Urgent invite: Humanitarian Technologies. An Ethnographic Assessment of Communication Environments in Disaster Recovery and Humanitarian Intervention

Lead Research Organisation: Goldsmiths College
Department Name: Media and Communications

Abstract

The proposed research aims to assess the uses and consequences of communication technologies in the recovery and rehabilitation of populations affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda), which made landfall in the Philippines on November 8th 2013 was one of the strongest storms ever recorded with over 6000 casualties and more than 12 million people affected. In particular, we propose to investigate the uses of digital technologies and innovations such as mobile phones, SMS, crisis mapping and social media both by directly affected populations and humanitarian organisations. Communications technologies are increasingly recognized as vital in the prevention, mitigation and rehabilitation of disasters. It is even claimed that digital innovations such as social media are transforming humanitarianism by enabling 'people-centred humanitarian action' which empowers disaster-affected communities to coordinate and respond to their own problems. This optimism has given rise to a discourse on 'humanitarian technology' referring to the uses and applications of technology by disaster-prone communities in the response, recovery and rebuilding (World Disasters Report, 2013). Yet, despite the enthusiasm regarding the role of digital technologies as tools for humanitarian relief there is little evidence to assess their impact. What seems to be particularly missing from accounts on 'humanitarian technology' is the perspective of the affected populations themselves. Our ethnographic study aims to weigh the optimism surrounding 'humanitarian technology' against actual benefits to users. Our approach places the voice of affected people at the heart of the analysis. We will specifically examine the impact of communication technologies in the following critical areas: 1) information dissemination; 2) collective problem-solving; 3) redistribution of resources; 4) accountability and transparency of humanitarian efforts and, 5) voice and empowerment of affected populations.
This is an 18-month ethnographic study that will take place in two disaster-affected locations (Tacloban, Leyte and Bantayan, Cebu) where we will conduct qualitative interviews, participant observation and online ethnography. We will conduct additional interviews with representatives from humanitarian organisations, government agencies and digital platforms to assess their uses of technological innovation in the disaster recovery efforts. Comparing the perspective of disaster-affected people and humanitarian organizations will allow us to understand both actual and potential uses of technology. The proposed research will be one of the first mixed method studies to combine an in-depth study of affected populations with a study of digital practitioners and humanitarian workers. The project will engage directly with humanitarian organizations, government and civil society agencies as well as the telecommunications and digital technology industry with which we have established partnerships. Our research aims to inform the academic, policy and public debates on the role of communication technologies in a humanitarian context.

Planned Impact

Our project has a clear societal and economic impact for a number of beneficiaries including humanitarian organisations and practitioners in communication for development, government and civil society agencies, the telecommunications industry, software designers and at-risk populations themselves, as discussed below:

1) NGOs and humanitarian organisations dealing with disaster management and development:
There is surprisingly little evidence for the actual and potential uses of digital media for disaster mitigation and rehabilitation. Our project aims to inform policy directions and strategies of NGOs and humanitarian organizations to improve their interventions. Our partnership with UNOCHA (United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Action) indicates great interest from one of the largest humanitarian organizations to integrate their disaster management operations to the digital environment and learn new ways to interact with vulnerable populations (see letter of support).
2) Practitioners in the field of communication for development (including ICT4D):
Our findings are also relevant for practitioners in the field of communication for development as they also require evidence on the consequences of ICTs for improving life chances and human capabilities as well as for increasing the voice and visibility of disadvantaged groups.
3) Government agencies and policymakers:
Public officials in the Philippines, neighbouring disaster-prone regions and developed countries all need better understanding of the potential of communication technologies to develop evidence-based policies. In preparing this proposal we have consulted our partner government agencies (Department of Social Welfare and Development), lawmakers (Senator Loren Legarda, Climate Change Commissioner Yeb Sano) and government advisers (Dr Tony La Vina) and will work with them to ensure our research findings lead to clear policy recommendations.
4) Telecommunications industry:
Private telecoms companies are at the forefront of communication innovations for disaster response. Government agencies and NGOs often seek the support of telecoms firms during disaster, thus requiring them to critically monitor and evaluate initiatives they are invited to support, as our partner SMART Telecoms relates to us (see letter of support). Philippine telecommunications companies have dedicated disaster response departments and design products to deploy during crises. Our in depth approach will be able to critically assess the difference communication technologies make in disaster response. Such insight can be applied in other disaster-affected empirical contexts.
5) Digital media designers and software developers:
Recent years have seen a proliferation of digital platforms employed in crisis situations, and often require the volunteerism of both expert engineers and ordinary people from around the world responding to a local crisis. These new digital apps and techniques of crowdsourcing are increasingly used by humanitarian workers when planning/distributing aid, including by UNOCHA. In-depth knowledge of whether these new software and applications have direct impact on vulnerable populations can improve the design of future products commissioned by humanitarian organisations or industry players.
6) Affected populations themselves:
We are committed to sharing our data with local populations who are not understood as passive victims but as active agents in the recovery phase. There is great potential in this research to empower affected populations to make informed decisions, coordinate recovery efforts and make their voices heard in the rebuilding process.
 
