Communicating with Vulnerable Children: Understanding the Everyday Practices of Child and Family Social Workers

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sussex
Department Name: Sch of Education and Social Work

Abstract

When social workers assess allegations of child abuse they are involved in potentially life and death situations. This work, along with the subsequent requirements to protect and promote the wellbeing of vulnerable children, from infancy to adolescence, through accurate and appropriate communicate with them, demands highly developed professional skills. Whilst there is a substantial body of knowledge about the circumstances surrounding social workers' communications with children in the extraordinary contexts of children being seriously harmed or killed, less is known about how social workers communicate with children in ordinary, everyday practice, the challenges they encounter in this process and the sense social workers and children make of these interactions. There is an urgent need for research to be conducted into social workers' communication with children at key points and places in a child's safeguarding and 'looked after' journey. Two such key points include the social worker-child interaction at the point of referral and assessment and in the course of longer-term relationship building if children become 'looked after'. To date we have relied largely on the retrospective reflective accounts of participants in these social worker-child encounters. We have some ideas as to what happens (children are overlooked or inadequately engaged with), how it happens (parents' use of space, and physical presence to exclude child from conversation) and why it happens (time pressures, power, intimidating emotional dynamics, exposure to risk, fear of what might be said and what to do with what is said). Currently what is missing, and the central focus of this study, is the direct observation of social worker-child interactions. To address this gap in knowledge this study will explore how social workers communicate with children in their ordinary, everyday practice and how the social workers and children involved in these encounters experience and understand them.
The research will take place in two specific settings to encompass communication that takes place across a range of key social work tasks with children: firstly, in the reactive domain of frontline assessment teams, where relationships with children have to be developed rapidly, and secondly, in the more controlled environment of teams working with 'looked after' children in foster, residential or kinship care, where there is the potential for longer-term relationships. The project will have three phases. Phase one will be located in assessment teams in four local authorities across the four UK nations and will involve observations of practice and semi-structured interviews with social workers. In phase two social workers and looked after children in two local authorities will be videoed when meeting to review the child's care arrangements and the video will be used in interviews with children and workers to stimulate their reflections on the meeting. These data will be complemented by a small scale participatory video project with children involved in the study. Phase 3 involves the development of dissemination and training tools, utilising the data from the first two phases, plus videoed discussions of the findings with groups of practitioners from the four local authorities involved in phase 1.
The findings will make an important original contribution to:
-social work policy and practice in national and international settings
-qualifying and post-qualifying social work education
-inter-professional work with vulnerable children
-social science knowledge

Impact will be realised in different, complementary ways:
-digital and paper-based resource packages for professional training and development
-academic and professional conference presentations;
-publications in academic and professional journals;
-academic-practice knowledge exchange activities.
-enhanced professional knowledge and skills of practice and research participants

Planned Impact

The study will address two of the three economic and societal impacts identified by Research Councils UK. These are:

1) Increasing the effectiveness of public services and policy: The project will make a contribution to knowledge and skills in relation to social work with children and young people as well as to knowledge about obstacles and opportunities in terms of communicating with vulnerable children more broadly.
2) Enhancing quality of life, health and creative output: The project will have a direct impact on those who take part in it (social workers and children), and will be of benefit to many more through the project's knowledge exchange activities. It is likely to be welcomed throughout the UK and beyond, as those working with vulnerable children struggle to find attuned ways of communicating with them. Similarly, the innovative method and tools will be readily transferable to other research and practice projects centred on work with children.

Who will benefit from this research?

Impacts are anticipated for different groupings of non-academic and academic beneficiaries:
- Children and young people and practitioners who take part in the research project
- Children and young people who receive interventions and services
- Those working in multi-disciplinary settings with children, e.g. social workers, teachers, school counsellors, early year providers, children and youth workers, child health professionals
- Those concerned with child welfare and child and family social work at a policy and management level, e.g. local and national policy makers and managers of children's services in both statutory and voluntary agencies.
- Social work academics and academics from other social science and professional disciplines.

How will they benefit from the research?

The study will have a differential impact according to levels of participation in the project:
- Those who are involved as members of the advisory group in developing the research study's design,tools and dissemination strategy will experience an immediate impact (practitioners, policy makers, care experienced young people) in terms of learning about research and its application to practice.
- The study will have a medium level impact on those who take part in the research as participants (social workers and children and young people). This includes being provided with the opportunity to reflect on their experiences.
- All those who take part in the knowledge exchange activities (seminars and events), who access the articles and summaries and who use the practitioner training materials will also experience some impact. This includes increased knowledge and skills.
- There is a potential for long-term and secondary impacts on children and young people about whom there are welfare concerns. They should benefit from better facilitation of their ability to express their views and better understanding of their needs, wishes and experiences by practitioners. This should lead to more accurate assessments of risk and need and better targeted provision of services.
- The research team will benefit from enhanced research experience and skills and the broader academic community will benefit from substantive and methodological developments.

