Strategic Support to Expedite Embedding Public Engagement with Research (SEE-PER)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Brighton
Department Name: Res, Enterprise & Social Partnerships

Abstract

The University of Brighton has had long standing success in connecting its research with communities/public for impact and have implemented many of the recommendations made in the State of Play report (on mission, leadership and communications, support, learning and recognition) to develop a culture of public engagement with research. In REF 14 the University of Brighton was ranked 27th for Impact, and the university's approach to engaging with communities and the public underpinned this success. There has been consistent support for our Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP, https://www.brighton.ac.uk/business-services/community-partnerships/index.aspx) and its innovative and successful approach to partnership working via the investment of infrastructure and expertise. An established access and brokerage point is available for communities via CUPP's Helpdesk, which sparks new ideas and possibilities and turns these into emergent partnership activities. We have established mechanisms for developing new successful partnerships through 14 years of a CUPP run seed funding programme. We have been the recipient of 2 major investments from HEFCE: The Brighton and Sussex Community Knowledge Exchange and South East Coastal Communities (involving 9 universities working with their communities, see evaluation report at http://www.coastalcommunities.org.uk/Sussex%20SECC%20final%20report.pdf) were both substantial programmes of community university engagement that gleaned considerable learning.

However, a continual challenge for emergent work of this type is what happens with mature community university partnerships as a long term platform for Public Engagement with Research (PER). While there are a myriad of ways to keep good work going these are not always clearly articulated and supported. Additional pressure on such partnerships arise from internal tensions as academic staff balance PER with teaching and research and external challenges linked to the rapid external changes in UK Higher education. Some of the most successful partnerships involving the University of Brighton have become independent Social Enterprises and/or communities of practices (e.g. Boingboing - www.boingboing.org.uk) but many more partnerships exist in a hybrid state with different levels of ongoing connection with the university (e.g. Community 21, https://community21.org/).

The aim of this PER project would be to address these challenges at Brighton and produce outputs and outcomes that will be of value to universities in the UK and internationally who face similar challenges of sustaining mature partnerships, whilst also addressing a rapidly changing higher education policy landscape and the tensions facing academics to deliver PER whilst producing high quality teaching and research.

Planned Impact

The research design is focussed on impact, and the co-designed and co-produced nature of the research activities will ensure impacts will be generated during and after the project. Impact pathways are integrated within the project's five objectives. These impacts will be strengthened as the project progresses into its dissemination phase. Working closely with NCCPE, our dissemination work will seek achieve national impacts with other HEIs. Our international connections give the prospect of international impacts. The involvement of community partners in the co-design and co-production of the project will ensure it is co-owned so that the impacts are valued by local communities, users and beneficiaries.

The vision is to:

* fully scope the challenge of how best PER partnerships can sustain themselves and develop a bespoke programme of support that can be maintained beyond the funded project that will benefit user groups(e.g. young people facing adversity, deprived neighbourhoods, LGBT, older people)

* development of the Community of Practice means impact is at the core of the project and this will deliver understanding of the challenges of the long term sustainability of PER partnerships. The process of cultivating the
Community of Practice will generate capacity building impacts amongst the partner beneficiaries including those working with disadvantage and vulnerable communities so that impact is generated throughout the project and beyond.

* generate wider impacts of the project via communicating with other academics and practitioners using social media. Existing UK and international social media networks will be extensively used to disseminate results, and equally lessons will be drawn from these networks to aid the planning and generation of impact

* establish a governance group at the University of Brighton to oversee the development of impactful PER partnerships that can generate impact in the long term

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description SEE-PER1 - KEY FINDINGS
1. Community University Partnerships are often at different stages and have different needs accordingly. E.g. emergent partnerships need dedicated support to create the pipeline for future success
2. Core needs of partnerships are: what organisational form to use, telling their story/evidencing impact; resourcing their work; managing university complexity; achieving mutual benefit
3. There are many different options for partnerships and some may best be wholly or mainly managed within the university rather than taking other forms such as a community-led organisation or a hybrid community-university partnership organisation.
4. For those partnerships that become separate to the university, thought needs to be given to legal forms as there are many options that will suit different situations.
5. Often partnerships evolve where the IP cannot be solely attributed to the university and these partnerships, particularly where the knowledge is co-produced can be drawn on by the university to evidence its knowledge exchange, rather than knowledge transfer, approach.
6. A 'value model' that addresses the complexity of the benefits produced (research, teaching, knowledge exchange, social) is required
7. Governance involving key stakeholders needs to be in place that assesses the value of the partnerships. This should include University senior leadership, community partners, engaged academics, students at different levels and professional services staff.
8. Marketing, Finance, HR and Information Services, Estates have approaches/protocols that don't always align with this work. Partnerships can struggle in getting what they need from key professional support services because of both the rules that these services work to and the lack of attention to the interface between each. Navigating the internal university system is a major piece of work for these partnerships.

