Explaining and Sustaining the Decline in Stranger, Acquaintance and Domestic Violence

Lead Research Organisation: Nottingham Trent University
Department Name: Sch of Social Sciences

Abstract

Violent incidents make up nearly a quarter of crimes recorded in the Crime Survey for England and Wales. The effects are not just those of emotional and physical harm to the individual victim but spread much wider in terms of the impact on healthcare, cost to the criminal justice system, lost working hours, and a societal fear of crime. Unlike acquisitive crimes the motive (and therefore appropriate preventive mechanisms) is arguably less apparent. As such, it is important to identify those changes in personal security and routine activities which can be associated with trends in violence. No systematic research studies have been undertaken to assess the protective impact of these factors in relation to acquaintance and stranger violence, examined separately, to date. The research proposed is precisely concerned with such an assessment. The primary research question is:

What is the role of population group- and context- specific changes in personal security and routine activities in explaining the decline in stranger and acquaintance violence?

This study will identify the personal security and routine activities measures that offer effective protection from violence and repeat violence to (a) the population overall; (b) specific population subgroups according to their socio-economic attributes; (c) the residents of different areas; and (d) area types and population subgroups plausible combinations in England and Wales and internationally over time.

The urgency to gain insights about violence prevention cannot be exaggerated: at a time of massive public spending cuts and increasing austerity measures, the cost of violence to the UK economy is estimated at £13 billion annually (National Audit Office 2008).

The proposed research will:
- Make a major scientific contribution with immediate and high societal and economic impact. Its theoretical and methodological advancements will inform future research developments in criminology. The current gap in knowledge impdes violence reduction opportunities not just in the UK but across the world.
- Engage throughout with high level research users in the public sector and civil society organisations and inform national and international guidelines on violence prevention.
- Analyse two decades of formidable existing data sources, the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and the International Crime Victims Survey (ICVS), both in the public domain, to allow creative and imaginative application and data linking via comparative work. The CSEW is a large and complex dataset with currently some 40,000 respondents annually. The ICVS is a unique comparative crime data partly funded and organised by the Home Office. Yet relative to both data generation cost and their impeccable quality, they have been extremely under-explored.
- Employ innovative research methodology and application in criminology. This includes the Security Impact Assessment Tool and multivariate multilevel logit modelling, pioneered by the co-applicants with ESRC support for assessing the effectiveness of burglary and car security devices and examining the effect of context on the relation between burglary risk and security, respectively; multilevel negative binomial modelling, pioneered by the P-I with American Statistical Association and Home Office support for investigating the effect of context on single and repeat victimisation patterns; and hurdle models which show whether repeat victims differ from others.
- Engage non-academic partners, the national charity Victim Support and the Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership, to triangulate findings, access further data, and ensure direct applicability of findings to victims of violent crime.
- Benefit from collaboration with International Co- Investigators.

Therefore the proposed research fits the ESRC-SDAI Phase 2 call specification. The co-applicants' theoretical, methodological and policy contribution to date ensure its successful delivery.

Planned Impact

Violent crime has far reaching social and economic costs - to individuals, local communities, and society in general. This research has been designed to inform future policy guidelines in ways that could lead to considerable financial savings and produce direct benefits to the following groups:
- Victims and repeat victims of violent crime, by informing them of how best to reduce their future risks
- All adults, by informing them of effective personal security measures and violence avoidance behavioural adaptations
- Victim Support as a national charity, by improving their evidence base and analysing their data to enable them to provide a more effective and cost efficient service
- Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership in particular and Crime Reduction Partnerships in general, working more effectively and efficiently to discharge their responsibilities
- Businesses which are affected either directly or indirectly by violent crimes, by informing them how best to contribute to reduction of risks and thus improve security for their staff and customers, and by enabling victims to return to work sooner, respectively.
- The insurance industry, by enabling them to offer incentives for individuals who actively seek to reduce their risk of violence by taking effective security measures
- The security industry, by enabling them to improve products of personal security and better target them according to clients' socio-economic and area profiles
- Public information by suggesting improvements to the personal security questions of the Crime Prevention Module of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and the International Crime Victims Survey and to the routine activities questions of both surveys; and
- Public policy by informing on violence reduction in private and public spheres

