CSIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre Phase 2

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Engineering

Abstract

Globally, national infrastructure is facing significant challenges:
- Ageing assets: Much of the UK's existing infrastructure is old and no longer fit for purpose. In its State of the Nation Infrastructure 2014 report the Institution of Civil Engineers stated that none of the sectors analysed were "fit for the future" and only one sector was "adequate for now". The need to future-proof existing and new infrastructure is of paramount importance and has become a constant theme in industry documents, seminars, workshops and discussions.
- Increased loading: Existing infrastructure is challenged by the need to increase load and usage - be that number of passengers carried, numbers of vehicles or volume of water used - and the requirement to maintain the existing infrastructure while operating at current capacity.
- Changing climate: projections for increasing numbers and severity of extreme weather events mean that our infrastructure will need to be more resilient in the future.

These challenges require innovation to address them. However, in the infrastructure and construction industries tight operating margins, industry segmentation and strong emphasis on safety and reliability create barriers to introducing innovation into industry practice.

CSIC is an Innovation and Knowledge Centre funded by EPSRC and Innovate UK to help address this market failure, by translating world leading research into industry implementation, working with more than 40 industry partners to develop, trial, provide and deliver high-quality, low cost, accurate sensor technologies and predictive tools which enable new ways of monitoring how infrastructure behaves during construction and asset operation, providing a whole-life approach to achieving sustainability in an integrated way. It provides training and access for industry to source, develop and deliver these new approaches to stimulate business and encourage economic growth, improving the management of the nation's infrastructure and construction industry.

Our collaborative approach, bringing together leaders from industry and academia, accelerates the commercial development of emerging technologies, and promotes knowledge transfer and industry implementation to shape the future of infrastructure.
Phase 2 funding will enable CSIC to address specific challenges remaining to implementation of smart infrastructure solutions.

Over the next five years, to overcome these barriers and create a self-sustaining market in smart infrastructure, CSIC along with an expanded group of industry and academic partners will:
- Create the complete, innovative solutions that the sector needs by integrating the components of smart infrastructure into systems approaches, bringing together sensor data and asset management decisions to improve whole life management of assets and city scale infrastructure planning; spin-in technology where necessary, to allow demonstration of smart technology in an integrated manner.
- Continue to build industry confidence by working closely with partners to demonstrate and deploy new smart infrastructure solutions on live infrastructure projects. Develop projects on behalf of industry using seed-funds to fund hardware and consumables, and demonstrate capability.
- Generate a compelling business case for smart infrastructure solutions together with asset owners and government organisations based on combining smarter information with whole life value models for infrastructure assets. Focus on value-driven messaging around the whole system business case for why smart infrastructure is the future, and will strive to turn today's intangibles into business drivers for the future.
- Facilitate the development and expansion of the supply chain through extending our network of partners in new areas, knowledge transfer, smart infrastructure standards and influencing policy.

Planned Impact

The UK is well placed to lead the smart infrastructure revolution, and investment in CSIC's programme to develop and demonstrate innovative, integrated solutions will provide a step change in the UK's capability to deliver solutions which are globally competitive.
CSIC Phase 2 funding will deliver a wide range of impacts in the UK and globally, through addressing the challenges to implementation of smart infrastructure solutions in an industry where innovation is challenging. These impacts can be summarised as follows:

Industry benefits:
CSIC's work will impact through transforming the capability of the industry to deliver smart infrastructure solutions:
- Increased industry confidence to implement smart infrastructure solutions through deployment of technologies and demonstration of their benefits, working with our network of more than 40 industry partners
- Increased industry capability to deliver smart infrastructure solutions through support in developing solutions and services from innovative technologies and solutions - for example current work with Skanska on developing a fibre optic monitoring service, which is projected to deliver a turnover of £1M in its first year
- New business opportunities, generated through networking between industry partners and exploring the potential for application of novel technologies in the infrastructure and construction industries
- Raised industry awareness and confidence in smart infrastructure solutions through training and knowledge transfer, using training courses, secondments, industry-focussed best practice guides and case studies CSIC will transfer knowledge to the infrastructure and construction industries to raise awareness and acceptance of smart infrastructure
- Development of complete smart infrastructure solutions, and the standards required to specify them

Policy makers:
- Insights into the benefits of smart infrastructure solutions, and guidance on what policy or regulation may be required to create the nvironment for industry uptake
- Development of a 'smart infrastructure standards' roadmap, in collaboration with BSI

Benefits to the public and wider society:
- Widespread uptake in industry of smart infrastructure solutions will result in more reliable infrastructure provision, with better performance and reduced whole life costs alongside increased whole life value. Services will be responsive to user needs and resilient to shocks, returning rapidly to service from interruptions due to events such as severe weather
- The programme will also feed into undergraduate and masters level education, producing the next generation of engineers who will be well-placed to work in the smart infrastructure industry and deliver these solutions

Organisations

Publications

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Vick S (2018) Road Design Layer Detection in Point Cloud Data for Construction Progress Monitoring in Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering

 
Title "Mixed Reality for Infrastructure " 
Description Video on Cambridge University's youtube channel by Brilakis, I., Huethwohl, P. and Kopsida, M. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Over 26,000 views (top 10 out of 98 videos in this channel in past year) 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmqBE4OA_xM&list=PL7NVHs7Y_TuIq7ViNahxYJnLz-_BMfjrS
 
Description Work is currently in progress. A partial list of findings is below. A full report will be made available nearer the end of the award.
Building on underpinning research at the University of Cambridge, CSIC has been developing fibre optic sensing methods, in particular Distributed fibre optic sensor (DFOS) systems and Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) systems, for assessing the performance of civil engineering infrastructure. These methods allow measurement of strain and temperature to infer movement, displacement, and cracking, for varied types of structures providing unprecedented spatial resolution. DFOS is ideal for monitoring strain or temperature over distance or area and is particularly useful for detecting phenomena such as cracks and material anomalies for embedded defects than cannot be observed with point sensors.
A key research result was a robust innovative optical fibre sensor installation technique for piles, retaining walls and tunnels which was used and refined in a series of case studies, providing important new insights into detailed microstrain soil-structure interaction mechanisms in large, complex civil engineering structures. Specific outputs included:
A new understanding of mechanical and thermal behaviour of piles. Theoretical analysis comparing measurements from traditional localised strain devices and DFOS; DFOS has revealed fundamental behaviour of thermal energy piles, proving that their load-bearing capacity is not compromised by thermal cycles.

A new data processing and temperature compensation method was produced to calculate strains and ultimately deformation of retaining walls. This was based on detailed measurement of axial and lateral deformation of a secant pile retaining wall using the Cambridge DFOS system.

New insights on the flexible behaviour of a Victorian masonry arch tunnel, affected by the construction of a new tunnel located directly below, were obtained from use of DFOS avoiding the potential need for costly remedial measures.

The DoEng team applied the same system in Singapore to measure circumferential strains in real time induced by excavating an adjacent twin tunnel. It provided enhanced understanding of lining deformation mechanisms, which is essential for improving future designs of twin tunnel-soil interactions. The DoEng DFOS research proved that the system can reliably measure the behaviour of a variety of tunnel types and showed the advantages of DFOS in accurately measuring continuous strain profiles and in its geometric adaptability. The research has been extended to other structures, particularly masonry arches.
A full report of findings will be made available nearer the end of the award. However in the meantime further information can be found in Annual Reviews https://www-smartinfrastructure.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/newsletters
Exploitation Route The engineering, management, maintenance and upgrading of infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimise use of materials, energy and labour whilst still ensuring resilience. This can only be achieved by a full understanding of the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through the application of innovative sensor technologies and other emerging technologies. The key aim of CSIC is that emerging technologies from world-leading research at Cambridge will transform the construction industry through a whole-life approach to achieving sustainability in construction and infrastructure in an integrated way. This covers: • design and commissioning • the construction process • exploitation and use • eventual de-commissioning Crucial elements of these emerging technologies are the innovative application of the latest sensor technologies, data management tools, manufacturing processes and supply chain management processes to the construction industry, both during infrastructure construction and throughout its design life. The major objective of CSIC is to integrate these innovations for exploitation and knowledge transfer - something which is new to the UK construction and infrastructure industry. We believe that the outcome will be major transformations in the approaches to the design, construction and use of complex infrastructure leading to step changes in improved health and productivity; a low carbon society; sustainable urban planning and management. There will be a very substantial market for exploitation of these technologies by the construction industry - particularly contractors, specialist instrumentation companies and owners of infrastructure for both domestic and international markets. With our industry partners CSIC is pushing forward new frontiers of technology and innovative management in a sector of the economy which has traditionally had very little investment in research, particularly when compared to sectors such as computing or electronics. CSIC draws on recent research in new techniques, new models of construction and new management approaches. Through this innovation in technology and management, supported by extensive training and development, deep-rooted attitudes and assumptions are being challenged by CSIC with the aim of revolutionizing construction and the public perception of it.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Electronics,Energy,Environment,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy,Transport

URL http://www-smartinfrastructure.eng.cam.ac.uk/
 
Description Work is currently in progress on this grant, a full report will be made available nearer the end of the award. Additionally, due to the wide scope of CSIC activities, only the briefest description can be given here. For further information please see our CSIC Annual Reviews and at our website http://www-smartinfrastructure.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/newsletters. Business benefits - As a result of the research in fibre optic sensing systems, Cementation Skanska plc have established a new business channel called CemOptics. During the grant period the technology has led to a reduction in the release of CO2 from projects, the installation of 100km of fibre optic cables, and has been used on a number of projects including the GBP1b Northern Line extension. Additionally, Network Rail have deployed the techniques for remote monitoring on 3 bridges, with savings estimated in the millions, and are making a significant investment in monitoring technologies. CSIC partner HS2 are specifying advanced monitoring solutions in many of their tender documents. This is on track to deliver huge benefits via prediction of damage and targeting maintenance. Transport for London (TfL) have saved GBP1m by avoiding unnecessary mitigation costs on one project, alerting staff of potential damage caused by new underground tunnel boring. Impact on industry practice - Technology based on the Cambridge research findings is embedded in Institution of Civil Engineering (ICE) Specification for Piling, and CSIC ICE best practice guides on structural monitoring, are used in many hundreds of organisations. CSIC have key roles on UK national infrastructure bodies driving policy and government investment plans for open information sharing. Spin-outs - Three start-up companies have spun out from CSIC - Epsimon, 8Power, and UtterBerry, creating new jobs and meeting the need for new technologies in the marketplace.
Sector Construction,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Energy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy,Transport,Other
 
Description APESS - CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Artificial Intelligence in Transport
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Autonomous Vehicles
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Future of Flight
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Future of Mobility
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Hyperloop
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Department of Transport policy on Transport Infrastructure Efficiency Strategy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As Head of CSIC responsible for producing Guidelines for Department of Transport on Condition Monitoring and Intelligent Infrastructure Professor Lord Robert Mair has Influenced systematic reviews, guidelines and policy documents
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As a member of the House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Government policy on the following topic (through publication of reports): Nuclear Research and Technology (published May 2017)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description As a member of the House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology, Professor Lord Robert Mair has influenced Government policy on the following topic: Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (published March 2017)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description BSI B/555 CB5 Strategic Planning Committee - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description BSI B/555 Committee on Design, Construction & Operational Data & Process Management for the Built Environment - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description CSIC hosted the workshop on Smart Infrastructure for the DFT Scientific Advisory Committee and DFT Agencies
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Centre for Doctoral Training Sensors Day - JMS presentation
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Chair of Strategic Research Advisory Group, Centre for Digital Built Britain (JMS)
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.cdbb.cam.ac.uk/CDBBResearchBridgehead
 
Description Chair of the Department for Transport's (DfT's) Science Advisory Council
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Chairman of the Department of Transport's Science Advisory Council
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Commissioner, Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.royalcommission1851.org/about-us/
 
Description Council Member in the International Society for Structural Health Monitoring of Intelligent Infrastructure (ISHMII)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL http://www.ishmii.org/new-council-members-introduced/
 
Description DFOS training - CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description DOFS CERN short course / training CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description DOFS sensing short course - CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Digital Catapult Crossrail PitStop - invited speaker - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Digital Framework Task Group JMS
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Digital Transformation Task Group JMS
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description FBb sensing short course/training CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description FINESSE - Commercialising your research training - PK
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description H2020 short course / training CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description HS2 BIM Advisory Group JMS
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Highways England Innovation workshop - invited participant - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description House of Lords Augar Review of Post-18 Education and Funding Debate
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www-smartinfrastructure.eng.cam.ac.uk/news-and-events/head-of-csic-champions-modern-engineer...
 
Description ICE Asset Management 2015 conference - invited speaker - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description ICE Council annual strategy meeting - invited speaker and participant JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description ICE Triennial Summit - invited speaker - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description ISO TC59 SC13 Organization and digitization of information about buildings and civil engineering works - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description IStructE Invited speaker - international conference
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Innovate UK Innovate 15 - invited speaker - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Institution of Civil Engineers State of the Nation 2020: Net-Zero
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Invited member to the Construction Leadership Council working party on Procuring for Value
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The CLC's objective is to drive industry improvement. It draws together business leaders from across the sector to identify how to promote solutions to meet the ambition of a 33% reduction in cost, a 50% reduction in project time, a 50% reduction in carbon emissions and a 50% reduction in the trade gap. The "Procuring for Value" report provides recommendations on how government, clients and the industry can maximise the impact of the sector deal by a change in approach to procurement
URL http://www.constructionleadershipcouncil.co.uk/news/procuring-for-value/
 
Description KTN Built evironment advisory board - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Maria Scott technical training CK
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Member Transport Research and Innovation Board
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Member of the House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology - Offsite Manufacture in Construction - Building for Change Report
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact A report published by the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee, Off-site Manufacture for construction: building for change, says that off-site manufacture (OSM) can help to increase productivity in the construction sector while reducing labour demands, improving the quality and efficiency of buildings, and reducing the environmental impacts associated with traditional construction.
URL https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201719/ldselect/ldsctech/169/16902.htm
 
Description Ove Arup Foundation Steering workshop - invited participant JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Professor Lord Robert Mair is Chairman of the Science Advisory Council of the Department of Transport
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description Professor Lord Robert Mair is a Member of House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description Professor Lord Robert Mair is a Member of the National Infrastructure Commission Expert Advisory Technical Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact See above
 
Description Report from the Economic Affairs Committee Rethinking High Speed 2
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www-smartinfrastructure.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/head-csic-calls-need-innovation-house-lords-hs2-d...
 