Publications

10 25 50

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
ES/K006134/1 18/07/2013 31/03/2015 £414,010
ES/K006134/2 Transfer ES/K006134/1 01/04/2015 31/05/2016 £132,736
 
Description The 'Talking and Listening to Children' research study (2014-2016) is a UK-wide research project that has generated detailed evidence of everyday communicative encounters of social workers' communication with children involved in the child protection system and identified the barriers and enablers to attuned communication. Using ethnographic methods (observations of visits and in offices) and video-stimulated recall to prompt reflections from social workers and children the project has filled important gaps in knowledge by highlighting, through direct observation, the complex and challenging nature of the communicative task. The final phase of the project has involved building an interactive website with digital learning materials embedded in it, designed to support practitioners' continuing professional development. The research has generated important new knowledge that will contribute to enhancements in the quality of social work education, practice and policy and in so doing improve children's experiences of practice and practice outcomes.
The study's three main findings are:
i) The complex, context specific 'ecology of communication'.
The characteristics of the work social workers undertake - namely the child, case and context - both influence and serve as the backdrop for communication between social workers and children; moreover, the project has highlighted that communication is less important than the relationship between child and social worker, because a 'good' relationship will forgive a 'poor' communicative encounter (Winter & Cree, 2015; Winter et al, 2016). In so doing it has underlined the importance of social workers having sufficient time and appropriate resources to establish and sustain meaningful relationships that acknowledge the complex uniqueness of each child's circumstances.

ii) The skilled nature of social workers' practice with children.
The research has provided detailed evidence of the highly skilled and demanding nature of communicating with vulnerable and at risk children and their families, which requires well-honed communication skills and professional capabilities. Social pedagogy and the concepts of 'framing', 'footing' and alignment, associated with Goffman's work, have been identified as helpful theoretical frameworks for making sense of and improving child-centred social work communication practices.

iii) Power of children's agency.
To date the capacity of children to exercise power - to be agentic - has been under-recognised within child care social work practice. This research, with its children's rights perspective, has highlighted how children can, and do, exercise their agency in a range of ways and that the child's agentic power can be enhanced if practitioners are alert to it.
Exploitation Route Academic impact and outputs include:
i) a range of conference papers and symposia, already delivered and planned, to national and European audiences to practice-based audiences.

ii) peer reviewed journal papers (two already published)

iii) development of research-informed curriculum material of social work qualifying and continuing professional development programmes, using the digital and written resources generated from the project.

Non-academic impact and outputs include:
i) the provision of a high quality, research informed digital professional development materials, free to all users, aimed at improving and enhancing social workers' communication skills

ii) delivery of a range of keynote presentations and workshops to practice-based audiences, including to local authorities who participated in the research, aimed at enhancing practice and having a positive impact on children's experiences of services from those service providers.

iii) the delivery of a bespoke IAA funded TLC continuing professional development programme introducing the professional development materials to practitioners from to local authorities, that will include mechanisms for tracking the impact of the programme on on-going practice and for informing strategies for expanding the take up and impact of the materials.

iv) a multi faceted impact IAA funded project working with: Scottish Govt and key policymakers to contribute to the developing policy agenda about child protection in Scotland more broadly; senior managers, frontline managers and practitioners to disseminate the project findings and to create space for practitioners across the statutory, voluntary and private sectors to explore with each other and with researchers what is and isn't working in child protection, building from examples of good practice in changing culture and in communicating with children; service users and the public more widely to generate a conversation about the role and task of statutory child protection with a view to co-creating positive child protection practice;
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy

 
Description The TLC project is in the early stages of implementing an ambitious impact strategy that currently includes: i) A wide range of academic and practice-based presentations and workshops that have been delivered across the four UK nations and internationally, focused on disseminating the research findings and developing ideas for promoting research-informed practice. ii) A Scottish-based IAA funded impact project is underway engaging with Scottish Govt, policymakers, practitioners and the general public in an ambitious project aimed at expanding evidence informed policymaking, practice improvements and public understanding of the challenges of child care social work. iii) Two English local authorities have agreed to participate in an IAA funded continuing professional development programme utilising the digital resources generated from the project. This will commence in autumn 2016 and report in spring 2017, with mechanisms in place for ongoing impact tracking. Subject to its success there is scope for this programme to be a template that can be easily replicated for ad adopted across across the UK. iv) plans for two further impact projects based in the two other UK sites where the research was conducted - Wales and Northern Ireland. The intention is for these projects to respond to the identified needs in these practice communities and encompass both practice and policy focussed activities.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description ESRC Impact Accelerator Grant
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Sussex 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2016 
End 07/2017
 
Description ESRC Impact Acclerator Grant (Edinburgh)
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2016 
End 05/2017
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Centre for Excellence for looked after children in Scotland (CELCIS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC research team, is project PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4 x ½ days); potentially costs of venue for KE event in Glasgow
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Children in Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scotish TLC academic is PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4x ½ days): Head of Policy/Policy Manager; generating 2 blogs (2x ½ days) and consultancy from our media team (1 day); running and co-ordinating a roundtable event of up to 25 people in CiS accommodation (2 days) ; disseminating and promoting the work through our distribution channels and featured in our magazine (1 day)
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Government of Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish TLC team member is PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering grp, chairing Summit, providing venue and ongoing project support
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC research team is project PI
Collaborator Contribution Steering group member
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Scottish Association of Social Workers
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Scottish TLC team member Prof Viv Cree is PI
Collaborator Contribution Financial support for project
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? 
Organisation Social Work Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic on TLC research team is PI on this Impact project
Collaborator Contribution Steering group member
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation Centre for Child Wellbeing and Protection (CCWP)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC research team, is project PI working to inform the developing agenda about child protection in Scotland across three broad areas: policy and government; agencies and practitioners; and service users and the general public. Our objectives are therefore: i. To share evidence from research with policy makers and so contribute to the developing policy agenda about child protection in Scotland more broadly; ii. To create space for practitioners across the statutory, voluntary and private sectors to explore with each other and with researchers what is and isn't working in child protection, building from examples of good practice in changing culture and in communicating with children; iii. To generate a conversation with service users and the public more widely about the role and task of statutory child protection with a view to co-creating positive child protection practice; iv. To track and assess the impact of the project as a whole. Project activities will be organised around the project's four main objectives. i. Sharing research evidence with policy-makers We will begin the process of dialogue with national child protection policy by presenting our research findings to those with strategic responsibility in government. This will be followed by a summit convened by the Chief Social Work Adviser at which we will facilitate a discussion between academics, civil servants, SWS, SSSC and SASW, on the role of child protection social work, challenging the perceived disconnect between policy rhetoric and practice reality and demonstrating the ways in which child protection might change in light of research evidence and practice experience. ii. Engaging with agencies, social work practitioners and social work academics We will use the child protection committees, Children in Scotland and WithScotland networks to advertise and convene a series of four, one-day knowledge exchange workshops across Scotland to present our research findings and stimulate practitioners and academics to reflect on their practice in child protection and in supporting practice, taking on board all the questions raised by our research and by our partner agencies. We will promote the professional development resources that were created as part of the Talking & Listening to Children study, as well as inviting researchers undertaking relevant research across Scotland to contribute insights from their work. We also aim to develop (in partnership with a local authority and SSSC) a new post-qualifying course for social workers on communication with children and with SASW, take forward the establishment of a Children & Families' Social Work Forum in Scotland. iii. Involving service users and the general public Building on our own and current New Zealand experience, we will engage in a number of public engagement activities with a view to challenging public (and social workers') perceptions about child protection, and opening up the conversation - what should child protection in Scotland be? - to as wide an audience as possible. This will be achieved through: • Working with the UoE press office to develop a media strategy that will enable us to place newspaper and magazine articles and explore the possibility of developing a television or radio programme about child protection in Scotland. • A social media presence - blog and Twitter activity. The 're-imagining social work services' blog, Aotearoa New Zealand, serves as a useful example of a blog that is having a major impact policy and practice in New Zealand, as well as being read across the world (http://www.reimaginingsocialwork.nz/about/). We will launch a Scottish blog that publishes one guest blog a month on issues connected to child protection for the year of the project. Using twitter, we will reach out to the public, practitioners and policy makers and start a debate about the role of child protection in Scotland. We will promote our social media work through our partners (e.g. CRFR, CELCIS, Children in Scotland, WithScotland, Chief Social Work Advisor) and our own networks. We will analyse readership to ensure that we are connecting with our target audience. • The project will culminate in a public engagement event targeted at service users and the public to be held on World Social Work Day on 17th March 2017. This will be held in a public library such as the Mitchell Library or the Edinburgh's Central Library. Who Cares Scotland (a campaigning and advocacy organisation for care experienced young people) and SSSC will be important partners in this event. iv. Tracking and assessing impact We will track impact through all the usual channels including user participation and involvement; feedback from events; monitoring of social media usage; evidence of changes to policy and practice in Scottish social work.
Collaborator Contribution Financial support has ben provided: £10,000 from SASW plus support in kind, and £5000 from SSSC, plus £5,000 of staff time. Other partners have offered significant 'in kind' support, on our steering group (4 x ½ days), helping to advertise events, making links for us with people who can influence the agenda etc.
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2014
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation City of Edinburgh Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC team, is Project PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4 x ½ days)
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation Scottish Social Services Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Part of an Impact Acclerator grant project. Prof Viv Cree Scottish academic in TLC research team is PI
Collaborator Contribution Financial and in kind (staff time) contribution for public engagement event and devt of the Children and Families Forum
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department Centre for Research in Families and Relationships (CRFR)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, TLC Scottish academic in TLC research team , is Project PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4 x ½ days); support for developing impact framework (2 days); hosting researcher (2000)
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation Who Cares? Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC team, is Project PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4 x ½ days); support young people attending public engagement event (2 staff x 2 days)
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2014
 
