Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course

Lead Research Organisation: University of St Andrews
Department Name: Geography and Sustainable Development

Abstract

Partner relationships, residential relocations and housing are crucial to people's well-being and are known to be connected with each other. Many aspects of this connection, however, have remained under-researched or unexplored thus far: living-apart-together besides co-residential partnerships, long-term effects, mutual causality, full trajectories rather than one-at-a-time events, and the impact of the contextual background. We aim to address the following research question: How do partner trajectories and residential trajectories develop in relation to each other in people's life courses, and how are these trajectories and the interactions between them related to the contextual backgrounds of Germany, the UK and the Netherlands? We will derive and test hypotheses from various micro-level theories, including rational-choice theory and bargaining models, and also develop hypotheses on the macro-level impact of welfare regimes and housing markets. We use large-scale longitudinal datasets for the three countries. We will analyze these using a variety of standard and advanced longitudinal methods, including multilevel event history analysis, sequence analysis and dyadic models. Our results will enhance the scientific insight into partner trajectories and residential trajectories in the life courses of linked individuals.

Planned Impact

Who will benefit from this research?
We anticipate that the major group of non-academic beneficiaries will be family, population, and housing researchers and analysts working at central and local governments in the UK, the Netherlands and Germany (e.g. the Office for National Statistics for the UK). We also expect that people involved in decision-making in the areas of family, population and housing policies will be interested in the results of the study. Finally, the results of the project will be of interest of the general public in the UK, the Netherlands and Germany.

How they will benefit?
The project will improve our understanding of how partner relationships and housing careers evolve and interact in people's life courses. With increasing diversity of partnership and housing trajectories in industrialised countries, research on partnership and housing dynamics is highly relevant. First, the results of the project could be used as input for household projections at national and regional levels, which are used for housing planning and resource allocation. Detailed information on the evolution of partnership and housing trajectories over people's life courses is critical to significantly improve our current (relatively crude) projections. Second, the project will identify the short- and long-term effects of partnership changes on housing conditions of individuals; the results will be important for policy-makers to revise and develop policies in order to also meet the housing needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged population groups. Third, it is equally important to inform the general public on the short- and long-term effects of partnership changes (particularly divorce and separation) on housing conditions and discuss how to avoid undesired housing trajectories.

Publications

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Wagner M (2019) The transition from living apart together to a coresidential partnership in Advances in Life Course Research

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Thomas MJ (2018) Geographical Distances Between Separated Parents: A Longitudinal Analysis. in European journal of population = Revue europeenne de demographie

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Schnor C Remain, leave, or return? Mothers' location continuity after separation in Belgium in Revise and Resubmit from Demographic Research, manuscript available upon request

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Mikolai J Separation, divorce and housing tenure: A cross-country comparison in Under review at Demographic Research, manuscript available upon request

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
ES/L01663X/1 01/09/2014 31/12/2016 £261,270
ES/L01663X/2 Transfer ES/L01663X/1 01/01/2017 31/12/2017 £73,941
 
Description The PartnerLife project investigated how partner relationships and residential trajectories develop in relation to each other in individuals' lives in the United Kingdom, Germany and the Netherlands. The British team studied: a) the interrelationships between partnership and residential changes, and b) residential and housing consequences of separation and divorce.

A. Significant new knowledge
Our findings highlighted that residential mobility and housing are closely related to family life events. We showed that the likelihood of moving is the highest when a partnership is formed or following separation. Interestingly, most moves in the UK are related to the formation of cohabitations rather than marriages. Cohabiting individuals are most likely to move to privately rented dwellings, whereas married people move to homeownership suggesting that marriage is still an important life event in Britain.

Divorce and separation have become life events that many individuals experience. Our analyses showed that separation leads to a period of residential instability; separated people are significantly more likely to move than single, cohabiting and married individuals. The propensity of a move is the highest shortly after separation and it decreases over time. However, even three years after separation, separated individuals are more likely to move than those who are in a relationship suggesting that separation has a long-term effect. These patterns vary by country and housing context. In Belgium, mobility rates remained elevated for a long period after separation, whereas in the Netherlands, post-separation residential instability appeared brief, with mobility rates declining rapidly; the UK, Germany and Australia held an intermediate position.

