Urgent Invite: 'Go Home': Mapping the unfolding controversy of Home Office Immigration Campaigns

Lead Research Organisation: University of Warwick
Department Name: Sociology

Abstract

In July 2013, the UK Home Office launched a series of high-profile interventions aimed at directing public attention to an increasing 'hard line' from the government in controlling 'illegal immigration'. The urgency of this proposal is to study the operation, impacts and implications of two elements of this: an advertising campaign which began in selected London boroughs calling on migrants with insecure legal status to 'go home'; and a series of high-profile immigration checks and raids in public spaces in super-diverse areas, particularly in London. The 'go home' advertising in public spaces has, since the instigation of this urgent bid, been subject to successful legal challenge for failing to consider its impact on 'good relations' in line with the Equality Act 2010. However, similar publicity has been used by the Home Office inside immigration centres in Glasgow and Hounslow. These developments demonstrate the fast-moving nature of this subject of study and the need for real-time research to capture data and for analysis now, and create an archive for future research.

The summer's wave of interventions is part of wider structural change to the immigration service and policies restricting non-EU citizens' entry to the UK, and their rights once present. They have drawn public attention and campaigns in an acute way which needs urgent attention, particularly with the Immigration Bill being introduced to Parliament this autumn. Debate on migration and borders will continue with the Scottish Independence Referendum in September 2014, and the general election in May 2015. We need to understand the impacts of such policies and public debate on: migrants (both 'legal' and 'illegal'); racially minoritised British citizens if subject to increased harassment; public opinion about migration; community cohesion and good community relations; and political mobilisations.

Immigration is an issue where economists have been influential on British government policy. However, there is a supposed mismatch between their views and those of the general public. Illegal immigration is not statistically very large, nor very costly; but sentiments on it are held very deeply by certain voters. This raises questions about the use of evidence and argument in public policy decision-making. Policy makers and organisations working with migrants, against racial harassment, and on promoting peaceful communities need research which analyses the effects of these policies.

The Home Office initially promoted these campaigns through both mainstream and social media (particularly their #immigrationoffenders hashtag on Twitter). Similar means have been used by those protesting against the interventions (notably through #racistvan and #gohome hashtags on Twitter). The combination of online and print media campaigns, and in-person interactions have been significant in both the original interventions and campaigns against them. For example, advice on migration rights has been circulated online then distributed in person, disruptions of immigration checks have been organised online and/or filmed for circulation through social media. These interactions are an important element of the situation we will study, by engaging both with policy makers planning such campaigns and with activists mobilising to support migrants and good relations. An inventive combination of techniques of on-line, textual and visual analysis together with interviews and participant observation will help us to capture the multiple arenas of unfolding events. This research has been designed in collaboration with civil society organisations which have been clear about their needs for robust social scientific evidence that will help them and others to effectively foster good relations. The research design is based on needs identified by these groups and will also provide insights into wider questions of how public policy decisions are made and interact with public debate and social science

Planned Impact

Beneficiaries include:
CAMPAIGNING & ADVOCACY GROUPS SUPPORTING MIGRANTS: Knowledge that can assist clients in accessing rights & contribute to wider campaigning to advocate for migrants' rights
RESIDENTS OF ETHNICALLY DIVERSE AREAS WITH SIGNIFICANT MIGRANT POPULATIONS: Opportunities to have views & experiences documented in evidence about the impact of enforcement campaigns; evidence that can be used to challenge adverse impacts of such campaigns
EQUALITY & HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION: Evidence of impact of enforcement campaigns on minority groups that can assist in ensuring compliance with equality & human rights obligations
LEGAL ADVISERS: Evidence of how enforcement campaigns may infringe rights of those targeted, which may assist with legal challenge to such infringement
POLICY MAKERS IN IMMIGRATION: Knowledge of unforeseen consequences of enforcement campaigns, including impact on UK & EU citizens, social cohesion & community relations
RESEARCHERS: Knowledge that expands debate in migration studies & emergency research methodologies
See 'Pathways to Impact' and 'Project Partners' for specific groups already engaged.

The project will involve users & potential users at all stages of the research, including through:
- involving advocacy groups as research partners;
- an advisory group for the project bringing together practitioners & researchers;
- opportunities for those affected by Home Office campaigns to respond to interim findings & feed into further development of the project

The project will generate knowledge to enhance the work of advocacy & campaigning groups, through a more nuanced understanding of immigration policy & its impact.

