'Smarter' homes?: a netnographic exploration of low carbon living

Lead Research Organisation: University of St Andrews
Department Name: Geography and Sustainable Development

Abstract

With growing concerns about climate change and energy security, how we use energy in the UK is receiving more attention than ever before. The way in which we use energy in our homes has been at the forefront of this attention (Lovell 2004) given recent high-profile recognition that it constitutes 24% of carbon emissions in the UK (Stern 2006). There have therefore been many attempts to try and reduce the amount of energy used in our homes, for instance, through the introduction of domestic energy-efficiency infrastructure, technology and appliances (Hand et al., 2007).

The desire to make our homes as efficient as possible and reduce the amount of carbon used per home has resulted in the UK government, like many other governments around the world, developing a low carbon strategy. Low carbon is a relatively new term used to describe activities that have a minimal output of greenhouse gases, specifically carbon dioxide, and governments have developed sophisticated policies to deliver new low carbon economies (While et al., 2010). Accordingly, low carbon housing is that which has a minimal output of carbon dioxide and the term is used to describe a wide range of housing types, for instance, those which meet or exceed specific environmental standards (e.g. UK Code for Sustainable Homes), for example passiv houses.

However, recent research indicates that although the energy efficiency of homes has risen steadily over the last 30 years, there has not been a reduction in domestic energy consumption (McManus et al., 2010, Steg & Vlek 2009). So, for example, despite the installation of technology like loft and cavity wall insulation and low-energy appliances, households are using ever more energy. In addition, research has demonstrated that occupants of low carbon homes often find methods to bypass low carbon solutions (e.g. installing radiators or removing devices which impeed the flow of hot water in the shower) in order to prevent the curtailment of their activities (Gill et al., 2010). This phenomena is called the 'rebound effect' where any savings made in energy use are less than the expected savings because householders adapt their behaviour.

As such, it has been argued that the focus of funding and research should not simply rest on developing more 'technological' solutions to energy efficiency, but instead, that more resources should be directed towards understanding why this rebound effect occurs by exploring the behaviours or experiences of householders who live in low carbon homes. To do so, this project will work with 50 households who live in low carbon homes across 5 fieldwork sites (3 in the UK, 2 in the Netherlands).

A range of research methods will be used. Firstly, data collected by the developers of these sites about the performance of the housing and satisfaction of the householders will be collected and compared. The second element of the project will be online. Householders will be asked to take photographs and keep an online journal for three weeks (uploading the photographs into the journal). The photographs and written entries will capture everyday household life and the practices which they think use energy. During this period, householders will also be invited to participate in an online discussion forum with other householders in the project to discuss their experiences of project participation, compare photo-journal content and, consider the differences in energy demand and consumption.

By collaborating with other academics, housing professionals, and policy makers in this project through mechanisms such as seminars and a placement, the intention is to identify where future strategy on building technology and associated household practices might be directed, and propose ways in which these may be implemented.

Planned Impact

There will be short-term (during the award), medium-term (up to one year following the award), and long-term (one year following and beyond) impacts from this project. Integral to the project are a number of opportunities which will ensure that beneficiaries (the general public; the private sector (e.g. energy efficiency technology businesses, architecture firms etc); and the public and third sectors (e.g. housing associations and national governments)) experience the full advantage of the research.

In the short to medium term, the comparative nature of the work (UK and the Netherlands) will be of use to national governments interested in increasing the effectiveness of public services and policy by identifying which forms of LC infrastructure and technology are most appropriate for housing initiatives (see RO3 in case for support). Moreover, public policy initiatives have particular consequences for the housing industry at the design (architects, and planners), development (housing associations, private home builders), and build (trades and crafts men) stages. Hence there is the potential in the longer-term, to inform practitioners and professional practice. This will contribute to homes being more efficient (reducing rebound), cheaper to run and warmer, ultimately improving quality of life.