Most cohabiting and married individuals in the UK are homeowners, but homeownership rates are low among separated individuals. Following separation individuals are most likely to move to privately rented housing, although some move to social housing, or become (again) homeowners. There are significant differences by gender and education. Women are more likely than men to stay in or move to social housing, especially low educated women and those with children, whereas separated men are more likely than women to return to homeownership. The results demonstrate that family structure, resources, and government policies shape housing trajectories of separated people in the UK.

B. Improved research methods
We developed a novel method to distinguish between moves due to separation and moves of separated individuals. Analysing both types of moves allowed us to better understand how separation influences individuals' housing careers in the short and long term. We also proposed an original way of dealing with attrition (separated people drop out of the study) and censoring due to a competing event (separated individuals form a new relationship) when applying sequence analysis to prospective panel data. Finally, we showed an innovative way of conducting a comparative study of residential mobility among separated individuals when individual-level data cannot be shared because of confidentiality issues.

C. New research resources
We demonstrated how large-scale national panel studies and longitudinal register data can be effectively combined and analysed in comparative research.

D. New research networks
We developed an international network of researchers to analyse and compare the relationship between family events and housing changes in industrialised countries.
Exploitation Route The project deepened our understanding of the short- and long-term effects of separation on residential mobility and showed how housing markets shape individuals' housing conditions. Future research could use the proposed innovative method for comparative research to analyse residential and housing changes of separated individuals in industrialised countries, which share similar levels of economic development, but have significantly different welfare regimes and housing markets (e.g. countries of Europe, East Asia and North America). Additionally, research could explore how the proposed approach can efficiently deal with small cell counts.

Our results highlighted that policy makers should make efforts to reduce prolonged residential instability among separated individuals and address issues of inequality. Social housing offers long-term residential stability to separated women with children. However, it should be more geographically dispersed and mixed with other tenure types to reduce residential segregation, increase social cohesion, and enhance educational opportunities for children of separated, low-income families. Private renting should provide long-term security for those who cannot afford homeownership and/or wish to rent. Smaller and more affordable, good quality homes should be made available on both the private rental market and the homeownership market to better reflect changing family patterns and needs of individuals and families.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other