In an indirect way the proposed research will also benefit:
- The police, by reducing workloads (and thus costs) through reduced violent crimes and by enabling more informed advice to be given to victims and the wider community
- The NHS, by reducing the pressure from violent crime on accident and emergency services
- The society at large, by reducing violence and its impact;
- The economy, via increased productivity (reducing work days lost as a result of violence)

Public engagement for the duration of the proposed research has been planned to maximise its impact to all research users groups (see Pathways to Impact). In addition the Project Partners will be actively involved in the development and dissemination of the research throughout its duration via their in-kind support in data provision, research planning, interpretation of findings with respect to their policy implications and writing up draft policy outputs (see Letters of Support, Pathways to Impact, Case for Support and Project Partners).

As seen in their respective CVs members of the research team already enjoy close contacts with and serve in bodies responsible for crime measurement and prevention. They are thus accustomed to communicating findings to non-specialists in ways that draw out their policy and practice significance. Past work has already had a substantial impact. Farrell's work on repeat victimisation has found its way into routine policy and practice. Grove's recent work on heritage crime has received substantial media coverage. Tseloni's work has played a pivotal part in official reports of crime statistics and patterns. Tilley wrote the original guidance for analysis for the Crime and Disorder Act (Hough and Tilley 1998) and his work on problem-oriented policing and partnership has had a substantial impact on the work of local police services and partnerships. The findings of the team's past ESRC-funded work (ES/F015186/1) have received substantial media coverage and informed Home Office publications on crime trends. Their current ESRC- funded work (ES/K003771/1) is presently informing burglary target hardening policy interventions in Nottingham.

Publications

10 25 50
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Farrell G (2015) Crime concentration theory in Crime Prevention and Community Safety

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Andresen M (2015) The Criminal Act

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Farrell G (2015) Attempted Crime and the Crime Drop in International Criminal Justice Review

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Hodgkinson T (2015) Student Academic Dishonesty: The Potential for Situational Prevention in Journal of Criminal Justice Education

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Tilley N (2015) The Criminal Act

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
ES/L014971/1 01/02/2015 13/09/2015 £151,092
ES/L014971/2 Transfer ES/L014971/1 14/09/2015 30/11/2016 £98,772
 
Description The second part of the research undertaken at Nottingham Trent University generated significant new knowledge on violence victimisation trends by strangers and by acquaintances (also differentiated between those with and without wounding, and also against males and females and across age groups for the above period) in England and Wales from 1991 to 2013/14. The analysis examined both unweighted and weighted Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) data for the eighteen CSEW sweeps of this period. It also modelled violence counts over victims' demographic, socio-economic characteristics, routine activities and self-reported alcohol and drugs use from two periods: before and after the crime drop in England and Wales.

The second part of this study found that acquaintance violence started to fall first in 1995 while stranger violence did not maintain a sustained fall and peaked much later in 2003/04. The falls in violence incidence rate (number of crimes per 1,000 population) since 1995 were driven by the sharp decline in low seriousness acquaintance violence, especially against males and/or young victims aged 16-24 years old. Declining prevalence rates (number of victims per 1,000 population) was the main driver of acquaintance and stranger violence falls. How repeat violence victims differ from single victims and why the violence falls did not reduce repeat violence victimisation is an important new research question that the study opened up.