Collaboration with other organisations (OTB, BRE, 'owners or developers' of fieldwork sites) will be critical to the success of the project and these relationships will be nurtured. In addition to the methods of communication and engagement outlined (see pathways to impact), the placement with OTB will ensure an international dimension to the project and resulting impact. Work with seminar speakers, both through the seminars but also in the development of the edited book, will provide the opportunity to bring together academics, policy-makers and practitioners to facilitate new collaborations. Together these activities will help to realise the aim, in the medium-term, of developing a network of individuals and organisations that will allow the submission of a medium scale grant proposal to a RCUK funding body.

Visual, electronic, and paper based engagement strategies exist for all user groups. In the short-term, a dedicated website will be constructed with relevant project information, seminar/event information and appropriate web links. Both an audio and video based podcast of each seminar will be downloadable from the website. This approach is essential in order to reach those representatives who are not able to attend the events. A further feature of the website will be the integration of facebook and twitter accounts, social media which will enhance participation. Relevant public, commercial and third sector organisations will be invited to register for password protected access to all the papers given at the seminars. A JISC email discussion list in addition to the academic outputs will ensure that the project makes a long term contribution to the field of low carbon living beyond the lifetime of the award. An application to host a Festival of Social Science (FoSS) Event in year 2 to showcase the netnographic method will also be submitted. In this FoSS application I will specifically target teenagers (via a local school), often the most proficient in using social media, and encourage them to develop their own netnographic project in a two-day event.

At each event information will be collected from participants (e.g. using questionnaires) to aid the process of evaluation. In addition, quantitative metrics employed will measure: the number of twitter mentions, re-tweets and followers; number of facebook followers; number of website hits (including information about the number and type of materials downloaded e.g. seminar presentations). Together, such measures will enable evaluation of how the short-term impacts have been delivered during the project.
 
Description New strands of research:

1) Prosumption - this term was coined by Alvin Toffler in the 1980's to characterize the changing relationship between production and consumption. It has gained recent attention to conceptualize phenomena such as user generated content and DIY activities, however, I have increasingly been exploring this in relation to domestic low carbon activities. For instance, might the installation and use of domestic micro renewables be thought of as prosumption? If so, is prosumption a useful theoretical device to explain such developments? How might prosumption also be useful to explain efficiency improvements which involve the householder taking more of a role in managing energy demand? Hence prosumption is an interesting idea for me, and one I got some small funding to explore (see funding - Carnegie Trust). See also publications: Reid & Ellsworth-Krebs (2017) and Ellsworth-Krebs & Reid (2016).

2) Installation matters - existing research overlooks the lived experience of domestic renewables and is therefore failing to understand the wider context of the renewables journey, and, specifically the impact of the installation phase. In this project householders (with microgeneration for heat systems) reported the need for post-installation unanticipated changes, which can be understood as a failure of proper planning and advice on the part of the installer. Thus, improvements at this stage in the process could help households gain more from the technology and/or minimise the impact on everyday domestic practices. In fact, the tension between the installation phase and the operational phase (i.e. trade-offs between structural changes and adaptations of routines/practices) could be aided through greater discussions with households.
That several householders were willing to make significant changes to the building fabric in order to make every day domestic life easier, suggests that domestic routines, rhythms and practices are at least as important, if not more so, than building fabric when seeking to develop more sustainable energy policies (and microgeneration in particular). Indeed, the extent to which renewable heating installations encourage more sustainable practices remains to be seen, as in our experience, participants with renewable heating tended to report they had systems with larger capacity than required suggesting that these technologies were not necessarily as sustainable as they could be. This reaffirms our argument that policies around renewable heating could work better if they recognise the social expectations and aspirations as well as the daily routines and experiences of households. For example, as Vlasova and Gram-Hassen (2014:523) highlighted in the context of domestic retrofits, policy should focus on 'how the retrofitted building can best support lower consumption related to everyday practices rather than just focusing on how to apply more efficient technology'. We therefore agree with their call for more dialogic based approaches which require collective understandings of social and household expectations. I currently have a paper under review on this topic, but please also see related publications: Ellsworth-Krebs et al., (2018), Reid & Ellsworth-Krebs (2018), Ellsworth-Krebs & Reid (2016), Reid et al., (2015), Ellsworth-Krebs et al., (2015).