The project provides opportunities for groups whose voices are rarely included in immigration debates to be recognised as social actors who also participate in such debates. This new knowledge of the impact of immigration policy on all residents in targeted areas promises conceptual impact by expanding understanding of who is affected by immigration policy & enforcement, & the wider social consequences of such tactics. This aspect of the research will enable us to identify possible government failures to meet obligations under equality & human rights legislation & to suggest methods of avoiding negative & unlawful impacts arising from these approaches to immigration enforcement. The project will produce knowledge that will assist bodies charged with ensuring compliance with equality & human rights legislation. An initial report from the pilot phase is being submitted to the EHRC.

The project seeks to unsettle & expand understandings of who 'counts' as a user of publicly-funded research. There will be opportunities for research users to comment on the formulation & dissemination of official & popular knowledge about immigration & the impact of different approaches to research & dissemination on the well-being of diverse communities.

RELATIONSHIPS WITH ESTABLISHED NETWORKS
We have active partnership arrangements with campaigning & advocacy groups including GRAMNET, Migrant Voice, Runnymede Trust, Scottish Refugee Council Rfugee Action (see 'Pathways to Impact' and 'Project Partners'). Each group convenes a network of users & supporters and has national lobbying power. They form an integral component of the research & dissemination. Specialist staff at Warwick & in partner organisations will support media work.

Interim findings will be discussed in open meetings & focus groups with representatives of advocacy groups & their clients. Feedback from these meetings will be used to refine & develop further stages of research.

LANGUAGE
An important impact of the project is to enable those targeted by Home Office campaigns (due to neighbourhood of residence, immigration status or perceived ethnicity) to comment & reflect on such campaigns. This will include voices of speakers of other languages, with translation accessed through the project's community partners.

Publications

10 25 50
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Bhattacharyya, G (2018) 'Go Home?' - five years on in Open Democracy

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Davies, W (2018) Weaponising Paperwork in London Review of Books

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Davies, W (2019) Leave, and Leave Again in London Review of Books

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Davies, W (2016) Home Office Rules

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Dhaliwal S (2015) Deserving and undeserving migrants in Soundings

 
Title Findings Film 
Description A short film, available as a YouTube video, presenting a summary of our interim findings in an engaging format and freely available to the public. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact 1) The video has supported sharing of our findings through social media 2) The video has aided communication of our findings at public meetings, workshops and conferences to mixed audiences of academics, practitioners, policy makers, activists and the interested public 3) We have received feedback from attendees at the above event that they will find the video useful in teaching (beyond HE) and community activism and debates. 
URL http://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.com/film/
 
Title Moving Responses 
Description Two of the research team (Gunaratnam and Jones) have worked with theatre company actREAL to produce an original theatre script based on the research project findings and data. This was then workshopped with young people (years 9 and 10) in two secondary schools, resulting in two performances for parents and friends. These performances were filmed and a toolkit is being produced to help others replicate this activity. The project was funded by the University of Warwick ESRC Impact Acceleration Account. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact Two of the research team (Gunaratnam and Jones) have worked with theatre company actREAL to produce an original theatre script based on the research project findings and data. This was then workshopped with young people (years 9 and 10) in two secondary schools, resulting in two performances for parents and friends. These performances were filmed and a toolkit is being produced to help others replicate this activity. The project was funded by the University of Warwick ESRC Impact Acceleration Account. 
URL http://actrealorg.wordpress.com
 
Title Trigger Warning by There There 
Description A participatory installation. Artists There There have developed a previous artwork, 'Eastern European for Dummies' to engage with wider immigration control controversies, based on our research. This is part of a collaboration organised through teh Tate Exchanges programme at Tate Modern. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The first performance of this version of the artwork is 17-18th March 2017 at Tate Modern, so impacts will be documented after the ResearchFIsh submission window. 
URL https://www.therethere.eu/fated
 
Description HEADLINE FINDING

Government publicity campaigns that demonstrate 'toughness' on immigration cause a significant minority of people to become more worried about irregular migration. This includes people who are scared that they are being targeted - both migrants and British citizens - and people who are worried that migration is 'out of control'.