Most stranger violence occurs in and around night-time economy venues and recently public spaces while most acquaintance violence occurs in and around home or work. Being male and self-reported cannabis use were risk factors for frequent stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation prior to the crime drop. Lifestyle/ routine activities trends reveal significant declines in how frequently people visit venues of the night-time economy (pubs, bars, night-clubs) since 1997 and routine activities are significant predictors of frequent stranger and acquaintance violence victimisation after the crime drop. In particular, the most important common risk factor for both types of violence is going to a club at least three times a week. Other common predictors include going to clubs once to twice weekly, going to pubs at least three times per week, being divorced/separated, and similarly to the mid-1990s, being male and cannabis use. Prominent differences in risk factors include heroin and cocaine use which predict only acquaintance violence; and being single which only relates to stranger violence. Considering violence that occurred 15' walk from victim's home, the study established that violence incidence is comparable across Local Authorities in England and Wales.

With regards to methodological contribution the effect of CSEW weighting and number of crimes per victim truncation methodology on estimated population - specific violence rates was ascertained.
New research networks were formed with the East Midlands Police Academic Collaboration network of six universities and police forces in the region and the University of Lancaster domestic violence team.
Finally new research skills and capability were developed from training the hired Research Staff to analyse crime counts via multilevel modelling, and access and securely use Special License ONS data.
Exploitation Route The findings can be taken forward via:
• 'Nudging' and raising awareness initiatives undertaken by: Core City Chief Executives and their Crime Reduction and Community Safety Partnerships, Police and Crime Commissioners, Local Authorities (LAs) or Councils, Police Forces, Victim Support, National Police Chief Council (NPCC) Violence Lead, the Home Office, Department for Education (DfE), Drinkaware and other charities working to reduce alcohol and drugs problems, the NHS, drugs and alcohol - related counselling services, and solicitors or other services advising during divorce procedures;

• National policy guidelines, regulations and levies for 'secure licensed premises' provided by the Departments for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) as well as LAs;

• National guidelines, incentives and regulations for responsible licensed premises owners accreditation provided by the DCLG, BIS and LAs;

• National guidelines, incentives and regulations for responsible licensed premises managers and staff accreditation provided by the Department for Work and Pensions and LAs;

• Insurance industry financial incentives for licensed premises' owners and landlords to have in place effective violence avoidance policies and staff training;

• Improving the Crime Survey for England and Wales questionnaire and data.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy

URL http://www4.ntu.ac.uk/apps/research/groups/4/home.aspx/group/178996/publications#overview
 