Description Skanska Deployment team Raman course
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Tideway Tideway Academic Advisory Meeting - JMS
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description i3P DLG Advisory Committee JMS
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description 1851 RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
Amount £99,000 (GBP)
Organisation Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2019
 
Description CDBB Early Career Researcher - Dr Li Wan - A City-Level Digital Twin Experiment for Exploring the Impacts of Digital Transformation on Journeys to Work in the Cambridge Sub-region
Amount £78,910 (GBP)
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 07/2019
 
Description CDBB Early Career Researcher - Dr Timea Nochta - The local governance of digital technology - Implications for the city-scale digital twin
Amount £59,765 (GBP)
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 07/2019
 
Description CDBB General Research Funding
Amount £500,000 (GBP)
Organisation Digital Built Britain 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2019 
End 09/2022
 
Description CMMI-EPSRC: Modeling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change
Amount £420,171 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/T019425/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2019 
End 10/2022
 
Description Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction - Phase 2: Additional Funding for Financial Year 17/18
Amount £500,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 920038 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 03/2018
 
Description Data Centric Engineering - Extension from Sep 2018 to Mar 2019
Amount £27,684 (GBP)
Organisation Alan Turing Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Data centric engineering
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Organisation Alan Turing Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 02/2018
 
Description Data-Centric Engineering Applications in Smart Infrastructure
Amount £216,711 (GBP)
Organisation Alan Turing Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 12/2021
 
Description Developing remote capability assessment for Bridges
Amount £70,000 (GBP)
Organisation Network Rail Ltd 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 12/2019
 
Description Digital Changes for Cities
Amount £233,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arup Group 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2017 
End 05/2019
 
Description Dr Liam Butler Fellowship - Group Leader for Data centric engineering
Amount £61,436 (GBP)
Organisation Alan Turing Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 02/2019
 
Description FINNESE (ITN)
Amount £433,790 (GBP)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2020
 
Description FOAK - Autonomous self powered Sensors
Amount £11,500 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description FOAK - Condition based maintanence
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description FOAK - MetroCare - Strategic decision-making for integrated urban infrastructure
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 971490 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description Facebook for Machines (EPSRC Institutional Support Grant) - AKNP
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
 
Description GIS-BASED INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR OPTIMIZED RESPONSE TO EXTREME EVENTS ON TERRESTRIAL TRANSPORT NETWORKS (SAFEWAY)
Amount € 4,521,100 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission H2020 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 09/2018 
End 02/2022
 
Description Innovate and Knowledge Centres
Amount £2,499,396 (GBP)
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2016 
End 06/2021
 
Description Junior Research Fellowship - MSA
Amount £90,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Department Clare Hall
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
 
Description Managing Air for Green Inner Cities (MAGIC) - YJ
Amount £4,000,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N010221/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2016 
 
Description Novel applications of structural equation models for car ownership and travel choice forecasting (PI) - YJ
Amount £25,000 (GBP)
Organisation Department of Transport 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
 
Description Performance of polymer support fluids for piling and diaphragm walls
Amount £27,800 (GBP)
Funding ID 2109009 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 09/2022
 
Description Poverty in Chinese Cities: application of new data analytics (PI) YJ
Amount £126,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
 
Description Small Partnership Awards - RC
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
 
Description Staffordshire Bridge Long Term Monitoring
Amount £399,914 (GBP)
Organisation Digital Built Britain 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2020 
End 12/2021
 
Title Advanced soil models to be incorporated into commercially available software Extended Saniclay model in Abaqus - Samila Bandara 
Description Advanced soil models to be incorporated into commercially available software Extended Saniclay model in Abaqus 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Advanced soil models to be incorporated into commercially available software Extended Saniclay model in Abaqus 
 
Title BIM Maturity Assessment Tool 
Description CSIC's BIM Maturity Assessment Tool (BMAT), initially developed in 2017, uses established performance measurement practices, BIM literature, and other relevant standards, to build and expand on previous BIM assessment tools. Consisting of two major parts -measurement of the organisation's BIM development maturity and measurement of the supporting processes - the tool provides a separate assessment of the different stakeholders (contractor, designer and employer), and is designed to be used as a continuous performance measurement tool that can be employed to track the evolution of BIM maturity throughout the construction phase through to handover. The Excel-based tool is designed to be user friendly and adaptable to the needs of individual organisations and projects. Limited testing of the tool was successful but more case studies were needed for validation. Secondment project - BIM Maturity Assessment Tool - This aim of the secondment project was to ensure the tool complies with all of the applicable standards, to validate the tool through five additional cross-sector case studies and to ensure its appropriateness for Level 2 BIM maturity assessments. Also, the tool required future-proofing for extension beyond Level 2. In order to develop the tool and make it effective and useful to industry, diverse case studies were identified from a range of sectors (water, railways, highways, and nuclear) and various stages in the project delivery cycle (design, construction and handover) as well as different contract types (e.g. traditional, and, design and build). The updated tool is structured to ask the right questions of the user depending on the stage of the Information Delivery Cycle (IDC) and which stakeholders are involved. The tool is designed to reveal how well the asset owner has defined the asset information requirements and how well the different project stakeholders have defined their approach to develop these requirements for both the BIM Execution Plan (BEP) and the Master Information Delivery Plan (MIDP). The tool enables clarity on who owns the data, who owns the common data environment, and who will take responsibility for the Asset Information Model (AIM) upon handover. Questions are asked about competency and information production, which standards have been applied, how to measure the quality of data used, and how the different stakeholders collaborate. The tool is designed to be extended further. Plans include testing additional case studies and improving the weighting system and interdependencies between the various BIM elements, as well as the development of a web-based version which will enable widely processing and disseminating maturity assessment results across the country. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact CSIC's BIM Maturity Assessment Tool (BMAT), initially developed in 2017, uses established performance measurement practices, BIM literature, and other relevant standards, to build and expand on previous BIM assessment tools. Consisting of two major parts -measurement of the organisation's BIM development maturity and measurement of the supporting processes - the tool provides a separate assessment of the different stakeholders (contractor, designer and employer), and is designed to be used as a continuous performance measurement tool that can be employed to track the evolution of BIM maturity throughout the construction phase through to handover. The Excel-based tool is designed to be user friendly and adaptable to the needs of individual organisations and projects. Limited testing of the tool was successful but more case studies were needed for validation. 
 
Title Monitoring axial shortening 
Description CSIC has developed a novel application of distributed fibre optic sensors (DFOS) to continuously measure the progressive axial shortening of reinforced concrete columns and walls during the construction of high-rise buildings. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The data acquired to date provide the shortening time histories of the instrumented elements with unprecedented detail and at an unprecedented temporal density. This information has been used to demonstrate how an element's shortening is affected by its profile and stiffness, with smaller and less stiff elements shortening more. The continuous data also show that transient thermal effects can play a significant role in axial shortening, at times accounting for as much as 50 per cent of the total deformation. This is particularly significant as shortening predictions prior to construction do not take into account such thermal effects. CSIC's FO monitoring system also makes it possible to observe the effects of occasional and unexpected events - such as an incident of abrupt loading - which could not be observed with periodic or occasional measurements. 
 
Title Predictive Maintenance Model 
Description CSIC researchers have developed a methodology to help asset managers to determine the most optimal timing for interventions on their bridge portfolio in a predictive manner. As maintenance budgets for bridge systems are squeezed, many necessary maintenance activities are delayed or cancelled. Retaining an appropriate level of service and safety for an infrastructure network has become a challenging issue and there is pressing need for a smart asset management approach for road bridges. The structure of the overall approach is composed of five interconnected models: deterioration model; lifecycle cost model; predictive maintenance; group maintenance; and maintenance scheduling model (Figure 2). The deterioration model is formulated for each component of the bridges based on the information from the Structures Asset Management Planning Toolkit, general inspection, and other theoretical models. The predictability of the maintenance model enables proactive grouping of maintenance activities at different timings to reduce add-on costs such as the cost of preliminaries, traffic management and design. These add-on costs can be up to 80 per cent of the cost of repairs that are carried out at the same time. Finally, a designed to be meaningful and supports asset management planning and business case development for the asset owner, as well as the interface between the Structures Asset Management Toolkit and asset management systems to allow asset data input to be automated. The tool is designed to be used for any type of bridge from footbridges to motorway bridges. It has been tested and demonstrated using real industry data and dependencies and, constraints have been tested to enable scenario planning. To develop the CISC toolkit, data including deterioration rates and maintenance costs were extracted from the 2015 update of the Structures Asset Management Toolkit Documentation published by the Department for Transport. This data is different from the current version of the DfT Strcutures Asset Management Toolkit released in 2017. Therefore, it is difficult to compare the CSIC toolkit results against the DfT toolkit. The latest data are required in order to secure more accurate results and also validate the outcome of the CSIC toolkit. The available tools in the market have a time-dependent strategy based on experience. The CSIC tool is the first to provide a strategy based on data using a mathematical model to reduce the maintenance costs and improve the safety of bridges at the same time; the CSIC tool introduces a cost and safety dependent maintenance strategy. The tool can be used for a wide range of applications within the infrastructure sector. The next step is to make the tool adaptable for different types of assets such as tunnels, retaining walls, and earthworks. Our secondment programme offers benefits to all stakeholders. Secondees bring new skills, projects and challenges to CSIC that help to develop emerging tools and technologies for industry use. The secondees gain a deep understanding of innovations which they can apply for the direct benefit of their own companies/organisations. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact CSIC researchers have developed a methodology to help asset managers to determine the most optimal timing for interventions on their bridge portfolio in a predictive manner. As maintenance budgets for bridge systems are squeezed, many necessary maintenance activities are delayed or cancelled. Retaining an appropriate level of service and safety for an infrastructure network has become a challenging issue and there is pressing need for a smart asset management approach for road bridges. The structure of the overall approach is composed of five interconnected models: deterioration model; lifecycle cost model; predictive maintenance; group maintenance; and maintenance scheduling model (Figure 2). The deterioration model is formulated for each component of the bridges based on the information from the Structures Asset Management Planning Toolkit, general inspection, and other theoretical models. The predictability of the maintenance model enables proactive grouping of maintenance activities at different timings to reduce add-on costs such as the cost of preliminaries, traffic management and design. These add-on costs can be up to 80 per cent of the cost of repairs that are carried out at the same time. Finally, a designed to be meaningful and supports asset management planning and business case development for the asset owner, as well as the interface between the Structures Asset Management Toolkit and asset management systems to allow asset data input to be automated. The tool is designed to be used for any type of bridge from footbridges to motorway bridges. It has been tested and demonstrated using real industry data and dependencies and, constraints have been tested to enable scenario planning. 
 
Title CSIC Fibre-Optics Data Analysis Dashboard 
Description The construction and infrastructure industries grapple with huge volumes of data (big data), when attempting to monitor the structural health of their infrastructure. CSIC is producing a Fibre-Optics Data Analysis Dashboard to assist the industries in quickly and efficiently assessing huge volumes of data for the key message. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The CSIC FODA Dashboard is still in the Research and Development phase, with CSIC's Industry Partners providing vital sites and data, as well as industry feedback as the dashboard develops. 
 
Title Data set related to the publication: "Structural performance monitoring using a dynamic data-driven BIM environment" 
Description The data was collected for the ME01 project being carried out in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge under EPSRC grant no. EP/L010917/1 The ME01 project is a fibre optic instrumentation and dynamic monitoring programme at Norton Bridge, UK, part of the Stafford Area Improvements Programme. The strain data was collected using fibre optic monitoring technologies based on fibre Bragg gratings. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge - QL 
Description Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models. A point cloud model for west Cambridge site and a point cloud model for IfM building. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Basis for further work 
 
Title Principal Tower axial shortening L0-16: Research data supporting "Monitoring the axial displacement of a high-rise building under construction using embedded distributed fibre optic sensors" 
Description Axial displacement of columns C8 and C9 and walls W1 and W2 at Principal Tower (London, UK) measured between mid-October 2016 and end March 2017 from levels 0 to 16. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Principal Tower axial shortening L0-16: Research data supporting "Monitoring the axial displacement of a high-rise building under construction using embedded distributed fibre optic sensors" 
Description Axial displacement of columns C8 and C9 and walls W1 and W2 at Principal Tower (London, UK) measured between mid-October 2016 and end March 2017 from levels 0 to 16. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Principal Tower column axial shortening L0-4 
Description Axial displacement of columns C8 and C9 at Principal Tower (London, UK) measured between mid-October and mid-December 2016 from levels 0 to 4. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Principal Tower column axial shortening L0-4 
Description Axial displacement of columns C8 and C9 at Principal Tower (London, UK) measured between mid-October and mid-December 2016 from levels 0 to 4. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "A Handheld Diagnostic System for 6LoWPAN Networks" 
Description This data consists of Contiki OS/Cooja simulation files to conduct experiments based on previously obtained diagnostic data from a six-month-long deployment on a construction site, specifically on a new Crossrail Station in Paddington, London. Accompanying these files are the scripts and data used to generate the figures presented in the paper. This research data supports "A Handheld Diagnostic System for 6LoWPAN Networks" which will be published in "13th Wireless On-demand Network systems and Services Conference (WONS 2017)" 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "A Handheld Diagnostic System for 6LoWPAN Networks" 
Description This data consists of Contiki OS/Cooja simulation files to conduct experiments based on previously obtained diagnostic data from a six-month-long deployment on a construction site, specifically on a new Crossrail Station in Paddington, London. Accompanying these files are the scripts and data used to generate the figures presented in the paper. This research data supports "A Handheld Diagnostic System for 6LoWPAN Networks" which will be published in "13th Wireless On-demand Network systems and Services Conference (WONS 2017)" 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "Dynamic response of a damaged masonry rail viaduct: Measurement and interpretation" 
Description Dataset includes fibre-optic data and photogrammetry data collected at Marsh Lane Viaduct in Leeds, UK. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "Elastoplastic solutions to predict tunnelling-induced load redistribution and deformation of surface structures" 
Description Dataset of the performed analyses 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "Evaluation of the response of a vaulted masonry structure to differential settlements using point cloud data and limit analyses" 
Description Raw data, processing algorithms and paper figure data 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "Evaluation of the response of a vaulted masonry structure to differential settlements using point cloud data and limit analyses" 
Description Raw data, processing algorithms and paper figure data 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting "Sensing dynamic displacements in masonry rail bridges using 2D digital image correlation" 
Description Key figures (in MATLAB .fig format) from the publication "Sensing dynamic displacements in masonry rail bridges using 2D digital image correlation". 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting: Robust fibre optic sensor arrays for monitoring the early-age behaviour of mass-produced concrete sleepers 
Description Research data supporting the above noted publication. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Research data supporting: Robust fibre optic sensor arrays for monitoring the early-age behaviour of mass-produced concrete sleepers 
Description Research data supporting the above noted publication. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Title Source code, simulation and data analysis scripts, and relevant data for "Power-efficient piezoelectric fatigue measurement using long-range wireless sensor networks" 
Description This dataset consists of the simulation and experimental data, data analysis scripts, and the source code of our wireless sensor system for fatigue strain cycles monitoring, published in "Power-efficient piezoelectric fatigue measurement using long-range wireless sensor networks", Smart Materials and Structures, 2019. The dataset contains several Readme files in various folders - see these for further details. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
 
Description 8 Power 
Organisation 8 Power Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Translating technologies on energy harvesting and low-power sensors
Collaborator Contribution Translating technologies on energy harvesting and low-power sensors
Impact Translating technologies on energy harvesting and low-power sensors
Start Year 2016
 
Description 8 Power - PRAF 
Organisation 8 Power Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Innovate UK First-Of-A-Kind Project - Phase I (JMS, DRH, PRAF)
Collaborator Contribution Innovate UK First-Of-A-Kind Project - Phase I (JMS, DRH, PRAF)
Impact Innovate UK First-Of-A-Kind Project - Phase I (JMS, DRH, PRAF)
Start Year 2016
 
Description ARUP - MJD 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Worked closely analysing monitoring data for masonry structures above the Crossrail tunnels
Collaborator Contribution Worked closely analysing monitoring data for masonry structures above the Crossrail tunnels
Impact Worked closely analysing monitoring data for masonry structures above the Crossrail tunnels
Start Year 2014
 
Description ARUP development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles -JMS 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles
Collaborator Contribution development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles
Impact development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles
Start Year 2016
 
Description Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands - ES 
Organisation Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Shadow EU-Summit: managing cities of tomorrow
Collaborator Contribution Shadow EU-Summit: managing cities of tomorrow
Impact Shadow EU-Summit: managing cities of tomorrow
Start Year 2016
 
Description Anglian Water - AKNP 
Organisation Anglian Water Services
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Asset Management
Collaborator Contribution Asset Management
Impact Asset Management
Start Year 2016
 
Description Anglian Water - PTK 
Organisation Anglian Water Services
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Newmarket Shopwindow
Collaborator Contribution Newmarket Shopwindow
Impact Newmarket Shopwindow
Start Year 2016
 
Description Anglian Water - PTK 
Organisation Anglian Water Services
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Grafham Water
Collaborator Contribution Grafham Water
Impact Grafham Water
Start Year 2015
 
Description Applications of New Techniques to the Detection and Monitoring of Bridge Scour 
Organisation WSP Group plc
Department WSP UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Cam Middleton and WSP working on secondment project 'Applications of New Techniques to the Detection and Monitoring of Bridge Scour'
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration is still active, output and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Aquacleansing installation of FO sensors in sewer tunnels - JMS 
Organisation Aqua cleansing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution installation of FO sensors in sewer tunnels
Collaborator Contribution installation of FO sensors in sewer tunnels
Impact installation of FO sensors in sewer tunnels
Start Year 2016
 
Description Arup 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles.
Collaborator Contribution Development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles.
Impact Development of strategies and implementation of sensing in piles.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Asset management - Zhenglin Liang 
Organisation Herefordshire Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Asset management
Collaborator Contribution Asset management
Impact Asset management
Start Year 2017
 
Description Atkins - LB 
Organisation WS Atkins
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Collaborator Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Impact Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Atkins - PTK 
Organisation WS Atkins
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridges
Collaborator Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridges
Impact Staffordshire Alliance Bridges
Start Year 2015
 