SEE-PER2 KEY FINDINGS
1 Seed funding is key. This ensures partners have some funds to experiment with their partnership in the early days of formation. But critically it can also be used to pay for some of the time that community partners dedicated to the partnership project. Each Ignite partnership was only given £4000 but it still enabled them to undertake a range of successful activities in this early phase.
2 The role of a programme. The partners told us how much they valued Ignite support over the 12 months programme. This including offering advice to potential applicants for the Ignite open call as well individual meetings and three open learning spaces.
3 Putting knowledge sharing at the heart of Ignite. This was through the open learning spaces as well as the production of suite of films and now a forthcoming online guide.
1.4 Underpinned by co-production. All seven partnerships have highlighted how important co-production was to developing a community-university partnership. It is not necessarily an easy objective to achieve but an essential one if the partnerships are to flourish.
Given the later point the following is also important to consider:

- Ensure mutual benefits - from the start partners must clearly state the mutual benefits they are hoping for from the partnership and regularly evaluate that these are being achieved.
- Be sensitive to issues of power - unequal power relations are a major challenge and it is important to have regular learning opportunities where these can be address and their consequences discussed.
- Be flexible - community partners and universities face regular ongoing challenges in their operating environments. Funding for public engagement must allow flexibility, especially for community partners, to adjust partnership activities during the course of the project.
Exploitation Route It is important to think of community-university partnerships at different life stages and with different needs. SEE-PER1 highlighted the importance of understanding different requirements of established partnerships which can differ considerably depending on their context and their maturity. SEE-PER2 highlighted the value of running a partnership programme for finding and fostering community-university partnerships. SEE-PER2 has identified areas of activity where we will aim to support our community partnerships to support their evolutions. These activities will also continue to create wider impacts in the university and community sector. We are planning to take the workshop that was run at the Engage conference and share it at Impact Canada this year.The Ignite films and online guide will be an ongoing legacy of this project. Additionally the partnerships have undertaken a range of activities to share their knowledge more widely so others can benefit from their learning
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description SEE-PER 2 The most substantial impacts of the Ignite project were their successful dissemination of applied research into the public sphere covering issues that are of relevant and importance to local communities. Some examples of innovative community engagement are highlighted here: 1. The Microplastics in the Chichester Harbour project disseminated findings about the fate and effects of plastic particles in the Chichester Harbour Area of Outstanding National Beauty. Key findings to date include a) Piloting new methods to test microplastic pollution distribution in a water column. This is key to understanding the impact on organisms. Eg many micro pollutants accumulate in the top 5mm of water where larvae stages of various marine species live. b)The identification of micro glass fibres in oysters - thousands of particles had been ingested by individual organism. The discovery of this Glass Reinforced Plastics (GRP) appears to be from fibreglass boats and prevalent in oysters during the season when they are being repaired. The researchers are not aware of any other research that has highlighted the presence of GRP in marine organisms. 2. The Hangleton and Knoll project for Making the Arts More Accessible in a disadvantaged community has started an important conversation with local people about the arts. This was a conversation started by residents trained in participatory arts research. They discovered the arts are highly valued locally but most of it seen as low status activities such as crafts. A key finding from the research was that local people would like to have a centre for the arts locally - in part, because it is so expensive to go into the centre of the city and because of the importance of art activities to improving wellbeing. This research has already created an impact as key stakeholders in the city are now seeking to increase community involvement in the arts in deprived communities and its role in supporting a range of health issues. What is more, the partnership research has initiated a conversation between the community partner and a housing developer about the potential for a dedicated arts space locally. 3. The partnership which focused on the Housing Crisis of Brighton and Hove, involved engaging local people and academics both local and international in exploring these issues and coming up with solutions. Their partnership impacts were significant as they resulted in securing from the local authority two areas of valuable land for community housing in a city where space is at a premium. Not only this, but they have also secured cross-party support for finding an additional eight sites of public land for community housing. The activities have also been used to provide evidence for a significant research funding bid. 4. The Ignite! Worthing project has also been ambitious in its public engagement. Holding two events to explore the mental health of children in a town with high levels of teenage self-harm - the partners have ignited a local movement to addresses these issues. They have generated interest and support from professionals including GPs, headteachers, councillors and NHS commissioners, alongside parents and carers. They have not only set up a professional stakeholder group to take up these issues but also a community of practice to explore different solutions for supporting children's mental health and wellbeing. Already they are getting interest from other areas wanting to find out how they could ignite support about these issues in their localities.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Boingboing CIC 
Organisation Boing Boing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Boingboing is both a social enterprise and a network set up in 2010 by Professor Angie Hart and Kim Aumann with support from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) under its Knowledge Exchange Programme and the Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP). Boingboing was set up as an experiment in creating a community-based research and practice development enterprise by, with and for people with lived experience of complex social disadvantage. It aimed to have a close partnership with the resilience research base at the University of Brighton, and to be both an impact vehicle for, and partner of, that research. It is constituted as a separate organisation to the University of Brighton. The core team is in Brighton and it set up an office base in Blackpool in October 2016 with funding from The Big Lottery Fund and space in kind provided by Blackpool Council. Boingboing seeks to create a world where individuals from all walks of life are valued and respected, working together as staff, volunteers and friends from all walks of life to beat the odds through resilience research and practice. Through co-designing activities and services and developing Resilient 'Communities of Practice' they share ideas and provide opportunities for individuals to refine and develop resilient ways of working and challenging social inequalities in their particular settings. The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research. Our team provided support and guidance to help this community university partnership to continue to thrive. This involved undertaking a needs and strengths analysis; setting up a community of practice with other similar partnerships and providing training and mentoring
Collaborator Contribution Key opportunities • Highly successful track record, strong reputation and marketing • Replicating the work in Blackpool with a substantial contract • Longstanding and proven research impact including an impact case study in REF 14 • Local to global interest and highly transferable model across multiple themes and sectors • Multiple income generation taking place including significant research grants, commissions and consultancy. Working via partners when looking for external funding
Impact The partnership received legal advice on how to capture its co-working with the University in a formal agreement
Start Year 2017
 