Description The 'Humanitarian Technologies Project' was an 18-month study of the uses of social and mobile media in humanitarian relief and disaster recovery focusing in particular on the recovery from Typhoon Haiyan, which hit the central Philippines in November 2013. This is the first study which brings together an ethnography of disaster-affected people and research with humanitarian agencies and other stakeholders in order to understand communication technologies as integral to disaster recovery.

Our study found that communication technologies do not give people a 'voice'. Technologies can facilitate voice but only as long as other factors, such as social capital and a strong civil society, are present. Further, we identify a divide among the better-off participants who are most likely to have a 'voice' in post-disaster contexts and the poorer participants who report limited participation opportunities (Madianou, Longboan and Ong, 2015).

Rather than creating a 'level playing field' new communication technologies can exacerbate social inequalities by heightening the life chances for the better off, whilst leaving poorer participants behind. The deepening of social inequalities can compound the effects of the original calamity creating a 'second order disaster' (Madianou, 2015).

We found that much of our participants' mediated communication resembles an 'echo chamber' and not a dialogue. Participants are likely to share their views with their peers but not with representatives from aid or government agencies. As much as this mediated voice has value, it cannot correct any power asymmetries in humanitarian action.

Because of the existing technological infrastructure in the Philippines, Haiyan was widely seen as an ideal laboratory to pilot initiatives on accountability to affected communities and thus represents the most systematic implementation of accountability initiatives by humanitarian agencies. Several agencies interpreted accountability as feedback and set up mechanisms for affected people to offer their views and express their concerns. Interactive digital technologies were often prioritised as feedback collection tools.

Despite the good intentions, the intensification of feedback mechanisms and metrics through digital technologies do not necessarily improve humanitarian action nor do they automatically make humanitarian organisations more accountable to beneficiaries. On the contrary, we discovered that systematic questioning of beneficiaries without closing the feedback loop can disenfranchise affected people and diminish trust of humanitarian agencies (Madianou, Ong, Longboan and Cornelio, 2016).

Although communication technologies do not fulfil the expectations of voice and accountability they were firmly embedded in the everyday lives of our participants. Mobile phones and social networking sites were widely used for sociality and entertainment while platforms introduced by aid agencies to facilitate information dissemination were often appropriated differently by affected people. We view media's everyday uses in the face of extraordinary events as meaningful coping mechanisms and ways of reintroducing normality in everyday life in the aftermath of disaster. Whilst not fulfilling the expectations of 'humanitarian technology', the uses of social and mobile media for sociality and recreation are vital for our participants' well-being. Yet, we remain aware that the ordinary uses of communication technologies, despite their social significance, do not achieve the redistribution of resources which is vital in the aftermath of disasters.

Please refer to our Executive Summary for a more comprehensive overview of findings.
Exploitation Route Throughout the project we worked closely with the following stakeholders: 1) humanitarian organizations, 2) practitioners in communication for development, 3) government agencies and policymakers, 4) telecommunications industry, 5) designers and software developers, and 6) disaster-affected populations.

In our publications, reports and stakeholder events we make the following recommendations:

We recommend that humanitarian agencies develop a 'culture of listening' extending beyond feedback tools. Digital technologies facilitate feedback collection but can only work alongside an understanding of local cultural and social contexts. Aid agencies need to recognize local norms and structural limitations that inhibit people's participation. Cultures of listening cultivate the participation of communities by developing relationships based on respect and trust.

Community organisers are important intermediaries for affected people, helping to amplify their voice by involving them in decision-making processes. Identifying, training and involving local people, including leaders, can enhance the delivery of relief programmes.

Within the humanitarian sector, agencies are encouraged to develop ways to address communication obstacles between teams in the organisational hierarchy. Inter-agency coordination is also vital.

Investing in digital literacy (a long-term project) is essential for addressing the problem of digital inequality.

