Loneliness in the Digital Age (LIDA): Developing Strategies for Empathy and Trust

Lead Research Organisation: Loughborough University
Department Name: English and Drama

Abstract

Loneliness is one of the most significant challenges facing Western society in the 21st century. Not only does research suggest that 1 in 10 people are lonely, our radically transforming society threatens to make the situation significantly worse. Increasingly large proportions of our lives are being lived in online environments, more people are now working from home, away from the social environment of the communal office, and workers are commonly expected to work away from home for protracted periods of time. The creation of a borderless Europe has also contributed to a more mobile workforce, where working away from home for periods of time is no longer unusual, especially for younger people. While much of the previous research on loneliness has focused upon chronic loneliness, it is this new breed of the 'transient lonely' that is more vulnerable to episodic periods of loneliness and it is the episodically lonely who are less likely to take steps to deal with bouts of loneliness.
LIDA seeks to map different experiences and responses to loneliness in both online and offline environments and, through the use of co-design and creative methodologies, explore the potential for creative interventions in online environments to help manage periods of loneliness by harnessing empathy for, and with, others. We intend to work with three temporarily separated groups: (i) migrant workers moving to the UK for employment; ii) young offenders who are being reintegrated into their communities, and; iii) personnel who are stationed temporarily overseas). By engaging with members of these communities throughout as co-researchers and co-designers, this project will establish new ways of using digital technology to address this emerging social issues. We will also look to explore what commonalities these groups have in how they experience and manage moments of loneliness in their everyday lives, and examine individual differences in how the home, the workplace, and the objects and people surrounding our participants influence these.
Our project will begin by working with partnering organisations to identify people representing these groups willing to participate in the research. Following this, interviews and focus group discussions will capture rich insights into the lives of our participants, focusing on their biographies and experiences as they relate to recent transitions in their lives. This will provide us a basis with which to map the 'episodes' of loneliness experienced by these individuals, whether they are managed online or offline, and what role empathy and trust plays in ameliorating these experiences. Quantitative measures will also be developed at this stage to enable evaluation of Phase 2 activities. This will involve surveying participants in those activities before and after engagement. This longitudinal survey will also be extended to other members of the targeted communities to provide a causal test of the relationship between online experiences and social involvement.
The second phase will focus on developing new technologies to counteract negative experiences related to loneliness and separation identified in the first phase of work. At first, we will return to our previous participants to gather their responses and input on our initial findings. Following this, researchers with a background in community engagement, the creative arts and technology design will work with our participants either on their own or during group workshops to co-create a set of provocative new design concepts to alleviate their moments of loneliness. The result of these engagements will be a set of provocative new technologies and creative activities that will be given to a small number of our participants for a period of several months. This 'real world' field trial of these innovative technologies will enrich our existing knowledge of how technology and creative practice may alleviate experiences of loneliness through harness empathy.

Planned Impact

As outlined in the attached 'Pathways to Impact' document, the Impact Plan for this project is predicated on a continuing programme of activities; wide and deep engagement with stakeholders; collaboration with the Project Advisory Board and Knowledge Exchange/Impact teams from across the participating universities; and a public communications strategy. It is our belief that this project has the potential to make significant policy, economic and societal (well-being) impacts and we have identified a number of non-academic beneficiaries, which include:

1. Individuals, their families and their communities who are at risk from episodic loneliness for a variety of reasons will benefit from learning creative strategies and the use of new technologies to manage loneliness episodes through increased levels of empathy and trust.

2. Businesses, employers and trades unions who have obligations in ensuring the well-being of workers who are temporarily separated from their home and community life will benefit by learning tools and techniques to help them better support such employees. As such the benefits here will also be economic to the employer, the employee and to the UK more generally.

3. Voluntary and professional organisations who exist to support individuals and groups who may be at risk from episodic loneliness, for example, various migrant worker support organisations and The Samaritans, will benefit by learning new ways to help build empathy and trust on line and thus mitigate against feelings of loneliness.

4. Government will benefit from this research by gaining insight into how empathy and trust can be built in online environments and so help tackle the increasingly concerning issue of loneliness. In this way, policymakers will have access to research that will enable the development of effective and evidence-based policy in the area.

