GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Social Policy and Intervention

Abstract

In thirty years' time there will be half a billion adolescents in Africa. Like youth everywhere, they possess huge potential to thrive. But more than half are trapped in cycles of poor nutrition, poverty, low education, violence and unemployment. They also have the world's highest rates of early fertility, with adverse long-term outcomes for adolescent parents and their children. Such inter-generational disadvantage creates risks not only in the region but also to global stability.

The SDGs and African Union's Agenda 2063 challenge us to take a radical new approach. The UK's Global Challenges Research Fund provides a unique opportunity to do this. The Accelerating Advantage Hub will find the combinations of services with the greatest positive impacts for Africa's adolescents and their children. We need to move beyond services focused on single outcomes, towards 'super-accelerator' impacts across multiple SDGs of health, education, violence prevention, gender equality and economic stability. With our government partners we will test combination services - for example of cash transfers, malaria prophylaxis, parenting programs, business skills and violence prevention - to identify the leanest and most effective policy packages.

The Hub has been planned with African governments and international agencies including the UN Development Program, African Union, UNICEF and the World Health Organisation. They have told us that 'evidence as usual' is not enough. When we make a personal investment, like buying a computer, we want to know not only whether it is the most efficient, but also whether it is good value for money and whether we will like to use it. Governments need the same information about services: their effectiveness, their cost-effectiveness, whether they can be delivered through existing health, education and welfare systems, and whether they will be accepted by service providers and by adolescents. The Hub will conduct large-scale studies and use existing data in Angola, Cote D'Ivoire, DRC, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. All projects will include cost-effectiveness to assist budget decisions. In short, we will provide African policy-makers with the evidence they need and want to do the best for adolescents.

The Hub will also train and support frontline workers to improve services for adolescents across Africa. We will turn evidence into training modules, freely accessible manuals and support materials. We will deliver practitioner training in 34 African countries by working with NGO partners selected for wide regional coverage, for example Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa, the International Rescue Committee, Clowns without Borders and the International AIDS Alliance. Skills-building for young researchers in Africa and the UK is built into the Hub's work. We will support 45 promising young academics and dedicated African policymakers to focus their careers on improving the lives of adolescents and their children.

The Hub's work is planned with adolescents themselves. Too many services have failed because they do not appeal to teenagers' aspirations and immediate goals. The Hub will work directly with adolescent advisory groups in Eastern, Western and Southern Africa to co-develop approaches that are not only effective, but also meaningful and fun for those who will use them.

We aim to reach 20 million adolescents and their children with effective combinations of services to meet their needs. Between our direct countries of research and our NGO partners, the Hub will actively engage with policymakers, practitioners and adolescents across East, West, Southern and Central Africa and including fragile and war-torn states. We have a common goal: to transform the potential of Africa's adolescents into a thriving future for the continent.

Planned Impact

WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM THIS HUB, AND HOW?

20 MILLION ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN IN AFRICA, TO REACH THEIR POTENTIAL THROUGH EFFECTIVE, SCALED-UP SERVICES. The Hub will feed evidence of effective combination services directly into national and regional policies, capitalising on political will to invest in Africa's emerging workforce and constituency. Impact strategies include two researchers in UNDP and the African Union, policy briefs and high-level meetings building on existing strong networks and advisory roles. In countries with major projects (Lesotho, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia) advisors will include senior government, multilateral agencies and donors (e.g. Dr Ntuli Kapologwe, Ministry of Health Tanzania, Dr Alhaji Kamara, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology Sierra Leone, Thabani Buthelezi, National Dept Social Development South Africa). Through evidence co-creation with African governments, we will maximise uptake of findings into national policies with population-level impact.

AFRICAN POLICYMAKERS, THROUGH PROVIDING THE EVIDENCE THEY ARE ASKING FOR. The Hub responds to clear requests from African policy-makers. As they start to operationalise the Sustainable Development Goals at country-level, with globally-shrinking aid resources, governments want to know two things. First, what combinations of services will impact the greatest number of their priority SDGs? Second, what are their most cost-effective options? We will provide such evidence from Angola, Cote D'Ivoire, DRC, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. Governments and adolescents will be directly involved in selecting the combinations of services to test. Finance civil servants will be invited to join our training program and co-author cost-effectiveness analyses, thus sharing capacity and building research engagement. The Hub will partner with UNICEF, WHO, the Global Fund and the NEPAD Agency of the African Union to deliver capacity-sharing webinars and workshops for national governments on super-accelerator evidence.

PRACTITIONERS, NGOS AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES DELIVERING SERVICES TO ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN IN 34 COUNTRIES, THROUGH FREE, ACCESSIBLE TOOLS AND TRAINING. We will turn research findings directly into manuals and training toolkits for effective combination services. We will work directly with our NGO partners Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa, International AIDS Alliance, Clowns Without Borders and International Rescue Committee and UN partners to deliver training modules within their existing networks in 34 African countries, adding Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, CAR, Chad, Libya, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Rwanda and Sudan. With partners we will build capacity for practitioners in health, education and community services, to reach over a million adolescents and their children through direct service provision. The Hub team have a strong record of turning evidence into service delivery in this way: for example one of our parenting programs available on the WHO website is being delivered to 300,000 families across 10 African countries in 2018.

ACADEMICS IN AFRICA AND THE UK, THROUGH GROUNDBREAKING SCIENCE, CAPACITY-SHARING, SHARED DATASETS, TOOLS AND MEASURES. The Hub will provide innovative evidence for researchers in the fields of adolescence and early childhood, intersecting across health, education, violence prevention, economic empowerment, nutrition and employment. Academics may access freely available resources and datasets, freely available for non-profit use. Early career investigators in Africa and the UK will benefit from training, mentorship and will be supported to take leadership roles - and subsequently to lead the Hub's legacy of future research and impact.

Organisations

Publications

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Accelerate Hub Authors (2020) World Food Programme Policy Brief

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Bantjes J (2020) Inequality and mental healthcare utilisation among first-year university students in South Africa. in International journal of mental health systems

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Based On Work By Cluver L (STACKing The Odds For Adolescent Survival: Health Service Factors Associated With Full Retention In Care And Adherence Amongst Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2019) STACKing the odds for survival: Boosting retention in care for adolescents living with HIV

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Based On Work By Cluver L (Sustainable Survival For Adolescents Living With HIV: Do SDG-Aligned Provisions Reduce Potential Mortality Risk?) (2020) SDG-aligned provisions reduce potential mortality risk among adolescents living with HIV

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Based On Work By Cluver, L (Multiple Violence Exposures And Adolescent Antiretroviral Non-Adherence In South Africa) (2020) Violence is stopping adolescents from taking lifesaving antiretrovirals

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Based On Work By Toska, Elona (Consistent Provisions Mitigate Exposure To Sexual Risk And HIV Among Young Adolescents In South Africa. AIDS And Behavior) (2020) Preventing exposure to sexual risk and HIV in South Africa through SDG-aligned provisions

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Based On Work By, Haghighat, R. (Transition Pathways Out Of Pediatric Care And Associated HIV Outcomes For Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2020) Pathways of adolescent HIV care transition in South Africa

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Based On Work By: Toska, Elona (Screening And Supporting Through Schools: Educational Experiences And Needs Of Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2020) School-based support for adolescents living with HIV

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Casale M (2021) Bullying and ART Nonadherence Among South African ALHIV: Effects, Risks, and Protective Factors. in Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)

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Casale M (2020) COVID-19: Can this crisis be transformative for global health? in Global public health

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Cluver L (2020) Parenting in a time of COVID-19 in The Lancet

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Desmond C (2020) Covid-19: accelerating recovery in Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies

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Donenberg G (2020) Pathways from witnessing community violence to mental health problems among South African adolescents. in South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde

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Ganz G (2020) Parental misperceptions of in-group norms for child discipline in Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology

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Herrero Romero R (2019) Exposure to violence, teacher support, and school delay amongst adolescents in South Africa. in The British journal of educational psychology

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Hertzog L (2020) Por uma abordagem interseccional das desigualdades: rupturas com visões hierarquizadas in Contemporânea - revista de sociologia da UFSCar

 
Title "Let's Slow Down" theme song 
Description "Let's Slow Down" theme song by Broadway producer Mary Mitchell Campbell. The lyrics capture what parents and caregivers may be feeling during this time of crisis, and aims to inspire them to use the parenting package to stay calm, mitigate stress, and maintain healthy environments for children - all set to an energising, uplifting tune. Includes online link to Instrumental karaoke, encouraging viewers to make and share their own cover versions: https://youtu.be/wul92VyMZKs Song: Let's Slow Down Credit: Artists Striving to End Poverty Songwriters: Mary-Mitchell Campbell and Crystal Monee Hall Sung by: Crystal Monee Hall Orchestrated by: August Eriksmoen 
Type Of Art Composition/Score 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Numerous professional artists and amateurs have made their own cover versions, creating and uploading videos to YouTube and other platforms. Available as a free for download ringtone via Safaricom, a Kenyan mobile network operator with an estimated 33.1 million subscribers. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D9FsCbRuQg28
 
Title Accelerate Hub Website Update 
Description The Accelerate Hub website has recently undergone major updates with new content and images showcasing our work. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact *Need to access statistics of website activity- maybe can ask Ruth? 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/
 
Title Accelerate Hub annual meeting 2021 infopack 
Description An infopack with all the details for attendees about the Hub's virtual annual meeting. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact NA 
 
Title Accelerate Hub logo redesign 
Description The Accelerate Hub logo was redesigned to include less text and colour and be simple and to the point. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The logo redesign has informed Accelerate Hub's style and brand guideline and is included in all marketing materials. 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/files/acceleratehubbrandguidepdf
 
Title Audio recordings for ParentApp 
Description Voiceover artists from SA and Tanzania were recruited to work closely with the the ParentApp technical team to create audios for the app. Recordings of approximately 40 audios, including introductory audios, relax activities and testimonials containing feedback from users of the app were created in English, isiZulu, isiXhosa, Sestwana, Sesotho, Afrikaans and Kiswahili. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The recordings in local languages allowed provided further contextualisation to the app, and made it possible for more local people to understand and benefit from the app. 
 
Title Breakthrough on HIV adolescence: Prof. Mark Orkin 
Description SABC Digital News, Johannesburg, SA 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact National reach, general public, estimated 38,000, SABC Digital News, Johannesburg, SA 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeXfH7MFs30&feature=youtu.be
 
Title COVID-19 Parenting Audio Pack and Public Service Announcements 
Description An audio pack with radio scripts and sketches that can be used by radio stations and by organisations working with those media outlets to disseminate the materials. Radio has a large listenership in many regions, including Sub-Saharan Africa, providing a means to access families with low literacy levels and in the absence of internet. https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/13pQx9yS7i3wzhRzhumqUzIPfCmGehxmR A repertoire of public service announcement messages, each with accompanying toolkit, for broadcast via mobile loudspeakers carried on vehicles, cycles, or any mode of transport. https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/resources/psas/PSA-English.pdf https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/resources/psas/How-to-PSA-English.pdf 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Some country-specific instances of utilisation and dissemination of the COVID-19 parenting messaging and materials through these audio modes include: Cameroon - In collaboration with the Society for the Promotion of Initiatives in Sustainable Development and Welfare (SOPISDEW) in Bamenda, jointly with Swiss NGO Foundation Hirondelle, our COVID-19 parenting radio scripts have been broadcast through 55 media houses across Cameroon. Daily announcements based on the resources are broadcast via CBS radio in Bamenda, with families given focused follow-up support. Jamaica - In collaboration with UNICEF Jamaica and the National Parenting Commission, the parenting tips were shared on national radio, including themed radio drama sketches. Lao PDR - UNICEF, government agencies, and NGOs in Lao PDR have reached an estimated 3.4 million people (roughly 50% of the nation's population), through combined mass media campaigns and targeted outreach to vulnerable families. The parenting tips were broadcast on 18 national TV and radio stations in Lao language, two ethnic minority languages (Hmong and Khmu) and sign language. At the same time, USBs with audio files were distributed to 5,800 villages using community loudspeakers. Malawi - Featured on Blantyre Synod Radio as a permanent guest, "Forgotten Voices" has been spreading the tips and parenting advice to over 8 million weekly listeners throughout Malawi. This approach has met a direct need in the community to challenge norms and strengthen families and will continue to impact families beyond the pandemic. The Philippines - Feature spots on community radio stations have shared the parenting tips through live demonstrations and on-air "Q&A" for parents and educators. Broadcasts make use of trained facilitators from the pre-pandemic in-person PLH programmes - targeting vulnerable families. South Africa - National radio broadcasts based on the resources have been shared in seven languages, reaching over 6.8 million people through 50 different community radio stations. Zimbabwe - 1 million people were reached with the parenting tips via national radio stations. 
 