Description Clothes on Our Back - Diversifying the Curriculum 
Organisation Diversity Lewes
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership was made possible by the SEE-PER (2) funding that enabled Ignite - a 12 month incubator programme to find and foster seven community-university partnerships. This development programme was devised, developed and delivered centrally by the University of Brighton's Community University Partnership Programme - CUPP - - in collaboration with researchers from across the institution and community partners. The individual partnerships were co-developed by academic researchers from the University of Brighton and a range of community partners. All their activities were co-produced with mutual benefits.
Collaborator Contribution As above
Impact • Ran workshops with Brighton Museum using their archive of Khangas. • Set up an interdisciplinary network with combined expertise to devise and write a new University of Brighton course module. • Presented at a conference and co-authored a chapter in a book on Utopias for Routledge. • Held two events in Black History Month (one at the University and one at the Brighton Dome). • Now working with two new PhD students who will continue and sustain the work of the project.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Community 21 
Organisation Culture Shift CIC
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Community21 is a social design agency that is housed within the University of Brighton's School of Architecture and Design. It was founded in 2010 by University of Brighton design academic Nick Gant and Action in Rural Sussex Deputy Chief Executive Teresa Gittins, but has grown to facilitate a network of University researchers and community practitioners, urban and rural communities, NGOs and service providers. Initially Nick, acting as a Parish Councillor, was supporting work in his locality in a personal capacity, however quickly realised the opportunity to co-relate community planning with his academic interests and concerns. The first few years of the project were spent capacity building parts of Sussex in partnership with Action Rural Sussex, however austerity measures, financial cuts and wider interests in the project have seen the project diversify its income streams and reach across research, commissioned contracts and international projects. Community 21 facilitate engagement and collaboration between creative students and staff at the University of Brighton, whist addressing community and societal issues co-designing tools, resources and innovative solutions working with community service organisations and communities of need. They facilitate design thinking sessions, carry out research and have a 'Tool box' of creative and digital resources. Projects to date focus around community led planning, utilising accessible digital tools and technology to aid this process and developing resilient communities. The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research Our team provided support and guidance to Community 21 which included a needs and strengths analysis; participation in a community of practice with other similar partnerships; training and capacity building
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided help to the Community 21 collaboration to enable it to consider how a future partnership would work best
Impact Key opportunities • The partnership has developed significant projects and products, has the potential to generate income from a range of sources and can mobilise teams to deliver high quality work. • The overall model has found some level of internal and external routine after operating for 7 years and building a strong track record and reputation with a broad range of partners. • They have developed a range of virtual, digital and real world tools which are potentially scalable and adaptable for a wide range of applications and audiences. • Research impact as evidenced by inclusion as a case study in REF 14
Start Year 2017
 