Description Child Protection Social Work in Scotland: what do we want from it and what needs to change? Impact partner 
Organisation With Scotland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Prof Viv Cree, Scottish academic in TLC team, is project PI
Collaborator Contribution Attendance at steering group (4 x ½ days), support with practitioner networks (2 days)
Impact New collaboration
Start Year 2016
 
Description Impact Accelerator Activity 
Organisation Addenbrooke's Hospital
Department Children's Services
Country Unknown 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Monies from the Sussex Social Sciences Impact Fund (SSSIF), in conjunction with the Talking and Listening Children's Team's (TLC) strong collaborative relationships with the Principal Child and Family Social Workers from East Sussex County Council (ESCC) and Brighton and Hove (BH) and the Centre for Social Work Innovation and Research (C-SWIR) at the University of Sussex, will: • facilitate the uptake and use of the CPD resources by locally situated social work practitioners • understand and capture the impact of the CPD resources on everyday working practices and their role in generating practice improvements • understand and capture the impact of the CPD resources on the experiences of children and families • develop the efficacy of the CPD resources in response to user feedback The Impact project activities will include: 1. Scoping meetings (2) with the Principal Child and Family Social Workers (PSWs) in ESCC (Nicola McGeown) and BH (Tom Stibbs) to establish a working partnership for the co-delivery of the project 2. Creation and implementation of a baseline -pre-and post-project- measure to capture the qualitative changes in practitioners' communication skills and practices before and after participation in the workshops 3. Co-convened (PSWs and project RA) practice-based workshops (approx 2.5-3 hours each) with approx. fifteen practitioners per workshop, delivered on a monthly basis over a six month period with one group in each authority (12 workshops; n=30). Practitioners will be expected to attend all six workshops which will provide a stimulating forum where they can engage with the CPD resources in relation to their own cases. An expectation will be set for the practitioners to continue to use the materials post-project and ongoing impact capture mechanisms will be implemented, including a 6 month post-project participant survey. 4. One focus group, comprised of a mix of practitioners from the two authorities, in order to cross-fertilise experiences and understanding of how impact in practice has been realised. The groups will provide an opportunity for practitioners to reflect and report on the experience of engaging with the CPD resources and utilising their learning in practice. One focus group across the two authorities, comprised of c. 10 managers/professional development officers responsible for practice development, which will capture their assessment of the project's impact on practice. The TLC project PI Professor Gillian Ruch will support and supervise external facilitators in convening and delivering CPD workshops with social workers using materials created from the TLC research.
Collaborator Contribution ESCC and BHCC practitioners will be supported to attend the workshops which will take place in LA meeting space. The workshop format will provide opportunities for the practitioner participants to shape their own learning and identify areas for practice development that will be supported by the workshop programme and TLC resources Regular updates with the PSWs in the two LAs will ensure the workshops are addressing the relevant aspects of everyday practice and areas that require practice improvements
Impact Not yet completed
Start Year 2016
 