Ten key findings from our research

1. We found no evidence that government communications about immigration and enforcement are based on research about 'what works' in managing immigration. The only research evidence policy makers mentioned to us was privately commissioned research on managing public opinion about immigration, particularly among those worried that immigration is 'out of control'. Yet our research suggests the tactics used on this basis can increase fear and anxiety.
2. Government campaigns on immigration provoked or increased anger and fear, among irregular migrants, regular migrants, and non-migrants, including people opposed to immigration. The latter told us they that the government campaigns were ineffective 'theatre'.
3. For people who were the subjects of immigration campaigns (or felt under threat from them), talking about the publicity campaigns often led them to think about their own experiences of immigration enforcement and feelings of fear and anxiety. Our research focused on communications campaigns, but participants made direct links to, for example, images of enforcement raids and their own experiences of immigration enforcement in their homes.
4. Hard-hitting government publicity on immigration seemed to provoke new waves of pro-migrant activism. Anger and outrage was translated into online and street-based activism, including of people who had not been engaged in activism before.
5. Some, but not all, activism has been migrant-led, and we identified inequalities in who felt able to take part in political debate because of real or perceived threats to their residency status as a result.
6. Traditional anti-racism campaigns are finding it hard to keep up with changes in the focus of hostility and discrimination, for example with how to engage with the status of international students and asylum seekers.
7. Our local case studies demonstrated local variations in how government campaigns were experienced, and the activism that was produced in response. In some places migrants and activists could build on existing infrastructures for political organising. In other places such resources did not exist or had dwindled, or energies were focused on service provision for vulnerable people in an increasingly difficult funding environment.
8. There is not always solidarity between people being targeted by anti-immigration campaigns. We found several instances of hostility between different groups of migrants, often based on an idea that their own group was 'deserving' of residency and status in the UK, while others were 'undeserving'.
9. The different legal statuses that migrants can have is confusing, and for many people in the wider public, the distinctions between 'illegal' and 'legal', and between asylum seeker, refugee, student, worker, resident, and sometimes between migrants and ethnic minority British-born people is difficult to understand. Many people reported harassment for being 'illegal immigrants' when they had settled status, or were British citizens.
10. We heard that many people had come to the UK because of ideals often promoted as 'British values' - such as democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs. Their experience since arrival called into doubt the existence of these values in Britain.
Exploitation Route Our findings are already being used within the community sector, including organisations that both provide services and campaign for migrant rights. The findings are used both to shape work and inform debate, and campaigning work.

The findings could also be of use to government to inform public-facing work on immigration control. Home Office representatives attended some of our feedback events, and we have shared the findings with government spokespersons, relevant policy organisations, and through a submission to the Home Affairs Committee Migrant Crisis Inquiry. We have also (following an invitation) produced a briefing for the ESRC incorporating material from our main key findings briefing and policy recommendations (https://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/esrc-briefing-the-impact-of-immigration-campaigns_tcm8-34760.pdf)

Our website, films and online learning resources produced based on our research will be of use in education and training settings, in terms of methodology as well as substantive findings. Several attendees at events we have held were from further education and campaigning groups and specifically said they would be using our resources in future.

We have a contract with Manchester University Press for a joint-authored monograph based on our findings, which will be produced at an affordable price (£15) and accessible to interested publics as well as academic audiences. We envisage that the format of this book will make it useful in public policy circles both in discussions of migration and community-engaged research methods.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/end-of-project-findings-leaflet-final.pdf
 
Description From the outset, our research was designed with a view to societal impact. The research questions and research design were developed with direct involvement from migrant support organisations and national civil rights groups. The process of carrying out the research involved local community organisations, and so the very process of research has helped to develop research-mindedness beyond the traditional academic community. Through a large number of engagement events (see 'Engagement Activities') - in a variety of formats and locations, throughout the life of the project - research participants, research users and researchers were brought together, not only to share findings but to input into analysis and development. This has helped to demonstrate the relevance of our research to users beyond the university (local community groups, national policy organisations, campaign groups, educators, national policy makers, national and local politicians, activists, journalists, asylum seekers, residents in areas of study). We have gathered a wide variety of written evidence of impact from these events, including statements that the findings would be used to develop new campaigning strategies, as a model for future research, and in educational activities in schools and colleges. Our findings are already being used within the community sector, including organisations that both provide services and campaign for migrant rights. The findings are used both to shape work and inform debate, and campaigning work. Written evidence of this from such groups can be provided. Our website, films, online resources and social media engagement based on our research have been viewed and used widely (see statistics under entry in 'Engagement Activities'). We have also had a variety of press coverage of our findings. While this might be considered 'dissemination' rather than 'impact', a key intention of our research and impact planning was that both the process and findings would inform and shape public debate. The data on our involvement in public debate in these various formats, and responses to this involvement, suggest this is an impact on public debate which involves active shaping of discussion, not simply dissemination (e.g. our work to include discussion of the effects of immigration control on women, in the Women's Hour piece listed under 'Engagement Activities'). Since completion of the research, we have published a book with Manchester University Press which is available as a free e-book and was downloaded 1197 times between April 2017 and August 2018, from locations around the world. We have continued to engage with wider communities on both local and international levels. This can be seen in activities listed elsewhere in ResearchFish, including our research being quoted in the End of Mission Statement of the Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance at the Conclusion of Her Mission to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the use of our research to develop workshops and performances with 13-15 year olds through our project with actREAL - the outcome of this being greater awareness of and reflection on questions of immigration control within the group of young people and their friends and family who attended the performances. Later this year we will produce toolkits to enable others to replicate this work to increase the reach of this impact.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Contribution to Runnymede Trust 'Our Migration Story' online resource used in schools to support History teaching across Key Stages; the resource has won awards from The Royal Historical Society's Public History Prize for Best Online Resource, and was named as a Research Champion in the 2017 Community Integration Awards.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://www.ourmigrationstory.org.uk/oms/go-home-responses-to-migration-in-britain-today
 