Description The research interim findings were disseminated to crime prevention practitioners at both national and local levels via their participation in the project's Advisory Committee (AC) which held workshops at regular intervals. The public and voluntary sector organisations which contributed to the project via the AC included the following: • Life-skills Education, C.I.C. (a voluntary organisation delivering programmes enhancing young people's resilience in problem solving and communication skills); • The Home Office, the Crime Statistics and Violence and Early Offending Units; • Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership (NCDP); and • Office for National Statistics, who received feedback on BCS/CSEW questionnaire design improvements for gauging additional information on security, guardianship and violence victimisation nationally. In addition to the Advisory Committee of Stakeholders and Experts (see above) the project team employed the following collaborative and engagement mechanisms: • Briefing Notes, Summary Reports and Press Releases; • Twitter account (@project_vio) and project's dedicated website for continuous postings/ opinion exchanges; • Radio/TV interviews, newspaper postings, articles in practitioners newsletters and magazines; • Participation in Local Crime and Safety Partnerships Board meetings; • Presenting findings in (non-academic) practitioners/ policy national and international conferences; • Working with national policy representatives and in designing the Nottingham alcohol-related harm reduction plan based upon the project's findings; and • One-day end of project non-academic conference (see later discussion). Details can be found in the Portfolio of outcomes section on Researchfish. The research has the potential to increase the effectiveness of public services and policy via cost-effective crime prevention, enhance quality of life via crime and fear of crime reduction, and contributed to improving the economic competitiveness of the United Kingdom via promoting safe night-time economy activities. The following discussion gives examples of the impact generated from this research to date: Members of the project team have disseminated the findings to the UK Statistics Authority; the WHO Global Violence Reduction Conference; the ESRC Secondary Data Analysis Initiative (SDAI) Event ('Keep burglars in the dark - Choose Safe Venues and Companions for Drinking & Dancing', 29.2.2016); the National socio-legal training day: Sources and Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice (19.11.2015); 'The way ahead for Neighbourhood Watch' Event (2-3.12.2015); and in meetings organised by the NCDP - in particular, the Violence Think Tank and the NCDP Board. The project's methodology is currently used for testing the effectiveness of two Drinkware initiatives ('Club Crew' and the 'Wouldn't Shouldn't' campaign). Two members of the Project team (the PI, Prof A. Tseloni, and Co-I, Dr L. Garius) sit in the Steering Group of the Local Alcohol Action Areas: Phase 2 (LAAA2) for Nottinghamshire (including Nottingham city) working on devising and eventually evaluating local policies with regards to the Home Office Programme's Core Challenges 2 to 5, that pertain to safe movement and spaces in the night-time economy, responsible alcohol sales and designing out crime. Finally the end of project conference (29.6.2016) focussed on how to both communicate findings to the public and take them forward to influence violence risk awareness and improvements amongst various stakeholders including: • Home Office related units; • Licensed premises and insurance sector organisations; • The Police and the National Police Chief Council; • Core City Chief Executives and their community safety partnerships; • Public Health; • the NHS; and • Local Authorities. Delegates included the Advisory Committee members (please see earlier discussion), representatives of Police Forces around the country, local councils and others from the above list. The conference was chaired by Peter Moyes, Life-skills Education, C.I.C., who has vast experience in policing and coordinating crime prevention policies at local and regional level. Speakers from the research-users community at the end of project conference included: • The Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Paddy Tipping; • Chief Supt Alex Murray, West Midlands Police and Founder and Chair of the Society of Evidence-Based Policing; • Tara Deshpande, Home Office, Head of Crime Insight and Assessment Team, Crime and Policing Knowledge Hub; • Dr John Larsen, Director of Evidence and Impact, Drinkaware; and • Professor Ken Pease, OBE (Visiting Professor UCL) with vast experience in crime prevention partly in collaboration with the Home Office and Police Forces. For a full list of the project's AC membership and the end of project "Explaining and Sustaining the Decline in Stranger and Acquaintance Violence" conference Programme, Delegate list, Speakers, Presentations, Roundtable Discussion Outcomes, and other information please see the project's website.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy
Impact Types Societal

 
Description Approval of Selective Licensing
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Selective Licensing for restricting proportion of rented housing in the city has been approved by the Department of Housing and Local Communities
URL https://www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/housing/private-sector-housing/selective-licensing/
 
Description Influenced discussion of Crime & Safety Partnership
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact Response to the Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership: Strategic Assessment 2017 draft & Partnership Plan which offered a more focussed depiction of crime issues in the city. A well- defined identification of a problem is the first step in solving it. 22 Nov.
 
Description Steering Group of the Local Alcohol Action Areas: Phase 2 (LAAA2)
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Written responses to the ONS Consultation "Changes to the Crime Survey for England and Wales"
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Changes in CSEW questionnaire and sampling.
 
Description East Midlands Police Academic Collaboration
Amount £862,620 (GBP)
Organisation College of Policing 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 10/2017
 
Description Evaluation
Amount £7,000 (GBP)
Organisation Life skills Education 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2015 
End 06/2016
 
Description Evaluation Scheme
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Drinkaware Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 11/2017
 
Description Evaluation scheme
Amount £31,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Drinkaware Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 06/2017
 
Description Secondary Data Analysis Initiative
Amount £152,656 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/K003771/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2009 
End 08/2012
 
Description Secondary Data Analysis Initiative
Amount £191,000 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/P001556/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 10/2018
 
Description Secondary Data Analysis Initiative Phase 4
Amount £189,000 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/P001556/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 01/2019
 