Description Impact Accelerator Activity 
Organisation East Sussex County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Monies from the Sussex Social Sciences Impact Fund (SSSIF), in conjunction with the Talking and Listening Children's Team's (TLC) strong collaborative relationships with the Principal Child and Family Social Workers from East Sussex County Council (ESCC) and Brighton and Hove (BH) and the Centre for Social Work Innovation and Research (C-SWIR) at the University of Sussex, will: • facilitate the uptake and use of the CPD resources by locally situated social work practitioners • understand and capture the impact of the CPD resources on everyday working practices and their role in generating practice improvements • understand and capture the impact of the CPD resources on the experiences of children and families • develop the efficacy of the CPD resources in response to user feedback The Impact project activities will include: 1. Scoping meetings (2) with the Principal Child and Family Social Workers (PSWs) in ESCC (Nicola McGeown) and BH (Tom Stibbs) to establish a working partnership for the co-delivery of the project 2. Creation and implementation of a baseline -pre-and post-project- measure to capture the qualitative changes in practitioners' communication skills and practices before and after participation in the workshops 3. Co-convened (PSWs and project RA) practice-based workshops (approx 2.5-3 hours each) with approx. fifteen practitioners per workshop, delivered on a monthly basis over a six month period with one group in each authority (12 workshops; n=30). Practitioners will be expected to attend all six workshops which will provide a stimulating forum where they can engage with the CPD resources in relation to their own cases. An expectation will be set for the practitioners to continue to use the materials post-project and ongoing impact capture mechanisms will be implemented, including a 6 month post-project participant survey. 4. One focus group, comprised of a mix of practitioners from the two authorities, in order to cross-fertilise experiences and understanding of how impact in practice has been realised. The groups will provide an opportunity for practitioners to reflect and report on the experience of engaging with the CPD resources and utilising their learning in practice. One focus group across the two authorities, comprised of c. 10 managers/professional development officers responsible for practice development, which will capture their assessment of the project's impact on practice. The TLC project PI Professor Gillian Ruch will support and supervise external facilitators in convening and delivering CPD workshops with social workers using materials created from the TLC research.
Collaborator Contribution ESCC and BHCC practitioners will be supported to attend the workshops which will take place in LA meeting space. The workshop format will provide opportunities for the practitioner participants to shape their own learning and identify areas for practice development that will be supported by the workshop programme and TLC resources Regular updates with the PSWs in the two LAs will ensure the workshops are addressing the relevant aspects of everyday practice and areas that require practice improvements
Impact Not yet completed
Start Year 2016
 
Title Taking and Listening to Children website 
Description Website with accessible resources for professional development purposes. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Under review 
URL http://www.talkingandlisteningtochildren.co.uk
 
Description Presentation of research findings to Child Protection Committees in Scotland. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of research findings to Child Protection Committees in Scotland which informed ongoing policy developments regarding Child protection practice in Scottish context.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description BASPCAN conference presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact BASPCAN conference presentation on our research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Belfast ESRC Social Sciences Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Engaging stakeholders in our research methods/themes from early findings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Conference keynote (Dublin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote presentation of the research to Unity in Relationships conference, Dublin
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference presentation on our research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Health and Social Care/Public Health Agency conference presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description European Social Work Research conference (Italy) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact European Social Work Research conference presentation, Bolzano, Italy
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description European Social Work Research conference (Slovenia) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact European Social Work Research conference Slovenia - wider engagement with research ideas and findings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Information event with social workers (Downpatrick, NI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Knowledge exchange event with social workers in Downpatrick regarding our research findings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation of findings to North South Social Work Educators Forum (Ireland) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of findings to social work academic and practitioners in the North South social work educators forum, Ireland - more research informed practice developing
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to policy makers ( Northern Ireland) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at Northern Ireland Social Care Council re: the research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to the South and East Health and Social Care Trust (NI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Information event on findings from our research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Student Training Event -Social Work and Nursing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Training event run jointly with nursing to train students in communicating with children - used findings from our research and nursing research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Symposium 18: Talking & Listening to Children in Everyday Social Work Practice: Findings & Conundrums 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference symposium of 3 TLC related papers to an international audience of academic practitioners and policymakers stimulating debate about how professional skills can be enhanced through improvements in sw education, policymaking and practice .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Training event with social workers( NI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Training event with social workers in the SEHSCT social work practitioner forum
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description practice-based presentation ( South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote presentation about the research as part of the launch of the Trust based social work research strategy
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description presentation to SEHSCT managers (NI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to social work managers in SEHSCT as part of knowledge exchange to re-develop materials regarding communicating with children
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015