Description Quoted in End of Mission Statement of the Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance at the Conclusion of Her Mission to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23073&LangID=E
 
Description 'Immigration Otherwise: Co-Production and Participative Engagement' from University of Warwick/ESRC Impact Acceleration Account Award ES/M500434/1
Amount £23,000 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/M500434/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description University of Warwick Research Development Fund
Amount £4,500 (GBP)
Organisation University of Warwick 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 12/2014
 
Title Survey 
Description We commissioned a questions on an Ipsos MORI Capibus survey of c.2000 adults, nationally representative sample, on questions derived from some of our initial qualitative research. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This was an integral part of our research, and relevant to our research findings. We will continue to work with the data in the next stages of analysis. We also intend to write further analysis on the methodological processes of commissioning surveys from commercial companies, and linking qualitative research with large-scale datasets. 
 
Description Birmingham Asylum and Refugee Action 
Organisation Asylum Bar and Venue
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution BARA is a community research partner from whom we are commissioning support with fieldwork. As a result of working with this group, Co-I Kirsten Forkert has become a member of the group.
Collaborator Contribution Commissioned support in establishing fieldwork contacts and conducting fieldwork
Impact BARA is a community research partner from whom we are commissioning support with fieldwork. As a result of working with this group, Co-I Kirsten Forkert has become a member of the group.
Start Year 2014
 
Description GRAMNET 
Organisation Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration Network
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution GRAMNET is an partner on the project from the project's instigation, and the project adds to the research and practice which the network can draw on. As a result of working with this group, Co-I Emma Jackson has become a member of the group.
Collaborator Contribution GRAMNET is an partner on the project from the project's instigation, providing expert advice, networks, and support with publicity. As a result of working with this group, Co-I Emma Jackson has become a member of the group.
Impact Interim findings have been circulated through GRAMNET networks; the research methodology and practice has been strengthened through advice from GRAMNET; further collaborations continue.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Migrant Voice 
Organisation Migrant Voice
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Providing an evidence base and engaging migrants in design, conduct and dissemination of research that effects them.
Collaborator Contribution Advising on research design and dissemination, disseminating findings and publicising events held by the project.
Impact Disseminating findings and publicising events.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Runnymede Trust 
Organisation Runnymede Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Providing a credible evidence base in an area of policy which is largely driven by ideology and anecdote.
Collaborator Contribution Advising on research design and dissemination through project Advisory Group; publicising findings and events.
Impact Findings and events promoted through Runnymede dissemination networks.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Scottish Refugee Council 
Organisation Scottish Refugee Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Research findings which will support knowledge and practice of the SRC and its negotiations with the Home Office.
Collaborator Contribution Advising on research design and dissemination, publicising findings and engagement events, support in organisation and speaking at policy findings event in Glasgow to disseminate project findings.
Impact Dissemination of project findings, including support in organising and inviting relevant policy and practice contacts to Glasgow policy findings event.
Start Year 2013
 
Description "The Making of Immigration Controversies", talk by Yasmin Gunaratnam, Centre for Global Migration, 20 September, University of Gothenburg 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact "The Making of Immigration Controversies", talk by Yasmin Gunaratnam, Centre for Global Migration, 20 September, University of Gothenburg
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://cgm.gu.se/english/news-events/e/?eventId=70136494213
 
Description "The Pop-up Border other-others' presented by Yasmin Gunaratnam bat Borders, Walls and Bans workshop, 22 June, 2017, Goldsmiths, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact "The Pop-up Border other-others' presented by Yasmin Gunaratnam at Borders, Walls and Bans workshop, 22 June, 2017, Goldsmiths, London
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=10858
 
Description A-level student conference, Goldsmiths 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Yasmin Gunaratnam and Emma Jackson contributed an hour session comprising a lecture and a Q& A session entitled 'Doing Sociology: Researching #RacistVan' this drew on the research project as an example of how sociology is live and engages with unfolding and controversial issues.