Title COVID-19 Parenting Tips Guides for Caseworkers and Faith-Leaders 
Description User-friendly guides for caseworkers and early childhood development practitioners in the form of community worker templates giving a step-by-step progression through a structured sequence of remote support conversations with parents. These can be utilised in phone-based or online chat counselling, for parenting hotlines and online parenting support groups. https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/resources/caseworkers/caseworkers_English.pdf A Church Leaders' Pack, developed in collaboration with World Without Orphans, links the evidence-informed parenting tips to religious text from the Christian Bible and provides church leaders with scripts for radio broadcasts along with ideas for sermons, pastoral visits and social media. https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/resources/faithbased/church_leader_pack.pdf Muslim and other faith versions are in development. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact The guides have been endorsed and advanced in a vast range and number of professional and faith forums respectively. These purpose-designed materials equip those who are at the "front lines" of community support with resources addressing pandemic parenting challenges within the established frameworks of their recognised expertise and leadership roles. In this way, these guides at once reinforce and are reinforced by the capacities of these key community actors. Some country-specific instances of utilisation of the COVID-19 parenting tips in casework programmes and faith contexts include: India - Viva Network developed an innovative, accessible phone call-based mentoring programme for at-risk families based on the caseworker guides and COVID-19 tip sheets. Extending beyond India, this programme is reaching more than 19,000 families in 16 countries and has been made available online for use by other organisations. Malaysia - Ministry of Women, Family, and Community Development; the Malaysian Association of Social Workers; the University Putra Malaysia; Maestral International; and UNICEF adapted the resources for remote case management by social workers and social welfare practitioners to facilitate child protection in the COVID-19 context. Additionally, further collaboration by the University Putra Malaysia with the National Population and Family Planning Board, and the Malaysia Department of Islamic Development (JAKIM) is producing a faith-based package for use by religious leaders to support families in the context of COVID-19. This reference guide will integrate COVID-19 Parenting resources with messages from the Quran, Hadith or sirah to be disseminated via parenting lectures, sermons, and courses in religious communities. Mosque leaders and committee members will participate in a training workshop on ways to implement the faith-based package within their communities Montenegro - UNICEF Montenegro integrated the resources into emergency parenting hotlines The Philippines - National government and UNICEF webinars have been held for 1500+ families, as well as specialist webinars for social welfare practitioners on online capacity building, parenting skills, sexual violence prevention, and stress reduction. Thailand - UNICEF and the Ministry of Public Health have utilised these materials in developing remote training protocols for the training of parenting programme facilitators working with at-risk households. Malawi - Chuch Leaders guide used in training pastors from 37 churches with family strengthening tools, reaching over 2000 households. 
URL https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/resources/caseworkers/caseworkers_English.pdf
 
Title COVID-19 Parenting Tips in Print, Comic Strips, Social Media formats 
Description 16 parenting tip sheets, featuring over 100 activities and prompts linked to our structured parenting modules across topics including relationship building, reinforcement of positive behaviour, learning through play, nonviolent behaviour management, consistent rules and routines, online child safety, talking about COVID-19, family budgeting, anger and stress management, and support for remote learning and education. Content is rooted in real-life day-to-day situations, with pragmatic suggestions that can be implemented without any preparation or supplementary knowledge. Parents can choose from active or calming activities and those that are audio, visual or sensorial, physical, verbal or tactile, suitable for all age groups and ability levels. Crucially, the activities do not require any particular equipment or additional resources, ensuring that they are achievable and appealing regardless of a family's material circumstances. Guidance materials feature upbeat, eye-catching visuals, in bright colours and without gender-, age-, or culture-specific identifiers to increase inclusivity, and there is content targeting families living with disabilities and in crowded conditions. Wording is positive and accessible, yet culturally adaptable, with short, rhythmic and memorable phrasing. Tip sheets are available in 114 languages and a range of print-friendly sizes, making them suitable for distribution through any route and for display at any communal, commercial, or public location. Over 20 illustrated stories from the Parenting for Lifelong Health programmes have been adapted into comic strips addressing COVID-19 parenting challenges, that are transportable across contexts and cultures. These have been further reshaped into playful and engaging animated short videos in multiple languages. https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/10I_OK2sstCKXON9b-hbnf6ZobpUDtOut Social media messaging with accompanying toolkit in a #covid19parenting campaign, entirely based on the COVID-19 Parenting Tips, promoted in partnership with influencers from the sports and entertainment industries. https://www.covid19parenting.com/socialmedia# 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact The tip sheets and allied COVID-19 parenting resources have reached a minimum estimate of 136.1 million people by 154 implementing partners in 187 countries. These materials have been taken up by 28 governments, and incorporated onto the websites of the WHO, UNICEF, UN Broadband Commission, and World Childhood Foundation, among others. Tip sheets have gone into food parcels in Sri Lanka, India, Cameroon, Montenegro, the Philippines, Paraguay, South Africa, and to refugee camps via UNODC. Kenya - Department of Children's Services are using the materials in developing the country's new national parenting guidelines. Zambia - Safe Motherhood Alliance distributes the tip sheets in kits dispensed to 100 new mothers every month. Namibia - The Office of the First Lady of Namibia has championed the materials, sharing them with frontline care workers and religious leaders. Ghana - education platforms supporting the national government during the pandemic are incorporating the materials into their online curriculum. South Africa - regional government offices are sharing the tip sheets with case workers and advice offices across the country. India - UNICEF India translated the tip sheets into 10 languages, which they used these for capacity building within government systems through online training sessions focused mainly on Early Childhood Development workers and caregivers. They then trans-created these tips, along with local additions, into a monthly calendar sharing "to do" activities with parents. These materials were further developed into short videos that have been used on the Saathealth app, with each tip sheet converted into two or three 90-second videos. The tips have been further shared in approximately 70,000 WhatsApp groups, readily reaching over a million parents. The government has also shared these tips on their websites, with further targeted promotion to parents in rural villages, involving their translation into a further 10 languages. ADAPT, a project focusing on adolescents, has used the tips (with local additions) to create short videos that encourage intergenerational dialogue. Multiple webinars have been offered for health care workers, who have requested the tip sheets to print and display in their offices and surgeries. The Philippines - tip sheets in 12 national languages were uploaded to a COVID-19 website and Facebook, with printed formats distributed to community services providers in Women and Child Protection Units nationwide. Booklets on the specific parenting "modules" have been printed and distributed to families without internet access. Thailand - the Ministry of Public Health distributes the tip sheets in Health Promotion Hospitals on a national level. Sudan - the tip sheets were distributed across major Coptic Christian churches, through schools and businesses such as the DAL group, via social media on Facebook and WhatsApp, and as posters throughout Khartoum, reaching an estimated 1.9 million families. Zimbabwe - Catholic Relief Services have shared the resources via MHealth and in-person consultation as part of a national HIV-prevention initiative. Others incorporating content of the tip sheets into their initiatives include a story-based educational game platform in Nigeria, a parenting support platform in Kenya, and a magazine for refugees distributed to all refugee camps in Rwanda. 
URL https://www.covid19parenting.com/assets/tip_sheets/en/merged_1.pdf
 
Title Employment as Accelerator Podcast 
Description The podcast interrogates the level of (un)employment in Africa with a specific focus on those aged between 15 and 24 (which of course adolescents fall into), and also ways of creating jobs. What are the existing barriers to job creation? What are the links between unemployment, migration and xenophobia, especially in South Africa? What could the push and pull factors of African immigrants into South Africa and Europe be around employment? This episode's conversation explores the practical ways in which jobs can be created as an intervention for young people on the African continent. The participants draw on their experience to talk about what worked particularly well in recent interventions relating to employment. Participants: Lukas Hensel (Guanghua University), Kebba-Omar Jagne (Gambia), Iyeyinka Kusi-Mensah (Cambridge) With Chair: Elleke Boehmer 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Wider audience reached through Tweets about the episode. 
URL https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/s2e2-employment-accelerator
 
Title Graphic recordings from annual meeting: Zuhura Plummer 
Description Graphic recorder Zuhura Plummer created artwork summaries from the annual meeting 3-5 Feb and the webinar which took place on 4 Feb. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Zuhura was able to visually capture the work shared by the Hub. These artworks may be used for Hub merchandise such as cups, bags, shirts as well as for posters, presentations and wall murals. 
 
Title HUB ECR video 
Description A video about our early career researchers. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This video will be used on our website, social media, and when describing our capacity sharing work to external partners. 
URL https://vimeo.com/508336746
 
Title Hub Overview video 
Description A video that summarises the work of the Hub. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This video will be used on our website, social media, when our team presents at events, and when we're pitching for funding/collaborations/partners. 
URL https://vimeo.com/508451193
 
Title Hub TAG video 
Description This video summarises our work with TAG Western Cape and TAG Kenya. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This video will be used on our website, social media, and when describing our participatory research work to external partners. 
URL https://vimeo.com/508329928
 
Title Jikelele song TAG Western Cape 
Description This song was recorded at a camp in January 2020 and created by TAG Western Cape. 
Type Of Art Composition/Score 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact This song is used as the background track for the Accelerate Hub videos. This song was also a key featureof the play the adolescents developed. 
 
Title Narrative, intervention and motivation podcast 
Description This is a conversation about narrative as enabling, empowering, motivating, and/or inspiring in situations of intervention in African contexts. It discusses how our work on motivation and storytelling helps to ground interventions in particular contexts and helps to make the relatable and ownable for people. It looks at the kinds of stories that have worked for us in our different activities and explores further things that might be done with narrative interventions, collaboratively and collectively, knowing what we now know. Participants: Alude Mahali (HSRC South Africa), Robert Muponde (Wits), Tamsen Rochat (Wits) With Chair: Elleke Boehmer 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Wider audience reached through Tweets about the podcast. 
URL https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/s2e1-narrative-intervention-motivation
 
Title PLH-SUPER South Sudan policy brief 
Description A brief to inform policy about 'Parenting programmes as a child abuse intervention in high-conflict settings' based on research published in 2020. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact No impacts yet as the policy brief was recently published. 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/files/plh-supersouthsudanpolicybriefpdf
 
Title Song Written By Teenage Advisory Group Participant 
Description After our first engagement activity in the Eastern Cape, one of the participants shared a song he had written with a facilitator. In the song, he reflects on a conversation he had with other participants in the group who are young fathers. The song describes some of the challenges that young parents may face and how these challenges may affect their child. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The song was written after our first engagement activity with our Eastern Cape TAG. In an accompanying explanatory voice note, the participants explains "This track guys, I wanted to say, the group of you guys, you brought me together with young mothers and young fathers. So I collected the story there, so I could have something to write. So that means it has something to do with me and the group, you know?" This echoes the reflections of other TAG members, who have expressed that their involvement in the adolescent advisory groups gives them the opportunity to share their stories, reflect on other participant's stories, which they can learn from. 
 
Title Thinking Futures 
Description This installation explores how we imagine the future, and questions of future thinking especially for adolescents across Africa. In contexts of poverty and deprivation, how do young people in Africa think about tomorrow and related ideas of hope, potential, possibility (including job possibilities), future planning? What are the characteristics of the desired future? What might be their motivations in their future planning? What are the inspirations to future thinking and planning that young people in Africa encounter, that you have met in your work? What are the current barriers to attaining this imagined future for young people and how can they be overcome? 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Wider audience reached through Twitter. 
URL https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/s2e3-thinking-futures/id1498437330?i=1000551584917
 
Title Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts Podcasts 
Description This series of podcasts explore the question of adolescence in African contexts. They are part of the ongoing work of the 5-year, UK Research and Innovation Global Challenges Research Fund Hub, Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents, hosted by the University of Oxford and the University of Cape Town. The podcasts were recorded during a three-day workshop on the theme of Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts, hosted at Rhodes House in Oxford. These podcasts are part of the innovation strand of the Hub's work, which will co-ordinate further workshops over the coming years, seeking to challenge and extend the ideas that underpin research on adolescence in Africa. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact *Awaiting to receive stats of how many times the podcasts have been listened to 
URL https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/understanding-adolescence-african-contexts
 
Title WP2 Posters 
Description Designed posters summarising the research studies in Work Package Two. These posters were displayed at the Accelerate Hub Year one meeting 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Approximately 27 Hub members engaged with these posters which assisted in stimulating dialogue and showcasing study highlights. 
 
Title Western Cape TAG Play and Mural Painting 
Description Our Western Cape TAG chose a play and a mural painting as some of the ways in which they wanted to participate in TAG. The play and mural reflect on their engagement as advisors in various research projects. They reflect on the challenges of first coming together with different people, getting to know them, sharing and learning from each other, growing confident and to sharing their experiences and now expertise with other young people. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact "When we participate meaningfully, it isn't taking something away because it is already within us. We are just sharing it" (Western Cape TAG participant)- This participant's reflection speaks to the fact that young people are willing to share their views and perspectives and wish to do it in a meaningful way. This re-affirms the importance of meaningfully engaging participants in research about them- they have the interest and can advise researchers. 
 
Title World Without Orphans promotion of Church Leaders Guide 
Description An animation to inform church leaders of the COVID-19 Parenting Church Leaders Guide and point them to accessing and utilising it. The animation has been created in such a way that as to encourage and enable re-recording of the voiceover and subtitles in any language. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Not yet known 
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing
 
Title Year One Meeting Infopack 
Description Accelerate Hub sent out a detailed and professionally designed info pack to all attendees prior to the Year One Meeting. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Approximately 80 delegates received this info pack via email and expressed excitement at attending the Year One meeting because of it. 
 