URL https://partnerlifeproject.org/
 
Description A. Beneficiaries and target groups In our original research proposal we identified the following non-academic beneficiaries: family, population, and housing researchers and analysts working at central and local governments in the UK (e.g. the Office for National Statistics). We also expected that people involved in decision-making in the areas of family, population and housing policies would be interested in the results of the study. Finally, we anticipated the results of the project to be of interest to the general public. B. Pathways to impact During the project life-time we undertook the following dissemination activities: First, we prepared six research articles; four papers focus on the UK, two papers are comparative studies of five countries (see Publications). We are also editing a special issue of an international journal of population studies (Demographic Research). The special issue consists of six studies on the relationships between family changes and housing transitions, and the short- and long-term effects of divorce and separation on housing conditions of individuals and families in the following industrialised countries: Italy, France, United Kingdom, Belgium, Finland and Hungary. Additionally, we prepared a book chapter and four related research articles. Second, the results of the project were presented at major national and international conferences in population, family and housing studies. In total, the UK team presented 28 conference papers (see Engagement activities). We considered conference presentations as good means with which to convey the results of the project to researchers and decision-makers in the areas of family and housing policies. Many government statisticians and decision-makers attend these conferences and actively participate in the discussion of papers (e.g. Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017; the European Population Conference: 2016, 2018; Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America: 2016, 2017, 2018). Additionally, the project results (including research methodology) were disseminated among the participants of the summer schools on Longitudinal and Life Course Research (2015, 2016, 2017, 2018). Third, we prepared an open access policy brief on Changing Partnership Patterns, Housing and New Social Vulnerabilities, which was published by Population Europe (https://www.population-europe.eu/policybrief/changing-partnership-patterns-housing-and-new-social-vulnerabilities). Population Europe is a network of leading population centers and its objective is to disseminate up-to-date research information to policy-makers and various stakeholders. We also published a summary of our research in the Understanding Society Insights in 2018/19 (https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/sites/default/ files/downloads/insights/insights-2018.pdf) and prepared a short video with the main project findings and their policy implications to showcase the project (https://partnerlifeproject.org/news/). The PartnerLife Project also has a website, which includes an overview of our main activities, publications and presentations (https://partnerlifeproject.org/). Fourth, we organised an International Research and Policy Symposium on Family Changes and Housing Transitions in the Life Course in St Andrews in May 2017. This symposium brought together academic researchers and non-academic policy-makers (e.g. Joseph Rowntree Foundation, UNECE) to discuss recent research on the relationships between family changes and housing transitions, the short- and long-term effects of partnership changes on individuals' housing conditions, and the challenges that changing housing systems and new demographic realities pose to family, housing and welfare policies in the UK and beyond. Academic presentations were the focus of the first day, whereas the key results of academic research and their policy implications were discussed on the second day. The symposium ended with a panel discussion on "Are policies fit for purpose?" (https://partnerlifeproject.org/research-and-policy-workshop/). C. Impact We have reported academic impact of the project in the Key Findings section (significant new knowledge, improved research methods, new research resources and new research networks). The wider societal and economic impact of the project is related to two areas: a) improved measurement of complex family and housing trajectories; and b) increased awareness of the negative impact of separation on individuals' housing careers. 1. Improved measurement of complex family and housing trajectories Our research has drawn attention to the need to improve the measurement and information collection on complex family and housing patterns in industrialised societies (including the UK) where marital divorce and separation have become life events that many individuals will experience in their lives. We have (directly) communicated our findings and recommendations to government statisticians at the Office for National Statistics, the National Records of Scotland and to the Statistical Division of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), which coordinates collection of population, family and housing statistics in Europe. Our research paper on separation and housing in Population Studies (2018), which is widely read by government statisticians, has been viewed 1,527 times (11/03/19); this is one of the largest figures for a recently published paper in this journal. This paper also won second place in the John Rasbash Prize, awarded by the Centre for Multilevel Modelling (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmm/research/rasbash-prize.html). We expect some changes in the future on how information on family disruption and housing changes are collected in order to provide improved services for most vulnerable and disadvantaged groups and to revise and develop relevant policies. 2. Increased awareness of negative impact of separation on individuals' housing careers Our project identified a number of negative consequences of divorce and separation on individuals' housing trajectories (see Key Findings section) and provided the following recommendations: policies should reduce residential instability of separated people; increase their tenure security; reduce spatial segregation of social housing (which is important for women with children); and diversify housing stock to better represent changing housing needs of individuals and households. We have communicated these recommendations to selected local authority representatives, stakeholders, policy makers and to the wider audience (see pathways to impact). Although we are not aware of any policy changes resulting from our recommendations, our dissemination activities have certainly increased the awareness of the housing issues of separated people and potential solutions to these problems to meet the housing needs of vulnerable population groups. We have launched some debate and anticipate that our results and policy recommendations will be referred to and discussed in the future. Additionally, we have recently contributed a book chapter summarising the key findings of the PartnerLife project to the Handbook of Demographic Change and the Life Course, which is likely to become a key textbook for social science undergraduates and postgraduates, hence generating further potential impact in the future. Furthermore, the RA (Julia Mikolai) was invited to the high-level expert meeting on lone parents in Brussels, organised by Population Europe. One of the main consequences of marital divorce and separation is the growing number of lone parent (mainly lone mother) families. The RA shared and disseminated some of the key findings at the expert meeting, which was attended by many key European stakeholders such as UNICEF, COFACE, One-Parent Families Scotland, European Economic and Social Committee, AGE Platform Europe, OECD, and the European Commission. The results of the discussions between these stakeholders and academic experts have been summarised in a Population Europe policy brief (https://www.population-europe.eu/policy-brief/supporting-lone-parents-and-their-children-europe). Finally, the project PI (Hill Kulu) has been invited to participate in the work of the Expert Advisory Group at the Scottish Government to analyse the impact of the UK leaving the EU on Scotland's population and migration including labour markets, housing and households. This certainly has been an indirect (if not a direct) impact of the PartnerLife project. Participation in the work of the expert group will provide the opportunity to further disseminate the project results and policy recommendations.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Lecture on event history analysis for 25 PhD students and post-doctoral fellows from various European countries, Summer School on Longitudinal and Life Course Research, Bocconi University, June 2016
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Enhanced analytical and methodological skills of a new cohort of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.
URL http://www.dondena.unibocconi.it/wps/wcm/connect/cdr/centro_dondena/home/events/2016+summer+school+o...
 