Description Automating concrete construction: digital processes for whole-life sustainability and productivity 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CSIC Investigators are collaborating with colleagues from the Universities of Bath and Dundee to drive a new culture in the construction industry to improve whole-life sustainability and productivity. CSIC is a project partner and Director Dr Jennifer Schooling chairs the steering group. Automating Concrete Construction (ACORN) is one of four research and development projects funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) under the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund 'Transforming Construction'. The three-year project will address the core aims of the programme: designing and managing buildings through digitally enabled simulation and constructing quality buildings through offsite manufacturing approaches. ACORN aims to create a culture that takes a holistic approach to the manufacture, assembly, reuse and deconstruction of concrete buildings. This will lead to a healthier, safer built environment and a culture that is built on the concept of using enough material, and no more. The challenge Today, the widespread use of flat panel formwork for concrete leads to materially inefficient prismatic shapes for the beams, columns, and floor-slabs in buildings. This practice, which has been around since Roman times, is both architecturally constraining and a key driver behind the high embodied carbon emissions associated with concrete structures. As much as half of the concrete in a building could be saved, if only we approached the use of the material in a different way. Optimised concrete Concrete starts its life as a fluid and can therefore be used to form structures of almost any shape, given the right mould geometry. ACORN will capitalise on this material property to drive the minimisation of embodied carbon in new building structures. The team will create an end-to-end digital process to automate the manufacture of non-prismatic building elements, capitalising on the recent proliferation of affordable robotics and bring them into an industry ripe for a step-change in sustainability and productivity. Something as simple as allowing beams, columns and floor-slabs to have the shape they need to take load, rather than the shape they need to be easily formed, allows a complete rethink of the way material is used in buildings. Fabrication of concrete elements By moving the manufacture of structural concrete elements into a highly controlled factory environment, ACORN aims to ensure that buildings can become more sustainable and the construction industry more productive. Considerations such as the materials to be used, how reinforcement is placed efficiently, how to take into account whole-life value, and how to organise the design process to take advantage of the new possibilities of robotics, will all be considered within the sphere of the project. Demonstration building The key to transforming this conservative industry is to lead by example. One of the most exciting parts of the project, is the proposed construction of two bays of a full-size prototype office building, to be completed at the BRE Innovation Park in Watford. One bay will be left with an exposed structure to show the methods and techniques used in its manufacture, the other bay will be fitted-out as an office building, with roof, walls, façade and internal finishings, to show how the techniques translate into an architectural solution. The demonstration building will serve multiple purposes. On an academic level, it will contribute to the research agenda by acting as a living laboratory. Embedded sensors will collect and share useful live data about how the building is performing structurally, as well as what loads the different parts are carrying. The BRE Innovation Park is visited by 20,000 people annually and data will also be collected from those visitors in user surveys, to evaluate the new appearance. The building's eventual deconstruction will also be an opportunity to verify how the whole-life value drivers for automation perform in reality. Benefits The ACORN project is expected to produce a number of benefits. Reducing reliance on concrete will have a positive environmental effect - construction accounts for nearly half of the UK's carbon emissions and concrete alone for five per cent of global CO2 emissions. There is also huge cost-saving potential - ACORN's research has identified close to £4bn in cost savings for UK construction per annum, that would arise directly from better consideration of material use. Globally, a mere one per cent reduction in construction cost would save $100bn annually. ACORN's focus on automated manufacturing and digital processes to reduce both fabrication and build time are key parts in realising better value. The project will benefit from the contributions of 12 industry partners, including architects, engineers and building contractors, who will work alongside the ACORN team to ensure outputs will bring value to industry. The professions will also benefit with architects able to explore a new form of construction; engineers gaining insights into the real loads such structures have to carry during their lifetime; and contractors having the tools they need to increase quality control, productivity and fabrication time, while de-risking the construction site. ACORN is tackling the UK government's Construction 2025 targets head-on. By automating construction, moving it off-site, and developing a culture of using just enough material, and no more, the project will lower costs, reduce delivery times and dramatically reduce carbon emissions.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Not yet known.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Automating concrete construction: digital processes for whole-life sustainability and productivity 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CSIC Investigators are collaborating with colleagues from the Universities of Bath and Dundee to drive a new culture in the construction industry to improve whole-life sustainability and productivity. CSIC is a project partner and Director Dr Jennifer Schooling chairs the steering group. Automating Concrete Construction (ACORN) is one of four research and development projects funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) under the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund 'Transforming Construction'. The three-year project will address the core aims of the programme: designing and managing buildings through digitally enabled simulation and constructing quality buildings through offsite manufacturing approaches. ACORN aims to create a culture that takes a holistic approach to the manufacture, assembly, reuse and deconstruction of concrete buildings. This will lead to a healthier, safer built environment and a culture that is built on the concept of using enough material, and no more. The challenge Today, the widespread use of flat panel formwork for concrete leads to materially inefficient prismatic shapes for the beams, columns, and floor-slabs in buildings. This practice, which has been around since Roman times, is both architecturally constraining and a key driver behind the high embodied carbon emissions associated with concrete structures. As much as half of the concrete in a building could be saved, if only we approached the use of the material in a different way. Optimised concrete Concrete starts its life as a fluid and can therefore be used to form structures of almost any shape, given the right mould geometry. ACORN will capitalise on this material property to drive the minimisation of embodied carbon in new building structures. The team will create an end-to-end digital process to automate the manufacture of non-prismatic building elements, capitalising on the recent proliferation of affordable robotics and bring them into an industry ripe for a step-change in sustainability and productivity. Something as simple as allowing beams, columns and floor-slabs to have the shape they need to take load, rather than the shape they need to be easily formed, allows a complete rethink of the way material is used in buildings. Fabrication of concrete elements By moving the manufacture of structural concrete elements into a highly controlled factory environment, ACORN aims to ensure that buildings can become more sustainable and the construction industry more productive. Considerations such as the materials to be used, how reinforcement is placed efficiently, how to take into account whole-life value, and how to organise the design process to take advantage of the new possibilities of robotics, will all be considered within the sphere of the project. Demonstration building The key to transforming this conservative industry is to lead by example. One of the most exciting parts of the project, is the proposed construction of two bays of a full-size prototype office building, to be completed at the BRE Innovation Park in Watford. One bay will be left with an exposed structure to show the methods and techniques used in its manufacture, the other bay will be fitted-out as an office building, with roof, walls, façade and internal finishings, to show how the techniques translate into an architectural solution. The demonstration building will serve multiple purposes. On an academic level, it will contribute to the research agenda by acting as a living laboratory. Embedded sensors will collect and share useful live data about how the building is performing structurally, as well as what loads the different parts are carrying. The BRE Innovation Park is visited by 20,000 people annually and data will also be collected from those visitors in user surveys, to evaluate the new appearance. The building's eventual deconstruction will also be an opportunity to verify how the whole-life value drivers for automation perform in reality. Benefits The ACORN project is expected to produce a number of benefits. Reducing reliance on concrete will have a positive environmental effect - construction accounts for nearly half of the UK's carbon emissions and concrete alone for five per cent of global CO2 emissions. There is also huge cost-saving potential - ACORN's research has identified close to £4bn in cost savings for UK construction per annum, that would arise directly from better consideration of material use. Globally, a mere one per cent reduction in construction cost would save $100bn annually. ACORN's focus on automated manufacturing and digital processes to reduce both fabrication and build time are key parts in realising better value. The project will benefit from the contributions of 12 industry partners, including architects, engineers and building contractors, who will work alongside the ACORN team to ensure outputs will bring value to industry. The professions will also benefit with architects able to explore a new form of construction; engineers gaining insights into the real loads such structures have to carry during their lifetime; and contractors having the tools they need to increase quality control, productivity and fabrication time, while de-risking the construction site. ACORN is tackling the UK government's Construction 2025 targets head-on. By automating construction, moving it off-site, and developing a culture of using just enough material, and no more, the project will lower costs, reduce delivery times and dramatically reduce carbon emissions.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Not yet known.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BAM Nuttall - Development of rockfall early warning system for rail PK 
Organisation BAM Nuttall
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of rockfall early warning system for rail
Collaborator Contribution Development of rockfall early warning system for rail
Impact Development of rockfall early warning system for rail
Start Year 2018
 
Description BP - AS 
Organisation BP (British Petroleum)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Improving reservoir management using MEMS sensors
Collaborator Contribution Improving reservoir management using MEMS sensors
Impact Improving reservoir management using MEMS sensors
Start Year 2010
 
Description Bechtel - PTK 
Organisation Bechtel Corporation
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution HS2 Excavation monitoring of heave
Collaborator Contribution HS2 Excavation monitoring of heave
Impact HS2 Excavation monitoring of heave
Start Year 2016
 
Description Beijing Information Sci & Techn University - DC 
Organisation Beijing Information Science & Technology University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution To supply low cost fibre analyser for field deployment
Collaborator Contribution To supply low cost fibre analyser for field deployment
Impact To supply low cost fibre analyser for field deployment
Start Year 2016
 
Description Beijing Information Science & Technology University - PK 
Organisation Beijing Information Science & Technology University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Development of mini-BISTU analyser
Collaborator Contribution Development of mini-BISTU analyser
Impact Development of mini-BISTU analyser
Start Year 2017
 
Description Bentley, Topcon, Redbite - QL 
Organisation Bentley Systems UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Bentley, Topcon, Redbite - QL 
Organisation RedBite Solutions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Bentley, Topcon, Redbite - QL 
Organisation Topcon
Country Japan 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Berkeley University - NdB 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Testing of trial piles
Collaborator Contribution Testing of trial piles
Impact Testing of trial piles
Start Year 2018
 
Description British Geological Survey - AB 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Collaborator Contribution Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Impact Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Start Year 2017
 
Description British Geological Survey and University of California Berkeley 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Co-published 2 journal articles and presented at 3 conferences. Large scale numerical modelling of shallow ground temperatures. Won a joint CMMI-NSF proposal with £450K per university partner
Collaborator Contribution BGS provided geological and hydro-geological models at urban scale and UC Berkeley helped with the finite element modelling
Impact New CMMI-EPSRC grant (EP/T019425/1) is a direct outcome of this collaboration.
Start Year 2017
 
Description British Geological Survey and University of California Berkeley 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Co-published 2 journal articles and presented at 3 conferences. Large scale numerical modelling of shallow ground temperatures. Won a joint CMMI-NSF proposal with £450K per university partner
Collaborator Contribution BGS provided geological and hydro-geological models at urban scale and UC Berkeley helped with the finite element modelling
Impact New CMMI-EPSRC grant (EP/T019425/1) is a direct outcome of this collaboration.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe - CK 
Organisation Brookfield
Department Multiplex Construction Europe ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Collaborator Contribution Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Impact Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Start Year 2016
 
Description Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe Ltd no August 2016 to February 2018 Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower - Cedric Kechavarzi 
Organisation Brookfield
Department Multiplex Construction Europe ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe Ltd no August 2016 to February 2018 Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Collaborator Contribution Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe Ltd no August 2016 to February 2018 Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Impact Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe Ltd no August 2016 to February 2018 Axial shortening monitoring of tall residential tower
Start Year 2016
 
Description Buro Happold - AKNP 
Organisation BuroHappold Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Futureproofing
Collaborator Contribution Futureproofing
Impact Futureproofing
Start Year 2016
 
Description CERN - PTK 
Organisation European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)
Department CERN - Other
Country Switzerland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Monitoring of LHC Tunnels
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of LHC Tunnels
Impact Monitoring of LHC Tunnels
Start Year 2015
 
Description CERN AEY 
Organisation European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)
Country Switzerland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Fibre Optic
Collaborator Contribution Fibre Optic
Impact Fibre Optic
Start Year 2015
 
Description CH2M - PTK 
Organisation CH2M HILL
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution HS2 Pile monitoring
Collaborator Contribution HS2 Pile monitoring
Impact HS2 Pile monitoring
Start Year 2016
 
Description CH2MHil(Halcrow) - PTK 
Organisation CH2M HILL
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution PO Tunnel
Collaborator Contribution PO Tunnel
Impact PO Tunnel
Start Year 2014
 
Description CSIC Formal Partner-Royal Haskoning DHV UK 
Organisation Royal HaskoningDHV
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Formal CSIC partner
Collaborator Contribution As above
Impact Not yet know
Start Year 2019
 
Description CSIC Formal Partner-Sintela 
Organisation Sintela
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Formal CSIC Partner
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Not yet know.
Start Year 2019
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Deep foundation automatic anomaly detection and visualisation system 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The proposed research aims to develop an automated pile integrity interpretation framework that uses thermal distributed fibre optic (FO) methodology, finite element modelling and machine learning techniques. In the first and second stages, using a full-scale well controlled laboratorytest, the project will firstly develop a system to visualise the pile construction process using collected date and an effective interpretation method for assessing the structural integrity of the pile. Then, machine leaning techniques will be used to recognise the defect patterns within the pile to establish a rapid anomaly response system. An automatic defect detection prototype (software) will be developed at the end of the first stage which allows automatic defection including the location of the defect and its size using minimal human input. In the third stage, the project aims to study the complex strain and temperature coupling effect for early age concrete. The study outcomes will not only help to improve the capability of the anomaly detection system, but will enable the whole-life performance assessment of the concrete piles and hence a benchmark for pile re-use in future.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Deep foundation automatic anomaly detection and visualisation system 
Organisation Skanska UK Ltd
Department Cementation Skanska
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The proposed research aims to develop an automated pile integrity interpretation framework that uses thermal distributed fibre optic (FO) methodology, finite element modelling and machine learning techniques. In the first and second stages, using a full-scale well controlled laboratorytest, the project will firstly develop a system to visualise the pile construction process using collected date and an effective interpretation method for assessing the structural integrity of the pile. Then, machine leaning techniques will be used to recognise the defect patterns within the pile to establish a rapid anomaly response system. An automatic defect detection prototype (software) will be developed at the end of the first stage which allows automatic defection including the location of the defect and its size using minimal human input. In the third stage, the project aims to study the complex strain and temperature coupling effect for early age concrete. The study outcomes will not only help to improve the capability of the anomaly detection system, but will enable the whole-life performance assessment of the concrete piles and hence a benchmark for pile re-use in future.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Digital Twins of Urban Farms 
Organisation Alan Turing Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The objective of seeking CSIC funding is to maximize fully the achievements-to-date on the digital twin of the world's first underground farm by delivering it at a high TRL and testing it for usability and reproducibility in a collaboration between CSIC and the Research Software Engineers at Turing.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Digital Twins of Urban Farms 
Organisation Growing Underground
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The objective of seeking CSIC funding is to maximize fully the achievements-to-date on the digital twin of the world's first underground farm by delivering it at a high TRL and testing it for usability and reproducibility in a collaboration between CSIC and the Research Software Engineers at Turing.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Digital Twins of Urban Farms 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The objective of seeking CSIC funding is to maximize fully the achievements-to-date on the digital twin of the world's first underground farm by delivering it at a high TRL and testing it for usability and reproducibility in a collaboration between CSIC and the Research Software Engineers at Turing.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Inside concrete - distributed spatial and temporal fibre optic sensing 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution 1. To validate and calibrate distributed optical fibre sensing systems as accurate measures of temporal and spatial temperature and strain in fresh and hardened concrete. 2. To explore how distributed sensor indicators could be used as early age predictive measures for conventional ordinary Portland cement and more sustainable low-carbon mixes. Better predictors of concrete strength reduce uncertainty, enhance productivity and improve efficiency. The insight could also be used to adapt manufacturing processes and to promote acceptance of low carbon cementitious elements. 3. To determine the feasibility of a back-scattering spectrometer based system for monitoring internal concrete temperature and strain. 4. To undertake a scoping study of the added value of 'Inside concrete' fibre optic sensing during the fresh state curing process and consider how this might be extrapolated across different
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Inside concrete - distributed spatial and temporal fibre optic sensing 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution 1. To validate and calibrate distributed optical fibre sensing systems as accurate measures of temporal and spatial temperature and strain in fresh and hardened concrete. 2. To explore how distributed sensor indicators could be used as early age predictive measures for conventional ordinary Portland cement and more sustainable low-carbon mixes. Better predictors of concrete strength reduce uncertainty, enhance productivity and improve efficiency. The insight could also be used to adapt manufacturing processes and to promote acceptance of low carbon cementitious elements. 3. To determine the feasibility of a back-scattering spectrometer based system for monitoring internal concrete temperature and strain. 4. To undertake a scoping study of the added value of 'Inside concrete' fibre optic sensing during the fresh state curing process and consider how this might be extrapolated across different
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Modular design for underground construction 
Organisation Laing O'Rourke
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The goal of this proposal is to revolutionise the approach to delivery of large underground basements with tools for design and implementation of modular off-site construction for increased productivity, faster completion and reduced carbon.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Modular design for underground construction 
Organisation Smith and Wallwork
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The goal of this proposal is to revolutionise the approach to delivery of large underground basements with tools for design and implementation of modular off-site construction for increased productivity, faster completion and reduced carbon.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project is still active, outputs and outcomes not yet know
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Whole life carbon costing in the context of ACORN - and beyond 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution - Identify/Develop techniques to quantify the whole-life cost and carbon impact of the new methods of construction. - Evaluate existing carbon-counting tools available to infrastructure and construction industry, to determine utility to the industry in e.g. assessing most appropriate interventions on existing assets wrt carbon - Create guidance for industry in terms of 'getting the basics right' with respect to carbon assessment and minimising CO2 emissions and resource use
Collaborator Contribution LOR Access to factory and construction sites McKinsey Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Costain Access to construction sites Qualisflow Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Arup Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Whole life carbon costing in the context of ACORN - and beyond 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution - Identify/Develop techniques to quantify the whole-life cost and carbon impact of the new methods of construction. - Evaluate existing carbon-counting tools available to infrastructure and construction industry, to determine utility to the industry in e.g. assessing most appropriate interventions on existing assets wrt carbon - Create guidance for industry in terms of 'getting the basics right' with respect to carbon assessment and minimising CO2 emissions and resource use
Collaborator Contribution LOR Access to factory and construction sites McKinsey Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Costain Access to construction sites Qualisflow Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Arup Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Whole life carbon costing in the context of ACORN - and beyond 
Organisation Laing O'Rourke
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution - Identify/Develop techniques to quantify the whole-life cost and carbon impact of the new methods of construction. - Evaluate existing carbon-counting tools available to infrastructure and construction industry, to determine utility to the industry in e.g. assessing most appropriate interventions on existing assets wrt carbon - Create guidance for industry in terms of 'getting the basics right' with respect to carbon assessment and minimising CO2 emissions and resource use
Collaborator Contribution LOR Access to factory and construction sites McKinsey Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Costain Access to construction sites Qualisflow Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Arup Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Whole life carbon costing in the context of ACORN - and beyond 
Organisation McKinsey & Company
Department McKinsey & Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution - Identify/Develop techniques to quantify the whole-life cost and carbon impact of the new methods of construction. - Evaluate existing carbon-counting tools available to infrastructure and construction industry, to determine utility to the industry in e.g. assessing most appropriate interventions on existing assets wrt carbon - Create guidance for industry in terms of 'getting the basics right' with respect to carbon assessment and minimising CO2 emissions and resource use
Collaborator Contribution LOR Access to factory and construction sites McKinsey Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Costain Access to construction sites Qualisflow Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Arup Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2020
 