Ethnography is ideal for understanding complex situations such as disasters.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy,Other

URL http://humanitariantechnologies.net
 
Description Our research findings and recommendations have already been quoted in Humanitarian Policy Documents and Sector Reviews by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Alnap, Plan International, World Vision and Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities Network (CDAC). All reports are listed in the 'Influence of Policy and Practice Section'. Our research has also been quoted in several online articles authored by practitioners such as humanitarian consultants. Finally, our research has also been featured in news outlets such as the Guardian, Rappler (Philippines) and SBS (Australia). Dr. Madianou and Dr. Ong have been invited by Humanitarian Organisations and Aid Donors (such as DfID) to contribute to panel discussions on Humanitarian Accountability and Communicating with Affected People initiatives. Dr Madianou was invited participant at the United Nations University multi-sector Workshop on Migration and Media at the Rockefeller Foundation / Bellagio Centre in October 2017. Dr Madianou has shared her findings with the UK Government (Behavioural Insights Team in partnership with the UK Cabinet Office). Team members have also invited to contribute online articles for Humanitarian Organisations and think tanks such as CDAC and IRIN (please refer to our engagement activities). These contributions have led to further requests for involvement, collaboration and advisory roles. As a result of work from Humanitarian Technologies Project, Jonathan Ong was hired as a consultant of Plan International, World Vision and the International Organization for Migration, where he was a lead researcher for the Accountability Common Services project in the Typhoon Haiyan Response. The two research reports ("Who's Listening" and "Obliged to Be Grateful") are linked to a policy initiative on "community engagement" for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit headed by Alex Jacobs of Plan International.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Government, Democracy and Justice,Other
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Citation in CDAC (Communication with Disaster Affected People) review
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL http://www.cdacnetwork.org/tools-and-resources/i/20141124131123-z7io0
 
Description Citation in Digital Humanitarian Network - OCHA Review
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The DHN / OCHA review adopted some of the recommendations of the Humanitarian Technologies Project, namely: the importance of developing Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems that are contextually based and empowering local communities in AI initiatives.
URL https://www.digitalhumanitarians.com/artificial-intelligence-principles-for-vulnerable-populations-i...
 
Description Citation in ICRC report Humanitarian Futures for Messaging Apps
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
Impact Emerging impact by contributing to ongoing critical evaluation of technological platforms for humanitarian practice.
URL https://www.icrc.org/en/publication/humanitarian-futures-messaging-apps
 
Description Citation in ODI Report 'Humanitarian Digital Divide'
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.odi.org/publications/16502-humanitarian-digital-divide
 
Description Citation in ODI report on gig economy and domestic work (2016)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/resource-documents/11155.pdf
 
Description Citation in Overseas Development Institute review
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL http://www.odi.org/events/4211-aap-communication-haiyan-philippines-ebola
 
Description Citation in Plan, World Vision and IOM report
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL http://www.alnap.org/resource/20632
 
Description Cited in Humanitarian Policy Group / ODI 2018 report
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/resource-documents/12202.pdf
 
Description citation in ODI report
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
 
Description College Research Themes competition
Amount £3,250 (GBP)
Funding ID Reimagining Digital Humanitarianism 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2017 
End 03/2018
 
Description Discovery Early Career Research Award
Amount $325,000 (AUD)
Funding ID DE150101866 
Organisation Australian Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Australia
Start 01/2015 
End 01/2017
 
Description Newton Grant Fund
Amount £150,000 (GBP)
Organisation Research Councils UK (RCUK) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2018
 
Description Blog CDAC (Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities Network) 'Do communication Technologies give Disaster-Affected People a Voice? Reflections Two Years After Haiyan' by M. Madianou (2015, November 9) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Attention and discussion in social media.

Request for collaboration from NGO
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.cdacnetwork.org/i/20151109110240-nkxd6/
 
Description Blog for OpenDemocracy: 'Beware the echo chamber: digital media and disaster recovery' by M. Madianou 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Blog received attention in social media.

Feedback on social media was very positive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.opendemocracy.net/mirca-madianou/beware-echo-chamber
 
Description Digital Aid Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participation at the Digital Aid Workshop organised by UKRI / GCRF and the Turing Institute. London, September 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Disaster Preparedness and the Right to Information Workshop, Organized by the Philippine Information Agency, International Organization for Migration and UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Tacloban City, Philippines, 6 August 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of early findings to humanitarian agencies and other stakeholders involved in Haiyan recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Dr Madianou invited to give a talk and share research findings with staff at Behavioural Insights Team (in partnership with Uk Cabinet office). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited to give talk at Behavioural Insights Team a social purpose company jointly owned by the UK Government and Nesta.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.behaviouralinsights.co.uk
 
Description Dr Madianou invited to participate in expert panel on messaging services in humanitarian sector (GSMA, London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact activity taking place in two weeks. Record will be updated following event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.panoplydigital.com/blog/march-london-meetup-messaging-as-the-unsung-hero-of-ict4d
 
Description From feedback fetish to a culture of listening (author; M. Madianou) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Attention in social media.