5. Health and social care professionals, (such as GPs, psychiatric nurses and mental health services) who are dealing regularly with the mental and physiological consequences of increased loneliness will benefit from gaining a better understanding of how building empathy and trust can help deal with loneliness and also by having access to technologies and strategies that are non medication-based.

Whilst for the three years of this project, it is our intention to focus on a particular set of vulnerable groups, we believe that there is significant opportunity for upscaling in the longer term. As such we believe that this research has the potential not only to contribute towards improving the health and well-being of individuals, but will lead to economic and social benefits, as well as informed policy-making.
 
Description LiDA has a number of significant achievements that were both a result of the initial planned research and the re-development of sections of the work in relation to the needs of the participants that took part.

LiDA's research activity has resulted in a wealth of new knowledge that has benefitted both academic and non-academic institutions. This knowledge has shed light on the challenges faced by groups of people not usually considered at risk of loneliness - including carers, students, lone works, migrants and first time mothers. This knowledge has included understanding coping methods of different groups, the ways in which the groups perceive what loneliness is, and the support they need to mitigate their experiences. The knowledge gained through the completion of this project has been disseminated via conference papers, journal articles and policy reports, with more articles/conference papers forthcoming.

The project has also developed a new mixed methodological approach to understanding and responding to the challenges of loneliness. By combining expertise of traditional interview techniques, surveying, creative activities, and digital design, the project co-developed a method for sharing the challenges faced by the individuals in a safe and sensitive way, before enabling them to co-design design ways to mitigate some of the negative impacts. The development of this mixed methodology has ensured an inclusivity of experience for the participants who all had different ways in which they were comfortable to share their experiences. Discussion of the mixed method approach can be found in the project's CHI papers.

Through the completion of the project we have developed some new technological resources and practical materials that have, and will continue to, contribute to the discussions around loneliness and managing the experiences. While the two technologies the project built were directly co-designed alongside the participant groups, and have been have been trialled with them, they present the opportunity for further testing and development to respond to other groups in future funded activity.

The development of new collaborations and partnerships has been a key strength of this project. From outset, the project partners sought to embed the work into existing and developing discussions around loneliness in the UK and beyond. To do this, key organisations, individuals and sectors were identified. This has led to a continually expanding network that feeds into our research, and that benefits from the work we have done. Key examples of this working with organisations such as the British Red Cross to hold events together, being able to contribute to wider policy decisions through connections with government bodies, and offering practical support and reassurance to smaller organisations such as carer centres.

The project's proudest accomplishment however, is the direct positive impact it has had on its research participants. As the aim of this project was to work with groups of people that experience loneliness, but currently have little support for the management of those experience, it has been able to provide opportunities for connections between people in similar circumstances, as well as gain new insights into their experiences and what support they might need in the future. Reflections on the usefulness of this work has been shared by all of the participant groups. Most recently, the student participants reported finding the work and technological device helpful in supporting their transition to university or level of study. The participants who were initially unsure of the value of peer support reported gaining a lot from their meetings with other students and sharing their progress, anxieties and concerns with them. Those with existing strong peer support in their local departments and groups found Pears (the technology developed for students) most valuable as a tool to grow social relationships outside their local community.

Other findings across al participant groups were broader and include further evidence that the maintenance of meaningful social relationships can be enhanced by digital technology when healthy offline relationships are maintained, but that it can increase isolation where on line relationships replace offline engagement. Furthemore, engagement with project participants through the co-design process suggests that the ability to tell our stories and listen to those of others (our 'storytelling well-being') is crucial to feeling connected and socially engaged. When our storytelling health becomes compromised, we are at greater risk of experiencing loneliness.