Description CSIC RA Funding Project - Whole life carbon costing in the context of ACORN - and beyond 
Organisation Qualisflow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution - Identify/Develop techniques to quantify the whole-life cost and carbon impact of the new methods of construction. - Evaluate existing carbon-counting tools available to infrastructure and construction industry, to determine utility to the industry in e.g. assessing most appropriate interventions on existing assets wrt carbon - Create guidance for industry in terms of 'getting the basics right' with respect to carbon assessment and minimising CO2 emissions and resource use
Collaborator Contribution LOR Access to factory and construction sites McKinsey Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Costain Access to construction sites Qualisflow Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting Arup Advisor on process mapping and carbon accounting
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2020
 
Description Cambridgeshire County Council - ES 
Organisation Cambridgeshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Land use - transport /mobility
Collaborator Contribution Land use - transport /mobility
Impact Land use - transport /mobility
Start Year 2016
 
Description Central Alliance 
Organisation Central Alliance
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Cumbrian bridge monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Cumbrian bridge monitoring
Impact Cumbrian bridge monitoring
Start Year 2016
 
Description Centro - JT 
Organisation Centro plc
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation
Collaborator Contribution Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation
Impact Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation
Start Year 2015
 
Description Collaboration with University of Tokyo 
Organisation University of Tokyo
Department Institute of Industrial Science
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution - Guest Professor at Ooka Lab, Institute of Industrial Science for 4 months (Sept-December 2015) supported by an invitational Fellowship by Japan Society of Promotion of Science. - Interacted with PhD students and staff on the following topics: uncertainty analysis, distributed energy systems, exergy analysis of building energy systems. - Since 2015, we have regular annual visits to each others labs
Collaborator Contribution The Ooka Lab invited Cambridge PhD student Bryn Pickering for 2 week visit in December 2015. We have co-authored 2 peer-reviewed conference articles and 3 journal publications. From the B-bem project, PDRA Kathrin Menberg has been heavily involved in these collaborations. We have worked with University of Tokyo to carry out uncertainty analysis in the estimation of ground thermal properties for geo-energy systems. In turn- University of Tokyo helped us carry out exergy analysis of heat pump systems, which enabled us to have an improved understanding of system efficiencies.
Impact 1. 2018 visiting researcher from U. of Tokyo hosted by Alan Turing Institute 2. Uncertainty Analysis: 2 journal articles in 2018 3. Exergy Analysis: 1 conference publication (2017), and 1 journal paper (2017). 4. Distributed Energy Systems: 1 conference publication in 2016.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Cornell University May-17 Laboratory scale pipeline testing - Cedric Kechavarzi 
Organisation Cornell University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Cornell University May-17 Laboratory scale pipeline testing
Collaborator Contribution Cornell University May-17 Laboratory scale pipeline testing
Impact Cornell University May-17 Laboratory scale pipeline testing
Start Year 2017
 
Description Costain - BIM - AKNP 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution BIM
Collaborator Contribution BIM
Impact BIM
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain - CK 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Tram track monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Tram track monitoring
Impact Tram track monitoring
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain - NdB 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Monitoring of light rail test track
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of light rail test track
Impact Monitoring of light rail test track
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain - PTK 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Costain light rail track instrumentation with bend sensors
Collaborator Contribution Costain light rail track instrumentation with bend sensors
Impact Costain light rail track instrumentation with bend sensors
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain - PTK 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Various London Bridge monitoring projects at construction sites
Collaborator Contribution Various London Bridge monitoring projects at construction sites
Impact Various London Bridge monitoring projects at construction sites
Start Year 2015
 
Description Costain AKNP 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ICASE Project on Data-driven engineering for improving the performance of asset management
Collaborator Contribution ICASE Project on Data-driven engineering for improving the performance of asset management
Impact ICASE Project on Data-driven engineering for improving the performance of asset management
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain Computer vision for tunnel monitoring JMS 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Computer vision for tunnel monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Computer vision for tunnel monitoring
Impact Computer vision for tunnel monitoring
Start Year 2016
 
Description Costain light rail -testing of light railtrial 
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design.
Collaborator Contribution Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design.
Impact Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Crossrail - CK 
Organisation Crossrail
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Post Office tunnel monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Post Office tunnel monitoring
Impact Post Office tunnel monitoring
Start Year 2015
 
Description Crossrail - MJD 
Organisation Crossrail
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Research on Settlement effects on masonry structures
Collaborator Contribution Research on Settlement effects on masonry structures
Impact Research on Settlement effects on masonry structures
Start Year 2013
 
Description Crossrail - PTK 
Organisation Crossrail
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Various shaft monitoring projects at construction sites
Collaborator Contribution Various shaft monitoring projects at construction sites
Impact Various shaft monitoring projects at construction sites
Start Year 2015
 
Description Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct) Haris Alexakis 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct
Collaborator Contribution Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct
Impact Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct
Start Year 2017
 
Description Data-centric bridge monitoring and assessment - Liam Butler 
Organisation Alan Turing Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Data-centric bridge monitoring and assessment
Collaborator Contribution Data-centric bridge monitoring and assessment
Impact Data-centric bridge monitoring and assessment
Start Year 2017
 
Description Department for Transport, Local Transport, UK - ES 
Organisation Department of Transport
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Local transport planning
Collaborator Contribution Local transport planning
Impact Local transport planning
Start Year 2016
 
Description Designing in data insights to improve customer experience at Gatwick Train Station  
Organisation Costain Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Jennifer Schooling and Costain working on secondment project Designing in data insights to improve customer experience at Gatwick Train Station 
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Developing toolkit for bridge maintenance - Zhenglin Liang 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Developing toolkit for bridge maintenance
Collaborator Contribution Developing toolkit for bridge maintenance
Impact Developing toolkit for bridge maintenance
Start Year 2017
 
Description Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London - Asal Bidarmaghz 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Collaborator Contribution Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Impact Development of a 3D geological model of Greater London
Start Year 2017
 
Description Diemount joint development of low cost FO sensors JMS 
Organisation Diemount GmbH
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution joint development of low cost FO sensors
Collaborator Contribution joint development of low cost FO sensors
Impact joint development of low cost FO sensors
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Cities for Change: next-generation tools for city planning and management 
Organisation Cambridgeshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The challenges for modern cities to deliver smart systems for its citizens are complex and cut across many traditional disciplines. CSIC's Digital Cities for Change project, funded by the Ove Arup Foundation and the Centre for Digital Built Britain, evaluates both the existing structures and systems of city and infrastructure management, and investigates how digital tools can help better decision-making within these areas. Understanding limitations of the current approach The planning, management and operation of assets, buildings and towns have traditionally operated in professional silos. Researchers are investigating the impact of these silos within city and infrastructure management and how this leads to departments following separate, and sometimes divergent, approaches to address common challenges. We live in an era of increasing digital abundance, but industry and city governments lack the tools to understand and interpret the data to support smarter decision-making processes and deliver best value from them. In order to deliver on the transformative potential of this digital revolution, we need built environment professionals who are trained in a broader range of disciplines and tools, bridging infrastructure and city management solutions and developing the opportunities presented by the digital economy. Working with local authorities The use of data has huge potential to help deliver social, economic and political goals for cities. Digital Cities for Change researchers have built a working partnership with Smart Cambridge, a programme supported by Connecting Cambridgeshire, which is led by Cambridgeshire County Council, and are using the city as a pilot. A workshop was held in December 2018 with o?cers from the council's transport, sustainability and planning departments to plan how digital technology and data can be used to support decisions and make improvements. The aim of the workshop was to understand the current activities addressing two of the council's policy goals; improving air quality and reducing congestion, including the use of data to support policy measures related to the goals and to explore future requirements. Researchers are also aiming to understand the possibilities for developing a digital twin prototype for the city which responds to imminent challenges and the delivery of the policy goals. Developing a new digital strategy The Digital Cities for Change team is now exploring the potential building blocks of a new digital strategy, with two key components: 1. A digital twin, combining traditional urban modelling techniques, new data sources and advanced data analytics, to support decision-making in di?erent sectors. 2. A new governance framework which will ensure successful implementation through linking planning, management and operation. The digital twin prototype will use technology and data to tackle air pollution and tra?c congestion. It will include recent trends of journeys to work in Cambridge, including how people of di?erent ages and employment status travel to work and how di?erent factors a?ect their travel. It will also explore future possible journeys to work based on transport investment, housing developments and how ?exible working and new technology may impact commuting. A web-based modelling platform will also visualise future development options and give people an opportunity for feedback. The governance aspect of the strategy will map stakeholders of the digital twin and their relationships to each other across government and private sectors. It will incorporate legislation and regulation, sharing and security. A crucial part of the governance will be citizen engagement - to connect the physical to the data and provide evidence that can motivate people to change their behaviour. This will involve talking to employees about ?exible working and community co-working spaces. The vision for the city-level strategy The Cambridge digital twin prototype, along with the governance recommendations is under development, with an initial version discussed with colleagues at Smart Cambridge in April. The project team is now planning to re?ne the strategy and develop the tool to explore di?erent aspects of the collection, processing and use of data to improve various city functions.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Nochta, T., Wan, L., Schooling, J. M. et al. (2019). Digitalisation for smarter cities: Moving from a static to a dynamic view. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Smart Infrastructure and Construction Journal, https://doi.org/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001. www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wan, L. (2019). Evidence-informed decisionmaking in multi-stakeholder settings: The case of city digital twins for planning and management. Proceedings of the Data for Policy Conference, 11-12 June 2019, University College London, UK. zenodo.org/record/2798858#.XV0MmXvTXQy Wan, L., Nochta, T., Schooling, J.M. (2019). Developing A City-level Digital Twin - Propositions and A Case Study. Proceedings of the International Conference on Smart Infrastructure and Construction (ICSIC), 8-10 July 2019, Churchill College, Cambridge, UK. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/291545 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wahby, N. (2019). On the Governance of City Digital Twins - Insights from the Cambridge Case Study. Working paper, published in the CDBB publication series. Series No: CDBB_WP_012. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293984
Start Year 2018
 
Description Digital Cities for Change: next-generation tools for city planning and management 
Organisation Digital Built Britain
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The challenges for modern cities to deliver smart systems for its citizens are complex and cut across many traditional disciplines. CSIC's Digital Cities for Change project, funded by the Ove Arup Foundation and the Centre for Digital Built Britain, evaluates both the existing structures and systems of city and infrastructure management, and investigates how digital tools can help better decision-making within these areas. Understanding limitations of the current approach The planning, management and operation of assets, buildings and towns have traditionally operated in professional silos. Researchers are investigating the impact of these silos within city and infrastructure management and how this leads to departments following separate, and sometimes divergent, approaches to address common challenges. We live in an era of increasing digital abundance, but industry and city governments lack the tools to understand and interpret the data to support smarter decision-making processes and deliver best value from them. In order to deliver on the transformative potential of this digital revolution, we need built environment professionals who are trained in a broader range of disciplines and tools, bridging infrastructure and city management solutions and developing the opportunities presented by the digital economy. Working with local authorities The use of data has huge potential to help deliver social, economic and political goals for cities. Digital Cities for Change researchers have built a working partnership with Smart Cambridge, a programme supported by Connecting Cambridgeshire, which is led by Cambridgeshire County Council, and are using the city as a pilot. A workshop was held in December 2018 with o?cers from the council's transport, sustainability and planning departments to plan how digital technology and data can be used to support decisions and make improvements. The aim of the workshop was to understand the current activities addressing two of the council's policy goals; improving air quality and reducing congestion, including the use of data to support policy measures related to the goals and to explore future requirements. Researchers are also aiming to understand the possibilities for developing a digital twin prototype for the city which responds to imminent challenges and the delivery of the policy goals. Developing a new digital strategy The Digital Cities for Change team is now exploring the potential building blocks of a new digital strategy, with two key components: 1. A digital twin, combining traditional urban modelling techniques, new data sources and advanced data analytics, to support decision-making in di?erent sectors. 2. A new governance framework which will ensure successful implementation through linking planning, management and operation. The digital twin prototype will use technology and data to tackle air pollution and tra?c congestion. It will include recent trends of journeys to work in Cambridge, including how people of di?erent ages and employment status travel to work and how di?erent factors a?ect their travel. It will also explore future possible journeys to work based on transport investment, housing developments and how ?exible working and new technology may impact commuting. A web-based modelling platform will also visualise future development options and give people an opportunity for feedback. The governance aspect of the strategy will map stakeholders of the digital twin and their relationships to each other across government and private sectors. It will incorporate legislation and regulation, sharing and security. A crucial part of the governance will be citizen engagement - to connect the physical to the data and provide evidence that can motivate people to change their behaviour. This will involve talking to employees about ?exible working and community co-working spaces. The vision for the city-level strategy The Cambridge digital twin prototype, along with the governance recommendations is under development, with an initial version discussed with colleagues at Smart Cambridge in April. The project team is now planning to re?ne the strategy and develop the tool to explore di?erent aspects of the collection, processing and use of data to improve various city functions.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Nochta, T., Wan, L., Schooling, J. M. et al. (2019). Digitalisation for smarter cities: Moving from a static to a dynamic view. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Smart Infrastructure and Construction Journal, https://doi.org/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001. www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wan, L. (2019). Evidence-informed decisionmaking in multi-stakeholder settings: The case of city digital twins for planning and management. Proceedings of the Data for Policy Conference, 11-12 June 2019, University College London, UK. zenodo.org/record/2798858#.XV0MmXvTXQy Wan, L., Nochta, T., Schooling, J.M. (2019). Developing A City-level Digital Twin - Propositions and A Case Study. Proceedings of the International Conference on Smart Infrastructure and Construction (ICSIC), 8-10 July 2019, Churchill College, Cambridge, UK. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/291545 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wahby, N. (2019). On the Governance of City Digital Twins - Insights from the Cambridge Case Study. Working paper, published in the CDBB publication series. Series No: CDBB_WP_012. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293984
Start Year 2018
 