The students were provided with the filling information and the project film to watch in advance.


Audience: About 200 school students

Additional audiences: school teachers

Doing Sociology: Researching #racistvan

It is mid-July 2013. The schools have broken up for the summer. The birth of a royal baby, the son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, occupies media attention. The first 'Go Home' vans are spotted in London. The vans were part of the launch of a Home Office pilot scheme called Operation Vaken, targeted at 'illegal immigrants'. Immigration enforcement officers appeared at train and tube stations and asked certain commuters about their immigration status, places of work were raided to arrest people who were in the country illegally. Social media whirled with wry commentary from all points of view. Images of the vans were soon accompanied by the hashtag #RacistVan. Some people think that the vans are the work of right-wing groups. Others feel that the vans are not big enough to deal with all the 'illegal immigrants' who are driving down wages and placing a huge strain on welfare services. It's a 'national' health service isn't it? The Advertising Standards Authority received 224 complaints about the Go Home vans, including from groups representing migrants and refugees in the UK, law scholars and the Labour peer Lord Lipsey.

Matters of who belongs and how are critical to sociology, touching on all aspects of social life - education, work, housing, the family and criminalisation. The events that unfolded around Operation Vaken marked the beginning of a joint sociological research project 'Mapping Immigration Controversies' carried out in British cities, including London, Glasgow and Cardiff. The researchers worked in partnership with community organisations, commissioned a national survey and interviewed local residents and policy makers. In this session two of the sociologists who were involved in the research will talk about the project, showing examples of what sociologists do.

In preparation of the lecture, please watch this short Youtube film about the project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItuIdhdaPP4

There is also a project website which includes a blog about the research - www.mappingimmigrationcontroversy.com

Before you come to the conference discuss and think about the following questions:

In what ways does the research relate to any of the topics you are studying?
Should sociology get involved with such controversial issues?
If you were a researcher on the project how might you do the research with those in your school or college? What would you try to find out? What methods would you use and why?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description BBC Coventry and Warwickshire 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact PI Hannah Jones has been an invited guest on BBC Coventry and Warwickshire's Religion and Ethics programme to comment on migration in the news, as a direct result of her involvement in the Go Home research. She has appeared three times as of 3rd August 2015.

The provision of an evidence-based perspective on migration issues which challenges the usual narratives presented on migration in national, regional and local discussion programmes. Repeated invitations to appear on the programme indicate that discussion related to the findings of the research are seen as relevant by broadcasters and presumably understood to be of interest to the listeners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p016rthk
 
Description BSA Diaspora, Migration and Transnationalism Study Group Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was the first activity of a new BSA study group, and as I gave an invited talk on a panel helped to establish our research as important in the field of social research on diaspora, migration and transnationalism. The event was attended by and included speakers from voluntary sector and campaigning organisations as well as academics, and involved dialogue, discussion and the potential for new collaborations.

A broader audience were made aware of our research and emerging findings. A colleague leading a research project at Leicester has established contact with one of my PhD students who has a related project, with a view to involving her in their project events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/77099/DMT_Symposium_301014_v2.pdf?1414764799015
 
Description Barking and Dagenham Feedback Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion, participants commented on interim project findings and their feedback was used to inform and develop our final research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/what-do-you-think-about-immigration-campaigns-and-debates-tickets-144...
 
Description Birmingham Book Launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Book launch for our jointly-authored research monograph, 'Go Home? The politics of immigration control', at Waterstones bookshop in central Birmingham. It included a panel discussion involving the research team and guest speakers Dr Nirmal Puwar; Dave Stamp of ASIRT and a representatives from CARAG (partner organisations in the research), followed by a drinks reception and the opportunity to buy the book. There was a mixed audience including the general public, practitioners (e.g. migrant support workers, youth workers) and academics, a lively discussion and many copies of the book were purchased, spreading the research further.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Blog piece for Policy Scotland 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Raised awareness of project and questions we are raising

Increase in interest in the project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://policyscotland.gla.ac.uk/go-home-mapping-ongoing-controversy-home-office-immigration-campaign...
 