Positive feedback and expressions of interest in our research. Raising awareness of our findings
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gold.ac.uk/news/humanitarian-technologies/
 
Description Global Humanitarianism and Media Culture Conference. University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, 7 February 2015. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of findings sparked lively discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Guardian Article October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article 'Digital sweatshops in disaster zones: who pays the real price for innovation?' by Jonathan Ong in the Guardian
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2016/oct/11/digital-sweatshops-...
 
Description Guardian article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article by Ong, J.C. (2015, 27 March). "Does Humanitarian Aid Mend Communities or Break Them?" in the The Guardian
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/mar/27/impact-communities-d...
 
Description Humanitarian Technologies End-of-Award Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Our final workshop provided the opportunity to reflect on the lessons from the Haiyan recovery which may be applicable to other disaster contexts. Some of the questions addressed include: how are old and new platforms used by affected communities to make their voices heard and increase their visibility? Do new communication technologies increase the transparency of relief efforts and do they improve the accountability of humanitarian agencies? Do new communication technologies empower local communities or do they create new dependencies and inequalities?

Our workshop was attended by representatives from humanitarian agencies and academics who discussed the opportunities as well as risks that new communication technologies pose in disaster recovery. The team members were joined by John Borton (Overseas Development Institute), Dr. Monica Krause (Sociology, Goldsmiths) and Barb Wigley (World Food Programme) who offered responses to the project's findings.

Requests for further participation and involvement
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=8828
 
Description Humanitarian Technologies Stakeholders' Workshop, Manila 5 November 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The team held a workshop in Manila during the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan/ Yolanda. The event provided the opportunity to share our preliminary findings from our ongoing 18-month research and engage with dialogue with local stakeholders involved in the Haiyan recovery. Our workshop was attended by humanitarian and government workers, local NGOs, academics, media and telecommunications companies and affected populations from Yolanda. The project team were joined by representatives from UNOCHA and World Vision who offered responses to our findings.

We received very positive feedback from stakeholders who described our research 'spot on' and 'useful for their own projects'. Our research was cited by policy reports following our dissemination activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://acfj.ateneo.edu/events/humanitarian-technologies-project-stakeholders-workshop/
 
Description Humanitarian Technologies Stakeholders' workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a one day workshop involving presentations from team members and responses from two representatives from INGOs (UN OCHA and World Vision). The presentations and responses sparked much discussion.

Our responders described our preliminary reports as 'critical and spot on'. There was much interest from representatives from humanitarian organisations, government and media (national and local) to remain informed of our findings and to communicate their own reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ateneo.edu/development-studies/events/humanitarian-technologies-project-stakeholders-work...
 
Description Interview with Toby Miller (cultural studies podcasts) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Mirca Madianou interviewed by Toby Miller about the 'Humanitarian Technologies' and 'Migration and New Media' Projects. The podcast was downloaded more than 570 times within the first month. Two further interview requests followed up.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://culturalstudies.podbean.com/e/mirca-madianou-on-humanitarian-technologies-crisis-and-migratio...
 
Description Invited Seminar Presentation at National University of Singapore, 19 August 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of findings to a mixed audience at the University of Singapore.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited speaker and participant at the Media, Migration and Xenophobia Conference, Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Conference Centre, Lake Como, 16-20 October 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited speaker and participant at the Media, Migration and Xenophobia Conference, Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Conference Centre, Lake Como, 16-20 October 2017 organized by the UN with participants from the aid and media sectors. The main conference output was the UN-commissioned report on Xenophobia, Migration and the role of the media which was published in 2018: https://i.unu.edu/media/gcm.unu.edu/attachment/4356/Bellagio-web-03ix18.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://i.unu.edu/media/gcm.unu.edu/attachment/4356/Bellagio-web-03ix18.pdf
 
Description Invited speaker at the Social Movements and Media Technologies ESRC seminar series, 15 May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation of research findings relating to protest movement (in the context of disaster recovery) to a mixed audience of activists, academics and postgraduate students as part of the ESRC seminar series on Social Movements and Social Media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://someseminars.org/seminars/seminar-one/programme/
 
Description Invited talk at the University of Leeds, 13 May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of research findings to the Institute of Communication Studies, Leeds University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://media.leeds.ac.uk/events/research-seminar-by-mirca-madianu-senior-lecturer-in-media-and-commu...
 