3) Online research methods - Digital methods is an approach gaining popularity in the social sciences, in particular because when people post using a screen name or pseudonym, they are perhaps more likely to be open in the information they divulge. Yet despite online and virtual methods (Hine 2013, Pink 2016 et al.,), digital methods (Rogers 2015) and netnography (Kozinets 2010) being popular neologisms, they are seldom used in domestic energy or microgeneration research. They have been used in two different ways during this project (analysis of an online forum (Mumsnet) and in an online household journal. This is because online discussions can be an extension of casual conversations, and more accurately reveal householders areas of interest and concern than may be achieved in conventional research methods such as interviewing or focus groups. See publication Reid & Ellsworth-Krebs (2017) and blog (for contributions from participants at the digimethods networking event): https://smarterhomes.wordpress.com/seminars-2/.

My work, and contributions to thinking about sustainable housing has also been recognized in so far as I became a co-director at the Centre for Housing Research (CHR) at St Andrews in 2013 and am now Director. In that role, I have managed some 20 staff (including researchers and associates) and a diversity of research projects. This has involved the development of new leadership skills, and skills around the financial planning and administration of a research centre. We have re-focused the work of CHR, and there is now a much stronger focus on two strategic themes of 'homes, families and communities' and 'places, policies and practices'.
Exploitation Route 1. Prosumption - by exploring the concept of prosumption in relation to microgeneration we have identified several areas in which future scholarship may offer a more critical and holistic investigation of the implications of blurring boundaries between energy production and consumption. Specifically, we argue for future reflection on power relations that impact the uptake and access to microgeneration technologies (e.g. interests and lobbying power of mass producers)(Kotler, 2010). For instance, are low-income households subsidising installation of PV panels? Are householders taking on government or energy companies' responsibilities? Such questions suggest that greater reflection of the context and implications of the socio-economic conditions of energy prosumers (e.g. a large proportion of the world's non-privileged population are prosumers as they use wood for cooking and heating) is required. Prosumption therefore presents energy companies, regulators, consumers, and developers with a new set of challenges, but equally with new opportunities.

2. Installation matters - given recognition that this is a critical stage in the process which has implications for future demand/spread of technologies, and because we've demonstrated the necessity of approaches which require collective understandings of social and household expectations, there are a number of implications. Most importantly, research and policy needs to better understand how this technology fits within the broader domestic context. So, one future research direction could be to focus on the developer and installer to understand how they conceptualise the lived experience of these forms of heating.

Secondly, while a lack of impartial advice on microgeneration technologies and a reliance on anecdotal information has been raised as an issue impeding householders from installing microgeneration technologies (DECC 2011), online forums such as Mumsnet, appear to fill a key gap for householders by linking solar thermal panels with advice on systems that will meet hot water 'needs' (e.g. pressure, flow and multiple outputs at the same time). This presents an opportunity for policy to expand the role of energy advisors to discuss how microgeneration technologies fit with the other desires householders have when making material changes to their home. This recommendation has previously been made in regard to energy-efficiency improvements (Gram-Hanssen 2014a) and preserving heritage features of homes (Judson et al. 2014), but not in the context of microgeneration.

Thirdly, technologies are tied up with what it means to live in a modern and future-proof home. Understanding this is critical when anticipating future energy demand and 'normal' expectations of home life (e.g. higher flow of shower means more energy demand for heating water, even if householders are not taking longer showers). For the most part, our findings have shown how households were assuming that their future energy demands would increase and built overcapacity into their new systems. Exploring these sorts of expectations as well as 'necessary energy uses' (Walker et al. 2016) is largely absent from microgeneration scholarship and domestic energy research. changes and material configurations that accompany the installation of solar thermal panels may in reality enable more energy-demanding practices (an example perhaps, of the rebound effect).
Together, findings across both 1 and 2, demonstrate the multiplicity of reasons, beyond financial rationalization (which is the most often cited explanation for microgeneration installation (Balcombe et al. 2013, Gram-Hanssen 2014, Wilson et al. 2015)), to explore when seeking to understand why householders invest in microgeneration technologies and how they use them once installed.