Description Lecture on event history analysis for 25 PhD students and post-doctoral fellows from various European countries, Summer School on Longitudinal and Life Course Research, University of Bamberg, August 2015
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Enhanced analytical and methodological skills of a new cohort of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.
 
Description Lecture on event history analysis for 25 PhD students and post-doctoral fellows from various European countries, Summer School on Longitudinal and Life Course Research, University of Bocconi, July 2018
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Enhanced analytical and methodological skills of a new cohort of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.
URL http://www.dondena.unibocconi.it/wps/wcm/connect/Cdr/Centro_Dondena/Home/Events/Summer+School+on+Lon...
 
Description Lecture on event history analysis for 25 PhD students and post-doctoral fellows from various European countries, Summer School on Longitudinal and Life Course Research, University of Zurich, September 2017
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Enhanced analytical and methodological skills of a new cohort of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.
URL https://www.slls.org.uk/summerschool
 
Description North West Doctoral Training Centre
Amount £64,300 (GBP)
Organisation University of Liverpool 
Department North West ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, University of Liverpool
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 12/2017
 
Title Competing-risks multilevel event-history model 
Description This is a statistical model to study life trajectories of individuals in social science research. We have extended conventional competing-risks survival analysis to simultaneous analysis; the method allows a direct comparison of the risk of various outcomes for population subgroups (e.g. the likelihood of moving to homeownership among married people compared to the likelihood of moving to social housing among separated individuals). 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Improves the measurement of human behaviour in social science research. 
 
Title Count-data approach to compare transition rates across countries 
Description This method proposes a way of comparing transition rates across countries when individual-level data cannot be released to another country for comparative analysis. The approach is as follows: The individual-level data are used to calculate aggregated event-time (or occurrence-exposure) tables for each country, which are aggregated by different combinations of socio-demographic variables; the country files are then merged into one common database and the data are analysed by using a Poisson regression model. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Improves the measurement of human behaviour in social science research. 
 
Title Competing-risks multilevel event-history model 
Description This is a statistical model to study life trajectories of individuals in social science research. We have extended conventional competing-risks survival analysis to simultaneous analysis; the method allows a direct comparison of the risk of various outcomes for population subgroups (e.g. the likelihood of moving to homeownership among married people compared to the likelihood of moving to social housing among separated individuals). 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Improves the measurement of human behaviour in social science research. 
 
Title Count-data approach to compare transition rates across countries 
Description This method proposes a way of comparing transition rates across countries when individual-level data cannot be released to another country for comparative analysis. The approach is as follows: The individual-level data are used to calculate aggregated event-time (or occurrence-exposure) tables for each country, which are aggregated by different combinations of socio-demographic variables; the country files are then merged into one common database and the data are analysed by using a Poisson regression model. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Improves the measurement of human behaviour in social science research. 
 