Description Invited talk at the launch of the Digital Ethnography Research Centre (DERC) Europe, Barcelona 17 June 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation of findings in Digital Ethnography workshop, RMIT Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Keynote Speaker at University of Hull / AHRC Conference: Addressing Communications in Disaster Research, 6 October 2017. Title of talk: Digital Humanitarianism: myths and realities. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Keynote Speaker at University of Hull / AHRC Networking event: Addressing Communications in Disaster Research, 6 October 2017. Title of talk: Digital Humanitarianism: myths and realities. This conference brought together academics, policymakers and practitioners to discuss the role of digital technologies in disaster response.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Online Article: 'A year after Typhoon Haiyan, poor Filipinos find a voice' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article generated discussion online and offline.

Raised awareness about consequences of disaster recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://theconversation.com/a-year-after-typhoon-haiyan-poor-filipinos-find-a-voice-31501
 
Description Online article 'After Yolanda: A tale of two Taclobans' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Sparked online discussion

Raised awareness on recovery from Typhoon Haiyan
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.rappler.com/thought-leaders/57692-tale-tacloban-post-disaster-yolanda-haiyan
 
Description Online article on Tacloban and uneven recovery 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Generated discussion online and offline.

Raised awareness on uneven progress of recovery efforts in Tacloban
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.rappler.com/thought-leaders/74513-tacloban-uneven-recovery
 
Description Organisation of International Symposium 'Reimagining Digital Humanitarianism' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The aim of this one-day symposium, organised by Dr. Madianou, was to advance the critical inquiry about humanitarian practice and digital developments. This one-day event brought together practitioners from the humanitarian field and researchers in the fields of Anthropology, Computing, Design, Media and Communications, Sociology and Visual Studies in order to develop a multisectoral and multidisciplinary dialogue.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.gold.ac.uk/calendar/?id=11362
 
Description Paper presented at the conference: Democracy: a citizens' perspective. Turku, Finland 27 May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of project findings at the conference: Democracy: a citizens' perspective.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Plenary Presentation at Philippine Sociological Society Conference. Mindanao State University, General Santos City, Philippines, 16 October. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited presentation of early findings at the Annual Conference of Philippine Sociological Society.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Post-Humanitarian Communication Conference, University of Helsinki, 26 September 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact presentation of early findings sparked discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project website has attracted several thousands of visitors and has had a strong presence in social media. It has also been referenced in several blogs by representatives of the humanitarian field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.humanitariantechnologies.net
 
Description SBS interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview SBS radio (Australia) on project findings (in Tagalog).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.sbs.com.au/yourlanguage/filipino/en/content/times-calamities-and-disaster-whose-voice-do-...
 
Description Social Science Bites Podcast 'Technology in Everyday Life' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Social Science Bites is produced by SAGE and invites leading social scientists to present their perspectives on how our social world is created, and how social science can help us understand people and how they behave. Dr. Madianou was invited to discuss her work on the role of media technologies in everyday life focusing in particular on her ESRC funded projects 'Transnational Families and communication technologies' and 'Humanitarian Technologies'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.socialsciencespace.com/about-socialsciencebites/
 
Description Talk at City University (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of project sparked discussion and requests for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.city.ac.uk/events/2016/january/conference-future-perspectives-in-international-communicat...
 
Description Talk at Mapping Digital Humanitarianism event, Kings College London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk on 'Data as Crisis' at the Mapping Digital Humanitarianism event, Kings College London, 15 February 2019. This was a multi-stakeholder event bringing together humanitarian organisations, NGOs, policymakers and academics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://humanitarianism.digital/
 
Description Talk at University of Cambridge 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of project findings sparked lively discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.smhr.sociology.cam.ac.uk/events/HumanitarianTechnologies
 
Description Talk at the 'Society in the Loop' Event, organised by Doteveryone, the Ada Lovelace Institute and Civil Society Futures, September 14 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Invited speaker at Society in the loop event, organised by Doteveryone, the Ada Lovelace Institute and Civil Society Futures, September 14 2018. The event brought together over 100 participants from the social sector and technology industry to help build the knowledge, understanding and relationships necessary to support society to be in the loop of how technology is developed and directed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://doteveryone.org.uk/project/society-in-the-loop/