Title Year One meeting SDG group photo 
Description We gathered attendees of the Year One meeting to capture a photo from above with the team holding SDG signs. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We gathered approximately 80 delegates of the Year One meeting for this group shot. We are using this photo on marketing materials, on our website and in proposals. 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/photos
 
Description Although the Accelerate Hub expects that the bulk of our evidence will emerge from studies and trials in Years 3-4, the first two years have already generated a number of key findings. The Hub has moved beyond the original proof of concept ('Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV', published in the 'Lancet Child and Adolescent Health' in 2019) to develop a body of evidence-based findings through the application of the Accelerator framework to a cohort of observational studies in WP2 exploring findings across a range of demographics, African sub-regions and vulnerabilities. Specifically, the following interventions, policies and provisions have demonstrated positive cumulative effects across multiple SDGs simultaneously:
• Cash grants and food security
• Parenting support
• Sexual and reproductive health education
• Community Based Organisation access
• Cognitive stimulation
• Mental health or psychosocial support
• Safe communities and schools
• Caregiver ART adherence
• Primary Healthcare
In addition to the actualisation of the original pathways to impact the Hub has also responded to emergent opportunities in the context of covid 19 to expand upon earlier iterations of routes to impact. COVID lockdowns, financial crisis and mental health distress have raised stress in families globally, increasing child abuse. The Hub, led by Prof Lucie Cluver built an emergency coalition with WHO, UNICEF, USAID, CDC and others. We rapidly adapted and translated our evidence-based parenting resources into 114 languages and made them open source (Cluver, Lancet 2020; Perks, Nature 2020). Since April 2020, uptake has reached 144 million people in 204 countries, with 33 governments using the resources in their national COVID responses. The resources have included radio plays, TV shows, leaflets in food parcels, public service announcements by loudspeaker, social media, religious sermons, telephone hotlines and delivery to refugee camps and by disability organisations.
With UNICEF, the Accelerate Hub reviewed evidence from previous HIV and Ebola epidemics to identify the most cost-effective solutions to reduce negative impacts of COVID on children and adolescents (Sherr et al, 2020). Led by Prof Lorraine Sherr, they found that the three most effective solutions were social protection cash transfers, parenting support programmes and mental health support - improving multiple COVID outcomes. The report was released as a major UNICEF advocacy initiative on World Children's Day in November 2020.
A team of Hub academics from Oxford and Duke Universities and the University of Cape Town, led by Dr Kate Orkin, were commissioned to provide policy briefs to the Presidency of South Africa on design of relief measures (cash transfers and food parcels) to protect households from economic impacts of lockdown. Briefs drew on a review of international responses (Gerard et al. 2020) and systematic reviews (including funded by DFID) (e.g. Bastalgi et al. 2016). With an impact assessment by the University of Cape Town, these informed designs of the social protection response. In April 2020, the South African Government shifted approach from food parcels to cash grants. Government temporarily increased the cash grants paid to 13 million people, including grants paid to caregivers of children, and created a new temporary grant for 5 million unemployed adults for six months. In October, government extended the unemployment grant until December 2020.
The Hub has been committed to ensuring pathways to impact remains an area of reflection throughout the lifecycle of the Hub. A central focus of effectively deploying the Hub's growing evidence base for the purposes of policy impact and positive outcomes for intended beneficiaries has been to ensure the evidence is in dialogue with pragmatic solutions to scalability, acceptability and cost-effectiveness. The Hub's WP5 has thus started to develop, refine and undertake testing of cost-effectiveness, acceptability and scalability frameworks. Observational studies in WP2 have been identified and utilised for the purposes of piloting a cost-effectiveness model with the scope to refine and apply as a generalist model to additional observational datasets. Similarly, a team of experts have undertaken a systematic review of acceptability models and have developed a contextually and regionally responsive model that will be piloted on a range of studies and trials to move beyond an original proof of concept towards a growing evidence base of an Africa-centric model for acceptability. In addition, findings have started to be consolidated on the scalability of interventions. Secondary Data analysis on implementation has been completed by the Parenting for Lifelong Health SUPER study and preliminary data analysis has been undertaken on available data to understand effective scale up, delivery and monitoring of in-person parenting interventions.

Year 3
We have generated evidence that responds to the needs of vulnerable children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa and supports policymakers and programmers with identifying packages of interventions that can be delivered at scale. These packages can reduce risk and increase resilience in adolescent boys and girls, in the face of multiple external shocks including the twin HIV and COVID epidemics, climate shocks and contracting economies. In our third year, we have scaled up our analysis of cost-effectiveness of interventions to identify solutions that can be delivered affordably at scale in low-income settings.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on families, increasing the numbers of children losing caregivers to illness or death, and reducing both household income and the funding of public services. Hub-supported research has responded to these emerging and extreme development priorities. Throughout 2021, Hub research and policy engagement has helped to highlight this largely unreported escalating caregiving crisis, working with PEPFAR, USAID, CDC, The World Bank and others to identify interventions which can both protect vulnerable children in the immediate crisis and improve their life-chances going forward.

Hub research has also helped inform efforts to provide economic assistance to vulnerable households and children. Accelerators have been identified which can not only tackle poverty and hunger, but also promote children's (particularly girls') return to school and reduce negative coping strategies, such as child marriage and child labour. At a national level, Hub research has informed economic strengthening policies and programmes. For example, the team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Duke University and the University of Cape Town - led by Dr Kate Orkin - has been providing the South African government with rapid evidence reviews and policy recommendations informing aspects of that nation's COVID and post-COVID relief. This has led to a shift to direct cash transfers in emergency poverty relief, replacing food aid and delivering transfers through the existing social welfare system. The Hub's research and policy engagement has supported interventions to improve both formal employment rates and livelihoods in the informal sector for the unemployed. In Lesotho, Hub research has (through a parallel programme with the Global Fund led by Dr Elona Toska) helped to support policy dialogue with government and civil society on approaches to economic strengthening which can address HIV-related risks, particularly those faced by adolescent girls and young women.

At a global level, the Hub has responded to growing interest amongst policymakers in packages of social assistance combined with other provisions (so called 'cash plus' approaches), which can respond to COVID impacts as well as supporting gender transformative outcomes for girls and women.

Hub researchers and policy and advocacy colleagues have presented at forums with FCDO, UNICEF, the Finnish government, SIDA, Save the Children and the SPIAC-B network, sharing our accelerator analyses on cash plus combinations with proven impact on adolescents and young people's wellbeing and on reducing gender inequalities. This work draws on more than 25 Hub publications on social protection, including accelerator analyses and systematic reviews. We are planning to develop a series of knowledge products based on our research and policy engagement, to support internal training on cash plus programming with UNICEF Africa and Asia teams.
• Food and nutrition security. Hub research on food insecurity has informed numerous partnerships, focusing in the last 12 months on populations at most risk: adolescent girls, adolescents living with disability, adolescents living with HIV, and orphans, and vulnerable children. For example, our partnership with WFP Regional Offices of Johannesburg and Nairobi guided two policy briefs on HIV-sensitive social protection for food and nutrition security. These findings and recommendations were later integrated into WFP's Social Protection Plan, and presented through numerous UN forums, including ICASA 2021 and the IATT High-Level Meeting on Social Protection. This has deepened understanding of the role cash and food transfers can play in promoting resilience.
• Health security and HIV prevention. Our research has also supported the prevention and mitigation of infectious diseases, including HIV, TB and COVID-19. With separate funding from the Global Fund,our UKRI-supported research is informing the identification of packages of interventions which can respond to national and sub-national drivers of HIV vulnerability in adolescent girls. This is currently conducted in partnership with the governments of Eswatini, Lesotho, Cameroon, Mozambique and Kenya. We have also supported the creation of interagency groups responding to health crises and their long-term repercussions; for example, our team is currently leading the Global Reference Group on Children Affected by COVID-19 - bringing together CDC, USAID, the World Bank, and leading civil society organisations to prevent, prepare and protect in mitigation of adverse consequences arising from COVID-19-associated orphanhood.

• Mental health and psychosocial support. Our evidence on accelerator combinations shows that the combination of psychosocial support and economic strengthening has broadly positive impacts across adolescent physical and mental health. This evidence has been presented in over 20 conferences, external meetings and events. For example, this was presented regionally through the SADC Development Community (led by the Ministry of Health Uganda), emphasizing mental health integration into health programming and the importance of strong referral systems that link psychosocial support, violence prevention, education and health. We have shared this evidence widely on an international scale. For example, Prof Lorraine Sherr, Prof Lucie Cluver and early career researcher Kathryn Roberts (among many other academic researchers), in collaboration with UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, produced an evidence brief drawing on previous Hub research titled "Mind Matters: Lessons from past crises for child and adolescent mental health during COVID-19."

• Addressing gender inequalities and social exclusion. Hub research continues to generate evidence on the differential impacts of interventions for boys and girls, with a focus on those facing multiple vulnerabilities (for example, adolescent mothers, adolescents living with HIV, and adolescents living with disabilities). At our annual Hub meeting in January 2022, every study presented findings disaggregated by sex. There has been intensified focus on which combinations of interventions can support gender transformative outcomes, such as reducing adolescent girls' and young women's HIV risk, sexual violence exposure and incidence of child marriage. With co-funding from the Oak Foundation, our team has brought together a cohort of 12 early career researchers working on preventing sexual violence, IPV, unsafe sex and GBV across the region. From demography and ethnographies to regression analyses and costing, our team is currently working on recognising the complex pathways that lead to violence against children and adolescents.

• Protecting adolescent education and schooling. In 2019-2022, access to education and safe school settings has been shown to be a significant development accelerator for a range of SDGs, as well as education being a development outcome in its own right. In Malawi, the Hub tested literacy as both an outcome and an intervention, detailing how education can confer significant protection benefits for young people, particularly in relation to reducing violence and sexual exploitation. In Kenya, evidence from our RCT showed that combining a motivational video promoting aspirations of young men and women at the household level with a cash transfer significantly increased investments towards boys' and girls' education and reduced gender-based violence, compared to the cash transfer alone. From our research in South Africa, led by Dr Janina Jochim, we further identified that access to affordable childcare can significantly improve adolescent mothers' return to school - an intervention which has been largely neglected in many education services and COVID recovery responses. We have presented this evidence to the Ministry of Education in South Africa, the WHO School Health team and to the African Union -NEPAD. Education findings from accelerator analysis in Nigeria has been shared with that country's Ministries of Education, Health and Gender, along with civil society, including youth-led organisations and teacher networks. In 2022, we will explore opportunities to deepen our engagement and promote research uptake with policymakers working on girls' education, including the FCDO-funded Girls Education Challenge and Global Partnership for Education.
Exploitation Route Our evidence will be used by a range of governments. agencies and institutions to develop evidence-based policies and services to benefit adolescents.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Healthcare