Description Cross-national study no. 1 
Organisation Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have designed and led the data preparation, analysis, and writing of the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution Partners followed our guidelines and prepared data for a comparative analysis.
Impact We have written a paper which is currently under review in European Sociological Review (second round) and we have presented the results of this collaboration at several conferences and research seminars.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Cross-national study no. 1 
Organisation Statistics Belgium
PI Contribution We have designed and led the data preparation, analysis, and writing of the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution Partners followed our guidelines and prepared data for a comparative analysis.
Impact We have written a paper which is currently under review in European Sociological Review (second round) and we have presented the results of this collaboration at several conferences and research seminars.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Cross-national study no. 1 
Organisation Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Department Interface Demography
PI Contribution We have designed and led the data preparation, analysis, and writing of the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution Partners followed our guidelines and prepared data for a comparative analysis.
Impact We have written a paper which is currently under review in European Sociological Review (second round) and we have presented the results of this collaboration at several conferences and research seminars.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Cross-national study no. 2 
Organisation Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have designed the study and data preparation guidelines for collaborators to follow. We have also drafted a journal article and presented the findings at several scientific conferences and research seminars.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators have prepared data for comparative analyses.
Impact Unpublished manuscript, soon to be submitted to a population journal, conference presentations, presentations at research seminars.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Cross-national study no. 2 
Organisation University of Groningen
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have designed the study and data preparation guidelines for collaborators to follow. We have also drafted a journal article and presented the findings at several scientific conferences and research seminars.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators have prepared data for comparative analyses.
Impact Unpublished manuscript, soon to be submitted to a population journal, conference presentations, presentations at research seminars.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council
Department Centre for Population Change
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation French Institute for Demographic Studies
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation Hungarian Demographic Research Institute
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation Statistics Belgium
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation University of Turku
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Special Collection in Demographic Research 
Organisation Vrije Universiteit Brussel
PI Contribution Mikolai and Kulu have initiated a Special Collection in Demographic Research, an Open Access demography journal. They contribute papers to the Special Collection and will co-edit the collection together with Mulder.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners, representing four additional country case studies (Finland, Italy, France, and Hungary) contribute papers to the Special Collection.
Impact Proposal for Special Collection accepted in Demographic Research. The Special Collection will be published within a year.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Pelikh, A., Kulu, H., Mikolai. J. Make up or break up? Union histories of young adults in England and Wales. Poster presentation at the Annual meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL. This poster has been awarded a poster prize.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description International Conference on Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course, University of Cologne, 27-29 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The international conference on "Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course" was organised as part the PartnerLife research project. The conference aimed to create a meeting point for researchers who study the interrelationship between partnership trajectories, residential relocations and housing. It took place in Cologne on July 27-29, 2017 and the program featured a number of invited talks by internationally renowned scientists.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.partnerlife.uni-koeln.de/home/
 
Description International Research and Policy Symposium on Family Changes and Housing Transitions in the Life Course, University of St Andrews, UK, 18-19 May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The international symposium brought together academic researchers and non-academic policy makers in the areas of family, population and housing policies to discuss recent research on the relationships between family changes and housing transitions, the short- and long-term effects of partnership changes on housing conditions of individuals and families, and the challenges that changing housing systems and new demographic realities pose to family, housing and welfare policies in the UK and beyond. Policy makers were from UNECE, Joseph Rowntree Foundation, ONS, NRS, and the British Society for Population Studies. Mikolai and Kulu will edit a special issue in a demography journal to collect some of the academic papers from the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://partnerlifeproject.org/research-and-policy-workshop/
 
Description Invited Talk - Centre for Population Change seminar series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai was invited to give a talk at the monthly ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC) seminar series at Ladywell House in Edinbugh. She delivered a talk titled "Union dissolution, residential mobility and housing in Britain" to showcase already published findings from the PartnerLife project as well as to discuss ongoing research. The audience included academics from CPC, the University of Edinburgh, the National Records of Scotland, and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited Talk - Centre for Population Change seminar series, 28 September 2017, Ladywell House, Edinburgh, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai was invited to give a talk at the monthly ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC) seminar series at Ladywell House in Edinburgh. She delivered a talk titled "Union dissolution, residential mobility and housing in Britain" to showcase already published findings from the PartnerLife project as well as to discuss ongoing research. The audience included academics from CPC, the University of Edinburgh, the National Records of Scotland, and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited Talk - Centre for Population Change seminar series, Southampton, 18 October 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai was invited to give a talk at the ESRC Centre for Population Change seminar series in Southampton. During this talk, the key findings of the PartnerLife project were showcased and explained, as well as the outputs (published papers and policy brief) were introduced and advertised. The talk was recorded and it is available on YouTube together with the presentation slides.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ch4JffxBX5s
 