Description Digital Cities for Change: next-generation tools for city planning and management 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Department of Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The challenges for modern cities to deliver smart systems for its citizens are complex and cut across many traditional disciplines. CSIC's Digital Cities for Change project, funded by the Ove Arup Foundation and the Centre for Digital Built Britain, evaluates both the existing structures and systems of city and infrastructure management, and investigates how digital tools can help better decision-making within these areas. Understanding limitations of the current approach The planning, management and operation of assets, buildings and towns have traditionally operated in professional silos. Researchers are investigating the impact of these silos within city and infrastructure management and how this leads to departments following separate, and sometimes divergent, approaches to address common challenges. We live in an era of increasing digital abundance, but industry and city governments lack the tools to understand and interpret the data to support smarter decision-making processes and deliver best value from them. In order to deliver on the transformative potential of this digital revolution, we need built environment professionals who are trained in a broader range of disciplines and tools, bridging infrastructure and city management solutions and developing the opportunities presented by the digital economy. Working with local authorities The use of data has huge potential to help deliver social, economic and political goals for cities. Digital Cities for Change researchers have built a working partnership with Smart Cambridge, a programme supported by Connecting Cambridgeshire, which is led by Cambridgeshire County Council, and are using the city as a pilot. A workshop was held in December 2018 with o?cers from the council's transport, sustainability and planning departments to plan how digital technology and data can be used to support decisions and make improvements. The aim of the workshop was to understand the current activities addressing two of the council's policy goals; improving air quality and reducing congestion, including the use of data to support policy measures related to the goals and to explore future requirements. Researchers are also aiming to understand the possibilities for developing a digital twin prototype for the city which responds to imminent challenges and the delivery of the policy goals. Developing a new digital strategy The Digital Cities for Change team is now exploring the potential building blocks of a new digital strategy, with two key components: 1. A digital twin, combining traditional urban modelling techniques, new data sources and advanced data analytics, to support decision-making in di?erent sectors. 2. A new governance framework which will ensure successful implementation through linking planning, management and operation. The digital twin prototype will use technology and data to tackle air pollution and tra?c congestion. It will include recent trends of journeys to work in Cambridge, including how people of di?erent ages and employment status travel to work and how di?erent factors a?ect their travel. It will also explore future possible journeys to work based on transport investment, housing developments and how ?exible working and new technology may impact commuting. A web-based modelling platform will also visualise future development options and give people an opportunity for feedback. The governance aspect of the strategy will map stakeholders of the digital twin and their relationships to each other across government and private sectors. It will incorporate legislation and regulation, sharing and security. A crucial part of the governance will be citizen engagement - to connect the physical to the data and provide evidence that can motivate people to change their behaviour. This will involve talking to employees about ?exible working and community co-working spaces. The vision for the city-level strategy The Cambridge digital twin prototype, along with the governance recommendations is under development, with an initial version discussed with colleagues at Smart Cambridge in April. The project team is now planning to re?ne the strategy and develop the tool to explore di?erent aspects of the collection, processing and use of data to improve various city functions.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Nochta, T., Wan, L., Schooling, J. M. et al. (2019). Digitalisation for smarter cities: Moving from a static to a dynamic view. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Smart Infrastructure and Construction Journal, https://doi.org/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001. www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/jsmic.19.00001 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wan, L. (2019). Evidence-informed decisionmaking in multi-stakeholder settings: The case of city digital twins for planning and management. Proceedings of the Data for Policy Conference, 11-12 June 2019, University College London, UK. zenodo.org/record/2798858#.XV0MmXvTXQy Wan, L., Nochta, T., Schooling, J.M. (2019). Developing A City-level Digital Twin - Propositions and A Case Study. Proceedings of the International Conference on Smart Infrastructure and Construction (ICSIC), 8-10 July 2019, Churchill College, Cambridge, UK. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/291545 Nochta, T., Badstuber, N.E., Wahby, N. (2019). On the Governance of City Digital Twins - Insights from the Cambridge Case Study. Working paper, published in the CDBB publication series. Series No: CDBB_WP_012. www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/293984
Start Year 2018
 
Description Dragados - MSA 
Organisation Dragados
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Planning for monitoring of Mansion House
Collaborator Contribution Planning for monitoring of Mansion House and
Impact Planning for monitoring of Mansion House and
Start Year 2017
 
Description Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge (Centre for Digital Built Britain Mini-projects Programme 2017-18) Quichen Lu 
Organisation Digital Built Britain
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge (Centre for Digital Built Britain Mini-projects Programme 2017-18)
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge (Centre for Digital Built Britain Mini-projects Programme 2017-18)
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge (Centre for Digital Built Britain Mini-projects Programme 2017-18)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge - Quichen Lu 
Organisation Bentley Motors
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge - Quichen Lu 
Organisation RedBite Solutions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge - Quichen Lu 
Organisation Topcon
Country Japan 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Collaborator Contribution Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Impact Dynamic digital twin with multi-layered information models for West Cambridge
Start Year 2017
 
Description E G Technology - PTK 
Organisation E G Technology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of Macro VEH, and development of New Analyser enclosure
Collaborator Contribution Development of Macro VEH, and development of New Analyser enclosure
Impact Development of Macro VEH, and development of New Analyser enclosure
Start Year 2014
 
Description FBGS - PTK 
Organisation FBGS
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures.
Collaborator Contribution Development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures.
Impact Development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures.
Start Year 2015
 
Description FGBS - development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures - JMS 
Organisation FBGS
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures
Collaborator Contribution development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures
Impact development of FRP armoured FBG fibre optic sensors for embedding in concrete structures
Start Year 2016
 
Description FO instrumentation for pile testing 
Organisation Gammon Construction Limited
Country Hong Kong 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution FO instrumentation for pile testing
Collaborator Contribution FO instrumentation for pile testing
Impact FO instrumentation for pile testing
Start Year 2018
 
Description FO instrumentation of 2 tall towers in London - Nicky de Battista 
Organisation Multiplex Construction
Country Australia 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution FO instrumentation of 2 tall towers in London
Collaborator Contribution FO instrumentation of 2 tall towers in London
Impact FO instrumentation of 2 tall towers in London
Start Year 2018
 
Description FO instrumentation of test piles in San Francisco - Berkeley University - Nicky de Battista 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution FO instrumentation of test piles in San Francisco
Collaborator Contribution FO instrumentation of test piles in San Francisco
Impact FO instrumentation of test piles in San Francisco
Start Year 2018
 
Description GE Aviation - AS 
Organisation GE Aviation Systems
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Innovate UK projects on MEMS energy harvesting and self-powered wireless sensors
Collaborator Contribution Innovate UK projects on MEMS energy harvesting and self-powered wireless sensors
Impact Innovate UK projects on MEMS energy harvesting and self-powered wireless sensors
Start Year 2013
 
Description Geosense - PTK 
Organisation Geosense
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Crossrail tunnel wireless XY tilt sensors
Collaborator Contribution Crossrail tunnel wireless XY tilt sensors
Impact Crossrail tunnel wireless XY tilt sensors
Start Year 2014
 
Description Growing Underground 
Organisation Growing Underground
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Digital twin of the underground farm to help optimize their crop yield and design the expansion
Collaborator Contribution supported our research with giving us access to the site for monitoring and with other data
Impact 1 book chapter, several presentations at seminars
Start Year 2015
 
Description Growing Underground - Paul Fidler 
Organisation Growing Underground
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Collaboration
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration
Impact Growing Underground
Start Year 2017
 
Description Gwynedd Council - PTK 
Organisation Gwynedd Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Brazil Wall movement, and Road condition monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Brazil Wall movement, and Road condition monitoring
Impact Brazil Wall movement, and Road condition monitoring
Start Year 2015
 
Description HS2 - PTK 
Organisation Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Collaborator Contribution HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Impact HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Hertfordshire County Council - AKNP and ZL 
Organisation Hertfordshire Sports Village
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution (1) Asset management for bridge networks. (2) Improve deterioration model for bridges with inspections data. (3) Prioritize maintenance activities for 11 bridges along A10 in Hertfordshire. (4) Group maintenance activities to reduce the traffic management cost in the bridge network. They have agreed on future support on providing historical principle and general inspections data for the 11 bridges.
Collaborator Contribution (1) Asset management for bridge networks. (2) Improve deterioration model for bridges with inspections data. (3) Prioritize maintenance activities for 11 bridges along A10 in Hertfordshire. (4) Group maintenance activities to reduce the traffic management cost in the bridge network. They have agreed on future support on providing historical principle and general inspections data for the 11 bridges.
Impact (1) Asset management for bridge networks. (2) Improve deterioration model for bridges with inspections data. (3) Prioritize maintenance activities for 11 bridges along A10 in Hertfordshire. (4) Group maintenance activities to reduce the traffic management cost in the bridge network. They have agreed on future support on providing historical principle and general inspections data for the 11 bridges.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Hertfordshire county council - ZhL 
Organisation Hertfordshire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Asset management for bridge networks
Collaborator Contribution Asset management for bridge networks
Impact Asset management for bridge networks
Start Year 2016
 
Description Highways England - PTK 
Organisation Department of Transport
Department Highways Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution A14 Road Noise Monitoring A14 Abutment monitoring using FO Geogrids
Collaborator Contribution A14 Road Noise Monitoring A14 Abutment monitoring using FO Geogrids
Impact A14 Road Noise Monitoring A14 Abutment monitoring using FO Geogrids
Start Year 2017
 
Description Historic England 
Organisation Historic England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Assessment/monitoring of heritage structures
Collaborator Contribution Assessment/monitoring of heritage structures
Impact Assessment/monitoring of heritage structures
Start Year 2015
 
Description Huesker - Sinkhole Detection Development PK 
Organisation Huesker
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sinkhole Detection Development
Collaborator Contribution Sinkhole Detection Development
Impact Sinkhole Detection Development
Start Year 2018
 
Description Huesker UK - PTK 
Organisation Huesker
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Instrumented Geogrid
Collaborator Contribution Instrumented Geogrid
Impact Instrumented Geogrid
Start Year 2017
 
Description Humber Bridge - PTK 
Organisation Humber Bridge Board
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Work on Humber Bridge
Collaborator Contribution Work on Humber Bridge
Impact Work on Humber Bridge
Start Year 2015
 
Description IHI - AS 
Organisation Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Low-power MEMS strain sensors and field deployment
Collaborator Contribution Low-power MEMS strain sensors and field deployment
Impact Low-power MEMS strain sensors and field deployment
Start Year 2015
 
Description Imetrum - MSA 
Organisation Imetrum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Workshops for learning their Video Gauge software
Collaborator Contribution Workshops for learning their Video Gauge software
Impact Workshops for learning their Video Gauge software
Start Year 2016
 
Description Imperial College London/Berkeley University/Alan Turing Institute - Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge 
Organisation Alan Turing Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Collaborator Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Impact Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Start Year 2018
 
Description Imperial College London/Berkeley University/Alan Turing Institute - Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Collaborator Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Impact Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Start Year 2018
 
Description Imperial College London/Berkeley University/Alan Turing Institute - Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Collaborator Contribution Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Impact Statistical Shape Analysis; Structural Alert System for Marsh Lane Bridge
Start Year 2018
 
Description Imperial College, London AEY 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research Grant co-working
Collaborator Contribution Research Grant co-working
Impact Research Grant co-working
Start Year 2015
 
Description Improbable - RC 
Organisation Improbable
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Knowledge Transfer Fellowship
Collaborator Contribution Knowledge Transfer Fellowship
Impact Knowledge Transfer Fellowship
Start Year 2016
 
Description Informing the 'Digital Blueprint' for the Houses of Parliament 
Organisation Parliament of UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Jennifer Schooling and Houses of Parliament working on secondment project Informing the 'Digital Blueprint' for the Houses of Parliament
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active, outcomes and outputs not yet know.
Start Year 2020
 
Description James Dyson Building - monitoring of superstructure - NdB 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site.
Collaborator Contribution Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site.
Impact Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site.
Start Year 2014
 
Description John Grill Centre, University of Sydney - CRM 
Organisation University of Sydney
Department John Grill Centre
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Promoting more innovative and customer-focused infrastructure design in Australia
Collaborator Contribution Promoting more innovative and customer-focused infrastructure design in Australia
Impact Promoting more innovative and customer-focused infrastructure design in Australia
Start Year 2016
 
Description KTN- PTK 
Organisation Knowledge Transfer Network
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Collaborator Contribution HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Impact HS2 Bored concrete Piles Challenge
Start Year 2017
 
Description Keller - CK 
Organisation Keller Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution 3 pile load tests
Collaborator Contribution 3 pile load tests
Impact 3 pile load tests
Start Year 2016
 
Description Keltbray - CK 
Organisation Keltbray
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution 2 pile load tests
Collaborator Contribution 2 pile load tests
Impact 2 pile load tests
Start Year 2016
 
Description Keltbray Piling - NdB 
Organisation Keltbray
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Instrumentation and monitoring of RC test piles
Collaborator Contribution Instrumentation and monitoring of RC test piles
Impact Instrumentation and monitoring of RC test piles
Start Year 2016
 
Description LDA - Design - YJ 
Organisation LDA Design
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Strategic LEP economic plan
Collaborator Contribution Strategic LEP economic plan
Impact Strategic LEP economic plan
Start Year 2016
 
Description Laing O'Rourke - LB 
Organisation Laing O'Rourke
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Collaborator Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Impact Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Laing O'Rourke - PTK 
Organisation Laing O'Rourke
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Pile monitoring , Francis Crick, Staffpordshiore Bridges
Collaborator Contribution Pile monitoring , Francis Crick, Staffpordshiore Bridges
Impact Pile monitoring , Francis Crick, Staffpordshiore Bridges
Start Year 2015
 
Description London Underground - PTK 
Organisation Transport for London
Department London Underground
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Smart Plan, Iron tunnel segments
Collaborator Contribution Smart Plan, Iron tunnel segments
Impact Smart Plan, Iron tunnel segments
Start Year 2015
 
Description MEMS surface gravimeter for geotechnical surveying 
Organisation Silicon Microgravity Ltd.
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Ashwin Seshia and Silicon Micrograity working on secondment project 'MEMS surface gravimeter for geotechnical surveying'
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2019
 
Description McLaren Applied Technologies - AS 
Organisation McLaren Applied Technologies
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Innovate UK project on self-powered wireless sensors
Collaborator Contribution Innovate UK project on self-powered wireless sensors
Impact Innovate UK project on self-powered wireless sensors
Start Year 2015
 
Description McLaren Racing Limited - HA 
Organisation McLaren Racing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Small size sensors (Fibre Bragg Grating)
Collaborator Contribution Small size sensors (Fibre Bragg Grating)
Impact Small size sensors (Fibre Bragg Grating)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Metrodynamics, UK - ES 
Organisation Metro Dynamics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Metropolitan planning and stakeholder engagement
Collaborator Contribution Metropolitan planning and stakeholder engagement
Impact Metropolitan planning and stakeholder engagement
Start Year 2016
 
Description Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change 
Organisation Alan Turing Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Universities of Cambridge and California, Berkeley, in partnership with the British Geological Survey, are launching a joint project on Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change. This project is run as part of the Data Centric Engineering Research Programme at the Alan Turing Institute and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction at the University of Cambridge. The objective of this NSF(US)-EPSRC(UK) funded research is to better understand impacts of urban underground infrastructure, such as basements and tunnels, on shallow subsurface temperature increase at city-scale. Overview In dense urban areas, the underground is exploited for a variety of purposes, including transport, additional residential/commercial spaces, storage, and industrial processes. With the rise in urban populations and significant improvements in construction technologies, the number of subsurface structures is expected to grow in the next decade, leading to subsurface congestion. Recently emerging data indicate a significant impact of underground construction on subsurface temperature and there is extensive evidence of underground temperature rise at the local scale. Although it is well known that urbanization coupled with climate change is amplifying the urban heat island effect above ground, the extent of the underground climate change at the city scale is unknown because of limited work on modelling the historical and future underground climate change at large scale and very limited long-term underground temperature monitoring. The hypothesis of this research is that (a) the high ground temperature around tunnels and underground basements, (b) the observed temperature increase within the aquifer, and (c) inefficiency in ventilation of the underground railway networks, necessitate more detailed and reliable knowledge of urban underground thermal status. The project will develop a framework for monitoring and predicting temperature and groundwater distributions at high resolutions in the presence of underground heat sources and sinks. This can be achieved via a combination of numerical modelling, continuous temperature and groundwater monitoring and statistical analyses. The ultimate goal is for every city to generate reliable maps of underground climate, with the ability to understand the influence of future urbanization scenarios.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact No impact yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Universities of Cambridge and California, Berkeley, in partnership with the British Geological Survey, are launching a joint project on Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change. This project is run as part of the Data Centric Engineering Research Programme at the Alan Turing Institute and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction at the University of Cambridge. The objective of this NSF(US)-EPSRC(UK) funded research is to better understand impacts of urban underground infrastructure, such as basements and tunnels, on shallow subsurface temperature increase at city-scale. Overview In dense urban areas, the underground is exploited for a variety of purposes, including transport, additional residential/commercial spaces, storage, and industrial processes. With the rise in urban populations and significant improvements in construction technologies, the number of subsurface structures is expected to grow in the next decade, leading to subsurface congestion. Recently emerging data indicate a significant impact of underground construction on subsurface temperature and there is extensive evidence of underground temperature rise at the local scale. Although it is well known that urbanization coupled with climate change is amplifying the urban heat island effect above ground, the extent of the underground climate change at the city scale is unknown because of limited work on modelling the historical and future underground climate change at large scale and very limited long-term underground temperature monitoring. The hypothesis of this research is that (a) the high ground temperature around tunnels and underground basements, (b) the observed temperature increase within the aquifer, and (c) inefficiency in ventilation of the underground railway networks, necessitate more detailed and reliable knowledge of urban underground thermal status. The project will develop a framework for monitoring and predicting temperature and groundwater distributions at high resolutions in the presence of underground heat sources and sinks. This can be achieved via a combination of numerical modelling, continuous temperature and groundwater monitoring and statistical analyses. The ultimate goal is for every city to generate reliable maps of underground climate, with the ability to understand the influence of future urbanization scenarios.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact No impact yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Universities of Cambridge and California, Berkeley, in partnership with the British Geological Survey, are launching a joint project on Modelling and Monitoring of Urban Underground Climate Change. This project is run as part of the Data Centric Engineering Research Programme at the Alan Turing Institute and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction at the University of Cambridge. The objective of this NSF(US)-EPSRC(UK) funded research is to better understand impacts of urban underground infrastructure, such as basements and tunnels, on shallow subsurface temperature increase at city-scale. Overview In dense urban areas, the underground is exploited for a variety of purposes, including transport, additional residential/commercial spaces, storage, and industrial processes. With the rise in urban populations and significant improvements in construction technologies, the number of subsurface structures is expected to grow in the next decade, leading to subsurface congestion. Recently emerging data indicate a significant impact of underground construction on subsurface temperature and there is extensive evidence of underground temperature rise at the local scale. Although it is well known that urbanization coupled with climate change is amplifying the urban heat island effect above ground, the extent of the underground climate change at the city scale is unknown because of limited work on modelling the historical and future underground climate change at large scale and very limited long-term underground temperature monitoring. The hypothesis of this research is that (a) the high ground temperature around tunnels and underground basements, (b) the observed temperature increase within the aquifer, and (c) inefficiency in ventilation of the underground railway networks, necessitate more detailed and reliable knowledge of urban underground thermal status. The project will develop a framework for monitoring and predicting temperature and groundwater distributions at high resolutions in the presence of underground heat sources and sinks. This can be achieved via a combination of numerical modelling, continuous temperature and groundwater monitoring and statistical analyses. The ultimate goal is for every city to generate reliable maps of underground climate, with the ability to understand the influence of future urbanization scenarios.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact No impact yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Monitoring of concrete bridges with acoustic emission sensors 
Organisation Kier Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Highways England - Monitoring of concrete bridges with acoustic emission sensors The research will explore the benefits of acoustic emission monitoring on damage detection, characterisation and localisation in concrete bridges, enhanced by multi-sensing information from fibre optics and environmental sensors. The main objective is the development of data processing tools for the structural performance assessment of bridges, through continuous infrastructure monitoring and experimental studies. This research and development project is partly funded by Highways England and it is planned a highway bridge will be fully instrumented during this project in collaboration with Mistras Group Ltd, a leading acoustic emission sensing provider.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2019
 