 
Description YEAR 3 The Accelerate Hub prioritised research that responds to government needs in sub-Saharan Africa. Our team has been quick to respond and adapt to COVID-19, to shifting global and national priorities, and with a focus on fragile states and countries experiencing humanitarian crises such as South Sudan, Sudan, Nigeria, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Our research continues to support economic and social transformation to accelerate achievement for Africa's adolescents. Global Leadership: The Hub has led and participated in evidence-based interagency collaborations globally, regional knowledge exchanges, and national round tables to advocate for and facilitate collaborations for adolescent wellbeing in Africa. Our evidence has informed a wide array of decision makers and global institutions, including with the governments of 33 ODA listed countries, and this includes six African governments, and beyond ODA, partners the Vatican, and the U.S. White House. Our findings have been reflected in international policy and guidance documents, including UNICEF's Mind Matters Policy Brief on mental health in COVID-19 (Oct 2021), the CDC's Hidden Pandemic brief on COVID-19- associated orphanhood (Feb 2022), and the WHO-UNICEF Brief on HIV service delivery to young mothers (Dec 2021). Academic excellence: Our team has undertaken more than 30 accelerator analyses across sub-Saharan Africa identifying provisions that impact on more than 10 Sustainable Development Goals. The Hub has produced over 100 high-impact publications, and with evidence-based messaging reaching over 210 million families globally. A large proportion of our publications have been co-authored with global leaders in international development; e.g., we co-authored high-impact publications with UNDP HIV & Health team and the WFP Regional office in Johannesburg. The Hub's work has been included in multiple citations in policy briefs, and presented in multiple high-level forums, such as the UNAIDS 2021 High-level Meeting, the UNICEF-WHO Interagency Parenting Vision Launch, and to partners at the Child Marriage Action Network and the Global Fund. Over 2021-22, our research has received international recognition and academic innovation awards, including Professor Lucie Cluver's ESRC Celebrating Impact Prize and Leading Women in Science 2021 Award, and an MBE to Professor Lorraine Sherr for services to vulnerable children and families. Capacity sharing: Despite the severe cuts in our budget, in Year 3 the Hub has continued to invest in talent both in the U.K. and across the African continent. Early career researchers (68 in total, with over 75% female) co-authored over 75 publications, 34 of which were first authored. In Nigeria, South Africa, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, early career researchers led policy briefs highlighting accelerator evidence and proposing their integration into national programming. Throughout the Hub's tenure, capacity sharing workshops and activities were co-organised with APHRC to strengthen the academic capacity within and across our networks. These tackled a range of themes, including policy engagement and advocacy, mentoring, scientific writing, grants proposal writing and statistical methods training. Led by an ECR, Dr. Anne Khisa, our capacity sharing programme was tailored to suit needs of early career researchers who wish to develop into research leaders on the African continent. A notable success was the advanced statistical training led by Dr. William Rudgard for 41 researchers across the U.K. and Africa, involving Hub researchers and others across our academic partners and development partners, including from the Population Council, African Population and Health Research Centre (APHRC), and multiple U.K. universities (Oxford University, UCL, Imperial College, LSHTM and Cardiff University). Funding cuts from 2022 have forced a reduction in our capacity development support and an end to our funding of APHRC. However, with support from the Oak Foundation, we will continue to invest in and support early career researchers in acquiring policy and advocacy skills and through a research methods masterclass on violence prevention targeted to policymakers, governments, the UN and multi-laterals. YEAR 2 The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub continues to have a considerable economic and social impact through the generation of high-quality research which has been utilised to accelerate progress on the Sustainable Development Goals and improve the lives of vulnerable adolescents in Africa. Over the last 12 months, the Accelerate Hub has been quick to respond to the new challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic as illustrated by the following examples: • School closures and lockdown during the pandemic has significantly increased child protection risks. By the end of March 2020, we had brought together WHO, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children, USAID, the CDC, UNODC and other key agencies, to develop a set of resources for parents during the lockdown, based on the Hub's research on Parenting for Lifelong Health. These COVID-19 Playful Parenting Emergency Response resources were endorsed and shared by all global agencies. Within eight months these resources reached more than 144 million families in 204 countries with 33 Governments in more than 100 languages. The resources have gained global recognition - we were a Top 10 finalist for Falling Walls Science Breakthroughs. • Our collaboration with UNICEF Innocenti on the publication Beyond Masks is another notable success. Drawing on evidence from previous crises, including the Ebola outbreaks and economic shocks, Hub researchers helped to identify the likely societal impacts of COVID-19. Together with UNICEF and other development agencies, we have identified a possible solution for mitigating impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic at an individual, household and societal level. In 2020, Professor Sherr was awarded an MBE for her services to vulnerable children in Africa. • Similarly, we have been quick to respond to country level support for evidence-based solutions. Dr Kate Orkin led a team of Hub academics from Oxford and Duke Universities and the University of Cape Town to develop policy briefs to the Presidency of South Africa on the design of relief measures (cash and food transfers) to protect households from the economic impacts of lockdown. Briefs drew on systematic review of cash transfers as well as an impact assessment by the University of Cape Town. In April, the South African Government shifted its approach from food parcels to cash grants. Government temporarily increased the cash grants paid to 13 million people, including grants paid to caregivers of children, and created a new temporary grant for 5 million unemployed adults for six months. In October, government extended the unemployment grant until December. Beyond the present COVID response, we continue to generate high quality research that tackles a range of development challenges. An example of this is the work we are doing with highly vulnerable adolescents affected by HIV and AIDS. Findings from the Mzantsi Wakho and HEY BABY studies (under Work Package 2) on improving access to HIV treatment and care services for adolescent mothers and their children were presented to policy makers across Africa. This included a presentation at the Annual Summit of the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa (PATA) in November 2020 which was attended by 902 healthcare providers (nurses, pharmacists, doctors, peer supporters) from across 27 countries. Our adolescent HIV research has also supported greater policy engagement with UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Office with whom we have developed an evidence and programming brief which draws on a systematic review of adolescent treatment care pathways in low- and middle-income countries and evidence from the Hub's work on longitudinal studies of 1000 adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. As part of this UNICEF collaboration, ten Hub researchers, including 8 early career researchers, co-facilitated an evidence webinar with more than a dozen cross-UN country teams in Southern and Eastern Africa. We have also been forging evidence-based policy dialogue between UK academic institutions and the new Government of Sudan. The Sudan electricity project - an Engineering and Physical Science Research Centre EPSRC spin-off grant to look at electricity as an accelerator along with the University of Khartoum and the Ministry of Energy. This has been a collaboration across lead investigators across the Department of Social Policy and the Department of Engineering and the Department of Physics (in Oxford) and Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Our governance structures have been critical in helping us to extend our policy influence. Through our Advisory Board and Strategic Advisory Group, we have established excellent networks with a range of bilateral and multilateral organisations including UNDP, AUDA-NEPAD, WHO, WFP, Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria which has given access to key policy makers and mechanism to support uptake of evidence. Over the last year we deepened these partnerships including new partnerships with the World Food Programme's, Regional Bureau for Johannesburg and with the Global Fund for TB, AIDS and Malaria which will enable us to support evidence-based adolescent HIV programming in Cameroon, Mozambique, Kenya, eSwatini and Lesotho. Finally, the Hub is helping to build research excellence in the UK and Africa which can help accelerate progress towards the SDGs, as well as positioning the UK as a thought leader in international development. The Hub is investing significantly in research and policy engagement capacity. In 2020, our partners the African Population and Health Research Centre (APHRC) and the Oxford University led the hub capacity sharing work with researchers participating in various theme specific accelerator methodology workshops. Ten researchers were also enrolled in a virtual mentorship programme and matched with mentors. This model of mentoring supports researchers at different stages of their career trajectories and progression to be independent research leaders. YEAR 2 The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub continues to have a considerable economic and social impact through the generation of high-quality research which has been utilised to accelerate progress on the Sustainable Development Goals and improve the lives of vulnerable adolescents in Africa. Over the last 12 months, the Accelerate Hub has been quick to respond to the new challenges posed by the COVID 19 pandemic as illustrated by the following examples: • School closures and lockdown during the pandemic has significantly increased child protection risks. By the end of March 2020, we had brought together WHO, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children, USAID, the CDC, UNODC and other key agencies, to develop a set of resources for parents during the lockdown, based on the Hub's research on Parenting for Lifelong Health. These COVID-19 Playful Parenting Emergency Response resources were endorsed and shared by all global agencies. Within eight months these resources reached more than 144 million families in 204 countries with 33 Governments in more than 100 languages. The resources have gained global recognition - we were a Top 10 finalist for Falling Walls Science Breakthroughs. • Our collaboration with UNICEF Innocenti on the publication Beyond Masks is another notable success. Drawing on evidence from previous crises, including the Ebola outbreaks and economic shocks, Hub researchers helped to identify the likely societal impacts of COVID-19. Together with UNICEF and other development agencies, we have identified a possible solution for mitigating impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic at an individual, household and societal level. In 2020, Professor Sherr was awarded an MBE for her services to vulnerable children in Africa. • Similarly, we have been quick to respond to country level support for evidence-based solutions. Dr Kate Orkin led a team of Hub academics from Oxford and Duke Universities and the University of Cape Town to develop policy briefs to the Presidency of South Africa on the design of relief measures (cash and food transfers) to protect households from the economic impacts of lockdown. Briefs drew on systematic review of cash transfers as well as an impact assessment by the University of Cape Town. In April, the South African Government shifted its approach from food parcels to cash grants. Government temporarily increased the cash grants paid to 13 million people, including grants paid to caregivers of children, and created a new temporary grant for 5 million unemployed adults for six months. In October, government extended the unemployment grant until December. Beyond the present COVID response, we continue to generate high quality research that tackles a range of development challenges. An example of this is the work we are doing with highly vulnerable adolescents affected by HIV and AIDS. Findings from the Mzantsi Wakho and HEY BABY studies (under Work Package 2) on improving access to HIV treatment and care services for adolescent mothers and their children were presented to policy makers across Africa. This included a presentation at the Annual Summit of the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa (PATA) in November 2020 which was attended by 902 healthcare providers (nurses, pharmacists, doctors, peer supporters) from across 27 countries. Our adolescent HIV research has also supported greater policy engagement with UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Office with whom we have developed an evidence and programming brief which draws on a systematic review of adolescent treatment care pathways in low- and middle-income countries and evidence from the Hub's work on longitudinal studies of 1000 adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. As part of this UNICEF collaboration, ten Hub researchers, including 8 early career researchers, co-facilitated an evidence webinar with more than a dozen cross-UN country teams in Southern and Eastern Africa. We have also been forging evidence-based policy dialogue between UK academic institutions and the new Government of Sudan. The Sudan electricity project - an Engineering and Physical Science Research Centre EPSRC spin-off grant to look at electricity as an accelerator along with the University of Khartoum and the Ministry of Energy. This has been a collaboration across lead investigators across the Department of Social Policy and the Department of Engineering and the Department of Physics (in Oxford) and Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Our governance structures have been critical in helping us to extend our policy influence. Through our Advisory Board and Strategic Advisory Group, we have established excellent networks with a range of bilateral and multilateral organisations including UNDP, AUDA-NEPAD, WHO, WFP, Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria which has given access to key policy makers and mechanism to support uptake of evidence. Over the last year we deepened these partnerships including new partnerships with the World Food Programme's, Regional Bureau for Johannesburg and with the Global Fund for TB, AIDS and Malaria which will enable us to support evidence-based adolescent HIV programming in Cameroon, Mozambique, Kenya, eSwatini and Lesotho. Finally, the Hub is helping to build research excellence in the UK and Africa which can help accelerate progress towards the SDGs, as well as positioning the UK as a thought leader in international development. The Hub is investing significantly in research and policy engagement capacity. In 2020, our partners the African Population and Health Research Centre (APHRC) and the Oxford University led the hub capacity sharing work with researchers participating in various theme specific accelerator methodology workshops. Ten researchers were also enrolled in a virtual mentorship programme and matched with mentors. This model of mentoring supports researchers at different stages of their career trajectories and progression to be independent research leaders. YEAR 1 Enabling adolescents to achieve positive outcomes depends on our research having an impact on policy and programming. Stakeholder participation, policy engagement and influencing are therefore an essential part of everything we do - and involve all staff and partners from early career researchers to Hub directors and academic leads. As part of this process, we are continuously consulting with governments, donors, agencies and most importantly adolescents to explore their needs and challenges, the questions they want us to investigate, and how they can turn research findings into adolescent-sensitive public policy and services. Our consultation with stakeholders takes place through specific forums such as our Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA); with district and national-level bodies and institutions in research countries; and in international forums with major global agencies concerned with welfare and economic development in DAC countries. Feedback from stakeholders so far tells us that adolescents want services designed for them and to make progress across the full range of SDGs (not just health and welfare); that governments need robust evidence about interventions that can achieve multiple outcomes for different groups (girls, boys, rural and urban teens, marginalised and disadvantaged youth) and information about how to rapidly scale-up interventions; and that agencies want smarter and more cost-effective programmes that achieve better out outcomes. We can already cite examples where our policy engagement has achieved ODA impact or progress towards impact (see below). In addition, developing these relationships ensures that we build the views, needs and expectations of stakeholders into our work, ensures they are interested in and receptive to our findings, and has helped us develop an influencing strategy to achieve greater policy impact over the next few years. Examples of ODA impact/progress or steps towards ODA impact [A] The Lancet Paper: The Hub's proof-of-concept paper was published in the high-profile and prestigious 'Lancet Child and Adolescent Health' journal, where it has been widely read and cited in nine published papers, including the Bulletin of the World Health organisation. It was also included in the UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 2019 and the forthcoming WHO Global Status Report on Preventing Violence against Children 2020. [B] Merged sexual health and violence prevention programme: The Accelerate Hub worked with USAID, PEPFAR (The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) and regional NGO, Clowns Without Borders South Africa, to merge a parenting programme to reduce violence and a sexual violence prevention programme. The programme was completed in 2019 and is currently being rolled out in Ethiopia, Botswana and South Sudan, reaching nearly 180,000 families and teens. There are now plans to roll it out to five more PEPFAR countries. The Parenting for Lifelong Health Progamme (PLH) has also been included as one of the PEPFAR-approved parenting programmes for use in Africa with 9-14 year olds, and included in the PEPFAR Country Operational Plan Guidance (p175). [C] SUPER Evaluation. The SUPER study (Scale Up of Parenting Evaluation Research) is evaluating the impact of the PLH programme in 24 countries. In South Sudan, an evaluation was completed by Accelerate Hub ECRs Roselinde Janowski and Sam Bojo, assessing the PLH's impact on 205 families. It found that the programme has reduced violence, emotional abuse, and physical violence - and enhanced positive parenting, parental monitoring and parent self-efficacy. The team used this evidence to engage with the Jubek State Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development in South Sudan, which has now included the programme in its National Work Plan. The findings were also used to persuade the USAID 4Children Programme to continue to fund this programme in Juba. [D] Partnership with the UNDP Gambia Accelerator Lab: A relationship with the UNDP Accelerator Labs, developed by Dr Mona Ibrahim, a Hub researcher seconded to the UNDP Health team, has enabled us to share research findings about, and approaches to, youth employment. The Gambia Lab have now included monitoring and evaluation of a job matching programme (GamJobs) in their youth employment programme and is increasingly using the SDG framework as an impact measure, considering progress across multiple (rather than single) goals and targets. [E] UNDP secondment: The UNDP secondment has also allowed the Accelerate Hub to build relationships with UNDP departments and to influence a range of UNDP proposals, plans and communications. These include a proposal for a road safely programme in Zambia, which did not originally include youth as a risk group even though road traffic accidents are one of the most significant killers of adolescents, and an agricultural project that originally included youth as assistants in a farming programme but was restructured to include youth groups as implementing partners. Overall, the secondment at UNDP has allowed us to identify appropriate entry points to disseminate Hub approaches, analyses, and evidence, which will be invaluable in helping us to influence UN policy and practice in future years. [G] Zifune/Thula Sana work with Department of Education in SA. The Zifune trial (Work Package 4) has well established and continuing links with the South African Department of Education. It has now secured funding for work in 30 schools on adolescent mental health. The work will draw heavily on lessons from Zifune research and has links to WHO's 'Helping Adolescents to Thrive' programme. The programme, involves teachers and learner support agents will be rolled out in 2020, and will include education clubs for learners and training for staff. [H] Youth employment Accelerators: Harambee trial policy influencing: The Harambee trial (Work Package 4) identified two cost-effective interventions to boost employment: a skills audit helps young people identify and feel confident in their own skills and a certificate summarising these which enables them to share this information with a potential employer. Both interventions have increased young unemployed people's likelihood of finding employment, and helped them find better quality jobs with higher earnings and more formal contracts. These findings have been presented to policy makers in a number of contexts. Researcher engagement with one local authority in South Africa (Cape Town) has influenced the inclusion of a similar work-seeker support package in their 2019-24 Economic Plan which, if implemented, will help up to 60,000 adolescents. Aspirations trial policy engagement: The 'Aspirations' trial is investigating the impact of unconditional cash transfers and an aspirational intervention on households in western Kenya. In November, the team conducted a 'policy engagement' roadshow with stakeholders to share early findings and find out what they wanted to know from the next stage of the research, which will focus on adolescents. The team met with key national government departments including the Social Assistance Unit, Social Protection Secretariat, and the Siaya Ministry of Education, as well as agencies such as World Bank and UNICEF. Stakeholders were particularly interested in seeing randomised trial results for vulnerable sub-groups, such as women and girls, and wanted more evidence about the 'cash plus interventions' approach. The team will return to share findings and discuss their policy implications with stakeholders later in the year. [I] Social Protection Study - Zambia: ECR David Chipanta is investigating the impact of 'social protection plus awareness-raising' on the uptake of HIV services in four districts of Luapula Province in Zambia. In February, he presented his base-line report to a meeting of more than 30 representatives from government, UN agencies, donors, adolescents and people living with HIV. Stakeholders were surprised by the number of disabled people in the study (and therefore the local population), and the evidence that participants have less access to HIV services than other groups. Government officials pledged to include follow-ups and expansion of the study in their HIV-related proposal to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS and TB. [J] Parenting for Lifelong Health Digital App: The PLH App is at the early stage of development, but has already built a major collaboration with UNICEF (South Africa and HQ) who are negotiating with Mobile Service Operators to zero-rate the app in Africa (thereby making it no data costs for users), as part of their 'Internet of Good Things'. The team is also working with a number of DAC organisations, institutions and community groups to explore their preferences and priorities and ensure the App meets user's needs. The project is an interdisciplinary collaboration with the core team made up of researchers from different backgrounds such as social work, education, literature and creative writing, and mathematics. [K] • The Monitoring and Evaluation Scaling Project is a research collaboration between Hub researchers and Young1ove (a youth-focused NGO in Botswana), working with a number of implementing organisations. The study is developing its first research paper, based on desk research and comparative case studies of the monitoring and evaluation processes of selected youth organisations undertaking intervention scale-ups, selected to include gender-sensitive interventions. The paper will share best practice ideas on monitoring and evaluation and will be relevant to policy makers and funders as well as to organisations, NGOs, and governments, meeting the need identified by numerous stakeholder groups for practical information about evaluation and scale-up. Development of policy impact strategy Broad stakeholder engagement and early examples of impact, have also helped us to identify opportunities and challenges for future policy influencing. Our ambition is to influence national governments to adopt Accelerate evidence in designing policies and services for adolescents, and to influence regional and international institutions to reflect our findings in country-level guidance, programmes and funding policies. To this end, we have developed an initial influencing strategy which engages key decision makers and civil servants at national level with one-to-one meetings and multi-stakeholder events, supported by written briefings, research communications materials, and information on cost-effectiveness. This national-level engagement will build on the relationships already being developed at study/trial level as well as our analysis of opportunities to achieve impact (eg where governments or institutions have a strong focus on adolescence). We will also be targeting international institutions and processes, including the High-Level Political Forum on SDGs, presenting evidence at meetings and forums where appropriate and building relationships with high-level decision makers. Going forward, the Hub will prioritise building the policy engagement motivation and capacity of all hub researchers, developing compelling materials to communicate our findings, and actively engaging with decision makers and practitioners at national, regional and international level. In this way, we intend to ensure our Accelerate research achieves maximum impact -- and delivers real, tangible welfare benefits for African adolescents.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Healthcare
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description ACCELERATE HUB DEMONSTRATON OF CONCEPT PAPER INCLUDED IN UNAIDS GLOBAL AIDS UPDATE
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact ACCELERATE HUB DEMONSTRATON OF CONCEPT PAPER INCLUDED IN UNAIDS GLOBAL AIDS UPDATE The Accelerate Hub has published a demonstration of concept paper: "Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV: a prospective cohort study" in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. The study aimed to test the UN Development Programme's proposed approach of development accelerators- provisions that lead to progress across multiple SDGs-and synergies between accelerators on achieving SDG-aligned targets in a highly vulnerable group of adolescents in South Africa. This demonstration of concept paper suggests that the UN's accelerator approach for this high-risk adolescent population has policy and potential financing usefulness. It showed that provisions are associated with progress across multiple SDG goals, even for a vulnerable group, and that combination of two or more accelerators delivers increased benefits. The paper's found that safe schools, parenting support and cash transfers were effective accelerators and that all three provisons together were associated with greater benefits across more Global Goals. We have developed and shared a policy brief, and the findings have been included in the UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 2019.
URL https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/documents/2019/2019-global-AIDS-update
 