As an addendum to the LiDA project, we also managed the EMoTICON Network to support the five projects that were funded under this call. Over the period of the grant the network hosted regular meetings of project PIs to share common challenges, opportunities and to explore ways of maximising collective impact. We also hosted three network conferences (Leeds, Sheffield and London), at which we distributed a number of small pilot grants aimed primarily at postgraduate and early career researchers. We have also co-hosted three events with Dstl (a network launch and two 'ideas workshops') in order to explore common future research agendas.
Exploitation Route There have been a number of very positive opportunities for the work completed by the LiDA project to be disseminated amongst a wide range of different stakeholders and interested parties, as well as new connections, networks and collaboration opportunities for the work to be continued past the life of the funding. Before the completion of the LiDA project, three stakeholder policy events were held to share the knowledge gained during the project. These brought together stakeholders from research, charity and leading public and private sector organisations such as government departments, universities, and local councils.

In addition, one of the project's co-investigators, Professor Julie Barnett, has recently taken up a position on the advisory board for the Loneliness Policy working group that forms part of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport. As part of this role, Julie will be sharing the insights gained in all aspects of the LiDA project, as well as developing new networking connections for future work.

The project's Principal investigator, Professor Michael Wilson, has received additional GCRF funding for arts and mental health research in Kerala, India and is also beginning to develop future project opportunities by working on a possible a collaboration with Aardman Animations, looking to establish the benefits animation can have for the support, understanding, and development of loneliness resources for students.

Professor John Vines is a co-investigator in a recently announced Mental Health Network+, for which Professor Wilson has been invited to chair the project advisory board.

In addition, some of the early career researchers that worked on the LiDA project are developing their own research agenda in this area through fellowship applications. Follow on funding opportunities to further trial the technologies developed in the LiDA project are also being planned.

The EMoTICON Network has received further support to develop GCRF-related activity around the theme and is currently in dialogue with Professor Stuart Taberner regarding a networking workshop, possibly in Nairobi for 2019.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare

 
Description It was clear through the Carers' Dissemination and Engagement event held at Bath in October 2017 that the project had had a positive impact on the project participants in that they had benefited from the establishment of new networks and connections and from having contributed to the project itself. Stakeholder organisations reported significant interest in the technology developed as part of the research and expressed interest in developing it further or in understanding more about the possible uses of digital technology in this area. The full impact will inevitably be played out in the future. In 2018 Professor Julie Barnett spent time on secondment with the Cabinet Office and worked with DCMS on developing the government loneliness strategy as a result of the work of LiDA.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description EPSRC Institutional Funding via Loughborough University for Storytelling and Deradicalisation Pilot
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Loughborough University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description Mental health literacy in urban and rural communities in Kerala India: An interdisciplinary approach using applied theatre methodology
Amount £578,150 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/S00145X/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 02/2021
 
Description Public Engagement Seed Funding
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Bath 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2015 
End 06/2016
 
Description University of Bath Public Engagement Funding for public engagement event with informal carers and voluntary sector profesionals, run by Vasileiou and Barnett.
Amount £1,460 (GBP)
Organisation University of Bath 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2016 
End 08/2016
 
Description BBC Anatomy of Loneliness 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Manuela Barreto was part of a team that worked with BBC Radio 4 on The Anatomy of Loneliness, a series of radio broadcasts aired in October 2018 on loneliness, with journalist and producer of All in the Mind, Claudia Hammond, and along with a world-wide survey (55.000 participants) with Pamela Qualter and Christina Victor. This work has been nominated for an impact award at Manchester University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Campaign to End Loneliness Annual Network Conference, Cardiff 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact One of LIDA's Research Assistants (Konstatina Vassileou (Bath) attended the workshop on behalf of the project, engaging with a range of stakeholders and generating further interest in LIDA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.campaigntoendloneliness.org/learning-network-conference
 
