Understandings of the young sexual body

Lead Research Organisation: University of Greenwich
Department Name: Sch of Health and Social Care

Abstract

The seminar series will develop inter-professional understandings of young people's sexual bodies across key policy areas. It will do so through facilitating a creative dialogue between academics and practitioners, recognising that they often approach these issues from different perspectives, with different constraints and with different desired outcomes. A key difference stems from the very different world views of social scientists and medical scientists. In particular, social and cultural factors are not always fully recognised within biomedical literature (Einsten and Shildrick 2009). Einsten and Shildrick have further suggested that since the 1970s sociological feminist health theory and women's health practice have developed different understandings of the body, and they call for dialogue and openness between social scientists and clinicians around the subject of the body in healthcare provision. This series will promote such a dialogue as a starting point, and will then target a number of key policy areas in relation to young people's sexual bodies. These are: contraception and reproduction; sexual violence and bullying; sexualisation; sex and relationships education; and sexual behaviour and sexuality.

The series will draw on cutting edge research on young people's sexual health, relationships, sex education, and the role of media, popular culture, commerce and technologies in the construction of different understandings of the young sexual body. It will draw together two groups: firstly: leading academics, early career researchers and PhD students working in the key fields of childhood and youth studies, health and social policy, sexuality, sexual exploitation, sex and relationships education, and media and communication studies; and secondly: practitioners and agencies dealing with young people's sexual health and education in the UK (for example, Brook, Education for Choice, British Pregnancy Advisory Service, Sex Education Forum) and GPs and clinicians. A core group of ten participants constructed from these two groups will ensure continuity of discussion and learning throughout the series. The series will also build on a previous series funded by the ESRC (2010-2011): 'Pornified: complicating debates on the sexualization of culture'. Organisers of an AHRC funded research network, 'Onscenity', will also be participating.

This series thus aims to foster partnerships, and creative dialogue, between leading academics and practitioners broadly concerned with young people's sexualities and sexual health. Further, it aims to include front-line practitioners' experiences and perspectives within this dialogue so it is a dynamic interactive two-way process The seminar series aims to enable and explore joint understandings. Insights generated through current theoretically informed applied social research will be examined in the light of educational and clinical issues concerning young people's sexualities and sexual health. The series will question what we understand by young people's sexual bodies, and what kinds of diverse sexual behaviours exist. It will explore the notion of difference through locating different sexual bodies and behaviours within diverse social and cultural contexts and it will consider how gender, race, ethnicity, age, ability, class, and religious 'norms' impact on these. It will also examine notions of choice in relation to concerns such as bodily control, reproductive rights and sexual freedom. Key concepts such as risk, desire, safety, innocence, promiscuity, empowerment, and agency will be explored and critiqued. Discussions will focus on developing a grounded understanding of all these issues and their implications for young people's lives.

A website, final report and other publications will be used to disseminate the findings of the series to as wide an audience as possible. The overall aim is to facilitate the impact of applied social research in the policy areas being analysed.