3. Online research methods - online discussions can be an extension of data gathered in natural settings (e.g. casual conversations) (Veen et al. 2011), important because one of the strengths of practice approaches is to reorient investigation, and therefore the emergent recommendations, away from the rather simplistic and linear framing of social change that dominates sustainability research and policies (Shove 2010; Shove and Walker 2014). For example, discussing 'reasonable' expectations of hot water pressure, the number of (en-suite) bathrooms, and house size as has been reported in the project's publications, is generally perceived to be outside the remit of home energy advice by government officials and policy (Palm, 2010). There is a considerable opportunity to further develop online methods in energy, housing and sustainability research (Ellsworth-Krebs and Marshall, 2017). Arguably, researchers increasingly need to be cognisant that these online spaces themselves are an extension of everyday life (Pink et al., 2016), and this project contributes to wider discussions highlighting the utility of online (ethnography) methods because the Internet makes personal experiences more public and creates spaces for a variety of voices (e.g. YouTube, and other forms of home produced video sites, offer glimpses of how people live, allowing the viewer to enter someone else's home).
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Energy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice

 
Description I have led and participated in knowledge transfer initiatives at national and local scales, providing evidence to Scottish Parliament Committees on legislation in relation to the Draft Climate Change Plan RPP3 http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/CurrentCommittees/103117.aspx. I argued for better understanding around behaviour change, specifically practice theory and domestic contexts. This was acknowledged in the committee's third report: 'although behaviour change has been considered and included in the draft Plan, its application in policies and proposals is omitted or inconsistent. This should be addressed in the final Plan' http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/CurrentCommittees/103917.aspx#z. Given the Scottish Government's history of innovation in this area (e.g. the first UK devolved administration to set ambitious climate change targets which were subsequently adopted by Westminster) there is potential for my evidence around domestic behaviour change to be important in the context of future policymaking. I have also presented my research as part of the Scottish Government's Climate Change Seminar Series. Moreover, as a funded part of my ESRC Future Research Leaders grant I have hosted an event for policy and practice communities related to the new UK Renewable Heat Initiative and hosted or been involved in numerous public and policy events, for example, the Private Rented Sector, Low Carbon Homes, and the Scottish Cities Initiative. I work closely with Scottish housing associations and practitioners (e.g. Shelter), and served on the Abertay Housing Association Board. I have received support from the ESRC for a festival of social science event to develop teaching materials for secondary school pupils studying Higher Geography. This was to build on my work with 18 Fife Secondary Schools via the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers (SAGT). I initiated an annual event whereby Higher Geography pupils come to the University for an afternoon to learn about my research (e.g. sustainable housing, prosumption and living with renewables). To date, I have engaged with over 240 school pupils, in addition to running a half-day workshop for teachers for training on teaching research methods, including the provision of teaching materials for external use (Nov 2016). I'm currently in discussion with SAGT about an event for Advanced Higher Geography pupils to come to St Andrews to identify topics (based on my research) for their independent study (in Aug 2019). I have participated in several University 'research showcase' and 'opening doors to innovation' events for industry, and have been involved in the energy utilities company, nPower's, Future Leaders student competition. In addition to events and knowledge sharing activities, I have been invited to participate in a live interview on BBC radio's Good Morning Scotland, and have contributed to The Conversation, as well as professional magazines such as The Geographer, blogs, websites and social media so that I am able to talk about my research beyond the academy. For example I blog at www.wordpress.smarterhomes.com, I tweet @louannereid (currently 414 followers). Selected recent highlights include: Jan 2019 Member, Scottish Government Housing Cross-Party Working Group. Jan 2019 Invited contributor, Futurum Careers publication encourages teenagers and young adults into science Dec 2018 Invited to participate in Scottish Gas Network's 'Future of Heat' stakeholder panel meeting Dec 2018 Panellist at 'The Future of Housing in Scotland' event for housing professionals, hosted/organised by Orbit (www.orbit.scot). Nov 2018 Invited to participate in ITN and Chartered Institute of Housing TV Programme 'Close to Home: Housing and Communities'. Sept 2018 Public talk at 'Politics of Small Places' exhibition, Cooper Gallery (Dundee) featuring work by Patrick Geddes and Paul Noble. June 2017 Organised and led a workshop for 40 participants from across the academic, policy and practice communities on domestic renewable energy, Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation, Edinburgh. Mar 2017 Invited to participate in live interview for BBC radio's Good Morning Scotland on renewable energy in relation to housing associations. Mar 2017 Organised and led a workshop for 160 Higher Geography pupils visiting St Andrews to talk about my research, and that of others in the School. Feb 2017 Chaired a Conference (for policy and practice communities) on the Private Rented Sector, Edinburgh, hosted by Holyrood Magazine. Jan 2017 Provided written evidence to Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform Committee on Draft Climate Change Plan RPP3. Jan 2017 Participated in a review of the usefulness of Government Statistics on Housing in the UK for the Office for Statistics Regulation (formally known as the monitoring and assessment team in UK Statistics Authority). Nov 2016 Led a workshop for teachers from across Fife's 18 secondary schools to provide training about online research methods for the Higher Geography Assessment. Nov 2016 Chaired an international conference on Affordable Housing by Holyrood Magazine. Oct 2016 Led and hosted an international two-day workshop on online research methods for 20 academic and practice (e.g. National Energy Action, NATO) participants at the University of St Andrews.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Energy,Environment
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Citation in Scottish Government Draft Climate Change Plan RRP3
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/CurrentCommittees/103917.aspx#z
 