Description Campaign to End Loneliness Meeting - project update 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Update on the LiDA project, with emphasis on empirical insights given to Campaign to End Loneliness Research Hub Meeting, 14 April, UCL, London by Konstantina Vasileiou (RA Bath) and Mark Atkinson (RA Exeter). This is part of an ongoing dialogue between the project and the Campaign to End Loneliness and raises awareness of the project amongst a mixed academic and professional/voluntary community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Campaign to End Loneliness Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A presentation on LIDA to the Campaign to End Loneliness Research Forum, made up of academics, practitioners, third sector workers and policymakers working the area of loneliness. The event took place at University of Salford and generated much interest amongst participants. It has resulted in a request to run a panel at the Campaign's conference for 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Carer Dissemination and Engagement Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact A report on our work package with carers was distributed prior to the workshop and a number of senior colleagues from regional and national organisations responded to the report and how it might impact on their future practice. There than followed presentation from project participants and researchers and workshop discussions on key learning and future directions. There was significant interest from stakeholders in developing the work further.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Contribution to BBC Radio 4's 'You and Yours' 31 January 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Contribution by Dr Mark Atkinson (RA Exeter) on this 'You and Yours' programme on loneliness, broadcast on 31 January 2017. Dr Atkinson discusses conceptual issues around loneliness from a psychological viewpoint. Dr Atkinson's contribution begins at 25 mins 55 seconds.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08byp23
 
Description EMoTICON Network Presentation at Prague Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact This was a panel as part of a international conference on Empathy. The Network had the whole panel to itself and it was the closing panel of the conference. There was much discussion immediately after the presentations from each of the projects and further discussion outside the conference.

The impact of this is still to work through, but it gave the network and associated projects an international visibility amongst an interdisciplinary group of international scholars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/wilsonemppaper.pdf
 
Description Exploring Issues of Trust and Mistrust workshop for EMoTICON Network and Trust Map (Durham) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Exploring issues of Trust and Mistrust: Ethics in Participatory Research, Design, Democracy and Action was a free participatory workshop hosted by the Trust Map project and co-funded by the EMoTICON Network as part of its programme of promoting the work of all EMoTICON projects. It was held at Durham University on 17th February 2017 and organised by the Trust Map PI Dr Karen Salt (Nottingham). The event was positively received but we are still waiting for signs of impact to emerge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.psychreg.org/exploring-issues-trust-mistrust-ethics-participatory-research-design-democra...
 
Description Feature on Health Check on BBC World Service in October 2017. The recordings were made at, and in response to, the Bath Carers Workshop run by the project in October 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact BBC journalist attended the dissemination and engagement workshop we held in Bath for our work package on Carers. He conducted interviews with researchers, policymakers and project participants for inclusion in a feature for Health Check on BBC World Service.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csty7v
 
Description Interview for You and Yours on BBC Radio 4 by Mark Atkinson 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was an interview for an episode of You and Yours on the issue of loneliness, broadcast on 31 January 2017. The interview material was used extensively in the programme and dealt with psychological understandings of loneliness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08byp23
 
Description Joint Workshop with Dstl 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The EMoTICON Network co-hosted with Dstl a two-day workshop that brought together researchers on the various EMoTICON projects together with technical partners and other key senior colleagues from Dstl to share updates on the projects so far and to explore possibilities for other collaborations. The first day took place in Salisbury and involved presentations from both researchers and Dstl colleagues on their work. The second day took place at Porton Down and was an Open Space workshop, facilitated by Johnnie Moore, a professional facilitator, and allowed participants to explore new collaborative ideas. The workshop was followed by a meeting of the organisers to evaluate the event. Feedback was very positive and it has helped to deepen the relationship between Dstl and the EMoTICON projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Migration and Mobilities Conference Presentation (Loughborough) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A conference presentation (peer-reviewed) by Prof M Wilson (PI) and Dr L Bakewell (RA) entitled 'Narrative and Loneliness in Migrant Communities' at the Migration and Mobilities Conference, 18th - 20th July, Loughborough University. The paper explored the work we have been doing with refugee groups as part of LIDA. The audience was largely international academics with some professional practitioners and Third Sector workers. The paper generated significant discussion and has helped further broaden our academic network for the project. As a result we were approached to explore possibilities for further collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/news/2016/-migration-conference-.html
 