Planned Impact

A wide range of non-academic professionals and practitioners are likely to benefit from the proposed seminar series. These include: health care professionals, sex and sexual health educators; social care professionals; GPs; clinicians; youth workers; and charities and other organizations representing and/or supporting young people. Representatives from all these groups have attended a previous Sexual Health Research and Practice Conference at the University of Greenwich, and all have expressed an interest in learning about how applied social research can improve their practice. This is a key objective of the seminar series, and we have already invited a number of such practitioners as participants and speakers (as detailed in the Pathways ti Impact). Discussions will cover a number of themes including the relationships between different social and cultural contexts; young people's experiences and expectations; and the role of education in preparing young people for sexual relationships, adolescence and adulthood.
As our case for support outlines, the seminar series will take place in a context of anxieties about the young sexual body. These anxieties incorporate fears about the growing 'sexualization' of young people, reports of sexual violence and exploitation, and continuing concerns about unintentional pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. These are just some of the issues that practitioners, and policy-makers, are grappling with. The seminar series will address these, and other relevant, issues from academic and practitioner perspectives. The Errant Body seminar, for example, will investigate at least three key (under-researched) questions that practitioners working in contraceptive and sexual health settings are asking: why are increasing numbers of young women presenting for repeat abortions? Why are young women who do not want to become pregnant not taking emergency contraception following an incident of 'unprotected' sex? Why do so many young women have a contraceptive implant removed within one year of having it fitted? Each of the seminars has been carefully designed around a set of issues that are of concern to practitioners, and are currently being addressed in academic research.
The series will also benefit policy-makers and commissioners as improved understandings of these issues can influence that way in which professionals and agencies design policy interventions; as well as encouraging academics to recognize policy and practical constraints in their research plans and recommendations. Outputs from the series will help agencies and practitioners develop more effective practice. Finally, the participation of the sexual health programme leaders from the University of Greenwich and Anglia Ruskin University will ensure that lessons learnt will be incorporated into sexual health practitioners' training.
Services for young people are often driven by the needs to achieve targets and prevent 'risky' sexual behaviour. Young people, however, may have different priorities and needs that can undermine much of the rationale underpinning policy and provision. The seminar series will enable discussion of innovative and flexible approaches to the exploration of the issues and needs relevant to young people. It will also facilitate collaborations between practitioners and academics that will feed into the provision of services to young people.
The series will see the development of a web-based resource which will be widely publicised via existing academic/professional networks and which will realise the series' potential for ensuring that future research builds on existing knowledge and good practice. The results of the seminar series will also be presented as a report outlining differences, continuities and pressing issues across academic disciplines and practitioner boundaries and will be disseminated to charities, education groups, policy makers and youth organizations.

Publications

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Dickson J (2014) Unanticipated bleeding with the etonogestrel implant: advice and therapeutic interventions. in The journal of family planning and reproductive health care

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Hoggart L (2017) 'Repeat abortion', a phrase to be avoided? Qualitative insights into labelling and stigma. in The journal of family planning and reproductive health care

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Hoggart L (2017) Collaboration or collusion? Involving research users in applied social research in Women's Studies International Forum

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Marecek J (2017) Abortion in legal, social, and healthcare contexts in Feminism & Psychology

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Newton VL (2015) Hormonal contraception and regulation of menstruation: a study of young women's attitudes towards 'having a period'. in The journal of family planning and reproductive health care

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Renold E (2014) Horse-girl assemblages: towards a post-human cartography of girls' desire in an ex-mining valleys community in Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
ES/J02208X/1 01/11/2012 28/10/2013 £13,586
ES/J02208X/2 Transfer ES/J02208X/1 29/10/2013 30/11/2014 £4,048
 
Title Just good friends? 
Description This is a 10 minute drama addressing the hetero-sexualisation of boy-girl friendships and the sexism and heterosexism of playground cultures in the last year of primary school. The script was created by one year 10 pupil and supported by pupils in the school-based anti-homophobia group DIGON ('enough' in welsh). Every quote is a direct quote from the research findings: "Boys and Girls Speak Out: A Qualitative Study of Children's Gender and Sexual Cultures". 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This drama was performed by DIGON (anti-homophobia group, Plasmawr High School) in Welsh and English to: 1) The launch of the research "Boys and Girls Speak Out: a qualitative study into children's gender and sexual cultures" (2013) was performed at the launch event in the Pierhead Building, Cardiff Bay, in front of AM's, policy-makers, practitioners, other academics and senior staff from NSPCC and other third-sector organisations. (December 2013) 2) For the Welsh education minister Huw Lewis at the launch of the Welsh Government's anti-bullying competition (October 2014) http://wales.gov.uk/newsroom/educationandskills/2014/141008ministerlaunchesantibullyingfilmcompetition/?lang=en 3) At the children's conference for over 100 Year 6 children, "Girls and Boys Speak Out! A Conference for Children, Teachers, Researchers and Policy Makers on gender well-being and young relationship cultures" (July 2014) 
URL http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/socsi/2013/12/09/research-on-pre-teen-experiences-of-sexism-receives-nati...
 