Description Ignite! Worthing - Improving the Wellbeing of Children 
Organisation West Sussex Parent Carer Forum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership was made possible by the SEE-PER (2) funding that enabled Ignite - a 12 month incubator programme to find and foster seven community-university partnerships. This development programme was devised, developed and delivered centrally by the University of Brighton's Community University Partnership Programme - CUPP - - in collaboration with researchers from across the institution and community partners. The individual partnerships were co-developed by academic researchers from the University of Brighton and a range of community partners. All their activities were co-produced with mutual benefits.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact The academic team and community partners undertook the following activities: - Carried out a literature review on children's emotional wellbeing including local data. - Showcased great things already happening in the community across a broad range of places - GP Surgery, Community Housing Project, Town Council, Wellbeing Therapists, Mental Health Provider. - Held two town-wide multi-stakeholder events, including parents, carers, teachers, GPs, commissioners, service managers, district councillors, therapists and town dignitaries who have identified a need to take action to support children's emotional wellbeing for Worthing. - Started a multi-stakeholder mental health prevention group that will sustain the work of the project and is focused on a whole community approach to tackling the drivers of poor mental health in children and young people. - Led the development of a community of practice made up of people who want to share knowledge around these issues and take action together to support children's emotional wellbeing. - Created impact by developing new relationships with strategic health commissioners, town council and other community partners. - Developing a pocketbook guide for local parents and carers on how to support children's emotional wellbeing, plus a list of local resources. - Presented partnership project at various events including a GP-School meeting. - Presented findings at a community psychology conference.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Loneliness and the Living Lab 
Organisation The Bevendean Community Pub (The Bevy)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This partnership was made possible by the SEE-PER (2) funding that enabled Ignite - a 12 month incubator programme to find and foster seven community-university partnerships. This development programme was devised, developed and delivered centrally by the University of Brighton's Community University Partnership Programme - CUPP - - in collaboration with researchers from across the institution and community partners. The individual partnerships were co-developed by academic researchers from the University of Brighton and a range of community partners. All their activities were co-produced with mutual benefits.
Collaborator Contribution As above
Impact • Developed a Living Lab consistent with the aim for "User-centred, open innovation ecosystems based on systematic user co-creation approach, integrating research and innovation processes in real life communities and settings" (European Network of Living Labs -https://enoll.org/about-us/). • In the past, it took the researcher 12 months to establish a Living Lab. Working with a community partner, it has taken only 12 weeks as part of the Ignite programme. • This, as far as we know, is the first Living Lab to be established in a community pub. • Ran sessions to explore loneliness locally including identifying key volunteers - the 'Community Connectors'. • Trialled a new community group. • Working with company Kraydel (https://www.kraydel.com) on a protocol for trialling a telecommunication device to engage isolated citizens that will help sustain the project and partnership.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Monitoring and Evaluation Impact (MEI) 
Organisation Brighton and Hove Community Works
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution A research based community of practice for the community and voluntary sector to develop its approaches to low cost effective evaluation. The partnership was formed through Community Works approaching CUPP to discuss a live issue for groups around choosing and working with data management systems. The Monitoring, Evaluation and Impact (MEI) Partnership and project began in June 2014 in response to a capacity building need identified by voluntary and community sector (VCS) organisations in Brighton and Hove. The partnership was initiated by Community Works brokered by CUPP and responded to by the School of Applied Social Science at the University of Brighton. The partnership brings together academic knowledge of data collection, analysis and research ethics with VCS intelligence and expertise in attending to people's needs in diverse settings. The aim was to 'make data work', relieving the burden and bureaucracy experienced around monitoring, evaluation and data management. To this end, 68 voluntary and community organisations were consulted between 2014 and 2016. Organisations described the challenges they face when working with data in their organisations and within the 'encounters' or 'moments of contact' they have with the people they support. The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research. Our team has helped the partnership assess its strengths and needs; participate in a community of practice and participate in training and mentoring
Collaborator Contribution Community works are the strategic body for the voluntary sector in Brighton and Hove and Adur and they contributed their knowledge of sector needs and their membership contacts
Impact Key opportunities • Tools, resources and support have been developed by the team which have created 3 key areas of strength: • Data sources and technologies • Voice and influence • Space for reflection and dialogue
Start Year 2017
 