Description Monitoring of concrete bridges with acoustic emission sensors 
Organisation Mistras Group Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Highways England - Monitoring of concrete bridges with acoustic emission sensors The research will explore the benefits of acoustic emission monitoring on damage detection, characterisation and localisation in concrete bridges, enhanced by multi-sensing information from fibre optics and environmental sensors. The main objective is the development of data processing tools for the structural performance assessment of bridges, through continuous infrastructure monitoring and experimental studies. This research and development project is partly funded by Highways England and it is planned a highway bridge will be fully instrumented during this project in collaboration with Mistras Group Ltd, a leading acoustic emission sensing provider.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Project still active, outputs and outcomes not yet known
Start Year 2019
 
Description Monitoring of tall building during construction - Nicky de Battista 
Organisation Multiplex Construction
Country Australia 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Monitoring of tall building during construction
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of tall building during construction
Impact Monitoring of tall building during construction
Start Year 2017
 
Description Mott MacDonald - CRM 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Measuring effectiveness of @one Alliance consortium for delivering long term infrastructure upgrade programme (with prospective PhD student Daniel Brackenbury)
Collaborator Contribution Measuring effectiveness of @one Alliance consortium for delivering long term infrastructure upgrade programme (with prospective PhD student Daniel Brackenbury)
Impact Measuring effectiveness of @one Alliance consortium for delivering long term infrastructure upgrade programme (with prospective PhD student Daniel Brackenbury)
Start Year 2016
 
Description Mott MacDonald - PTK 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall.
Collaborator Contribution Instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall.
Impact Instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Mott MacDonald - ZL 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Develop user friendly software for asset management of bridge systems
Collaborator Contribution Develop user friendly software for asset management of bridge systems
Impact Develop user friendly software for asset management of bridge systems
Start Year 2017
 
Description Mott MacDonald instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall - JMS 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall
Collaborator Contribution instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall
Impact instrumentation of sheet piling with FBG sensors and measurement during pile installation at Trinity Hall
Start Year 2016
 
Description Mouchel - PTK 
Organisation Mouchel Group PLC
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Detection of defects in water courses
Collaborator Contribution Detection of defects in water courses
Impact Detection of defects in water courses
Start Year 2015
 
Description Multi-sensing structural health monitoring of a skewed masonry arch bridge 
Organisation AECOM Technology Corporation
Department AECOM, Nottingham, UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution In 2018, Network Rail commissioned CSIC and AECOM to install structural health monitoring technologies on a skewed masonry arch bridge in North Yorkshire, which had suffered extensive historic damage. The technologies would monitor how the 150-year-old bridge behaved structurally and how it was responding to intervention work carried out in 2016. Network Rail also wanted to explore available monitoring technologies to determine which ones worked well and could be used on other assets. The system traditionally used in the UK is deflection pole monitoring, which measures vertical crown displacements at the arch soffit under the centre of the tracks above. However, this method often entails difficulties with access and may require costly and disruptive road closures. Bespoke monitoring system Following several desk studies, laser vibrometry and laser scanning at an initial monitoring visit, engineers were able to study the environment of the bridge and design a bespoke monitoring system. The vibrometry was used to provide an initial gauge of the magnitude of movements that the bridge was experiencing under typical train loading. The laser scan data was used to profile the surface of the bridge and to decide the locations of monitoring equipment, given the constraints of an A-road and footpath running underneath it. CSIC installed distributed monitoring technologies, including a network of fibre optic Fibre Bragg Gratings for detailed dynamic measurement of strains across the arch, a laser scan analysis of historic deformations, and videogrammetry to capture dynamic displacements. AECOM installed an autonomous remote monitoring system comprising a range of dynamic, point-sensing technologies. Real-time monitoring with this system allows for accurate tracking of long-term trends in the monitoring data. The bridge was monitored for six months from September 2018 to February 2019. Both teams from AECOM and CSIC analysed large quantities of data to co-author a series of reports for Network Rail. The reports summarised the studies undertaken before installation, the reasons the system was chosen, the evaluation of the technologies used, and the results to date. An upcoming report will also provide guidance on monitoring technologies that can be used as alternatives to the deflection pole method. Next steps Following internal review by the client, it is intended that these reports will be submitted to the European Shift2Rail programme as examples of research that Network Rail is supporting. Network Rail is also commissioning AECOM and CSIC to perform long-term monitoring of the bridge, which demonstrates the value of the installed monitoring system and the benefits of long-term structural health monitoring. As part of this, the CSIC FBG system will be upgraded to be autonomous and self-sufficient, running on solar power in the same way as AECOM's remote point-sensing system. This enables FBG measurements to be taken automatically and monitoring data transferred back to the CSIC office for analysis. The teams from AECOM and CSIC have also been invited to present the project results to other asset engineers at Network Rail as an example of best practice. This project has enabled CSIC to continue the development of fibre optic monitoring of heritage structures and carry out research into the fundamental behaviour of an existing skewed masonry arch railway bridge. Following refinement of the monitoring system at this bridge, it is expected that more testing on other bridges will take place in the next year.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact CSIC's innovative way of monitoring the health of ageing railway infrastructure won the New Civil Engineer TechFest Rail Visionary award. The award recognises organisations developing pioneering ideas and designs to effect major changes in the global rail sector. The University of Cambridge, Innovative Structural Health Monitoring of Ageing Railway Infrastructure and Smart Monitoring for Condition Assessment of Ageing Infrastructure (a collaboration between CSIC, AECOM, Network Rail and the Alan Turing Institute (ATI)) showcases two bespoke monitoring systems designed for a masonry arch bridge and viaduct, both in Yorkshire. As well as enabling fundamental research into the behaviour of these heritage structures, the detailed monitoring data is also being used to research novel, statistical-based approaches to asset management and structural assessment, through collaboration between CSIC and ATI. Furthermore, at one of these structures, a skewed masonry arch bridge, Network Rail wanted to explore available monitoring technologies to determine systems with the potential to be used on other assets.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Multi-sensing structural health monitoring of a skewed masonry arch bridge 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution In 2018, Network Rail commissioned CSIC and AECOM to install structural health monitoring technologies on a skewed masonry arch bridge in North Yorkshire, which had suffered extensive historic damage. The technologies would monitor how the 150-year-old bridge behaved structurally and how it was responding to intervention work carried out in 2016. Network Rail also wanted to explore available monitoring technologies to determine which ones worked well and could be used on other assets. The system traditionally used in the UK is deflection pole monitoring, which measures vertical crown displacements at the arch soffit under the centre of the tracks above. However, this method often entails difficulties with access and may require costly and disruptive road closures. Bespoke monitoring system Following several desk studies, laser vibrometry and laser scanning at an initial monitoring visit, engineers were able to study the environment of the bridge and design a bespoke monitoring system. The vibrometry was used to provide an initial gauge of the magnitude of movements that the bridge was experiencing under typical train loading. The laser scan data was used to profile the surface of the bridge and to decide the locations of monitoring equipment, given the constraints of an A-road and footpath running underneath it. CSIC installed distributed monitoring technologies, including a network of fibre optic Fibre Bragg Gratings for detailed dynamic measurement of strains across the arch, a laser scan analysis of historic deformations, and videogrammetry to capture dynamic displacements. AECOM installed an autonomous remote monitoring system comprising a range of dynamic, point-sensing technologies. Real-time monitoring with this system allows for accurate tracking of long-term trends in the monitoring data. The bridge was monitored for six months from September 2018 to February 2019. Both teams from AECOM and CSIC analysed large quantities of data to co-author a series of reports for Network Rail. The reports summarised the studies undertaken before installation, the reasons the system was chosen, the evaluation of the technologies used, and the results to date. An upcoming report will also provide guidance on monitoring technologies that can be used as alternatives to the deflection pole method. Next steps Following internal review by the client, it is intended that these reports will be submitted to the European Shift2Rail programme as examples of research that Network Rail is supporting. Network Rail is also commissioning AECOM and CSIC to perform long-term monitoring of the bridge, which demonstrates the value of the installed monitoring system and the benefits of long-term structural health monitoring. As part of this, the CSIC FBG system will be upgraded to be autonomous and self-sufficient, running on solar power in the same way as AECOM's remote point-sensing system. This enables FBG measurements to be taken automatically and monitoring data transferred back to the CSIC office for analysis. The teams from AECOM and CSIC have also been invited to present the project results to other asset engineers at Network Rail as an example of best practice. This project has enabled CSIC to continue the development of fibre optic monitoring of heritage structures and carry out research into the fundamental behaviour of an existing skewed masonry arch railway bridge. Following refinement of the monitoring system at this bridge, it is expected that more testing on other bridges will take place in the next year.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact CSIC's innovative way of monitoring the health of ageing railway infrastructure won the New Civil Engineer TechFest Rail Visionary award. The award recognises organisations developing pioneering ideas and designs to effect major changes in the global rail sector. The University of Cambridge, Innovative Structural Health Monitoring of Ageing Railway Infrastructure and Smart Monitoring for Condition Assessment of Ageing Infrastructure (a collaboration between CSIC, AECOM, Network Rail and the Alan Turing Institute (ATI)) showcases two bespoke monitoring systems designed for a masonry arch bridge and viaduct, both in Yorkshire. As well as enabling fundamental research into the behaviour of these heritage structures, the detailed monitoring data is also being used to research novel, statistical-based approaches to asset management and structural assessment, through collaboration between CSIC and ATI. Furthermore, at one of these structures, a skewed masonry arch bridge, Network Rail wanted to explore available monitoring technologies to determine systems with the potential to be used on other assets.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Multiplex - NdB 
Organisation Multiplex Construction
Country Australia 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Monitoring of tall building during construction
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of tall building during construction
Impact Monitoring of tall building during construction
Start Year 2016
 
Description Myriad CEG Limited - PTK 
Organisation Myriad Heat and Power Products Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Thermal piles
Collaborator Contribution Thermal piles
Impact Thermal piles
Start Year 2015
 
Description NPL (National Physical Laboratory) - CRM 
Organisation National Physical Laboratory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Discussions on parameters for NPL-sponsored PhD studentship for Sakthy Selvakumaran to study structural health monitoring of bridges.
Collaborator Contribution Discussions on parameters for NPL-sponsored PhD studentship for Sakthy Selvakumaran to study structural health monitoring of bridges.
Impact Discussions on parameters for NPL-sponsored PhD studentship for Sakthy Selvakumaran to study structural health monitoring of bridges.
Start Year 2015
 
Description National Grid - PTK 
Organisation The National Grid Co plc
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Tunnel segments and tunnel monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Tunnel segments and tunnel monitoring
Impact Tunnel segments and tunnel monitoring
Start Year 2015
 
Description Network Rail 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Leeds Masonry arch
Collaborator Contribution Leeds Masonry arch
Impact Leeds Masonry arch
Start Year 2015
 
Description Network Rail - HA 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Installation of distributed and discrete (FBG) optical fibre sensors on a Victorian masonry arch rail bridge, Leeds.
Collaborator Contribution Installation of distributed and discrete (FBG) optical fibre sensors on a Victorian masonry arch rail bridge, Leeds.
Impact Installation of distributed and discrete (FBG) optical fibre sensors on a Victorian masonry arch rail bridge, Leeds.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Network Rail - HA 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct)
Collaborator Contribution Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct)
Impact Data-centric Bridge Assessment (Marsh Lane Viaduct)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Network Rail - JMS 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Digital Railway programme
Collaborator Contribution Digital Railway programme
Impact Digital Railway programme
Start Year 2017
 
Description Network Rail - LB 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Collaborator Contribution Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Impact Staffordshire Alliance Bridge Monitoring Project (EPSRC)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Network Rail - MJD 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Monitoring of a masonry viaduct in Leeds
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of a masonry viaduct in Leeds
Impact Monitoring of a masonry viaduct in Leeds
Start Year 2015
 
Description Network Rail HS1 St Pancras - AKNP 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution BIM
Collaborator Contribution BIM
Impact BIM
Start Year 2016
 
Description Network Rail/BAM Nuttall/BAM Ritchies and L&C Precision - Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting PK 
Organisation BAM Nuttall
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting
Collaborator Contribution Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting
Impact CSIC has been shortlisted in six categories for the Ground Engineering Awards 2019, for the Hooley Cuttings Fibre Optic Sensing project. The project was a collaboration between Network Rail, BAM Nuttall, BAM Ritchies and L&C Precision and was led by CSIC Business Development Manager Philip Keenan. The categories in which CSIC have been shortlisted are: Award for digital innovation Award for equipment innovation Award for technical excellence Ground investigation project of the year - under £2M Health and safety award UK geotechnical team of the year.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Network Rail/BAM Nuttall/BAM Ritchies and L&C Precision - Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting PK 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting
Collaborator Contribution Development and testing of a rockfall monitoring system at Hooley Cutting
Impact CSIC has been shortlisted in six categories for the Ground Engineering Awards 2019, for the Hooley Cuttings Fibre Optic Sensing project. The project was a collaboration between Network Rail, BAM Nuttall, BAM Ritchies and L&C Precision and was led by CSIC Business Development Manager Philip Keenan. The categories in which CSIC have been shortlisted are: Award for digital innovation Award for equipment innovation Award for technical excellence Ground investigation project of the year - under £2M Health and safety award UK geotechnical team of the year.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Network rail - MJD 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Long term monitoring of masonry arch bridge assets
Collaborator Contribution Long term monitoring of masonry arch bridge assets
Impact Monitoring of a masonry viaduct in Leeds
Start Year 2015
 
Description Noztek - PTK 
Organisation Noztek
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of fibre coating equipment
Collaborator Contribution Development of fibre coating equipment
Impact Development of fibre coating equipment
Start Year 2017
 
Description Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - transportation - Alex Gkiokas 
Organisation Department of Transport
Department Highways Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - transportation
Collaborator Contribution Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - transportation
Impact Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - transportation
Start Year 2017
 
Description Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - water sector - Alex Giokas 
Organisation Mott Macdonald UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - water sector
Collaborator Contribution Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - water sector
Impact Ongoing discussions November 2017-present - water sector - Alex Giokas
Start Year 2017
 
Description Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton - Dynamic distributed sensing with FO 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton - Dynamic distributed sensing with FO
Collaborator Contribution Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton - Dynamic distributed sensing with FO
Impact Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton - Dynamic distributed sensing with FO
Start Year 2018
 
Description Peter Brett Associates - CR< 
Organisation Peter Brett Associates
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Smarter construction including re-use of existing piles, structural elements, off-site construction with incorporation of services and utilities design & integration of industry software platforms intelligently; smarter city design with a focus on energy & transport infrastructure
Collaborator Contribution Smarter construction including re-use of existing piles, structural elements, off-site construction with incorporation of services and utilities design & integration of industry software platforms intelligently; smarter city design with a focus on energy & transport infrastructure
Impact Smarter construction including re-use of existing piles, structural elements, off-site construction with incorporation of services and utilities design & integration of industry software platforms intelligently; smarter city design with a focus on energy & transport infrastructure
Start Year 2016
 
Description Photogrammetric Study of Landslides and Rapid Ground Deformations 
Organisation Cam Dragon
Sector Private 
PI Contribution CSIC investigator Dongfang Liang and Cam Dragon Corporation working on secondment project 'Photogrammetric Study of Landslides and Rapid Ground Deformations'
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still action, outputs and outcomes not yet known.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Preliminary discussion about joint research project proposal - Nicky de Battista 
Organisation Arup Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Preliminary discussion about joint research project proposal
Collaborator Contribution Preliminary discussion about joint research project proposal
Impact Preliminary discussion about joint research project proposal
Start Year 2018
 