Title Mis(s) Seen 
Description The research finding, "Boys and Girls Speak Out: a qualitative study into children's gender and sexual cultures" were interpreted by students who worked over 6 weeks with Professor Emma Renold as part of their 'Merched Mentrus' activities (girl power/feminist school group) from Ysgol Gyfun Plasmawr. The group created a poem on the sexual objectification of girls' bodies and a short drama piece on the pressures of compulsory heterosexuality in children's friendship cultures. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This drama was performed by Merched Mentrus (girls power/feminist group, Plasmawr High School) in Welsh and English to: 1) The poem was performed at the launch of the research "Boys and Girls Speak Out: a qualitative study into children's gender and sexual cultures" (2013) in the Pierhead Building, Cardiff Bay, in front of AM's, policy-makers, practitioners, other academics and senior staff from NSPCC and other third-sector organisations. (December 2013) 2) Emma Renold negotiated with The Telegraph, and the poem was published in full, and credited to the research, on 3) At the children's conference for over 100 Year 6 children, "Girls and Boys Speak Out! A Conference for Children, Teachers, Researchers and Policy Makers on gender well-being and young relationship cultures" (July 2014) 
URL http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/socsi/2013/12/09/research-on-pre-teen-experiences-of-sexism-receives-nati...
 
Title MyBodyMyLife exhibition and website 
Description This is a travelling exhibition designed as a public engagement activity to challenge abortion stigma. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Women who have had an abortion who visit the exhibition report reduced internalised abortion stigma. We have also had favourable press coverage including pieces in the Independent, Buzzfeed and the Metro. 
URL http://mybody-mylife.org/
 
Title abortion films 
Description Four short films on young women's experiences of abortion. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact These films will form the centre piece of an abortion storytelling installation (if funded). They will also be available on the MSI, bpas, and fpa webpages. 
URL http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/public-health/my-abortion-experience-d...
 
Description This award is for a seminar series so we do not have research findings per se. But we do have one finding: successful partnerships between academics and practitioners can be developed through an academic seminar series. We have developed practitioner/academia partnerships in the course of this series. Participation has been very successful. Each seminar successfully brought together key stakeholders from government and industry including practitioners (teachers, doctors, youth workers, trainers) expert groups, NGOs and, postgraduates and early career researchers, leading academics across disciplines, and international scholarly experts to explore young people and issues of health, education and sexuality in detail.
Exploitation Route We have a number of partnerships that have been developed as a result of the seminar series. In particular, we have a large collaboration working on an ESRC IAA KE Dialogues award 1609-DIAL-252 and a further IAA Award: Abortion Stories: showing and telling: Project reference: 1702-KEA-264. Some of these collaborators have also secured a Wellcome Trust project 'Normative female sexuality and abortion stigma: a feasibility study using qualitative secondary analysis', Grant Reference: 207878/Z/17/Z.
Sectors Healthcare

URL http://www.open.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/research/understanding-young-sexual-body/
 