Description Invited Talk - Institute of Education, University College London, 4 October 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Hill Kulu gave an invited talk at the Institute of Education at University College London in October 2017 on "Divorce and housing tenure: A cross-country comparison". This talk provided the opportunity to showcase our findings from the PartnerLife project to date and to discuss ongoing work. The feedback from postgraduate students and colleagues have encouraged us to conduct additional analyses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited Talk - Nordic Demographic Society,Oslo, 27 November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai was invited to the Nordic Demographic Society in Oslo, Norway, to talk about the PartnerLife project and its key findings. The audience included housing experts, family demographers, as well as sociologists from academic and non-academic institutions (e.g. Statistics Norway) from across Oslo. The title of the talk was "Union dissolution, residential mobility, and housing in Britain: Findings from the PartnerLife project".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited Talk - Nuffield College, University of Oxford, 31 January 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Invited talk on "Residential mobility and tenure changes among separated individuals: A cross-country comparison" at the prestigious Nuffield College, University of Oxford on 31 January 2018 given by Hill Kulu. The presentation lead to intense debates and discussions which have helped us to improve our journal article.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited Talk - University of Oslo, Norway, 27 November 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai was invited to the University of Oslo, Norway, to talk about the PartnerLife project and its key findings. The audience included housing experts, family demographers, as well as sociologists from academic and non-academic institutions (e.g. Statistics Norway) from across Oslo. The title of the talk was "Union dissolution, residential mobility, and housing in Britain: Findings from the PartnerLife project".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited talk - Vrije Universiteit Brussels, 9 January 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai presented results of the paper "Union dissolution, residential mobility, and housing in the UK" at Interface Demography, Vrije Universiteit Brussels on 9 January 2018. The talk generated discussions and enabled us to disseminate a selection of the main findings from the PartnerLife project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Poster Presentation at the European Population Conference, Brussels, 6-9 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai presented a poster (co-authored with Kulu, H) titled "It's about time. The interrelationship between partnership transitions, residential mobility, and housing tenure". Poster presentations allow for detailed discussion with many individual participants who are interested in the topic of the poster. The questions of the audience and discussions with them enabled us to further improve this paper and refine the analyses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies (BSPS), 6-8 September 2017, Liverpool, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J. & Kulu, H. The interrelationship between partnership and housing histories in the UK. During the poster presentation, representatives of ONS, NRS, and Glasgow City Council were interested in our work and discussed the findings with us. Additionally, we received requests for further information about the project from esteemed colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J. & Kulu, H. Short- and long-term effects of separation on housing tenure in England and Wales. Poster presentation at the Annual meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Kulu, H., Mikolai, J., Thomas, M. J., Vidal, S., Schnor, C., Willaert, D., Visser, F. H. L., Mulder, C. H. Separation and spatial mobility: A cross-national comparison. Poster presentation at the Annual meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 27-29 April 2017, Chicago, IL.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, 31 March - 2 April 2016, Wasington, D. C. , USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J. & Kulu, H. The interrelationship between separation and housing transitions. Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 31 March - 2 April 2016, Wasington, D. C. This poster has been awarded a poster prize.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, 31 March - 2 April 2016, Wasington, D. C., USA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Kulu, H., Mikolai, J., Vidal, S., Schnor, C., Willaert, D. Separation and spatial mobility: A cross-national comparison. Poster presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America (PAA), 31 March - 2 April 2016, Wasington, D. C.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies (BSPS), 6-8 September 2017, Liverpool, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Kulu, H., Mikolai, J., Vidal, S., Mulder, C. Divorce and housing tenure: A cross-country comparison.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies (BSPS), 6-8 September 2017, Liverpool, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H. Union dissolution and hosuing tenure trajectories in Britain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 12-14 September 2016, Winchester, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J. and Kulu, H. Separation and housing tenure trajectories in England and Wales. Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 12-14 September 2016, Winchester, UK. Statisticians of the ONS and NRS participated in the meeting and discussed our paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 12-14 September 2016, Winchester, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H., Vidal, S., Schnor, C., Willaert, D., Visser, F. H., Mulder, C. H., Thomas, M. J. Separation and spatial mobility: A cross-national comparison. Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 12 - 14 September 2016, Winchester, UK. Statisticians of the ONS and NRS participated in the meeting and discussed our paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 7-9 September, Leeds, UK. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Mikolai, J. & Kulu, H. Separation and housing transitions in England and Wales. Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, 7-9 September, Leeds, UK. Statisticians of the ONS and NRS participated in the meeting and discussed our paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, Winchester, UK, 10-12 September 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Julia Mikolai presented a paper in collaboration with Hill Kulu. The paper is titled "It's about time. The interrelationship between partnership transitions, residential mobility, and housing tenure". Discussions throughout the conference has led us to completely change the set up of this paper to better address challenges related to young adults' partnership and housing experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, Winchester, UK, 10-12 September 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Hill Kulu presented a paper at the Annual Meeting of the British Society for Population Studies, which brings together British and international academic and non-academic audiences. The paper, titled "Getting back on the housing ladder? Separation and homeownership in Britain", co-authored with Mikolai, J. has been discussed with academic colleagues as well as non-academic participants. As a result of these discussions, we have decided to extend the paper to also include Germany in collaboration with a colleague.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at the European Population Conference, 31 August - 4 September 2016, Mainz, Germany. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H., Vidal, S., Schnor, C., Willaert, D., Visser, F. H., Mulder, C. H., Thomas, M. J. Separation and spatial mobility: A cross-national comparison. Presentation at the European Population Conference, 31 August - 4 September 2016, Mainz, Germany.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at the European Population Conference, Brussels, 6-9 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Hill Kulu presented a paper co-authored with Mikolai, J., Vidal, S., Mulder, C. H., & van der Wiel, R., titled Residential mobility and tenure changes among separated individuals: A cross-country comparison at the European Population Conference in Brussels. This is the most prestigious population conference in Europe, which brings together academic and non-academic audiences from across Europe. As a result of these discussions, we managed to finalise the draft of this paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at the International Conference on Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course, University of Cologne, 27-29 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H. Union dissolution and hosuing tenure trajectories in Britain. PartnerLife conference, University of Cologne, Germany, 27-29 July 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the International Conference on Partner Relationships, Residential Relocations and Housing in the Life Course, University of Cologne, 27-29 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Kulu, H., Mikolai, J., Vidal, S., Mulder, C. Divorce and housing tenure: A cross-country comparison. PartnerLife conference, University of Cologne, Germany, 27-29 July 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the International Symposium "Internal Migration and Commuting in International Perspective", 4-6 February 2015, Wiesbaden, Germany. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H. Separation and housing transitions in the United Kindgom. Presentation at the International Symposium "Internal Migration and Commuting in International Perspective", 4-6 February 2015, Wiesbaden, Germany. Statisticians of the Federal Institute of Population Research (BiB, Germany) participated in the meeting and discussed our paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the RGS-IBG conference, 29 August - 2 September 2017, London, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H. Union dissolution and hosuing tenure trajectories in Britain. RGS-IBG conference, London, UK, 29 August 2017 - 2 September 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the Understanding Society Conference, 11-13 July 2017, University of Essex, Essex, UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Mikolai, J., Kulu, H. Separation and housing trajectories in Britain: Opportunities and challenges of using sequence analysis on panel data. Presentation at the Understanding Society Conference, University of Essex, Essex, UK, 11-13 July 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Two poster presentations at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Denver, 26-28 April 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact These two poster presentations have sparked intense debates and discussions between the authors and the conference audience which consisted of a mix of academic and non-academic participants as well as students from a wide range of countries.
The title of the posters were:
Kulu, H., Mikolai, J., & Vidal, S. Residential mobility and tenure changes among separated individuals: A cross-country comparison.
Mikolai, J., & Kulu, H. It's about time. The interrelationship between partnership transitions, residential mobility, and housing tenure.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Video Showcasing the PartnerLife Project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Hill Kulu summarises the main findings of the project in this short (5 min) video and discusses their policy implications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://partnerlifeproject.org/news/