Description APHRC Mentorship for Early Career Researchers
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The Hub has invested significantly in research and policy engagement capacity. In 2020, our partners the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) and the Oxford University led the hub capacity sharing work with researchers participating in various theme specific accelerator methodology workshops. Ten researchers were also enrolled in a virtual mentorship programme and matched with mentors. This model of mentoring supports researchers at different stages of their career trajectories and progression to be independent research leaders.
 
Description Adolescent Girls and Young Women Evidence Update
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact An evidence update on Adolescents Girls and Young Women (AGYW) that was jointly written by the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub and the UNDP- Global Fund Partnership team. The brief was circulated to the Global Fund HQ and UNDP Gender team to improve evidence-based decision making in country offices across Africa.
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/files/130220hubagywevidenceupdatedigitalpdf
 
Description Advised a joint policy brief by Children & AIDs and UNICEF
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub advised and contributed to a UNICEF Policy Brief titled "Prioritizing the Continuity of Services for Adolescents Living with HIV During the COVID-19 Pandemic ". The evidence-driven brief pushed for the continuity of essential life-saving HIV and other vital health services is a priority for adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV), to safeguard their immediate and long-term health and well-being. Hub members at the University of Cape Town, University of KwaZulu-Nata and Paediatric AIDS Treatment for Africa (PATA) contributed evidence and recommendations to the document. The brief was then circulated across key stakeholders in the Ministry of Health, Eswatini; Ministry of Health, Kenya, and; the Ministry of Health, Uganda. The document is now published with opened access on the Children and AIDs website.
URL http://www.childrenandaids.org/sites/default/files/2020-10/Prioritizing%20the%20continuity%20of%20se...
 
Description Advisory role for the Presidency of South Africa
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description Advisory role for the Presidency of South Africa
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Dr Kate Orkin led a team from Oxford and Duke Universities and the University of Cape Town commissioned to provide policy briefs to the Presidency of South Africa on design of relief measures (cash transfers and food parcels) to protect households from the economic impacts of lockdown. Briefs drew on a review of international responses (Gerard et al. 2020) and systematic reviews (including funded by DFID) of effects of cash transfers (e.g. Bastalgi et al. 2016). Alongside an impact assessment by South African academics, these informed the design of the social protection response. Notes were widely used and debated in government, including circulation to the President, Cabinet and relevant departments. In 2020, on the basis of the first note, government moved from providing food aid to providing aid in cash, by temporarily increasing grants for 20 million existing social grant beneficiaries. Government also instituted a new special COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant for 7 million unemployed aged 18-59. Independent analysis estimates the two additional grants together reduced the number of people with earnings below the food poverty line by 5.5 million people (Jain et al. 2020). In June 2021, informed by the second note, the latter grant was extended to March 2022.
 
Description Building on a long-standing relationship, the Department of Social Development in South Africa are planning a PLH scale-up
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description COVID-19 Evidence-based parenting resources for rhe prevention of child abuse
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact School closures and lockdown during the pandemic has significantly increased child protection risks. By the end of March 2020, we had brought together WHO, UNICEF, the Global Partnership to End Violence against Children, USAID, the CDC, UNODC and other key agencies, to develop a set of resources for parents during the lockdown, based on the Hub's research on Parenting for Lifelong Health. These COVID-19 Playful Parenting Emergency Response resources were endorsed and shared by all global agencies. Within eight months these resources reached more than 141.7 million people in 204 countries with 33 Governments in more than 100 languages.
URL https://www.covid19parenting.com/home/index.html
 
Description Collaborators in the Zimbabwe government are interested in taking on the scale-up of the PLH Teen programme.
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Consultations on UNAIDS Strategic Review
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Accelerate Hub director Prof Lucie Cluver and senior Researcher Dr Elona Toska were part of strategic consultations on the next UNAIDS Strategic Review, focusing on HIV-Sensitive Social Protection. Findings from the Mzantsi Wakho and HEY BABY studies, both conducted by joint UCT-Oxford University teams were included in the evidence for adding HIV-sensitive social protection in the next UNAIDS Strategy.
 
Description Evidence dissemination to the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Findings from UKRI GCRF Accelerate studies on improving access to HIV treatment and care services for adolescent mothers and their children were presented to policy makers across Africa. This included a presentation at the Annual Summit of the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa (PATA) in November 2020 which was attended by 902 healthcare providers (nurses, pharmacists, doctors, peer supporters) from across 27 countries.
 
Description Evidence sharing with international civil society organisations
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The Hub has been engaging with a number of civil society networks over the last year to share research and promote uptake at a national level - this has included work with Coalition for Children Affected by HIV and AIDS and Girls Not Brides (who have more than 500 member organisations across the African continent working on adolescent well-being)
 
Description Evidence updates to the World Food Programme RBJ
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The Accelerate Hub has embarked on a new partnership with the World Food Programme' Regional Bureau for Johannesburg. This partnership on focuses on the wellbeing of HIV-affected adolescents including adolescent mothers and their children in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. The collaboration started with a concept note on HIV, Food security and Social Protection - highlighting the gaps in the evidence base across Eastern and Southern Africa. Using the Hub's longitudinal data sets, we examined whether food security is associated with HIV infection risks (such as transactional and age-disparate sex, risk behaviours). The WFP and Accelerate Hub have also organised regular monthly evidence updates inviting colleagues across the WFP Regional offices in Eastern and Southern Africa.
 
Description Facilitated a space for DAC collaborations across Africa through the Independent Advisory Board
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Government collaboration in Montenegro has led to implementation of PLH SUPER within existing social protection, healthcare and social care systems. providing transferrable lessons.
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Government collaborations in Philippines and Thailand have led to implementation of PLH SUPER within existing social protection, healthcare and social care systems. providing transferrable lessons.
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description IDENTIFYING VIOLENCE PREVENTION ACCELERATORS WITH THE WHO AND GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The Global Partnership is supporting countries to implement the WHO 'INSPIRE' framework - a recommended package of programmes to reduce violence against children. Many countries however are struggling to implement the full package due to limited resources, and have requested that Accelerate Hub identify 'accelerators' that can prevent multiple forms of violence. Working directly with WHO and the Global Partnership, Accelerate Hub merged data from two studies to provide a dataset large enough to test for impacts on incidence of even rarely-reported forms of violence such as sexual assault. Analyses found that improved parenting and food security could significantly reduce sexual abuse, crime involvement, transactional sex, physical abuse, emotional abuse and community violence victimisation. Accelerate Hub Director Lucie Cluver and ECR Will Rudgard are now coauthoring a paper with WHO and Global Partnership to share findings, which will also be directly incorporated into the Global Partnership's countrylevel support.
 