Description Provide support for current projects and explore possible future collaboration with CSIC - Haris Alexakis 
Organisation National Instruments Corp (UK) Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provide support for current projects and explore possible future collaboration with CSIC
Collaborator Contribution Provide support for current projects and explore possible future collaboration with CSIC
Impact Provide support for current projects and explore possible future collaboration with CSIC
Start Year 2018
 
Description RedBite - Social networked smart infrastructure assets AP 
Organisation RedBite Solutions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Social networked smart infrastructure assets
Collaborator Contribution Social networked smart infrastructure assets
Impact Social networked smart infrastructure assets
Start Year 2018
 
Description Road degradation: a city-scale model to inform efficient asset management and maintenance 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The scale of the problem Road degradation is an increasing problem for asset managers. Potholes are one of the main contributing factors and require local authorities to commit limited funding to maintenance and repairs. According to the Asphalt Industry Alliance (AIA) Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance Survey (ALARM) 2019, the total number of potholes filled in the past year (April 2018 to April 2019) in England and Wales totals 1,860,072 at a cost of £97.8m. The average cost to fill one pothole as part of planned maintenance is £39.80 compared to £65.10 for a reactive repair. Improving asset management A CSIC, University of Cambridge and University of California, Berkeley research project is examining the degradation of roads (evaluation considers potholes, cracks and other types of defects) with the aim of improving road asset management. Currently asset managers lack accurate methods to support decision-making on maintenance programmes resulting in an ad-hoc approach to deciding which areas of road to repair and maintain. A predictive and city-scale maintenance approach based on accurate information would allow more efficient planning, reducing the cost of works and disruption. Pavement condition data This research seeks to improve knowledge about local road degradation using road condition data from visual surveys published by the San Francisco Department of Public Works. This provides historical and current information on the Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of more than 12,000 street segments in the city (pavement in this context refers to road surface). Following recent advances in road condition monitoring, resulting data is becoming available in increasingly large spatial scales and high spatial resolutions. This brings both opportunities and challenges for road management: opportunities to understand network-wide condition change and maintenance needs at high spatio-temporal resolution; challenges to efficiently analyse large amounts of spatio-temporal data to identify meaningful and usable quantification to inform maintenance and management. Incorporating spatial and temporal dimensions Incorporating spatial and temporal dimensions into road degradation modelling secures a system-wide understanding for asset management. There are many difficulties in producing a reliable road condition prediction model, particularly with the strong presence of measurement errors inherent in visual surveys and lack of information on crucial degradation-affecting factors including construction quality, microclimate and ground conditions. To address the issue of 'imperfect data', additional structures in the data are considered to enable further insights of the street network. This research demonstrates that a hierarchical modelling approach can be applied in a more general manner to take advantage of natural spatial structures in the street network and considers the possible correlations between nearby road sections. Three road degradation models were designed to represent a range of modelling strategies, including a conventional approach that fits a degradation curve for each category (road material type and functional class, see Figure 1), as well as a spatial model that explicitly considers the similarities in degradation trends of neighbouring road segments. Benefits of spatial (SP) model The SP model coordinates degradation rates between adjacent street segments showing regions of high degradation rates in red and low in blue (see Figure 2). Results show a large part of the individual variations in degradation rates are explained by the spatially structured component but the most convincing strength of the SP model is its ability to identify high degradation rates. The SP model: Is able to estimate the degradation parameters for road sections with missing or erroneous observations by using information from adjacent sections Can visually illustrate regions where roads degrade faster than average Can assist asset managers to apply their attention to a smaller region. Smart infrastructure and management The spatial road degradation model proposed in this study emerges from recent advances in the field of smart infrastructure and management and is built on two decades of continuous records of cityscale road condition data. Such input data are premised on advanced sensing and digital data inventory technologies for road infrastructure. This model is also an example of how interdisciplinary data analysis techniques can contribute to the management of smart infrastructure. As a basis it addresses the imperfections (measurement errors and missing predictors) in road condition data and identifies critical regions where roads tend to age faster. Such results can support local engineers to conduct more informed inspections/site investigations, and make more effective asset management decisions. Future prospects The spatial model can support targeted inspections to investigate underlying causes of degradation in vulnerable regions and inform asset management decisions and activities by enabling system-level maintenance planning. Inter-disciplinary modelling for sustainable cityscale management In the longer term road degradation and traffic simulation modelling will be brought together to consider the sustainability of the cityscale transportation system through the modelling of potential emission mitigation scenarios. Currently, there are many carbon mitigation proposals within the transportation system, for example, eco-routing where drivers choose less congested and less bumpy routes. From the infrastructure asset management perspective, the opportunities include the adoption of recycled materials, roadwork schedules to minimise construction disruptions and maintenance allocations that prioritise the reduction of use phase emissions from vehicles. Current studies of both areas remain siloed; road engineers do not consider dynamics in traffic and traffic engineers do not consider condition of roads. Taking a systems approach enables network-wide impact in reducing emissions, total vehicle hours/distance travelled and overall road conditions to better manage traffic congestion and associated pollution and inform more efficient asset management.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration is still active.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation DEMO Consultants
Country Netherlands 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation INSITU Engineering
Country Nigeria 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Infraestruturas de Portugal
Country Portugal 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Innovactory
Country Netherlands 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Institute of Transport Economics (Norway)
Country Norway 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Norwegian Geotechnical Institute
Country Norway 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation Planetek Italia
Country Italy 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation University of Minho
Country Portugal 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description SAFEWAY 
Organisation University of Vigo
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The SAFEWAY project The SAFEWAY project, a GIS-Based Infrastructure Management System for Optimised Response to Extreme Events on Terrestrial Transport Networks, aims to address the ability of transport systems to function during adverse conditions and quickly recover to acceptable levels of service after extreme events. SAFEWAY develops a transversal solution mainly focused on terrestrial transport modes, including both roads and railway infrastructure networks. Several of the SAFEWAY modules (mainly monitoring and risk prediction) can also be applied to other transport modes such as maritime. The main objective of the project is to design, validate and implement holistic methods, strategies, tools and technical interventions to significantly increase the resilience of inland transport infrastructure by reducing risk vulnerability and strengthening network systems to extreme events. The University of Cambridge is one of 15 partners collaborating on the project, which is being coordinated by the University of Vigo, Spain. Challenges addressed SAFEWAY project tools and interventions will be deployed for critical hazards, both natural and man-made, including: wildfires in Portugal; floods, which currently account for half of climate hazards across Europe; land displacements in the UK, Spain, the Netherlands and Portugal; and seismic-related events in the Iberian Peninsula and Italy. Resilience to man-made hazards such as terrorism, vandalism, accidents, and negligence will be secured by mitigating their impacts with real-time mobility advice, such as TomTom real-time traffic management. SAFEWAY also employs innovative socio-technical elements of psychology and risk tolerance for communities at local, regional and European level, for both natural and man-made hazards. SAFEWAY's objectives will address and strengthen the four criteria for a resilient infrastructure: robustness, resourcefulness, rapid recovery and redundancy. Optimum balance Senior Lecturer in Industrial Systems at the Institute for Manufacturing and CSIC Investigator, Dr Ajith Parlikad, is leading collaborative research to develop predictive models for critical infrastructure assets that consider measured structural performance and trends observed in large databases to estimate the risks of future infrastructure damage, shutdown and deterioration. Projections of second, thirdorder, and long-term consequences will also be assessed. The University of Cambridge team will be involved in the development of a robust decision support framework for terrestrial transportation infrastructure management by considering diverse types of risks related to natural and man-made extreme events and balancing stakeholders' demands and optimising priorities over asset types. The objective is to identify the optimum balance between long-term risk minimisation and available financial resources to find the optimum resilience. SAFEWAY is funded by the EU Horizon 2020 'Smart, green and integrated transport' work programme which is aimed at achieving a European transport system that is resilient, resource-efficient, climate-and-environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless for the benefit of all citizens, the economy and society.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Still active
Start Year 2019
 
Description Satellite Applications Catapult - CRM 
Organisation Satellite Applications Catapult
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Remote sensing
Collaborator Contribution Remote sensing
Impact Remote sensing
Start Year 2016
 
Description Satellite Applications Catapult - MSA 
Organisation Satellite Applications Catapult
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Bank Station Capacity Upgrade Mansion House and St Mary Abchurch monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Bank Station Capacity Upgrade Mansion House and St Mary Abchurch monitoring
Impact Bank Station Capacity Upgrade Mansion House and St Mary Abchurch monitoring
Start Year 2017
 
Description Senceive - Collaboration on deployment project for CSattAR at Moorgate station - JMS 
Organisation Senceive
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Collaboration on deployment project for CSattAR at Moorgate station
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration on deployment project for CSattAR at Moorgate station
Impact Collaboration on deployment project for CSattAR at Moorgate station
Start Year 2016
 
Description Senceive - PRAF 
Organisation Senceive
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Testing/Calibration of a new Senceive wireless sensor in the Instron room. (Note: No 'formal' agreement apart from a few emails.)
Collaborator Contribution Testing/Calibration of a new Senceive wireless sensor in the Instron room. (Note: No 'formal' agreement apart from a few emails.)
Impact Testing/Calibration of a new Senceive wireless sensor in the Instron room. (Note: No 'formal' agreement apart from a few emails.)
Start Year 2016
 
Description Senceive - PTK 
Organisation Senceive
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution CSIC - testing and evaluation of wireless strain sensors
Collaborator Contribution CSIC - testing and evaluation of wireless strain sensors
Impact CSIC - testing and evaluation of wireless strain sensors
Start Year 2016
 
Description Sengenia - PTK 
Organisation Sengenia Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Development of FBG solutions
Collaborator Contribution Development of FBG solutions
Impact Development of FBG solutions
Start Year 2015
 
Description Sengenia -PTK 
Organisation Sengenia Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Custom FBG sensor arrays
Collaborator Contribution Custom FBG sensor arrays
Impact Custom FBG sensor arrays
Start Year 2017
 
Description Severn Trent Water - PTK 
Organisation Severn Trent Water
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sewer infiltration monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Sewer infiltration monitoring
Impact Sewer infiltration monitoring
Start Year 2015
 
Description Silicon Microgravity Ltd AS 
Organisation Silicon Microgravity Ltd.
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Design, fabrication and characterisation of MEMS gravity sensors
Collaborator Contribution Design, fabrication and characterisation of MEMS gravity sensors
Impact Design, fabrication and characterisation of MEMS gravity sensors
Start Year 2015
 
Description Skanska - DC 
Organisation Skanska AB
Country Sweden 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Northern line extension (visit of Dr Chris Williamson)
Collaborator Contribution Northern line extension (visit of Dr Chris Williamson)
Impact Northern line extension (visit of Dr Chris Williamson)
Start Year 2016
 
Description Skanska - PTK 
Organisation Skanska UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Pile loading, training in FO splicing and deployment.
Collaborator Contribution Pile loading, training in FO splicing and deployment.
Impact Pile loading, training in FO splicing and deployment.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Smith and Wallwork - PTK 
Organisation Smith and Wallwork
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Trinity Hall Excavation Monitoring
Collaborator Contribution Trinity Hall Excavation Monitoring
Impact Trinity Hall Excavation Monitoring
Start Year 2015
 
Description Southbank - pile testing - NdB 
Organisation Southbank Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site; Operation of monitoring system; Data analysis and reporting
Collaborator Contribution Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site; Operation of monitoring system; Data analysis and reporting
Impact Project management; Site visits and discussion with client; Monitoring system design and preparation; Installation on site; Operation of monitoring system; Data analysis and reporting
Start Year 2016
 
Description Splicetec - Crossrail site splicing projects. Co-development of methods for field-splicing FO sensors - JMS 
Organisation Splicetec AG
Country Switzerland 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Crossrail site splicing projects. Co-development of methods for field-splicing FO sensors
Collaborator Contribution Crossrail site splicing projects. Co-development of methods for field-splicing FO sensors
Impact Crossrail site splicing projects. Co-development of methods for field-splicing FO sensors
Start Year 2016
 
Description Splicetec - PTK 
Organisation Splicetec AG
Country Switzerland 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Crossrail site splicing during tunneling
Collaborator Contribution Crossrail site splicing during tunneling
Impact Crossrail site splicing during tunneling
Start Year 2015
 
Description St Mary Abchurch, Mansion House 05.17-01.20 - Sinan Acikgoz 
Organisation Dragados
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Dragados / LUL - St Mary Abchurch, Mansion House 05.17-01.20
Collaborator Contribution Dragados / LUL - St Mary Abchurch, Mansion House 05.17-01.20
Impact Dragados / LUL - St Mary Abchurch, Mansion House 05.17-01.20
Start Year 2017
 
Description Sylex - PTK 
Organisation Sylex
Country Slovakia 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution joint delivery of FBG training
Collaborator Contribution joint delivery of FBG training
Impact joint delivery of FBG training
Start Year 2015
 
Description Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia - ES 
Organisation Tallinn University of Technology
Country Estonia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Big data, data mining and access to information
Collaborator Contribution Big data, data mining and access to information
Impact Big data, data mining and access to information
Start Year 2016
 
Description Tensar 
Organisation Tensar International Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Integrated strain sensors in geogrids
Collaborator Contribution Integrated strain sensors in geogrids
Impact Integrated strain sensors in geogrids
Start Year 2016
 
Description Testing of trial piles - Nicky de Battista 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Testing of trial piles
Collaborator Contribution Testing of trial piles
Impact Testing of trial piles
Start Year 2018
 
Description TfL - PTK 
Organisation Transport for London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Hammersmith Bridge
Collaborator Contribution Hammersmith Bridge
Impact Hammersmith Bridge
Start Year 2015
 
Description TfWM (Centro) - JT 
Organisation Transport for West Midlands
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation.
Collaborator Contribution Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation.
Impact Establishment of collaborative project on vehicle-based track condition monitoring, incl. supply of tram, access to depot facilities and support during installation of instrumentation.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Thames Tideway/Thames water - MJD 
Organisation Thames Water Utilities Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Monitoring of 3rd party assets during tunnelling, including bridges and heritage structures
Collaborator Contribution Monitoring of 3rd party assets during tunnelling, including bridges and heritage structures
Impact Monitoring of 3rd party assets during tunnelling, including bridges and heritage structures
Start Year 2016
 
Description Tony Gee Partnership - LB 
Organisation Tony Gee Consultants
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Smart 'Band-Aids' for Resilient Concrete Structures
Collaborator Contribution Smart 'Band-Aids' for Resilient Concrete Structures
Impact Smart 'Band-Aids' for Resilient Concrete Structures
Start Year 2017
 
Description Transport for London - AKNP 
Organisation Transport for London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Information risk assessment; Asset information management
Collaborator Contribution Information risk assessment; Asset information management
Impact Information risk assessment; Asset information management
Start Year 2016
 
Description Transport for London - CRM 
Organisation Transport for London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Remote sensing
Collaborator Contribution Remote sensing
Impact Remote sensing
Start Year 2016
 
Description Trimble - CRM 
Organisation Trimble Inc.
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Augmented reality and computer modelling in construction
Collaborator Contribution Augmented reality and computer modelling in construction
Impact Augmented reality and computer modelling in construction
Start Year 2016
 
Description Università di Napoli Federico II - CK 
Organisation University of Naples
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Erasmus student
Collaborator Contribution Erasmus student
Impact Erasmus student
Start Year 2016
 
Description Università di Napoli Federico II April 2017 to Sept 2017 Hosted Erasmus student - Cedric Kechavarzi 
Organisation University of Naples
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Università di Napoli Federico II April 2017 to Sept 2017 Erasmus student
Collaborator Contribution Università di Napoli Federico II April 2017 to Sept 2017 Erasmus student
Impact Università di Napoli Federico II April 2017 to Sept 2017 Erasmus student
Start Year 2017
 
Description University College, London AEY 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Fibre Optic analyser
Collaborator Contribution Fibre Optic analyser
Impact Fibre Optic analyser
Start Year 2015
 
Description University of Cambridge Department of Engineering- PTK 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Department of Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution James Dyson Building, piles and floors
Collaborator Contribution James Dyson Building, piles and floors
Impact James Dyson Building, piles and floors
Start Year 2015
 
Description University of Edinburgh AEY 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Business Engagement
Collaborator Contribution Business Engagement
Impact Business Engagement
Start Year 2016
 
Description University of Pretoria - LB 
Organisation University of Pretoria
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Fibre-optic instrumentation of bridges (Alborada Trust, Cambridge-Africa Programme) - knowledge exchange trip, lecture
Collaborator Contribution Fibre-optic instrumentation of bridges (Alborada Trust, Cambridge-Africa Programme) - knowledge exchange trip
Impact Fibre-optic instrumentation of bridges (Alborada Trust, Cambridge-Africa Programme)
Start Year 2017
 
