events, and more traditional academic papers, we summarised the findings to allow both the academic community and cultural organisations to appropriate the digital tools, and the design of experiences for audience engagement through technology. Through online and on-site framed experiences, we provided the general public creative ways to interact and engage with cultural resources through technology. Our approach demonstrated to be quite effective from the responses of all the target groups. Therefore, we have been directing our endeavours towards the organisation of activities involving the stakeholders in a reflective process on the convergence of social and technological innovation (e.g. participatory workshops; how-to sessions). Our findings and design recommendations can be used by the research communities (HCI; Education; Digital Humanities) to explore uncharted aspects, which emerged in our research practice, as well as by cultural organisations to deliver innovative experiences for diverse audiences through technology.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic

 
Description ArtMaps 
Organisation Tate
Department Tate Research Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Horizon co-developed a crowdsourcing platfrom to visualise the Tate collection on a map and supporting user generated content. Furthermore, we provided expertise in online audience engament.
Collaborator Contribution Tate provided their expertise
Impact This a multi-disciplinary collaboration involving researchers and practitioners in performance studies, learning, computer science.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Project Collaboration with Tate 
Organisation Tate
Department Tate Education and IT
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Art Maps and Art Maps 2are sub projects are funded by Horizon Hub main project
Collaborator Contribution Facilitating and evaluating workshops; linking the experiment into the main Tate website
Impact This has involved researchers in computing, curation, learning and drama - all outputs listed are joint.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Project Collaboration with the Museo Omero 
Organisation Museum Tattile Statale Omero Ancona
Country Italy 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Interactive Trail 'Il Grand Tour nelle Marche' was a one-off experience staged in collaboration with the State Tactile Museum Omero in Ancona, Italy. Using Wander Anywhere to play audio reproductions of travel journal entries and digitisations of sketches, the experience took walkers along Ancona sea-front to sights that inspired Joseph Mallord William Turner and his contemporaries on their tour of the city and region. The walk was led by an expert tour guide and complemented by tactile representations of Turner's sketches for partially-sighted participants.
Collaborator Contribution Participants recruitment; Venue; Support in the deployment of the interactive trail; Expert guide for the tour; Staff time.
Impact This collaboration was interdisciplinary and involved: Social Sciences (Learning); Computer Science (HCI); and Art History. The main outcomes of this collaboration are: Invited Talk: Crafting Experiences for Online and On-Site Engagement with Cultural Resources at the 'First Historical-Cultural Forum of the Russian World' organised by the Russian Mir Foundation. Veliky Novgorod (Russia), October 10th 2014. How-to-Session (submitted): Carletti, L., & Bedwell, B. (2014). Taking Your Digital Collection For a Walk: Crafting Location-based Experiences for the Public. Museum & the Web 2015. Dissemination Blog Post (Forthcoming): Carletti, L., & Bedwell, B. (December 2014). Wandering in Italy with JMW Turner and his contemporaries. Press coverage: RAI (Italy's National Public Broadcasting Company) Regional News Coverage. 25 June 2014. http://www.wanderanywhere.com/ancona/rai.mp4.
Start Year 2014
 
Description 3 Art Maps Online Engagement Events 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/art-maps-tool-web-based-engagement-digital-collections
 
Description Art Maps Kiosks at Tate Britain 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/art-maps-kiosks-tate-britain-data-analysis
 
Description Art Maps Short Article on The Museum Associations website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Art Maps presentation on the Museum Association Website

NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.museumsassociation.org/museum-practice/new-approaches-to-volunteers/16092013-tate
 
Description Demo: Art Maps - Cultural Crowd-sourcing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact demo at DE2012: Digital Futures

NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Interactive Trail: The Grand Tour in the Marche 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invite talk on Art Maps at V&A Digital Futures (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3408/digital-futures-eva-london-at-bl-nk-4857/
 
Description Invited Talk "Crafting Experiences for Online and On-Site Engagement with Cultural Resources", First Historical-Cultural Forum of the Russian World, Veliky Novgorod, Russian Federation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to deliver a talk at the First Historical and Cultural Forum of the Russian World. This Forum aimed at contributing to the preservation and growing popularity of the achievements of the Russian culture and objects of the Russian cultural heritage using up-to-date digital technology as well as at supporting the traditions of the multinational culture of the Russian Federation peoples. Over 200 experts from major Russian and foreign museums, libraries, higher education and other cultural institutions took part in the work of the Forum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited Talk "Crafting Interactive Experiences for Engagement", Highwire Doctoral Training Centre for Digital Innovation, Lancaster University. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact 20 PhD students took part.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://highwire.lancaster.ac.uk/events/Preview/14053
 
Description Invited Talk on "Crowd Sourcing, Impact and Co-Creation: Key Lessons and New Strategies", Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities, Queen's University Belfast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 20 people attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://pure.qub.ac.uk/portal/en/activities/crowdsourcing--impact-and-cocreation-key-lessons-and-new-...
 
Description Invited Talk on "Digital Impacts: Crowdsourcing in the Arts and Humanities", Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This one-day workshop showcased digital crowdsourcing projects in the Arts and Humanities, and discussed the impact of such initiatives. The ArtMaps project was presented.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL https://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/events/digital-impacts-crowdsourcing-in-the-arts-and-humanities/
 
Description Invited Talk on DH Crowdsourcing (Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/events/?id=573
 
Description Invited Talk on Digital Engagement (Russia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description May Fest 2013: Mapping The University Park Landscapes 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Poster/Presentation: Art Maps - Telling Tales of Engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Poster for DE2013: Open Digital conference

NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Project Blog "Art Maps as a Tool for Web-based Engagement with Digital Collections" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The blog aimed at presenting our research to a wider public beyond the academic community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/art-maps-tool-web-based-engagement-digital-collections
 
Description Project Blog "Art Maps: Learning in Mobility" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The blog aimed at presenting our research to a wider public beyond the academic community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/art-maps-learning-mobility
 
Description Project Blog "Art Maps: a crowd-resourcing project" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The blog aimed at presenting our research to a wider public beyond the academic community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/blogs/art-maps-crowd-resourcing-project
 
Description RAI Regional News Coverage (Italy's National Public Broadcasting Company) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact International publicity of Horizon EPSRC Art Maps telling tales of engagement project

Taking our research to audiences in other countries
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description RAI TV News "Il Grand Tour nelle Marche" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact TV News on our research study
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wctbZomSlCk
 
Description Workshop: Structures for Knowledge Co-creation between Organisation and the Public 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop: The Morphing Organization 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact NA
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014