Description Invitation for Lucie Cluver to join the WHO Adolescent Service Delivery Working Group (ASDWG)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Invitation for Lucie Cluver, Frances Gardner and Catherine Ward to join the Parent Training Guideline Development Group led by the World Health Organization
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Invitation to present on Zifune at the Helping Adolescents Thrive (HAT) Intervention consultation meeting
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description J. Hutchings: Parenting for Lifelong Health: Guidelines for working remotely with parents and leaders with the PLH programmes for parents of young children and parents and teens programmes
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Joint evidence-guided programming in South Sudan
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Led by Dr Samuel Bojo, Accelerate Hub team in South Sudan worked closely with Federal Ministry of Health - with the Director General for SRH as co-investigator and the UNDP as an implementation partners. The partnership allowed for active participation in meetings at national, state and community level. With some partners in UNDP, this collaboration resulted in evidence-based programming - specifically in delivering a financial literacy training program and providing seed capital of out of school adolescents and caregivers. In addition, UNDP has sourced mobile money with services provider M-Gurush where their beneficiaries will also receive free registered SIM cards. This project brought together academics, governmental officials, UN representatives and a private company to operationalize Accelerators.
 
Description Merged Sexual Health and Violence Programme
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN THREE AFRICAN COUNTRIES - SERVICES TO BENEFIT 180,000 FAMILIES AND TEENS The Accelerate Hub worked with USAID, PEPFAR (The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) and regional NGO, Clowns Without Borders South Africa, to merge two adolescent interventions: a parenting programme to reduce violence and substance use and improve family budgeting, and a sexual violence prevention programme. The programme was completed in 2019 and is currently being rolled out in Ethiopia, Botswana and South Sudan, reaching nearly 180,000 families and teens. There are plans to roll it out to five more PEPFAR countries. The Parenting for Lifelong Health Programme has also been included as one of only two PEPFAR-approved parenting programmes for use in Africa with 9-14 year olds, by the PEPFAR Country Operational Plan Guidance (p175).
URL https://www.state.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/PEPFAR-Fiscal-Year-2019-Country-Operational-Plan-Gu...
 
Description Mzantsi Wakho team provide feedback on a WHO information note on adolescent HIV and COVID-19
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description PARENTING SUPPORT IN A CONFLICT SETTING - SERVICES INCLUDED IN THE NATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR SOUTH SUDAN
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The SUPER study (Scale Up of Parenting Evaluation Research) is evaluating the impact of the Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) programmes in 28 countries. In South Sudan, an evaluation was completed by Accelerate Hub early career researchers (ECR) Roselinde Janowski and Sam Bojo with 205 families. It found that the programme has achieved reduced violence, emotional abuse, and physical violence; and enhanced positive parenting, parental monitoring and parent self-efficacy. The team used this evidence to engage with the South Sudan Jubek State Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development, which has now included the programme in its National Work Plan. The findings were also used to persuade the USAID 4Children Programme to continue funding this programme in Juba.
 
Description Parenting Module/Student Mentoring - Contribution to Online Adolescent Youth Health Policy Short Course in 2020/University of Cape Town
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact There was training session on parenting interventions with focus on adolescent wellbeing that seek to build the capacity of programme managers and implementers cowering in government and provide organisations. This will support policy discourse in their organisations. In addition, there was mentoring sessions for Masters and PhD students, who are working on health intervention programmes that the government of South Africa are focusing on, and also seeking to support policy dialogue and advocacy.
 
Description Parenting Tips Church Leaders Guide
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact This Guide and accompanying training has been catalysing culture change in churches in countries where previously church leaders talking about how to parent was a 'taboo'. It is equipping church leaders with the tools to support positive parenting. The incorporation of positive parenting messages within a framework of biblical teachings increases accessibility and acceptability of the guidance.
URL https://jliflc.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/COVID_19_Parenting_Church_Leader_Pack_2020_09_03.pdf
 
Description Policy Brief: HIV Sensitive Social Protection. 'Leaving no-one behind'
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact This policy brief outlines WFP's role in ensuring social protection systems are inclusive of people living with, at risk of and affected by HIV. The research team co-drafted a policy brief outlining the role WFP can play in ensuring social protection systems are inclusive of people living with, at risk of or affected by HIV at the policy, programme and intervention levels. It highlights pieces of evidence on the impact of HIV-sensitive social protection; it identifies potential entry points, and opportunities in the development and implementation of national HIV response, poverty-reduction and development plans; and it speaks to broader social policies, programmes and schemes. It further highlights relevant partnerships to complement WFP approaches. The policy brief accessible on the WFP website and has been disseminated to 20 country offices ((Angola, Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe) in the Eastern and Southern Africa Region.
URL https://www.wfp.org/publications/leaving-no-one-behind-how-wfps-approach-hiv-sensitive-social-protec...
 
Description Policy Impact recommendations by Prof. Lucie Cluver, at UNAIDS PCB, Geneva, Switzerland (December, 2019)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/28112019_UNAIDS_PCB45_Thematic-Segment-Backgr...
 
Description SADC SRHR Managers Meeting - New evidence for adolescent sexual and reproductive health: Using research to boost programming
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The research team (including an early career researcher) was invited to deliver a session linking to the SADC's SRHR strategy, gender-based violence, education, teen pregnancy, HIV and AIDs, and social environments remain major impediments to achieving SRHR in the SADC region. With the objective of examining emerging evidence on adolescent SRHR and their impact as development accelerators across the SADC region, the team presented an evidence base to further understand and mobilize linkages between SRHR, gender-transformation and social protection. The intended outcome of this session was the recognition of the impact of accelerator interventions and services on SRH outcomes, their potential to achieve SRHR for all, and wider gains for adolescent wellbeing; to identify innovative approaches to build adolescent-sensitive evidence-based policies and provisions in SADC countries; to ensure SADC SRH leadership and multi-laterals are acquainted with regional literature, recognize the value of regional knowledge-sharing initiatives and their role in supporting inclusive SRHR policies.
 
Description Support to the UNDP Zambia $1.2 mil. Road Safety programme
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Working with UNDP colleagues and the Zambian Ministry of Local Government; an Accelerate Hub researcher Dr Mona Ibrahim (seconded to UNDP), co-wrote a road safety proposal in Zambia which included adolescents as a major target group. The $1.2 million project, which has now been funded by the UN's Road Safety Fund, aims to reduce pedestrian and cyclist fatalities in Lusaka by 66% over the next three years by improving road safety measures and boosting non-motorised road transport.
 
Description The Accelerate Hub included in the official UNDP 2020 Work Plan
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact The Accelerate Hub was included in the 2020 UNDP work plans, which allows for the strategic channeling of evidence from the Hub to the Global UNDP team. This improves the evidence base for policies and services provided by the UNDP. This also puts the Hub in a good position to push for/ advise on adolescent inclusion in UNDP programmes. A Hub research officer is seconded to the UNDP office in New York, and will be able to contribute to this work plan, and would maintain the communication flow between both organisations.
URL https://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/HIV-AIDS/UNDP%20HIV%20Health%20and%20Development%20Str...
 
Description Training of Early Career Researchers - Jan 2020
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact BUILDING CAREERS FOR EARLYCAREER AFRICAN RESEARCHERS Our 43 early-career researchers (ECRs) have completed training needs analyses; joined training workshops on statistical analyses, presentation skills, policy engagement; and are being mentored to develop their career plans and next steps. Nationalities from the African continent include Zimbabwean, South Sudanese, Sudanese, Zambian, Swazi, South African, Malawian, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Nigerian, and Cameroonian, as well as others globally - British, Brazilian, American, Spanish, Italian, Israeli, German, Canadian, Belgian, Chinese and Belarusian. One of our goals is to increase the number of PhDs for early-career researchers. This year, six of our early-career researchers have won externally-funded scholarships for their doctorates: Samuel Bojo (South Sudan), Nontokozo Langwenya (eSwatini), David Chipanta (Zambia), Kathryn Roberts (UK), Kopano Monaisa and Siyanai Zhou (Zimbabwe); and Diana Ocholla (Kenya/South Africa) is starting an MPhil this year.
 
Description Turning Point: Prioritizing youth empowerment, for a transformative post-COVID-19 recovery in the Decade of Action. Briefing note to UNDP practitioners
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description UK Minister of Science brief
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact In 2020, the Minister of Science (UK) requested a brief summary of the impacts of the Accelerate Hub's evidence. The brief highlighted the vision of the Hub, and the importance of delivering 'accelerator' policies that boost multiple sustainable development goals at the same time. The brief focused on the use of accelerators in COVID-19, their impact and their unique ability to support governmental COVID-19 response plans.
 
Description UNDP Accelerator Lab in the Gambia - Youth Employment programme
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact The Accelerate Hub continues to strengthen engagement and partnership with the UNDP Accelerator Lab. In Q4 2020, the Gambia Accelerator lab used evidence from the Hub to guide evidence-based implementation of a Youth Employment program. The program provided networks, opportunities and vocational training to negate the Gambia's high youth unemployment rate.
 
Description UNICEF Eastern and Southern African Region Office policy brief
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.unicef.org/esa/media/7151/file/UNICEF-ESA-Young-Mothers-HIV-Report-2020.pdf
 
Description UNICEF Innocenti COVID-19 Accelerated solutions for children and adolescents
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact In 2020, the Accelerate Hub build on existing links with UNICEF Innocenti to influence COVID-19 policy and practice. The Hub and UNICEF teams jointly wrote and rapidly circulated some key messages on the social impacts of COVID-19 on children and adolescents. The joint brief also highlighted some key recommendations for social protection. The brief titled "Beyond Masks: Societal impacts of COVID-19 and accelerated solutions for children and adolescents" has now been circulated as a guidance note throughout UNICEF's networks, UN country offices, the Hub's academic networks, and the Hub's advisory group. More than 40 Accelerate Hub researchers - including early career researchers from ten different countries - contributed to the joint brief. The publication is now on UNICEF Innocenti's official website.
URL https://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/UNICEF-Beyond-Masks-Report-Societal-impacts-of-COVID-19....
 
Description UNICEF collaboration across Africa
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The Accelerate Hub's adolescent HIV research has also supported greater policy engagement with UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Office with whom we have developed an evidence brief which draws on a systematic review of adolescent treatment care pathways in low- and middle-income countries and evidence from the Hub's work on longitudinal studies of 1000 adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. As part of this UNICEF collaboration, ten Hub researchers, including 8 early career researchers, co-facilitated an evidence webinar with more than a dozen country teams in Southern and Eastern Africa.
URL https://www.unicef.org/esa/reports/new-evidence-and-programming
 
Description Workshop at National Department of Health - South Africa - Pediatrics' and Adolescent (0-19 years olds)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Workshop delivered by Early Career Researcher on "HIV-Sensitive Social Protection" at a World Food Programme Learning Event (6-8 May) for Regional Bureau Nairobi.
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Research team was invited to deliver a workshop on "HIV-Sensitive Social Protection" at a World Food Programme Learning Event (6-8 May) for Regional Bureau Nairobi. Early career researcher (Wittesaele) delivered the session which included: 1) covering definition of HIV-Sensitive protection; 2) what WFP's role is in this and 3) participatory activities. Objectives: for attendees to 1) gain understanding of different cash and care social protection provisions that can support young people living with HIV; 2) become confident understanding some of the evidence that supports cash + care social protection for HIV prevention and supporting adherence and 3) understanding how cash transfers and food security can support HIV presentation + adherence. Participants engaged in activities to design HIV-sensitive social protection programme into school-feeding programmes. After the session we also shared social protection policy briefs to WFP Regional Bureau Nairobi - these has been disseminated to all countries covered by the regional office: Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia. 25-30 attendees representing WFP HQ (Rome); WFP Regional Bureau of Cairo (MENA) Johannesburg (Southern Africa) and Nairobi (Central and Eastern Africa region) and country offices. Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, Egypt, South Africa,
 
Description Y20 Programme: Influenced Youth Training for G20 representation
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub team collaborated with the Misk Foundation for the Y20 delegate training and development. The Y20 program is a yearly training series that equips 20 to 40 young people with the knowledge and skills they need to represent youth interests in the UN's Annual G20 forum. In 2020, the Accelerator concept was included in their syllabus as an introductory module. The session was jointly delivered by the Hub's policy engagement officer and one of the co-directors of the program.
 