Description The impact of findings from the seminar series is difficult to measure, though we have a number of outputs that can be at least partially attributed to the series, and we have a number of ongoing partnerships that can be directly attributed to the series. Applicants have been involved in contributing to government guidance and policy development on sexualisation, sex education, sexual health and online safety in England (Government Equalities Office, Body Confidence Campaign, Department of Health, Public Health England) and Wales (Welsh Assembly Government). Applicants have also been active in co-production of training materials and pedagogy with practitioners. As a direct result from our collaborations with international keynote, Rasmussen (Australia) in Seminar 3, we have been commissioned to co-ordinate the chapters on pedagogic practice for the young sexual bodies in a new International Handbook of Sexuality Education (Routledge forthcoming). Research dissemination channels developed for the seminar series played an important role in the dissemination of research findings for all applicants. They were utilised by Hoggart, for example, for abortion and contraceptive research dissemination that had an impact recognised in the 2014 REF entry for the University of Greenwich where it formed an impact case study for UoA3. papers presented in the series by Hoggart and by Newton prompted partnerships that helped facilitate a number of impacts mentioned in the case study. These included: 'the delivery of a public service has changed' where we noted that there has been a change in contraceptive counselling practice in a number of local areas (eg Greenwich, Hillingdon) where women are now given more information about all possible side-effects of the contraceptive implant, and also advised to return to the clinic as soon as they become concerned about side effects, and that therapeutic interventions can be offered to alleviate bleeding-related side-effects. These changes have been recommended at training workshops conducted by Jane Dickson (consultant in sexual health) throughout the country. A second relevant impact in the case study was that 'Professional training has been influenced by the research'. Again this was facilitated by partnerships emerging from the seminar series. Hoggart and Newton have worked closely with partners to incorporate the findings of their long acting contraceptive research into practitioner training and thus maximise the impact of the research in clinical practice. Papers from the series have been published in the practitioner journals, Journal for Family Planning and Reproductive Healthcare and Contraception. Other papers have been published in the journal Sexualities, and a special issue on queer sexualities in Discourse: Cultural Politics of Education and the forthcoming edited collection, 'Children, Sexuality and The Sexualisation of Culture' (Renold, Ringrose and Egan). Further academic publications are noted in the Publications section for this award. Jessica Ringrose and Emma Renolds (along with Alison Phipps and Carolyn Jackson) have had a special issue approved for Journal of Gender Studies. This is a direct outcome of the collaboration between the one day event (led by Jessica Ringrose), 'Researching Girls' Sexualities: Materiality, Affect and the Digital'; which the seminar series partially supported. The special issue for the journal is: 'Rape culture, Laddism and Everyday Sexism: New Mediations of Gender and Sexual Violence'. We have at least four on-going academic/practitioner partnerships (specified in the collaborations and partnerships) that were formed as a result of the series. We anticipate further research and development activities, and societal and cultural impact to arise from the activities of these partnerships. Finally, networks first developed in this seminar series have led to the development of a programme of impact activities being developed by Hoggart, also specified in collaborations in partnerships, which include making four abortion films, and have culminated in an application for an ESRC Impact Acceleration Award for an Abortion Storytelling installation. This application was successful, and the resulting touring exhibition, MyBodyMyLife, has appeared in Edinburgh, Oxford, Belfast and London. A booklet of abortion stories has been adopted by bpas, the largest abortion provider in the UK, and is available in all its clinics. This impact work has since won two prizes in 2018: Runner up for the Open University's Outstanding Impact of Research on Society and Prosperity Award; and Highly Commended award for Excellence in Impact in the O2RB Excellence in Impact Awards run by Oxford University. Partnerships developed during the original award have also resulted in a successful Wellcome Trust seedcorn bid on exploring abortion stigma through secondary analysis of existing data sets.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Healthcare
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Co-founder of Welsh Government cross-party group, "Children, Sexualities, Sexualisation and Equalities"
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact Two invited presentations at the Senedd to inform the Welsh Government's policy on children and 'sexualisation'; to inform the first stages of the Welsh Government 'Gender-based violence, sexual abuse and domestic violence' bill; and to inform the Welsh Government's Curriculum Review (PSE in particular).
URL http://www.senedd.assembly.wales/mgOutsideBodyDetails.aspx?ID=289
 
Description Invited presentation for cross-party group, Children, Sexualities, Sexualisation and Equalities
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL http://www.senedd.assembly.wales/documents/s28322/Minutes%20of%206%20May%202014.pdf
 
Description Invited presentation to welsh government cross-party group, Violence Against Women and Children
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
URL http://www.senedd.assembly.wales/documents/s28323/Minutes%20of%2029%20April%202014.html?CT=2
 
Description Membership of All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sexual Health
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Research and expertise on sexualisation and violence in pre-teen relationships cultures cited by Assembly Member in First Minister's questions
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guidance committee
URL http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/socsi/2014/05/30/socsi-research-findings-used-in-questions-to-first-minis...
 
Description Written and verbal evidence for Welsh Government's Gender-based violence, sexual abuse and domestic violence bill
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL http://www.senedd.assembly.wales/documents/s30792/17%20September%202014%20-%20Draft.html?CT=2
 
Description Commissioned Research
Amount £138,000 (GBP)
Organisation Bayer 
Department Bayer HealthCare
Sector Private
Country Germany
Start 03/2014 
End 09/2015
 
Description Commissioned dissemination of research findings
Amount £27,000 (GBP)
Organisation Bayer 
Department Bayer HealthCare
Sector Private
Country Germany
Start 10/2015 
End 01/2016
 