Description Evidence submitted to Scottish Government Draft Climate Change Plan
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description Carnegie Trust Small Grants
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 31680 
Organisation Carnegie Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2014 
End 08/2014
 
Description ESRC Collaborative Studentship with the James Hutton Institute
Amount £63,000 (GBP)
Organisation Scottish Graduate School for Social Sciences 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 08/2019
 
Description International Fee Waiver for PhD studentship, University of St Andrews
Amount £30,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of St Andrews 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 08/2018
 
Description RSE Travel Award
Amount
Organisation Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) 
Sector Learned Society
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2014 
End 06/2014
 
Description RSE/Scottish Government Sabbatical Research Grant
Amount £58,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 62651 
Organisation Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) 
Sector Learned Society
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2019 
End 05/2020
 
Description Scottish Graduate School collaborative PhD funding
Amount £63,000 (GBP)
Organisation Scottish Graduate School for Social Sciences 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 08/2019
 
Description Society of Biology
Amount
Organisation Society of Biology 
Sector Learned Society
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2013 
End 04/2013
 
Description The Carnegie Trust Research Incentive Grant
Amount £9,137 (GBP)
Funding ID RIG008250 
Organisation Carnegie Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2019 
End 05/2020
 
Description University of St Andrews PhD studentship - 7th Century Competition
Amount £43,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of St Andrews 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
End 08/2017
 
Title Data collected as part of research 
Description Data from online journal with 30 households in the UK and Netherlands. Households had a range of microgeneration technologies installed, and discussed their experiences of these. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact No impacts known as yet - recently been entered in the UK Data Archive. 
 
Description Critical Urbanism Blog 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a collective blog. I am theme editor of sustainability which means I am responsible for recruiting and managing submissions on this topic
Collaborator Contribution Developing the blog and inviting contributors to comment on the other themes
Impact This initiative brings together a number of scholars from across the UK on a shared blog. It is multi-disciplinary and involves those from sociology, geography, planning, built environment studies. It will also involve those beyond the academy. It is only in its infancy but will grow with the addition of each new contributor.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Critical Urbanism Blog 
Organisation University of St Andrews
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a collective blog. I am theme editor of sustainability which means I am responsible for recruiting and managing submissions on this topic
Collaborator Contribution Developing the blog and inviting contributors to comment on the other themes
Impact This initiative brings together a number of scholars from across the UK on a shared blog. It is multi-disciplinary and involves those from sociology, geography, planning, built environment studies. It will also involve those beyond the academy. It is only in its infancy but will grow with the addition of each new contributor.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Critical Urbanism Blog 
Organisation University of Stirling
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a collective blog. I am theme editor of sustainability which means I am responsible for recruiting and managing submissions on this topic
Collaborator Contribution Developing the blog and inviting contributors to comment on the other themes
Impact This initiative brings together a number of scholars from across the UK on a shared blog. It is multi-disciplinary and involves those from sociology, geography, planning, built environment studies. It will also involve those beyond the academy. It is only in its infancy but will grow with the addition of each new contributor.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Digital Methods Workshop 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We hosted a two day interdisciplinary workshop for invited participants on the topic of digital methods
Collaborator Contribution They participated by giving presentations
Impact Outputs are blog posts - forthcoming Outcomes are a working group to develop a paper for publication
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Methods Workshop 
Organisation National Energy Action
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We hosted a two day interdisciplinary workshop for invited participants on the topic of digital methods
Collaborator Contribution They participated by giving presentations
Impact Outputs are blog posts - forthcoming Outcomes are a working group to develop a paper for publication
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Methods Workshop 
Organisation Umea University
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We hosted a two day interdisciplinary workshop for invited participants on the topic of digital methods
Collaborator Contribution They participated by giving presentations
Impact Outputs are blog posts - forthcoming Outcomes are a working group to develop a paper for publication
Start Year 2016
 