Description Accelerator solutions for Africa's adolescent girls - Grant no. 16204: Department of Social Policy and Intervention: The Accelerate Project
Amount $600,000 (USD)
Funding ID Grant no. 16204: Department of Social Policy and Intervention: The Accelerate Project 
Organisation Wellspring Philanthropic Fund 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 11/2021 
End 10/2023
 
Description Alien Time Capsules as a Remote Participatory Arts-Based Approach to Build Resilience and Disaster Preparedness in the COVID-19 Pandemic among Adolescents in South Africa
Amount $24,717 (CAD)
Organisation Government of Canada 
Department SSHRC - Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Sector Public
Country Canada
Start  
 
Description CIHR COVID-19 Rapid Research FO - Social Policy and Public Health Responses
Amount $295,246 (CAD)
Organisation Canadian Institutes of Health Research 
Sector Public
Country Canada
Start  
 
Description COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response: Malaysia and Philippines
Amount € 150,000 (EUR)
Organisation Generali Group 
Department The Human Safety Net
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Italy
Start 12/2020 
End 06/2021
 
Description COVID-19 Playful Parenting: South Africa
Amount $711,317 (USD)
Organisation The Lego Group 
Department Lego Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Denmark
Start 02/2021 
End 08/2021
 
Description Cash Transfers, Aspirations Interventions and Student Learning - QR GCRF grant awarded to the University of Oxford by Research England
Amount £33,000 (GBP)
Funding ID KCD00141- LE01.01 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 07/2020
 
Description Cash Transfers, Growth Mindsets, and Student Learning
Amount $202,945 (USD)
Funding ID GR-1146 
Organisation Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Sector Academic/University
Country United States
Start 01/2020 
End 04/2021
 
Description Child Abuse Prevention Emergency Response
Amount £532,432 (GBP)
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Competitive Fund for Studies of Predictive Validity of Soft Skill Measures
Amount $20,000 (USD)
Organisation Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 07/2021 
End 10/2022
 
Description EPSRC IAA Lights Laws and Livelihoods (Sudan)
Amount £4,989 (GBP)
Funding ID EPSRC IAA 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2021 
End 03/2021
 
Description ERC Proof of Concept Call 1 - ERC-2022-POC1
Amount € 150,000 (EUR)
Funding ID PROTECT: Parenting Response with Open-source Technology to End COVID-related Trauma - Proposal number 101067451 
Organisation European Research Council (ERC) 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start  
 
Description Global Fund Strategic Initiative on Adolescent Girls and Young Women (AGYW-SI) Component 1
Amount $997,280 (USD)
Funding ID FA No.: 202100741 
Organisation University of Edinburgh 
Department Global Fund
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2021 
End 12/2023
 
Description Global Parenting Initiative
Amount $16,550,056 (USD)
Organisation The Lego Group 
Department Lego Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Denmark
Start 03/2022 
End 03/2027
 
Description Global Parenting Initiative Planning Grant
Amount $100,000 (USD)
Organisation Tides Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 01/2021 
End 06/2021
 
Description Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children - COVID-19 Playful Parenting activities by Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Amount $19,987 (USD)
Organisation End Violence Against Children 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 06/2020 
End 09/2020
 
Description Human and Social Dynamics for Development 2022
Amount R1,958,500 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start  
End 12/2024
 
Description Job Search and Hiring with Two-Sided Limited Information about Workseekers' Skills
Amount $299,000 (USD)
Organisation National Science Foundation (NSF) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start  
 
Description John Fell Fund: COVID-19 Child Research Unit (CCRU)    
Amount £106,494 (GBP)
Funding ID COVID-19 Child Research Unit (CCRU) Reference: 0010737 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Department John Fell Fund
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2022 
End 05/2023
 
Description Knowledge translation and implementation science in humanitarian programmes: Taking advantage of the Parenting for Lifelong Health roll­out
Amount R647,480 (ZAR)
Funding ID 118571 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2019 
End 11/2020
 
Description LEGO Foundation COVID-19 Emergency Grant - COVID-19 PLAYFUL PARENTING RESPONSE, University of Oxford
Amount $274,732 (USD)
Organisation The Lego Group 
Department Lego Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Denmark
Start 04/2020 
End 10/2020
 
Description NRF: Competitive Support for Unrated Researchers
Amount R0 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start  
 
Description OPEN Fellowship
Amount £19,857 (GBP)
Organisation Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2021 
End 07/2022
 
Description Oak Foundation: Accelerating Violence Prevention in Africa
Amount $1,692,228 (USD)
Organisation Oak Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Global
Start 06/2020 
End 03/2024
 
Description Oak Foundation: Global Parenting Initiative
Amount £3,749,995 (GBP)
Funding ID Global Parenting Initiative - Grant Number: OFIL-21-212 
Organisation Oak Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Global
Start 01/2022 
End 12/2026
 
Description Oxford University Innovation GCRF Sustainable Impact Fund (PLH Digital; WP4)
Amount £60,968 (GBP)
Funding ID KCD00141-CV02.01 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2019 
End 07/2020
 
Description The Furaha Adolescent Implementation Research (FAIR) Study of the Kizazi Kipya Project
Amount $199,967 (USD)
Organisation The Evaluation Fund 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Start 03/2020 
End 08/2021
 
Description Tides Foundation - TF2006-092313 - COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response, University of Oxford
Amount $100,000 (USD)
Funding ID TF2006-092313 
Organisation Tides Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 06/2020 
End 12/2020
 
Description UCT Conference hosting grant
Amount R25,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 08/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description UCT Enabling Grant-seekers Excellence Award (2019)
Amount R100,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 08/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description UCT University Research Committee Start-Up grant (2019)
Amount R20,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 08/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description UK Research and Innovation ESRC Impact Award 2021
Amount £2,500 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Untransmittable: reducing HIV transmission among young women living with HIV, their partners and children in South Africa
Amount $487,453 (USD)
Funding ID K43TW011434 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Department Fogarty International Centre
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 07/2019 
End 04/2024
 
Title Adapted version of the Mullen Scales of Early Learning 
Description A simple and child-friendly observational tool to document child physical and cognitive development will be used to measure development of adolescents' children across five domains: gross motor skills, fine motor skills, receptive language, expressive language, and visual reception. This involves a series of game-like tasks which have been adapted to the study context. For example the list of age-appropriate words a child should know was translated into the local language - Xhosa - and unfamiliar toys were replaced with substitutes available in the study area. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This tool was used to to measure motor and cognitive development in children of young mothers participating in the study. During baseline data collection, over 1100 motor and cognitive development assessments were administered to children over 3 months old. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this tool will not be implemented as planned during follow-up data collection. This is continually under review and the fieldwork team are preparing arrangements to consider pursuing a hybrid model of fieldwork (limited face-face research). 
 
Title Adolescent Health & Wellbeing questionnaire 
Description The adolescent health & wellbeing questionnaire was drafted over several consultations with health practitioners and adolescents who are part of the study's Teen Advisory Group. Participants choose the site of their interviews to allow for maximum privacy. The adolescent health questionnaire includes items to assess socio-demographics, healthcare service access (i.e. transport, costs, waiting times, distance and satisfaction of health services), self-reported health outcomes, and risk factors hypothesized to influence adolescent ART adherence and sexual reproductive service uptake. Measures use (where available) tools validated in Southern Africa. The adolescent health and wellbeing self-report questionnaire is administered through tablets. The questionnaire includes teen-friendly images and language designed to engage youth. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This questionnaire was used to collect real-life data for the world's largest longitudinal cohort of adolescents living with HIV. This has created unique opportunity to investigate risk and resilience promoting factors among adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. The study has already had major impact on policy, UN guidelines and programming for adolescents living with HIV. The team has presented findings in nearly 60 presentations at over twenty-five conferences and workshops. Findings and research priorities have been shared with several hundred of stakeholders engaged in adolescent health and HIV/AIDS policy and programming. The study has to date resulted in 42 peer-reviewed publications in journals including the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, AIDS, Journal of the International AIDS Society and PloS One. This questionnaire is now also being used to investigate predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. During baseline data collection, the fieldwork team have conducted 1042 surveys with adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who have at least one child. In 2020-21, the research team planned to trace the full cohort of adolescent mother-child dyads and administer repeat measures of these surveys. Due to COVID-19, the research team has adapted the adolescent parent questionnaire to be administered over telephone interviews. An extensive literature review was conducted in order to understand key considerations and adaptations required for administered such surveys telephonically. Following this, lead investigators concluded that reducing number of items in the questionnaire was necessary to keep interviews at an acceptable length for research participants. This is also important to ensure research participant engagement and maintaining the quality of data collected. In addition to reducing the numbers items in scales and measures, the survey was split into two segment in order to be administered over two telephone interviews. Pilot testing of this adapted follow-up tool concluded in 2020 and follow-up data collection is underway involving the full baseline cohort. 
URL https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54e3c4b3e4b02a415877e452/t/5dc952e3e8290d7830fee50d/157347508...
 
Title Adolescent Parent Questionnaire 
Description In 2017-18, the Adolescent parent questionnaire was drafted over several months in consultation with health practitioners and young mothers in the Eastern Cape. The questionnaire was pre-piloted with teen mothers and fathers who are part of the study's Teen Advisory Group. The adolescent parent questionnaire measures adolescent's parenting experiences, parenting stress, pregnancy experiences and assesses their child's health, nutrition and care. Measures use (where available) tools validated in Southern Africa. After pilot testing the questionnaire was further adapted so that research assistants are able to collect information about the child's care from the child's primary caregivers (usually maternal grandmothers) instead of adolescent parents. Pilot testing revealed that adolescent parents were often not able to recall or answer questions about their children's care, nutrition and health. In the study context, childcare is often provided by the adolescent parent's caregivers or extended family to ensure that the adolescent parent can return to school or to reduce stigma of associated with being an adolescent parent. By asking the primary caregiver of these children to respond to questions about childrens' health, nutrition and care we are able to collect data that is prone to biases. The adolescent parent questionnaire is administered through tablets. Participants choose the site of their interviews to avoid unnecessary transport and associated child-minding costs. The questionnaire includes teen-friendly images and language designed to engage youth. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact During baseline data collection, the fieldwork team have conducted 1046 adolescent-parent self-report surveys with adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who have at least one child. In 2020-21, the research team planned to trace the full cohort of adolescent mother-child dyads and administer repeat measures of these surveys. Due to COVID-19, the research team has adapted the adolescent parent questionnaire to be administered over telephone interviews. An extensive literature review was conducted in order to understand key considerations and adaptations required for administered such surveys telephonically. Following this, lead investigators concluded that reducing number of items in the questionnaire was necessary to keep interviews at an acceptable length for research participants. This is also important to ensure research participant engagement and maintaining the quality of data collected. In addition to reducing the numbers items in scales and measures, the survey was split into two segment in order to be administered over two telephone interviews. Pilot testing of this adapted follow-up tool concluded in 2020 and follow-up data collection is underway involving the full baseline cohort. 
URL http://www.youngcarers.org.za/s/HEY-BABY-Adolescent-Primary-caregiver-Questionnaire_2018_Reducedsize...
 
Title Adolescent Parent Questionnaire (Follow-up) 
Description Due to COVID-19, the research team has adapted the scales and measures in the adolescent health & well-being questionnaire and the adolescent parent questionnaire for remote data collection. Firstly, an extensive literature review was conducted in order to understand key considerations and adaptations required for administering such surveys telephonically. The review explored alternative modes for administering the follow-up survey tool, the recommended duration and respective impacts on response rates. This work found that despite the lack of literature (in South Africa with young people) remote survey methodologies are both feasible and acceptable. The research team explored mixing the survey modes to leverage the strengths of each mode, and the use of modular designs. This offered a new opportunity to implement a hybrid model involving: SMS, Computer Assisted Technology Interview and remote Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interviewing with higher frequency data collection. Importantly, the team also wanted to ensure that following up with the cohort through telephonic interviews would not lead to a significant non response and attrition bias due to mobile phone access issues and reachability of participants. To confirm whether remote interviewing would lead to significant sampling biases the fieldwork team conducted "check-in calls" with the existing cohort of adolescent mothers to learn about: access to devices among the cohort, access to mobile data, participants frequency of interaction with the research team and contact preferences. By the end of 2020, the fieldwork team had successfully reached a representative sub-sample of the cohort and learned about when and how often participants would prefer to be contact for telephone interviews and that majority of participant have access to their own smartphone. Following this, the research team reviewed items and scales in the questionnaire to reduce length of the interview while ensuring that key outcomes of interest were maintained for repeated measures. In addition to reducing the numbers items in scales and measures, the survey was split into two parts in order to be administered over two telephone interviews. Pilot testing of this adapted follow-up tool concluded in 2020 and follow-up data collection is underway involving the full baseline cohort. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact During baseline data collection, the fieldwork team have conducted 1046 adolescent-parent self-report surveys with adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who have at least one child. Follow-up data collection is underway to trace the full cohort of adolescent mother-child dyads and administer repeat measures of key outcomes. 
 