Description Bradford Feedback Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion, participants commented on interim project findings and their feedback was used to inform and develop our final research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/bradford-publicity.pdf
 
Description Cardiff Feedback event (team) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact To present and seek validation on the themes emerging from the qualitative work undertaken. 25 women attended the event. The presentation was informal and I spoke mostly from notes. The women responded and explored the emergent themes which was very helpful. They were keen to know what would happen next and we talked about the reach of such research. The event added with food and further discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.com/news-and-events/
 
Description Detention Forum Salon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards, both at the event and afterwards through social media.

After our talk, practitioners shared our findings and commented on the value to their practice - both service delivery and campaigning - of having an engaged, research perspective on questions with which they are working.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://detentionforum.org.uk/what-is-immigration-enforcement-doing-to-us-20-feb-2015-6pm-to-830pm-lo...
 
Description Ealing and Hounslow Feedback Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion, participants commented on interim project findings and their feedback was used to inform and develop our final research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.southallblacksisters.org.uk/two-years-impact-anti-immigration-campaigns/
 
Description Feedback event sharing interim findings, gathering responses 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact CI (Emma Jackson) spoke about the research to the whole meeting of 130 people (AGM of a community research partner), and 10-12 people stayed for a detailed feedback workshop. All the major organisations in housing and refugee support in Glasgow were there and more people took reports and contact details than stayed for the workshop. Maryhill Integration network seemed keen for an additional session to be held with them, to hear more about and feedback on our research findings, as a result of this event.

All the major organisations in housing and refugee support in Glasgow were there and more people took reports and contact details than stayed for the workshop. Maryhill Integration network seemed keen for an additional session to be held with them, to hear more about and feedback on our research findings, as a result of this event.

Event was held on 31 Oct so hard to identify longer-term results at this point. Feedback from the meeting will be included in data analysis as part of our research design.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Financial Times Interim Findings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An article appeared in the Financial Times presenting the interim findings of our research.

Awareness of our research reached an audience who may not otherwise have heard similar evidence on migration policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ft.com/cms/s/4890fb18-73c8-11e4-92bc-00144feabdc0,Authorised=false.html?_i_location=http%...
 
Description Findings Report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A 12-page booklet was produced in both hard copy and available freely online through the project website, to showcase key findings from the research project in an accessible and attractive way which will be of use to practitioners and policy makers. Hard copies were sent to key influencers, including politicians, civil servants, NGOs and relevant NGO funders - a list compiled from networks known to the research team, partners and advisory group. This has been well-received and led to invitations to speak at policy and practice events.

The research team has been invited to speak at East of England Migration Partnership to share findings of the research - more information on the results of this will be added once this has taken place.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/end-of-project-findings-leaflet-fi...
 
Description Glasgow Policy Briefing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We organised this event to present our findings and asked partners from NGOs (Positive Action in Housing, Scottish Refugee Council, GRAMNET, and Amul Azzudin - one of the 'Glasgow Girls' and a community campaigner) to comment on their relevance. An engaged debate followed, from an audience including practitioners, policymakers, academics, campaigners and volunteers, both migrant and non-migrant. Many people suggested practical ways in which the findings could be useful to them, including the use of the short film we produced and shared at the event.

We asked participants to respond in writing to the question 'What one idea or action will you take away from today's discussion?'. Some of the responses were:
- Alternative ways of communicating research and campaigning to engage people
- Every tool for campaigning should be used
- Link African Forum Glasgow with Positive Action in Housing
- Deeper consideration and value of the purpose and value of research and of the effects of campaign strategies
- The buzz, energy and fantastic results that can come from an effective partnership between academics and grassroots activism!
- Research is essential, and necessary to include activism and humour to go with it. Always speak out, take risks.
- Thank you for your research, will help us make our case stronger
- Step forward to make more stronger ways of campaigns, using research and film as a combination of methodologies to reach people to change their minds and open their hearts. Teaching anti-immigration, anti-racism, move from hate to love.
- The role of documentation and creating a network among diverse organisations seems a vital role to resourcing and sustaining these campaigns and something academics/institutions can do.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.eventbrite.com/e/mapping-immigration-controversy-research-briefing-tickets-16314468013
 
Description Independent Interim Findings Coverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A long article covering our interim research findings appeared in the online version of The Independent, and a shorter version in the print edition. The article had 1000 social media 'shares', and a much larger readership beyond this. The article followed a press release we had issued, and included a further informal interview with the PI.