Description KE Dialogues Award
Amount £2,500 (GBP)
Funding ID 1609-DIAL-252 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description Abortion story-telling 
Organisation Ulster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This partnership forms the core of a number of impact activities and also further research funding applications. We have submitted (with a range of non academic partners) for an impact acceleration award; and also for a Wellcome Trust seed award on abortion story telling, abortion stigma, public engagement, and provider intervention.
Collaborator Contribution We have worked collaboratively on all these applications, through workshops, meetings, and on-line collaboration.
Impact Application for ESRC Impact Acceleration Award Application (to be submitted March 16th 2017) to Wellcome Trust seed award in sexualities.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Abortion story-telling 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Department Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This partnership forms the core of a number of impact activities and also further research funding applications. We have submitted (with a range of non academic partners) for an impact acceleration award; and also for a Wellcome Trust seed award on abortion story telling, abortion stigma, public engagement, and provider intervention.
Collaborator Contribution We have worked collaboratively on all these applications, through workshops, meetings, and on-line collaboration.
Impact Application for ESRC Impact Acceleration Award Application (to be submitted March 16th 2017) to Wellcome Trust seed award in sexualities.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Adolescent girls' negotiating sexualization 
Organisation City University of New York (CUNY)
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The goals of the "Girls Negotiating Sexualization" project are two-fold. The first is to document, from girls themselves, the ways they describe and navigate sexualization, attending both to online and offline contexts. The second is to compare patterns of how girls discuss, reproduce, resist and challenge-navigate and negotiate-sexualization of girls (a psychological lens) and of society (a sociological lens) across two countries, the US and the UK. Comparing these two countries is especially important, as US and UK feminist scholars rely on and utilize scholarship from each other, without having investigated what national differences there might be. Within the US and the UK, we conducted one focus group with White, economically privileged girls each and one focus group with marginalized girls of color each, yielding a total of four focus groups.
Collaborator Contribution The partnership was established through a seminar in the Young Sexual Bodies seminar series
Impact Deborah Tolman, Jessica Ringrose, Marisa Ragonese, Race, Class and Sexualization of Girls in the US and the UK: Adolescent Girls 2016 SRA Biennial Meeting, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Start Year 2013
 
Description Intra-uterine contraception in General Practice study 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Two members of the team have collaborated to apply for funding to carry out a study into the Acceptability of Intrauterine Contraception in general Practice
Collaborator Contribution Major partner in application for funding and in carrying out the project
Impact None yet. Research ongoing
Start Year 2013
 
Description Kizzy speaks: using new media to combat exploitation and promote the sexual health of young people 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Together with Dr. Lesley Hoggart and Dr. Victoria Newton at the Open University, I've been collaborating with filmaker Ruth Beni of Animage films on the development of a web-based series aimed to tackle sexual exploitation and abuse among young people and promote sexual health.
Collaborator Contribution Animage Film, with funding from the University of Greenwich produced a trailer and a series outline which is now at the stage of seeking funding for furhter development.
Impact At the moment a trailer and an outline for a series have been produced alongside three episode scripts
Start Year 2012
 
Description Wellcome Trust abortion stigma project 
Organisation Ulster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am Co-I on a successful bid submitted to the Wellcome Trust
Collaborator Contribution We developed the proposal jointly, and we are all contributing qualitative data for secondary analysis and archiving.
Impact Successful bid for funding
Start Year 2016
 
Description Wellcome Trust abortion stigma project 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am Co-I on a successful bid submitted to the Wellcome Trust
Collaborator Contribution We developed the proposal jointly, and we are all contributing qualitative data for secondary analysis and archiving.
Impact Successful bid for funding
Start Year 2016
 
Description abortion research 
Organisation Ulster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked together on preparing research proposals for further research on abortion discourses and abortion stigma. We have written three research proposals jointly, in collaboration.
Collaborator Contribution We have written these proposals jointly, in collaboration. The University of Ulster invited me as a visiting scholar for one moth to develop the proposal in October 2014.
Impact Joint presentation in abortion stigma panel at Abortion and Reproductive Justice international conference at University Prince Edward Island, Canada. August 2014 Proposal on abortion discourse submitted to The Nuffield Foundation in 2013 (unsuccessful) Proposal for an International network on abortion discourse submitted to Leverhulme 2014 (awaiting outcome) proposal on abortion discourse and stigma under development for ESRC Grant application
Start Year 2013
 