Description PGR event at EMoTICON Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact As part if the first annual EMoTICON Network Conference, in collaboration with the Digital Personhood Network, we ran a successful workshop for Postgraduate Research Students (co-organised by Dr John Vines from Newcastle and Dr Karen Salt from Aberdeen). The selection process was highly competitive. As a result a number of participants applied for (and were successful in securing) seedcorn funding from the network for short pilot projects and feasibility studies. A further PGR workshop is now planned for the 2016 conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Pre-Show talk at the Royal National Theatre, London by Professor M Wilson 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was an hour-long invited talk called 'Digital (Dis)Connect', presented as part of the pre-show programme for David Eldridge's new play Beginnings, which deals with themes of loneliness and disconnection in an age of digital and online communication. There was positive feedback afterwards from the organisers and the audience, mainly comprising of theatregoers, who had either already seen the play, or were intending to go that evening, responded with multiple questions and discussion, which suggested that they were rethinking their own opinions. Their attendance certainly contributed to an enhanced enjoyment and engagement with the play.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/digital-disconnect
 
Description Presentation at Respond! Conference (Waterford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an invited presentation to a conference of professional practitioners, volunteers and policymakers working in the social housing sector in Ireland. It was attended by over 150 delegates. The event was co-organised by the Social Sciences Department at University College Cork and Respond!, a national social housing organisation in Ireland. The prrsentation, 'Loneliness in the Digital Age', by Prof M Wilson and Dr L Bakewell, outlined the project and proposed early findings. The conference (Responding to Social Isolation Through Technology) was addressed by John Halligan, TD and Minister of State for Training, Skills and Innovation. The presentation generated significant discussion and has helped us extend our networks both internationally and into the charitable housing sector. As a result we have planned a further meeting in Dublin to explore the potential for new collaborations with UCC and Respond!
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.respond.ie/events/responding-to-social-isolation-through-technology-conference-february-2...
 
Description Project Update at EMoTICON Conference (Sheffield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A presentation by Prof M Wilson (PI) and Dr L Bakewell (RA) at the EMoTICON Conference, updating delegates on the progress of LIDA. The audience was generally a cross-disciplinary audience of researchers, including other EMoTICON projects,as well as other researchers and ECRs. Raised awareness of and generated discussion about the project with other researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Qualitative Health Research Conference (Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Vasileiou, K., Barnett, J., Ealey, K., Barreto, M., Atkinson, M., Vines, J., Wilson, M., and Lawson, S. (2016). Experiencing and articulating situational loneliness: A qualitative study with three case communities in the UK In "Re-imagining Healthcare: Research, Relationships and Reform": 22nd Qualitative Health Research Conference, 17-19 October, Kelowna, Canada. Paper well-received and has helped raise awareness internationally of the project and extend networks.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Symposium Presentation (Brunel University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An invited symposium presentation entitled 'Loneliness and Storying caring' at Brunel University on 16th January 2017 as part of the ESRC Seminar Series on 'Reimagining Loneliness: Issues in Research, Policy and Practice. The presentation was by Prof M Wilson (PI, Loughborough) and Dr Lyndsey Bakewell (RA Loughborough). The presentation was well-received and generated significant discussion. It has also led to an invitation to publish from a peer-reviewed journal. It has also helped widen the project's network and engage with a wider community concerned with loneliness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.brunel.ac.uk/research/Institutes/Institute-of-Environment-Health-and-Societies/Ageing-Stu...
 
Description Symposium Presentation (University of Central Lancashire) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A presentation entitled 'Storying caring' as a contribution to "Owning Your Walrus' : A cross-disciplinary symposium on Loneliness & Performance" on 23rd November 2016, presented by project RAs Konstantina Vasileiou (Bath), Lyndsey Bakewell (Loughborough) and Mark Atkinson (Exeter). The event was attended by a mixed audience of academics and professional practitioners. The presentation was well received and has helped expand the project's network and raise its visibility.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk at York Mediale 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A presentation by Prof Shaun Lawson as part of a one-day symposium during the York Mediale, entitled Stories of Solitude: Technology, Performance and Digital Overload. The symposium was aimed at academics and non-academics, including general publics, creative and industry practititoners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.yorkmediale.com/events/stories-of-solitude
 
Description Video showcasing ChatR device 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Publicly available video produced by Bath University Media department which consolidates the public engagement workshop held at Bath in 2017 and showcasing the ChatR device designed by participants in collaboration with team members from Loughborough and Northumbria Universities. The video has been well received by project participants and organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://vimeo.com/292901715