The article led to further media interest from international news organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/immigration-policy-led-to-new-forms-of-racism-says-ne...
 
Description LBBD Community Safety Partnership 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Two members of the research team were invited to present our interim findings to the Community Safety Panel of the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham, one of the case study areas for our research. This panel of decision makers on community safety in the local area expressed interest in our research through their invitation, and were keen to understand how migration policies were affecting their local area and what their role should be.

Practitioners present asked questions of the research and took away briefings to use in informing future policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description LBH Critical Challenge Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As a direct result of her involvement in this and related research, the PI was asked to participate in the London Borough of Hackney's Critical Challenge Group on community and future planning. She will comment on local authority engagement activities, and planned interventions which will directly inform the borough's next 10 year plan.

As a direct result of her involvement in this and related research, the PI was asked to participate in the London Borough of Hackney's Critical Challenge Group on community and future planning. She will comment on local authority engagement activities, and planned interventions which will directly inform the borough's next 10 year plan. The activity is ongoing, so more tangible results will continue to emerge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description London Book launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Book launch for our jointly-authored research monograph, 'Go Home? The politics of immigration control', at London bookshop The Word. It included a panel discussion involving the research team and guest speakers Dr Suzanne Hall and Rita Chadha, then chief executive of Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London (a partner in the research), followed by a drinks reception and the opportunity to buy the book. There was a mixed audience including the general public, practitioners (e.g. migrant support workers, youth workers) and academics, a lively discussion and many copies of the book were purchased, spreading the research further.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Manchester Book Launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Book launch for our jointly-authored research monograph, 'Go Home? The politics of immigration control', as a fringe event linked to the British Sociological Association conference 2017 in Manchester. We held our event at the Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Library. It involved a showing of our project video, a panel discussion involving the research team and guest speakers Professor Anne-Marie Fortier and journalist Kiri Kankhwende, a drinks reception and the opportunity to buy the book. There was a very mixed audience including the general public, practitioners (e.g. migrant support workers, youth workers) and academics, a lively discussion and many copies of the book were purchased, spreading the research further.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/go-home-book-launch-tickets-33207835530
 
Description New Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion, participants commented on interim project findings and their feedback was used to inform and develop our final research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.facebook.com/events/1553343528255862/
 
Description Presentation at IMISCOE conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation made at the IMISCOE conference for an audience of academics and practitioners. This sparked questions and discussion, and led to a discussion about collaboration in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Press release at launch of event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Small article was published in Telegraph online. Several students from both Warwick and other institutions got in touch with questions about the research.

The article somewhat misrepresented the aims of the research, but did not have a wide reach (the press release itself probably reached more people). However the process of handling hostile press inquiries helped to build links with partner organisations and strengthen and refine our press engagement strategy for later stages of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/new_research_project_to_examine_impacts_of_the...
 
Description Project Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Scientific meeting (conference/symposium etc.)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation keynote/invited speaker
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The conference - organised by us to share the findings of our research and related research and practice - was rated as extremely successful by participants. It included an excellent and unusual mixture of academic researchers, campaigners, practitioners, migrants and students. We shared our research in creative ways, including artistic performance alongside more traditional academic papers and interactive workshops, and we engaged a wider audience in the proceedings through live-tweeting and making recordings of the day available online.

We asked participants to fill in cards telling us one idea or action they would take away from the event. Responses included the following:
- Making a connection between race and class
- Thinking more about the historical links with present day policy
- Campaigns must be led by communities, do not ignore class, strategise for positive outcomes
- Doing more to consider how university-based researchers can capacity build the migration sector to challenge as well as alleviate exclusionary migration policies
- Use of forum theatre to engage audiences, do workshops and provide eg benefits advice for all people and engage in debates about immigration through that
- Coming together in solidarity, building connections
- The importance of 'live' research and participatory forms of dissemination of research
- Creative communication of research, along the way
- Be careful with separating the migrant from the citizen
- Campaigning must start from the small organisations to the big ones
- Talk to others about what has happened
- Learn about how movements gain traction
- Listening to migrants about their stories and allowing them to frame it the way they want
- Apply to the ESRC when outraged by something - combine activism with academia and your sociological imagination
- New thinking needed for traditional anti-racist campaigners to develop future actions. Very valuable research and very accessible for activists/non-academics
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/go-home-mapping-immigration-controversy-end-of-project-conference-regi...
 