Description EMPAC Local and Community Policing Network 
Organisation University of Northampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution EMPAC is comprised of police forces, Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and universities in the region and has an established governance framework. We have advised on burglary prevention good practice the police forces within the collaboration. Further we lead research on Local and Community Policing Network on 'Managing anti-social behaviour risk: helping identify individuals and areas most likely to experience ASB', 'Community Engagement Toolkit' and other projects.
Collaborator Contribution EMPAC is comprised of police forces, Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and universities in the region and has an established governance framework.
Impact A list of conference presentations and research reports on: Police engagement with local communities Aims: Development and testing of a tool which enables police forces to target their engagement approaches most effectively, across socio-demographics, particularly rural areas and for children and young people. Improving efficient practice in neighbourhood policing, public confidence, reporting crime. Police engagement with local communities project page Anti-Social Behaviour risk and management Aims: Development and testing of a tool to identify those at risk of further victimisation, for example violence, based on individual profile, context and circumstance. Implementing targeted resources to reduce repeat victimisation, policy development across police and partners Anti-Social Behaviour risk and management project page Cyber beat: policing cyber space Nottingham Trent University will be responsible for independently evaluating the Cyber Beat pilot. Evaluation criteria include changes in demand, efficiency savings and changes in public confidence. Braunstone Blues impact evaluation Leicestershire Police, Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service and East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) are collaborating in a project to reduce demand for all three emergency services from repeat service users in the Braunstone area of Leicester. The evaluation includes assessing the impact of deploying an EMAS paramedic to three care homes in the area.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Conversation entry 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The Conversation UK. Fact Check: do the police spend over a million hours a year fighting cannabis? 24 May.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://theconversation.com/fact-check-do-the-police-spend-over-a-million-hours-a-year-fighting-canna...
 
Description Data user discussion panel member 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussant- Data user panel member in the session 'How will we measure crime in ten years' time?' Crime Surveys Users Meeting, Royal Statistical Society, London. 8 Dec.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ukdataservice.ac.uk/news-and-events/eventsitem/?id=5174
 
Description Discussion on improving Crime Statistics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Organiser /participant meeting of Quantitative and Spatial Criminology team with Crime Statistics Lead, Office for Statistics Regulation. 27 Feb.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description End of project conference: 'Explaining and Sustaining the Decline in Stranger and Acquaintance Violence' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented and discussed research finding at the end of project conference including discussions on practical implications and approaches to violence prevention with approx. 70 participants (mixture of academics, policy makers and practitioners). 29 June 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.ntu.ac.uk/research/groups-and-centres/projects/violence-trends
 
Description Home Office presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact R. Thompson discussed findings from the burglary project with approx. 20 Home Office researchers (mixture of statisticians, researchers and policy makers).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact "New crime figures in dock: Criminologist questions police recording showing surge in crime." By Ciara Leeming. Big Issue North. 05-11 Feb 2018, pp. 6-7.
Interviewed 30.1.2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bigissuenorth.com/news/2018/02/new-crime-figures-dock/
 
Description Membership, Nottingham Young Victims as Offenders Reference Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nottingham Young Victims as Offenders Reference Group, Nottinghamshire OPCC, - first meeting 24 Jan. and since then ongoing virtual discussions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership Board presentation of results 14 March 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presented and discussed interim results (Agenda item 9) to 29 city representatives (see membership list of NCDP) and invited participation in the end of project conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Press Release 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Press coverage Violence Trends project
Local
? Nottinghamshire in Focus
? Wigan Evening Post
? Western Daily Press
? Capital FM: http://www.capitalfm.com/eastmids/radio/news/local/going-clubbing-increases-risk/


National coverage: Metro, BT, AOL, Yahoo pieces were all national.
? https://uk.news.yahoo.com/regular-club-goers-suffer-more-061344951.html

? http://home.bt.com/news/uk-news/regular-club-goers-suffer-more-violent-crimes-11364070618042

? http://www.aol.co.uk/news/2016/06/29/regular-clubgoers-suffer-more-violent-crimes-than-those-who-dont-go-clubbing/

International coverage
? Sputnik News
http://sputniknews.com/europe/20160629/1042177751/uk-nightclub-crime-violence.html
? R&D Magazine
http://www.rdmag.com/news/2016/06/study-nightlife-goers-more-prone-violent-attacks