Description New Note Orchestra 
Organisation New Note Projects
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The partnership developed after UoB staff member Conall Gleeson approached New Note, a local start-up charity, to see if he could offer some support and expertise. New Note previously had little knowledge of or connection to UoB. New Note is an award winning charity which uses music to help people who have faced addiction issues. Their musicians have faced many barriers including homelessness, isolation and mental health issues. They use music to reconnect to themselves, their families and the wider community. The partnership has been very successful and impactful in a short space of time and has remained as a mutually useful partnership/relationship. Conall has become Artistic Director on a voluntary basis with New Note and Molly has enabled links to the local community, in curricular enrichment, event management and shared expertise as part of an EU conference. As victims of their own success they need guidance to understand the possibilities, opportunities and direction they could go in future to develop their longer term vision, income generation options and capacity. They now have a successful 3 year track record which has attracted local and national recognition and media attention which is potentially transferrable to other communities of need. The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research. Our team has enabled a strengths and needs analysis to take place; participation in a community of practice; training and mentoring to develop the partnership
Collaborator Contribution New note have provided working experience of supporting people recovering from substance abuse via music.
Impact Key opportunities • This partnership has delivered a wide range of outcomes including developing key activities which include music groups for people recovering from or affected by addiction • Public events to showcase new work and reduce stigma around addition and recovery • Educational enrichment including in-curricular sessions at the University of Brighton to enhance undergraduate learning • Knowledge and learning dissemination through conferences - sharing knowledge and expertise as part of workshops during the Erasmus 'Music Dare' conference attended by delegates from across the EU.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Older people - wellbeing and participation 
Organisation Age UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Dr Lizzie Ward (UoB) and Dr Beatrice Gahagan from Age UK have developed numerous collaborative research projects. The partnership was originated by Age UK and demonstrates an example of where a project can be initiated and a legacy then built upon the original idea. It shows how new researchers/partners with the right skills and values can take projects on and expand them. The first project, funded by CUPP in 2008, was about older people and alcohol and engaged a range of agencies with an interest in this area. It aimed to try out involving older people as co researchers in the design and delivery of research and to develop collaborative methods. From the success of this, a subsequent project was funded by Age Concern and University of Brighton The overall aim was to produce resources to help those working with older people and develop ethical practice to enhance wellbeing. What this really means is promoting good practice with a heightened awareness of all the things that might be important in enabling people to 'be well' as they grow older. Participatory research was designed so that older people could talk about what wellbeing means to them, and what helps them experience a sense of wellbeing. This was carried out by a team of trained older people, university researchers and a voluntary sector manager. A format for creating highly engaging and participatory methods for older people was developed to enable them to have a voice, a practical role in research and influence policy decisions about them. A film, a handbook and older people's researcher training programme were also produced The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research. During this partnership our team has enabled a strengths and needs analysis; participation in a community of practice, and provided training and mentoring
Collaborator Contribution The partner has utilised their experiential knowledge of working with older people to inform the development of the partnership
Impact Key opportunities • This has been a trailblazing initiative which created new methods of 'Co-research when this was still a new concept. • It demonstrates an example of where projects can be initiated by one set of people and the legacy can be developed by another. The model is now being replicated, expanded and refined in partnership with universities in Birmingham and Lincoln. • Over the lifetime of the partnership they have secured over £810,000.00, generated through several phases of work. Resources have been mainly through HE and Academic investment including CUPP, ESRC, Rising Stars, SEED and the Wellcome Trust. • Research and policy is changing as a result of older people's views, voices and experience. Community insight is informing future policy. • They are achieving success and recognition as a REF impact case study. • There is scope to ramp up their knowledge sharing, dissemination activities, policy development and work involving older people as experts by experience - especially with the public sector and statutory agencies. • As a very strong partnership, with aligned values and synergy between theoretical frameworks such as Ethic of Care and the person centred value practice base of the community partner, the partners have developed useful practical ways to help overcome some of the challenges and bureaucracy involved with delivering programmes in partnership with a university.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Our City - Community Solutions to the Housing Crisis 
Organisation Brighton and Hove Community Land Trust