Description contraceptive consultation model 
Organisation Anglia Ruskin University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have formed a partnership with Susan Mann of UCL, and Susan Walker of ARU, in order to bring together academics, practitioners and users to develop a model for contraceptive consultations. At present we are scoping the parameters of the project,for which we will apply for research funding. This need was identified during the course of the research seminars, and the partnership was formed as a result of collaborating in the seminar series. This is now a collaboration with Public Health England.
Collaborator Contribution To date, the contributions have been staff time of approximately four days for each of the partners. One of these days was dedicated to a day long workshop, with selected practitioners, to scope the project.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration: social policy, sociology and medicine.
Start Year 2014
 
Description contraceptive consultation model 
Organisation University College London
Department Medical School
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have formed a partnership with Susan Mann of UCL, and Susan Walker of ARU, in order to bring together academics, practitioners and users to develop a model for contraceptive consultations. At present we are scoping the parameters of the project,for which we will apply for research funding. This need was identified during the course of the research seminars, and the partnership was formed as a result of collaborating in the seminar series. This is now a collaboration with Public Health England.
Collaborator Contribution To date, the contributions have been staff time of approximately four days for each of the partners. One of these days was dedicated to a day long workshop, with selected practitioners, to scope the project.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration: social policy, sociology and medicine.
Start Year 2014
 
Description technology and abortion 
Organisation Ulster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have brought together a research partnership to begin the process of developing a collaborative bid to examine the impact of new technologies of reproduction on medical practitioners views and practices with respect to abortion.
Collaborator Contribution At this stage we have just been communicating in order to arrange a workshop (1st December 2015) to develop the contours of the bid. This work has been subsumed into the Wellcome Trust project reported separately. We have changed the focus of the collaboration in order to undertake secondary analysis of our data sets and then we will design an intervention.
Impact Multi-disciplinary: social policy, sociology, social anthropology and medicine.
Start Year 2015
 
Description technology and abortion 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have brought together a research partnership to begin the process of developing a collaborative bid to examine the impact of new technologies of reproduction on medical practitioners views and practices with respect to abortion.
Collaborator Contribution At this stage we have just been communicating in order to arrange a workshop (1st December 2015) to develop the contours of the bid. This work has been subsumed into the Wellcome Trust project reported separately. We have changed the focus of the collaboration in order to undertake secondary analysis of our data sets and then we will design an intervention.
Impact Multi-disciplinary: social policy, sociology, social anthropology and medicine.
Start Year 2015
 
Description technology and abortion 
Organisation University of Plymouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have brought together a research partnership to begin the process of developing a collaborative bid to examine the impact of new technologies of reproduction on medical practitioners views and practices with respect to abortion.
Collaborator Contribution At this stage we have just been communicating in order to arrange a workshop (1st December 2015) to develop the contours of the bid. This work has been subsumed into the Wellcome Trust project reported separately. We have changed the focus of the collaboration in order to undertake secondary analysis of our data sets and then we will design an intervention.
Impact Multi-disciplinary: social policy, sociology, social anthropology and medicine.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Gender well-being and relationship cultures conference for children and teachers (year 6) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This one-day event launched the findings of a Welsh research project that explored what pre-teen children had to say about growing up as 'girls' and 'boys' in the 21st Century. One of the key findings was how angry children felt about having lived in a sexist and sexualised peer culture and society. A key aim of this conference was to provide a platform where boys and girls can have their say and learn what other children think about body image, fashion, bullying, friendships and relationships in school, in communities and online.
Workshops were run by young people (secondary school students) and facilitated by Professor Renold and PhD students focusing on gender/sexuality related topics.