ESRC
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/news-events-and-publications/news/news-items/revellers-face-brunt-of-violent-crime-study-suggests/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rdmag.com/news/2016/06/study-nightlife-goers-more-prone-violent-attacks
 
Description Provided to a Select Committee of the House of Parliament 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact House of Commons Oral Evidence taken before the Home Affairs Committee on 'Policing for the future: changing demands and new challenges'. Portcullis House. 28 Mar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description dissemination to Government Head analysts. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presented and discussed results from the project which led to further email exchanges with Euan Dick, Head of Safer Communities Analysis, The Scottish Government (stored under meetings). Andy Myhill College of Policing was also present
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Crime Surveys Users Conference. About 70 participants including Home Office, The Scottish Government, Northern Ireland, ONS, PCC's offices and voluntary sector organisations representatives (in addition to academics) 9.1.2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.ukdataservice.ac.uk/news-and-events/eventsitem/?id=4754
 
Description findings' dissemination 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 1.8.2016 Meeting with the West Midlands Violence Prevention Alliance to discuss violence project findings and potential for collaboration. Awareness of the project with a view to informal regional policy and practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Informed NPCC Violence Chief Constable Simon Bailey of the findings over the phone, 21.11.2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination and local policy advice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Participated in a meeting with the Home Office, Drinkaware, NPCC Office, Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County Police to discuss LAAA2 intervetions in the city & county inforred by the violenc etrends project findings. 24 Feb. 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description findings' dissemination at the EMPAC Fellowship Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact EMPAC Leads, 20 police officers and Derbyshire PCC received print information on the research findings. See also EMPAC -related further funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination to Nottingham Civic Exchange Inclusive and safe places workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Nottingham Civic Exchange Inclusive and safe places workshop, Nottingham Contemporary
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination to police officers 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussed burglary and security project findings and Nottingham pilot as well as violence trends project findings at 2 EMPAC workshops to front-line police officers. See also EMPAC further funding entry
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description findings' dissemination to policymakers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact N Tilley- Title of address - 'Using Crime, victimisation and justice statistics to understand the global crime drop and its implications for crime prevention policy.' Keynote address at the Third International Conference on Governance, Crime and Justice Statistics, in Merida, Mexico, organised by UNODC (United National Office on Drugs and Crime) and INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia). The intention is to improve the conduct and analysis of large victimisation surveys and other statistical sources better to inform crime prevention strategies
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.gsj.inegi.org.mx/programme.html
 
Description provided commentary for a scientific newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview to Nala Rogers for her article 'Why Seemingly Scary Cities Might Be Safer Than You Think: Mathematical model shows how fear of crime can spread even when risk is low' in Inside Science American Institute of Physics. (interviewed 10 July, published) 12 July 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.insidescience.org/news/why-seemingly-scary-cities-might-be-safer-you-think
 
Description radio commentary 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact BBC Radio Nottingham: Interviewed by Verity Cowley re the ONS and BBC crime risk calculator 7 Sept. 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05cxq8s#playt=1h21m40s
 
Description research findings dissemination to police officers 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussed research with the High Potential Development cohort of police officers at the College of Policing and provided officers with takeaway materials.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description response to City Council Consultation for application to the DHLG 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Written Response to the Nottingham City Council Selective Licensing Consultation 24 Mar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/housing/private-sector-housing/selective-licensing/
 
Description results dissemination 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk to front-line officers, PCC offices' staff, EMPAC Leads and College of Policing staff about burglary project and pilot and briefly violence project findings at the Society of Evidenced Based Policing (SEBP) annual conference, Northampton, 2-3 March.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.sebp.police.uk/events
 
Description written evidence to ONS comsultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Written responses to the ONS Consultation "Changes to the Crime Survey for England and Wales" as member of the British Society of Criminology Executive Committee (21 July 2017) and the Quantitative and Spatial Criminology Research Group at NTU (23 July 2017).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017