Description University of Sheffield AEY 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Noise sensor
Collaborator Contribution Noise sensor
Impact Noise sensor
Start Year 2015
 
Description University of Southampton - CK 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution "OLE piles instrumentation and testing. Collaborating on research papers."
Collaborator Contribution "OLE piles instrumentation and testing. Collaborating on research papers."
Impact "OLE piles instrumentation and testing. Collaborating on research papers."
Start Year 2016
 
Description University of Wollongong, NSW - AEY 
Organisation University of Wollongong
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Wollongong, NSW
Collaborator Contribution Infrastructure and Smart Cities
Impact Infrastructure and Smart Cities
Start Year 2015
 
Description UtterBerry instrumentation of structures at Trinity Hall to assess building movement during ground engineering - JMS 
Organisation Utterberry Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution instrumentation of structures at Trinity Hall to assess building movement during ground engineering
Collaborator Contribution instrumentation of structures at Trinity Hall to assess building movement during ground engineering
Impact instrumentation of structures at Trinity Hall to assess building movement during ground engineering
Start Year 2016
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation African Union Development Agency
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation Durham University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation Jones & Wagener
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation Parsons Bakery
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation University of Dar es Salaam
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation University of Khartoum
Country Sudan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation University of Pretoria
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Wind Africa: Developing performance-based design for foundation systems of WIND turbines in AFRICA 
Organisation WSP Group plc
Department WSP UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The project Now in its second year, Wind Africa is a collaborative project which aims to support the potential of renewable energy resources to generate power across the continent and is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Approximately half of Africa's population lacks access to electricity and more power generation is also needed to meet future demand. It is estimated that 35 per cent of the world's resources for wind energy could be located in the continent, but there are several challenges to developing the necessary infrastructure. Arid conditions result in unsaturated soil, mostly expansive clay, which makes founding wind turbines difficult. The soil properties change throughout the seasons and with variations in moisture content; surfaces heave in the wet season and shrink in the dry season. These cycles can cause significant damage to buildings founded on these soils. The aim of the Wind Africa project is to develop a set of design guidelines for piled wind turbine foundations in expansive clay to support growth of a sustainable energy market in Africa. There are four work packages to the project: To perform field tests on the cyclic response of foundations on unsaturated expansive soils To complement the field testing with centrifuge tests To perform an extensive laboratory study on samples of soils taken from expansive soil regions in Africa To develop a numerical analysis code to allow detailed studies to be performed on foundations with various geometries and configurations. The first and third packages are being undertaken by researchers in Cambridge, led by Dr Mohammed Elshafie, CSIC Investigator and Senior Lecturer for the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology. The second and fourth packages of the project are being investigated by collaborators at the University of Pretoria and Durham University respectively. Field testing in South Africa In January, a geotechnical drilling investigation took place on the proposed field-testing site in South Africa. The site was chosen as there is evidence of problems with structures, which can be seen in the cracks of nearby buildings. It is also a large open area of known expansive clay with a lack of current infrastructure that would be impacted by testing. Two boreholes were drilled to investigate the profile of the soil and samples were taken for laboratory testing. Rock was found at an approximate depth of 12m in both boreholes and slickensided material, which is evidence of expansive soil, was found throughout the profile until the transition to rock. Undisturbed soils were also taken from the boreholes for the laboratory testing in Cambridge. Three types of testing were carried out on the soil samples; water retention, oedometer and triaxial tests to determine the moisture characteristics, stiffness and strength of the soil respectively. The samples were characterised and were found to have a high percentage of clay and a low percentage of gravel. The change in the volumes of the samples was measured during wetting and drying cycles and shrinkages recorded. Swelling tests under different stress levels are still to be undertaken and mineralogical composition investigated. Planning is now under way for the installation of the piles for the full field testing programme.
Collaborator Contribution As above.
Impact Collaboration still active.
Start Year 2017
 
Title DUAL AND TRIPLE AXIS INERTIAL SENSORS AND METHODS OF INERTIAL SENSING 
Description DUAL AND TRIPLE AXIS INERTIAL SENSORS AND METHODS OF INERTIAL SENSING EP20130771166 "Seshia, Ashwin ,Thiruvenkatanathan, Pradyumna, Zou, Xudong " 09/04/2013 Cambridge Enterprise Ltd - PTK 
IP Reference EP2893362 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2013
Licensed No
Impact DUAL AND TRIPLE AXIS INERTIAL SENSORS AND METHODS OF INERTIAL SENSING EP20130771166 "Seshia, Ashwin ,Thiruvenkatanathan, Pradyumna, Zou, Xudong " 09/04/2013 Cambridge Enterprise Ltd.
 
Title Energy harvesting apparatus and method 
Description Energy harvesting apparatus and method European patent application number 13734854.6 filed 22 December 2014, US patent application number 14/402670 filed 20 November 2014, Chinese patent application number 201380039064.6 filed 22 December 2014 and Japanese patent application number 2015-513341 filed 25 November 2014 based on international patent application number PCT/IB2013/054314 filed 24 May 2013 (claiming priority from US61/651,867 filed 25 May 2012 and US61/707,436 filed 28 September 2012) Licensed to 8power - AAS 
IP Reference US9871472 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2014
Licensed No
Impact Energy harvesting apparatus and method European patent application number 13734854.6 filed 22 December 2014, US patent application number 14/402670 filed 20 November 2014, Chinese patent application number 201380039064.6 filed 22 December 2014 and Japanese patent application number 2015-513341 filed 25 November 2014 based on international patent application number PCT/IB2013/054314 filed 24 May 2013 (claiming priority from US61/651,867 filed 25 May 2012 and US61/707,436 filed 28 September 2012) Licensed to 8power
 
Title Energy harvesting systems and methods 
Description Energy harvesting systems and methods GB1603475.3 filed 29 February 2016 AAS 
IP Reference GB1603475.3 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2016
Licensed No
Impact Energy harvesting systems and methods GB1603475.3 filed 29 February 2016
 
Title Energy-harvesting apparatus and method 
Description Energy-harvesting apparatus and method US20150135869 A1 Kenichi Soga, Aswin Arunkumar Seshia, Yu Jia, Jize Yan 21/05/2015 Cambridge Enterprise PTK 
IP Reference US20150135869 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact Energy-harvesting apparatus and method US20150135869 A1 Kenichi Soga, Aswin Arunkumar Seshia, Yu Jia, Jize Yan 21/05/2015 Cambridge Enterprise PTK
 
Title IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD 
Description IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD 20160027208 Minh-Tri PHAM, Riccardo GHERARDI, Frank PERBET, Bjorn STENGER, Sam JOHNSON, Oliver WOODFORD, Pablo ALCANTARILLA, Roberto CIPOLLA 23/07/2015 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK 
IP Reference US20160027208 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD 20160027208 Minh-Tri PHAM, Riccardo GHERARDI, Frank PERBET, Bjorn STENGER, Sam JOHNSON, Oliver WOODFORD, Pablo ALCANTARILLA, Roberto CIPOLLA 23/07/2015 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK
 
Title Image processing method and system 
Description Image processing method and system 9008439 Minh-Tri Pham, Oliver Woodford, Frank Perbet, Atsuto Maki, Bjorn Stenger, Roberto Cipolla 14/04/2015 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK 
IP Reference US9008439 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact Image processing method and system 9008439 Minh-Tri Pham, Oliver Woodford, Frank Perbet, Atsuto Maki, Bjorn Stenger, Roberto Cipolla 14/04/2015 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK
 
Title MEMS Devices 
Description MEMS Devices GB1508377.7 filed 15 May 2015 Licensed to 8power - AAS 
IP Reference GB1508377.7 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact MEMS Devices GB1508377.7 filed 15 May 2015 Licensed to 8power
 
Title MEMS INERTIAL SENSOR AND METHOD OF INERTIAL SENSING 
Description MEMS INERTIAL SENSOR AND METHOD OF INERTIAL SENSING GB2011/000805 THIRUVENKATANATHAN, Pradyumna,SESHIA, Ashwin YAH, Size 26/05/2011 Cambridge Enterprise Ltd - PTK 
IP Reference WO2011148137 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2011
Licensed No
Impact MEMS INERTIAL SENSOR AND METHOD OF INERTIAL SENSING GB2011/000805 THIRUVENKATANATHAN, Pradyumna,SESHIA, Ashwin YAH, Size 26/05/2011 Cambridge Enterprise Ltd.
 
Title MEMS energy harvesting 
Description MEMS energy harvesting - Invention disclosure filed with Cambridge Enterprise on 22/08/2016 - JMS 
IP Reference  
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2016
Licensed No
Impact MEMS energy harvesting - Invention disclosure filed with Cambridge Enterprise on 22/08/2016 - JMS
 
Title METHODS FOR 3D OBJECT RECOGNITION AND REGISTRATION 
Description METHODS FOR 3D OBJECT RECOGNITION AND REGISTRATION 20150254527 Minh-Tri Pham, Frank Perbet, Bjorn Dietmar, Rafael Stenger, Riccardo Gherardi, Oliver Woodford, Sam Johnson, Roberto Cipolla, Stephan Liwicki 26/08/2014 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK 
IP Reference US20150254527 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2014
Licensed No
Impact METHODS FOR 3D OBJECT RECOGNITION AND REGISTRATION 20150254527 Minh-Tri Pham, Frank Perbet, Bjorn Dietmar, Rafael Stenger, Riccardo Gherardi, Oliver Woodford, Sam Johnson, Roberto Cipolla, Stephan Liwicki 26/08/2014 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba - PTK
 
Title Manufacturing methods 
Description Manufacturing methods WO 2015181533 A3 Heba Bevan 30/05/2014 Utterberry Ltd - PTK 
IP Reference WO2015181533 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2014
Licensed No
Impact Manufacturing methods WO 2015181533 A3 Heba Bevan 30/05/2014 Utterberry Ltd.
 
Title Method of monitoring subsurface concrete structures 
Description Method of monitoring subsurface concrete structures WO2015118333 A1 Andrew Bell, Yue Ouyang, Kenichi SOGA, Duncan NICHOLSON 05/02/2014 Cementation Skanska Limited, The Chancellor, Masters And Scholars Of The University Of Cambridge, Arup Group Limited - PTK 
IP Reference WO2015118333 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2014
Licensed No
Impact Method of monitoring subsurface concrete structures WO2015118333 A1 Andrew Bell, Yue Ouyang, Kenichi SOGA, Duncan NICHOLSON 05/02/2014 Cementation Skanska Limited, The Chancellor, Masters And Scholars Of The University Of Cambridge, Arup Group Limited,
 
Title Methods and systems for matching keypoints and tracking regions between frames of video data 
Description Methods and systems for matching keypoints and tracking regions between frames of video data 9002055 Ryuji Funayama, Hiromichi Yanagihara, Julien Fauqueur, Gabriel Brostow, Roberto Cipolla 07/04/2015 Toyota Motor Europe NV, Cambridge Enterprise Limited - PTK 
IP Reference US9002055 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact Methods and systems for matching keypoints and tracking regions between frames of video data 9002055 Ryuji Funayama, Hiromichi Yanagihara, Julien Fauqueur, Gabriel Brostow, Roberto Cipolla 07/04/2015 Toyota Motor Europe NV, Cambridge Enterprise Limited - PTK
 
Title Sensor systems 
Description Sensor systems WO 2016027104 A1 Heba Bevan 22/08/2014 Utterberry Ltd - PTK 
IP Reference WO2016027104 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2014
Licensed No
Impact Sensor systems WO 2016027104 A1 Heba Bevan 22/08/2014 Utterberry Ltd.
 
Title Vibration-Based Energy Harvester with Strain Optimised Topology 
Description Vibration-Based Energy Harvester with Strain Optimised Topology GB1512456.3 filed 16 July 2015 Licensed to 8power 
IP Reference GB2540406 
Protection Patent granted
Year Protection Granted 2015
Licensed No
Impact Vibration-Based Energy Harvester with Strain Optimised Topology GB1512456.3 filed 16 July 2015 Licensed to 8power
 
Title CB-GEO HPC Code 
Description The CB-GEO High-performance computing code is an application that can run numerical models using the material point method (MPM). The code is parallelised for both serial and distributed applications. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2018 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact One of the first (to the best of my knowledge) open source fully parallelised MPM codes using a modular design scheme for rapid alteration and modification by the user. 
URL https://github.com/cb-geo/mpm
 
Company Name Epsimon 
Description Engineering related scientific and technical consulting activities 
Year Established 2017 
Impact Engineering related scientific and technical consulting activities
 
Description 2nd International Conference on the Material Point Method for Modelling Soil-Water-Structure Interaction 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Second International Conference on the Material Point Method for "Modelling Large Deformation and Soil-Water-Structure Interaction" organised by the Anura 3D MPM Research Community was held in January 2019 at Cambridge. The conference was focussed on researchers and practitioners interested in computational methods, geotechnics, hydraulics, etc.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://mpm2019.eu/home
 
Description Guangdong Provincial Programme (lecture TN) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact CSIC researcher Dr Timea Nochta gave a guest lecture on CISL China - Guangdong Provincial Programme entitled "Sustainable and Smart Cities" (24 July 2019)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description ICE/CDBB National Digital Twin Day (presentation JMS) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jennifer Schooling presented at The National Digital Twin Day.

The National Digital Twin Day will shine a light on how digital twin thinking can drive more value from data, maximise infrastructure performance and deliver better outcomes for society.

Delegates will hear from the built environment's digital leadership, CDBB's Digital Framework Task Group (DFTG), on the pathway to better information management plus features and benefits of digital twins. The event programme offers guidance on digital twin adoption through a series of interactive afternoon workshops, including:

Digital Twins Explained - a workshop aimed at delegates who have little-to-no experience or knowledge of digital twins, and want to gain a basic understanding of their features and benefits
Digital Twin Early Adopters - a workshop aimed at those who are at the outset of utilising digital twins on real projects, and want to share ideas and learning experiences with fellow early adopters
Digital Twins Enhanced - a workshop aimed at digital twin hub pioneers and owners, who want to fine-tune their approach and gain further understanding from fellow digital twin leaders
The event, part of CDBB Week, aims to drive collaboration between government, academia and industry, offering delegates unique opportunities to forge new business relationships with digital twin pioneers.

By attending this event, you will:

Understand industry's direction of travel on digital transformation
Gain insight into owner challenges and how digital twin solutions can meet their needs
Visualise digital twin solutions and the benefits they can offer
Gain real examples/lessons into how to break down challenge areas
Meet digital transformation experts and get to know the digital twin marketplace
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.ice.org.uk/eventarchive/national-digital-twin-day
 
Description IDBE MSt course (lecture TN) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact CSIC researcher, Dr Timea Nochta gave a guest lecture on IDBE MSt course entitled "Future Cities are Smart"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description "Going digital" roundtable discussion - JMS 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Participation in "Going digital" roundtable discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description "P1589 ™/D1 Draft Standard for Augmented Reality Learning Experience Model". IEEE-SA Standards Board, IEEE. Sponsor Learning Technologies Standards Committee of the IEEE Computer Society/Learning Technology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Participant to the P1589 Working Group.
"P1589 ™/D1 Draft Standard for Augmented Reality Learning Experience Model". IEEE-SA Standards Board, IEEE.
Sponsor Learning Technologies Standards Committee of the IEEE Computer Society/Learning Technology

Abstract: Augmented Reality (AR) promises to provide significant boosts in operational efficiency by making information available to employees needing task support in context in real time. At this time, however, there is no general-purpose conceptual model and data model specification for representing learning activities (also known as employee tasks and procedures) and the learning 4 environment in which these tasks are performed (also known as the workplace).
This document proposes an overarching integrated conceptual model that describes interactions between the physical world, the user, and digital information, the context for AR-assisted learning and other parameters of the environment. It defines a first proposal of the two types of required data models, modeling languages, and their binding to XML. Creating such interoperability specification and standard will help to open the market, adding interchangeable component products as alternatives to monolithic Augmented Reality-assisted learning systems. Moreover, it will enable the creation of experience repositories and online marketplaces for Augmented Reality-enabled learning content. Specific attention was given to supporting reuse and re-purposing of existing learning content and to cater to 'mixed' experiences combining real-world learner guidance with the consumption (or production) of traditional contents such as instructional video material or learning apps and widgets.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://zapdf.com/ieee-draft-standard-for-an-augmented-reality-learning-experi.html
 
Description 'Time for change' Hong Kong Delegation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 'Time for change' Hong Kong Delegation visit to CSIC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 13th International Workshop on Advanced Smart Materials and Smart Structures Technology - YR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dissemination of research to international academic community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 6th International LafargeHolcim Forum for Sustainable Construction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited Speaker at Workshop
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 8power - JMS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Expert input to 8power regarding business opportunities in concrete curing
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description @one Alliance - CRM 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Monitoring effectiveness of consortium to deliver long term infrastructure programme (with prospective PhD student Daniel Brackenbury)