Body Talk (a movement workshop with choreographer, Jen Anghared, Canolfan a Theatr Soar)
- Challenging Gender Stereotyping in Schools (Mark Jennett, Education Consultant, and Co-Ordinator of 'Breaking the Mould' project.)
- Staying safe and having fun online (Andy Phippen, University of Plymouth)
- Just good friends?: a peer-led PSE lesson on relationship cultures (with DIGON, Ysgol Plasmawr)
- Building feelings (Lego workshop on gender stereotypes in the media with FF - NEWID, Ysgol Plasmawr)
- Camping Out (Making gender feel-good shelters in a tent decorating workshop with Emma Renold)

There was also be an opportunity for researchers interested in research impact and public engagement to stay on for a roundtable after the children's conference has finished (led by Professor Emma Renold). This event has now become a case study, with resources and additional activities in the forthcoming AGENDA: A young people's guide to making positive relationships matter (primary school case study) to be launched 2018.

A key outcome of the day was to bridge the silence between children's worlds, and between children and teacher worlds. This was achieved (teacher feedback and pupil feedback)

A key outcome of the day was to enable boys and girls to discuss the pressures of gender stereotypes and combat gender and sexual bullying. This was achieved via feedback from each workshop, and in the children's comments from the 'wall of thoughts' (see pictures on the URL below)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://feminismsinschool.wordpress.com/2014/07/18/girls-and-boys-speak-out-conference/
 
Description Knowledge Exchange Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This was a research presentation, on abortion policy and research, at a Knowledge Exchange Seminar at Stormont, the Northern Ireland Assembly. It sparked discussion on the possibility for legislative changes, and on women's experiences of abortion. Approximately 80 people attended, but the seminar was filmed and placed on the Northern Ireland Assembly webpages.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.niassembly.gov.uk/assembly-business/research-and-information-service-raise/knowledge-exch...
 
Description Post show panel discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 2016: 3rd December. After show panel member at The Courtyard Theatre for a production of 'Out of Silence', a play about women's abortion experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Researching Girls and Sexuality: Affect, the digital and the body 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Girls, sexting and gender politics: making material-discursive space for teens girls as sexual agents (Amy Dobson, Monash University, Australia).

"It just makes you feel so bad".: Girls' embodied experiences of postfeminist popular culture (Sue Jackson, University of Wellington, New zealand)

Pram-face girls: young female sexuality and the management of stigma (Mary Jane Kehily, Open University)

"On the Internet no one knows you're a dog. But on Twitter everyone knows you're a bitch." (Danny Miller, UCL)

Researching the digital and affect (Laura Harvey, University of Surrey and Jessica Ringrose, IOE)

Researching bodies and affect (Beckie Coleman, Goldsmiths University and Emma Renold, Cardiff University)

After the talk we explored ideas for a follow on symposium
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ioe.ac.uk/98688.html
 
Description Science Uncovered event, at the Natural History Museum, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a soap-box event in which researchers discuss their research with members of the public. At least 60 people at various points in the evening approach my stand and enquired about the topic. Approximately 35 people stayed for 15 minutes and engaged in coversation about the topic.

Several members of the public continued to debate the topic with other members for up to an hour.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/community/research/life_sciences_news/lepidoptera/blog/2014/09
 
Description Young sexual bodies symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The symposium consolidated and extended learning from the ESRC seminar series by bringing together practitioners and academics once more in order to facilitate dialogue between practitioners and researchers. Several previous participants (who had not previously presented their work) presented new material at the event, and many previous participants attended the event. There was an even distribution of academics and practitioners and the event received very favourable feedback.

After the event two sub-groups were formed to take forward ideas for future collaborative research. The first on designing a contraceptive consultation model, and the second to work on abortion providers and abortion stigma. Symposium participants also decided that the Reproduction, Sexualities and Health Group at the Open University should organise an annual academic/practitioner symposium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description open access abortion films 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Four abortion films on young women's abortion experiences have been made. These are open access on OpenLearn at present but shortly to be released on YouTube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/health/public-health/my-abortion-experience-d...
 
Description post show discussion panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 2017: 9th February. After show panel member at Battersea Arts Centre for a production of 'I told my mum I was going on an RE trip', a play about young women's abortion experiences
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description practitioner conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation resulted in discussion about professional interaction with women who have more than one abortion

After my talk practitioners from Portsmouth asked me to collaborate in designing a de-stigmatising intervention. We are developing a proposal to be submitted to NIHR or the Society for Family Planning late 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://fiapac.org/en/program/13/authors/