Description Digital Methods Workshop 
Organisation University of Tilburg
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We hosted a two day interdisciplinary workshop for invited participants on the topic of digital methods
Collaborator Contribution They participated by giving presentations
Impact Outputs are blog posts - forthcoming Outcomes are a working group to develop a paper for publication
Start Year 2016
 
Description Energy efficiency special issue 
Organisation Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I wrote a paper
Collaborator Contribution They organised the special issue
Impact I was invited to participate in a special issue of a journal. The special issue was organised by Prof. Henk Visscher who is my Delft mentor. The paper I provided is: Reid, L (2014) Deal or no deal?: assessing the UK's new green deal. Open House International 29: 2.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Chaired housing conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I chaired a conference for Holyrood Magazine about housing and the Private Rented Sector
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Contribution of written evidence to Scottish Government Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I gave written evidence to the Scottish Government's Energy, Climate Change and Land Reform Committee on the Draft Climate Change Plan
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/CurrentCommittees/103917.aspx
 
Description Meeting with Ganka Mueller Scottish Government 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meeting with housing building standards analysts to discuss my ESRC project, potentially identify case study sites and fr me to better understand their ongoing work/priorities

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description School Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 160 Fife Higher Geography school pupils and their teachers visited St Andrews to hear about my research (on housing) and how it relates to geography - and their curriculum. The idea behind the event was to create interest in subject area, develop collaboration between St Andrews Uni and the Schools, and teach pupils about exciting developments in the subject
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Scottish Government Climate Change Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I gave a seminar as part of the Scottish Government Climate Change Seminar series on our work around prosumption and renewable energy generation in Scotland. Audience was primarily policymakers/researchers within the Scottish Government.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk at 'Politics of Small Spaces Exhibition' at Cooper Art Gallery 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I gave a talk as part of the 'Politics of Small Spaces' exhibition (Paul Noble and Patrick Geddes) at Cooper Gallery, Dundee. 'As part of Cooper Summer Residency 2018, Noble will engage in a four-week written correspondence with Lorens Holm, Director of Geddes Institute for Urban Research at the University of Dundee. This will culminate in a public event at the exhibition preview on 13 September. Featuring Noble, Holm and Dr. Louise Reid, researcher in Sustainable Development and Geography at the University of St Andrews, the event will explore current debates on urbanisation alongside ideas of social and environmental justice'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.dundee.ac.uk/cooper-gallery/exhibitions/politicsofsmallplacespaulnobleandpatrickgeddes/
 
Description Teacher visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact School teachers from 18 Schools in Fife attended a workshop about research methods to help inform their teaching in the Higher Geography Assessment. I talked about online methods. Collected evaluation forms where teachers recorded how the workshop will change their teaching - notably by new methods they can teach, and also the importance of talking to the pupils about ethics (which may get them extra points in the assessment)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Visit to Chinese Academy of Social Science as part of a Royal Society of Edinburgh Initiative 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact I participated in discussions and also provided a presentation. This led to questions at the time, but also email exchanges afterwards, where I sent information to CASS colleagues. We are awaiting details of a funding call, but should this happen, we will be applying for funding to continue this collaboration.

CASS colleagues asked for further information and literature.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014