Description Project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Our blogs have been circulated among public, activist, media and academic users; in total there have been 13,195 views of the website by 7,019 visitors (as of 3 Aug 2015) and our 'best ever' day saw 597 views in a single day on 21st November 2014 when we launched our interim findings report. Comment and debate has been sparked on the website itself, on twitter, and by email and in person.

There has been a wider awareness of the project and its findings and debate stimulated online and in person which might not otherwise have happened.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015
URL http://mappingimmigrationcontroversy.com
 
Description Public debate, titled Go home? Research as intervention in heated political debate: Conversation between Hannah Jones (University of Warwick), Yasmin Gunaratnam (Goldsmiths) and Helena Holgersson (University of Gothenburg) about the role of critical thinking and collaborative working in our time of 'post-truth' and 'refugee crisis'. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public debate at community space in Gothenburg, Sweden (Göteborgs Litteraturhus, Lagerhuset, Heurlins plats 1b) where the public and students were invited to consider engaged, political research, which sparked questions and discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://hum.gu.se/english/current/calendar/Event_detail/?eventId=70136525163
 
Description Public workshop at Tate Modern: Alternative Facts - Fake it Til You Make It? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The research team worked with artist collective There There to bring to life findings from the Mapping Immigration Controversy project, in which we found much government communication about migration is based on affecting public mood, rather than on facts. We held an event at Tate Exchange in the Tate Modern, in which members of the public worked with researchers and artists to create 'fake newspapers' to reflect the realities of Britain and its migrant life, rather than the sensational 'real' headlines we see every day. We had very enthusiastic engagement from a range of participants, including enthusiasm about continuing the project and producing further materials for wider distribution. There was good engagement and sharing of the research messages and workshop materials on social media (particularly Twitter).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/alternative-facts-and-immigration-fake-it-til-you-make-it-tickets-322...
 
Description Russia Today Interim Findings Coverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following a press release and an item in The Independent newspaper, Russia Today contacted us and broadcast a television report on our findings, quoting our interim report and interviewing the PI on air.

Spread awareness of our research findings to a global audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXtsPtaeNUI&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Twitter account 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Spread information on our project; stimulated debate on the subject; where 'Twitter debates' run (see project methodology), produced data for our analysis.

1,017 followers of the account as of 3rd August 2015, and continues to grow. The reach is beyond this as we often have messages retweeted to wider audiences.

During our end of project conference on 20th June 2015, our hashtag #micresearch was used in 1,272 tweets (including RTs) and this generated 6,903,120 impressions (total number of times tweets with this hashtag were delivered to timelines) on that day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015
URL http://www.twitter.com/micresearch
 
Description West Midlands Feedback Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion, participants commented on interim project findings and their feedback was used to inform and develop our final research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/challenging-xenophobia-in-public-debate-tickets-13968031759
 
Description Westminster Breakfast Briefing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Interim findings were shared with policy makers and practitioners who engaged in lively debate and discussed how their engagement would inform future practice and ideas. Tweets from the project account received 27,700 impressions (when the tweet is displayed in a Twitter user's timeline) during the three day period around this event.

Participants commented in written feedback that as a result of the event they would:
- Reflect on join-up (or its lack) of integration agenda across government (DCLG policymaker)
- Continue voluntary work supporting migrants (NGO practitioner)
- Use the evidence shared to develop work on arts practice with migrant support (NGO practitioner)
- Reflect on the split duties of the police with regard to immigration and domestic violence support, and the importance of security and belonging in creating/sustaining community (Local government policymaker)
- Develop work linking academic studies to public life (Academic researcher)
- Include more cross-sectional debate between students and migrants of different statuses (NUS officer)
- Use role of local government positively, both officers and politicians (Local government policymaker)
- Be inspired by research on community activism (NGO practitioner)
- Focus on pro-migrant activism and develop links with the student movement (NUS officer)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/go-home-mapping-immigration-controversy-breakfast-research-briefing-t...
 
Description Woman's Hour coverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following our press release and a direct approach to BBC Radio 4 Woman's Hour, an item was broadcast discussing the findings of our research. This was set up through the research team and included two women involved in the research through our partner organisations, though none of the research team was directly interviewed on air.

Our research directly led to a shift in debate on national radio to discuss immigration control in terms of the effects on vulnerable women, highlighted in some of our research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b055j9rx#playt=0h00m40s