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution This partnership was made possible by the SEE-PER (2) funding that enabled Ignite - a 12 month incubator programme to find and foster seven community-university partnerships. This development programme was devised, developed and delivered centrally by the University of Brighton's Community University Partnership Programme - CUPP - - in collaboration with researchers from across the institution and community partners. The individual partnerships were co-developed by academic researchers from the University of Brighton and a range of community partners. All their activities were co-produced with mutual benefits.
Collaborator Contribution As above
Impact • In the run up to the local elections, the partners hosted a hustings that resulted in cross-party support for community housing. • Secured from the council two new sites for community housing and cross-party support to find a further eight. • Recruited an ESRC-funded PhD student to work on the history of co-operative housing in Brighton. • Held an international conference with academics working with community partners to address the housing crisis in their localities. • Set up an international network of academics working with their communities to address the housing crisis and sustain the project work. • Held a local event for communities on community-led housing in Brighton. • Developed a significant research funding bid to sustain the work of the project.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Waste House 
Organisation Freegle
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Brighton Waste House - The development of a 'living laboratory' for ecological architectural design also supported by the private sector led by Duncan Baker Brown and Cat Fletcher. The Brighton Waste House, which is a permanent building now complete on the University of Brighton (UoB) campus, investigates strategies for constructing a contemporary, low energy, permanent building using over 85% 'waste' material drawn from household and construction sites. It is the brain child of Duncan Baker Brown (UoB) and Cat Fletcher (Freegle) who have evolved the concept and disseminated the learning since 1994, having developed previous projects of a similar nature. The partnership related to this funding started in 2017 when we selected 7 established community university partnerships to be part of this research. Our team enabled a needs and assets analysis of the partnership to take place; participation in a community of practice; training and mentoring
Collaborator Contribution Freegle provided waste materials for the waste house project and brought their experiential knowledge of sourcing waste to the partnership
Impact • Utilisation of the Waste House itself for research, teaching, enterprise and community benefit • Youth engagement & employability and skills dev-360 students involved via partnerships with Brighton & Home College. Making use of Apprenticeships UoB PHD Student monitoring • Research impact around waste use and environment • Educational resources for school aged learners • Significant Media Attention through Grand Designs • Significant corporate backing and sponsorship via Mears Group and many others plus a live funding call out.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Community of practice of community-university partnerships 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact We ran a social learning group (community of practice) for 7 established community university partnerships at the University of Brighton. Each partnership was represented by an academic and community lead. We ran 3 events to enable participants to share their learning with each other, and a day's training on developing their partnerships. We also conducted an assets and needs analysis with each partnership and provided bespoke support on the basis of this. This provided useful learning for the individual partnerships but also enabled us to codify a programme for partnership development. We have used this, alongside our historical expertise to design a 12 month incubator programme for new community university partnerships that we are running in 2019 with our 2nd year of SEE-PER funding
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.brighton.ac.uk/business-services/community-partnerships/index.aspx
 
Description Ignite Guide 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following the development and delivery of Ignite - a 12 month incubator programme for finding and fostering new community-university partnerships - an online guide will be produced. This will be an interactive and engaging resource to share the learning from the Ignite programme with other institutions in the UK and around the world. It will include step-by-step guidance on the Ignite processes as well as case studies and films.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Ignite Report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following the end of the SEE-PER2 funding, the University of Brighton produced a report summarising the activities and impact of the Ignite programme. This has been well received by UKRI and NCCPE and the latter is planning to publish this report on it's website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Public and Community engagement : 7 Ignite partnerships 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact All 7 community-university partnerships undertook a range of events engaging with different stakeholders. For the details of individual partnerships see collaborations and partnerships section.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description SEE-PER2 - Engage Conference Ignite Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The CUPP Development Manager co-produced a one-hour Engage Conference workshop on the Ignite programme with the community and research partners for Making the Arts More Accessible. There was a lot of interest in the ignite programme and the forthcoming guide.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description SEE-PER2 - Ignite YouTube films. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We are finalising the production of a suite of short YouTube films on five of the Ignite partnerships. They will be available on the University of Brighton website and YouTube. We will be posting the web address here in due course.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020