Title Harambee toolkit 
Description The Mind and Behaviour Research Group (MBRG), based at the Blavatnik School of Government, Oxford University, developed an implementation toolkit as a step-by-step guide for actors within government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), donor agencies, and other institutions looking to deliver a skills certificate programme to improve earnings for young job-seekers based in a developing country setting. The handbook offers an overview of this programme developed and tested by researchers, provides a flexible framework on how to approach programme delivery, and includes practical templates to aid implementers. The toolkit is also accompanied by a cost analysis of the intervention. The intervention was tested by Carranza, Garlick, Orkin and Rankin (2020) in South Africa. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The toolkit has been positively received by members of the World Bank. The UNDP Accelerator Lab in the Gambia is planning to adopt the intervention and launch an exciting new soft skills training programme for young people who have lost their jobs because of COVID-19. Gambia have adapted the intervention to the local context and are looking to do a six-month evaluation next year. The toolkit is also acting as a framework for the development of other intervention toolkits. 
URL https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2020-09/Skill%20Cert%20Guide.pdf
 
Title Interventions to promote future-orientation and self-affirmation. 
Description The research team, led by Kate Orkin, developed intervention videos as part of the study 'Cash Transfers and Aspirational Videos In Kenya'. They are based on role models, both male and female, and seek to promote two psychological constructs: future-orientation and self-affirmation. The team shared these videos to enable other researchers, practitioners or policymakers to use these instruments as resources in other programmes. The placebo video, which includes all content except for the psychoactive elements, is also included. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact To date, the research team received an inquiry from the Global Poverty Research Lab (Northwestern University) who are working with the Government of the Philippines on a project testing both short documentaries and soap operas as a way to deliver an aspiration raising intervention. We shared our study resources further, and these will be included in their project design. 
URL https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/aspirations-and-goal-setting-video-intervention
 
Title Labor market questionnaires (Harambee, WP2) 
Description We have developed questionnaires that reliably measure job-search behavior, expectations and knowledge about the labor market, and employment history and outcomes. The questionnaires were carefully piloted with a relevant sample of young job-seekers to ensure contextual appropriateness and reliability of survey items. The surveys are designed to be self-administered or administered over the phone. We have written a blog post on how we designed the income expectations measures (see URL included below). We will publish the full questionnaires upon publication of the final paper. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The questionnaires were used to create the data set used the research activities in the research stream. 
URL https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/method/measuring-income-expectations-using-phone-surveys
 
Title Semi-structured interview guide for ParentApp users and implementing partners. 
Description Interviews were conducted with ParentApp users (n=8) and with staff from implementation partners (n=7) to explore emerging themes, particularly barriers and facilitators to engagement with the app. The objective was to gather feedback from users on the relevance, acceptability, satisfaction, and usability of ParentApp across contexts and sub-populations, and subsequently, use the feedback to improve the app experience for target users. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The findings have been used to re-design the app and are being used to further inform next phases of the study. 
 
Title Study Instruments: Pairing Cash Transfers And Aspirational Videos in Kenya 
Description Researchers conduct a randomised evaluation to understand the economic effects of watching an aspirational video, as well as whether pairing the video with an unconditional cash transfers can improve the impact of cash. All study materials (surveys, behavioural task materials, survey code) has been made publicly available. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact To date, the research team received an inquiry from the Global Poverty Research Lab (Northwestern University) who are working with the Government of the Philippines on a project testing both short documentaries and soap operas as a way to deliver an aspiration raising intervention. We shared our study resources further, and these will be included in their project design. 
URL https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/instruments-trial-cash-transfers-and-aspirational-videos-kenya
 
Title Telling stories about our own adolescence: Methodology of Self-Immersion 
Description The methodology emerged from an icebreaker, initially developed for the Understanding Adolescence in African contexts workshop, organised by the Hub's Work Package 3 researchers and staff in Oxford in October 2019. The organisers hope that the approach may prove useful in a variety of workshop or teaching contexts, in particular for researchers working with groups of individuals different from themselves, and where negative attitudes towards adolescents may be leading to inappropriate interventions. Indeed several researchers attending the workshop have reported using the exercise themselves in their own research. We will conduct an evaluation to assess the extend to which the methodology has been adopted by researchers. Methodology. Participants were asked to answer the question in two words or in a sentence: 'What kind of adolescent were you?' 2. Following the introductions the participants divided into breakout groups around tables of 6-8 people and were asked to list as many characteristics of adolescence as they could, and to group these words into positive, negative and neutral categories. 3. Each group reported back on their discussions, which was followed by general then general discussion. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Potential for more effective understanding and engagement from research participants. The methodology is still at an early stage but we intend to evaluate it - and if it proves effective - to develop some guidance or toolkit so that others can use it. 
 
Title Template analysis script in Stata that researchers can use to account for multiple correleated outcomes in their analyses of adolescent accelerators (2021) 
Description This syntax helps researchers restructure individual-level survey data to conduct statistical analysis of multiple outcomes accounting for correlations between them using the Generalised Estimating Equations approach specified with a logit link. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research tool has been accessed and used by hub researchers in their analyses to significantly improve statistical precision in their quantitative analyses of adolescent accelerators. 
URL https://mfr.de-1.osf.io/render?url=https://osf.io/cjtrm/?direct%26mode=render%26action=download%26mo...
 
Title Toolkit for evaluating the scale-up of parenting programmes 
Description As part of the SUPER project, focused on examining the dissemination and implementation of a suite of evidence-informed parenting programmes called Parenting for Lifelong Health, we have developed a number of new research tools, namely: - interview and focus group guides for interviewing parenting programme staff (facilitators, coaches, trainers, coordinators, managers), as well as local and international policy-makers in the field of parenting programmes; - organizational surveys to capture key organisational characteristics. In addition, the following previously drafted tools have been refined as part of the study: - facilitator and coach demographic questionnaires, used to characterise the staff involved in programme delivery; - facilitator and coach assessment tools, used to understand the quality of programme delivery. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We made the study materials freely available online in mid-2020 on the project's Open Science Framework page, which has been used since then for sharing the study tools in publications and presentations as well as directly with programme implementing agencies and researchers interested in evaluating parenting programmes. 
URL https://osf.io/v597r/
 
Title HEY BABY Dataset 
Description The research team successfully completed baseline data collection that established the first data point of a complex two-wave dataset including 1046 adolescent parent and child dyads. Variables collected from self-report questionnaire as well as extraction from participants health records will allow the research team to identify barriers and facilitators of healthcare utilisation amongst high-risk adolescent mothers and their children. A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Rudgard, Hamed Banougnin, Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Wittesaele, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities to create a complex relational dataset. The first time-point of this dataset has been prepared and now in use by early career research and lead investigators to respond to real-time policy needs that will impact on health services delivery for high-risk adolescent mothers and their children. At present this dataset will includes baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; and (3) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. A smaller team are completing data cleaning for data extracted from over 1000 home-based Road To Health booklets. This requires extensive cross-checking and data validation in order to ensure self-reported data and medical records are internally consistent. This has resulted in a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. Additional data points continue to be prepared and appended to this data to offer unique opportunities for longitudinal analysis. In addition to preparing this dataset, the research team has prepared user-friendly guidance protocols to maximise use-ability and accessibility of this dataset. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This dataset is the first known primary research in Africa examining predictors of adolescent maternal healthcare use. By completing preparation of this baseline dataset the research team has been able to conduct responsive data analysis to respond to real-time evidence needs. This has be particularly impactful during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
 
Title Kenya - Adolescent Outcomes From Cash & Aspirational Video (WP4) 
Description Baseline data collection occurred in 2016 (data was collected via surveys) for about 8,000 households in western Kenya. The video intervention and goal-setting exercise was administered in 2017. Endline data was conducted in 2018 and wrapped up in early 2019. The following information was gathered during the trial: production, yields, investment, consumption, aspirations, self-efficacy, depression, other psychological outcomes, beliefs, finances (savings, remittances, loans), assets, labour supply, education, risk and time preferences. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Dataset has not yet been made public in order to achieve notable impacts. 
 
Title Mzantsi Wakho - adolescent self-report data 
Description The Mzantsi Wakho dataset includes data from a three-wave longitudinal cohort study of 1050 adolescents living with HIV and 350 uninfected adolescents. This datas was collected between 2014-2018. This dataset includes self-report survey data aiming to answer several research questions about youth health, with a focus on long-term medication, contraception, and sexual and reproductive health. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This has created unique opportunity to investigate risk and resilience promoting factors among adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. The study has already had major impact on policy, UN guidelines and programming for adolescents living with HIV. The team has presented findings in nearly 80 presentations at over thirty conferences and workshops. Findings and research priorities have been shared with several hundred of stakeholders engaged in adolescent health and HIV/AIDS policy and programming. The study has to date resulted in 60 peer-reviewed publications in journals including the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, AIDS, Journal of the International AIDS Society and PloS One. 
 
Title PLH Digital WP4 - online survey 
Description Recently, we launched a pan-African online survey and promoted it via Facebook targeted ads. We wanted to explore the feasibility and acceptability of our future parenting app. We also wanted to know among potential users how common smartphones are, how easy it is to get internet access, people's experiences with apps and their feelings about using an app to improve relationships between caregivers and teenagers. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact As data collection is still in progress, no impact has been achieved yet. 
 
Title Teaching materials and template analysis syntax 
Description Publication of teaching materials and accompanying syntax for using within and between (hybrid) statistical models with multiple outcomes. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research tool has been accessed and used by hub researchers in their analyses. 
URL https://osf.io/fwy2d/
 
Title Template analysis script in Stata that hub researchers can use to guide the design of their analyses of factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goals 
Description The tool is a step by step template analysis script which demonstrates to hub researchers how they can program Stata to estimate the association between factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goals. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research tool has been accessed and used by hub researchers in their analyses. 
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Title Template analysis syntax in Stata 
Description Publication of template analysis syntax in Stata that researchers in the Hub and more broadly can use to consider correlations between multiple outcomes in accelerator analyses. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research tool has been accessed and used by hub researchers in their analyses. 
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Title Workerseeker longitudinal database (Harambee, WP2) 
Description The database contains data on employment history and status, job-search activities, self-beliefs, beliefs about the job market, skills, and demographics of 6,889 job-seeking South African youths. All respondents are part of a large randomized controlled trial (RCT) that tested the impact of counseling on one's ability and counseling on and public certification of one's ability. The data is longitudinal and contains a maximum of three entries per respondent. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact We have shared this database with our partner Harambe who will use it to conduct internal analysis. We will share the data publicly upon publication of the research paper. 
 
Description Adolescent Engagement in Kenya- Partnering with local organisation, Centre for the Study of Adolescence, in initiating a Teenage Advisory Group 
Organisation Centre for the Study of Adolescence
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One of our aims with the Teenage Advisory Group in Kenya was to test some of the methods we had developed with our South African Teenage Advisory Groups in South Africa with a younger cohort. We led the development of the programme, we trained our colleagues at the Centre for the Study of Adolescence on this programme. We co-facilitated the sessions over the weekend.
Collaborator Contribution Members of Centre for the Study of Adolescence's team recruited the participants for the first Teenage Advisory Group; they approached the schools where participants were recruited from, they spoke to the caregivers of the participants to gain their consent, they also spoke to the participants themselves to gain the consent. As our local partner, they organised accommodation, booked flights, booked the venue and were responsible for all the local logistical planning. As experienced facilitators, they helped with adapting the programme for local acceptability and understanding, they led the facilitation of the sessions as well.
Impact As an initial engagement in the partnership, the most important outcome was building a relationship which led to interest from both partners to continue the engagement. One of the initial outcomes has been identifying the possible ways in which the partnership could further be nurtured. From the participants, there was interest for follow-up sessions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Alicedale CARE (Community Attempt Reaching Empowerment) 
Organisation Alicedale Community Attempt Reaching Empowerment (CARE)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Distributed these resources at SASSA Paypoints
Impact 1886 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Alliance for a Uganda without Orphans 
Organisation Alliance for a Uganda Without Orphans (AUWO)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 2,001,300 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Angaza Charity Organization 
Organisation Angaza Charity Organization
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 2760 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Association for the Protection of Women's and Children's Rights (APWCR) 
Organisation Association for the Protection of Women's and Children's Rights (APWCR)
Department Association for the Protection of Women's and Children's Rights, Cameroon
Country Cameroon 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 1007 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Bay Primary School 
Organisation Bay Primary School
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources in rhe form of printed tip sheets and posters.
Collaborator Contribution The visual aids were posted on our school's Classroom Dojo. This is a platform of communication for learners and parents.
Impact 250 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Catholic Health Commission, Lilongwe Diocese 
Organisation Archdiocese of Lilongwe Catholic Health Commission (LLCHC)
Country Malawi 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 9,000 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services (CRS) local implementing partners 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Onwards distribution of our resources, including via social media messaging on m-health platform
Impact 56,594 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services - Cameroon 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Department Catholic Relief Services, Cameroon
Country Cameroon 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources - implementing partners received the materials via email and shared with their caseworkers during weekly meetings and disseminated to families. As a result, positive parenting services were delivered to 8,538 for children and 4,474 for adolescents between April-June.
Impact 13,156 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services - South Africa 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Department Catholic Relief Services, South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources - shared parenting tips through bulk text messages that were followed up by phone call and radio and TV programmes as part of our child protection services during COVID 19. Reach of phone call / radio/tv unknown.
Impact 27,635 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Catholic Relief Services - Zimbabwe 
Organisation Catholic Relief Services
Department Catholic Relief Services, Zimbawe
Country Zimbabwe 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 1,065,600 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Centre for Community Justice and Development 
Organisation Centre for Community Justice and Development
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution They work with 29 community advice offices in KwaZulu-Natal, providing legal and technical support to communities. These offices are located in police stations and magistrates' courts, and are visited by more 1,000 people per month. The organisation will share the materials with staff members (roughly 50 people).
Impact 1050 households reached with child violence prevention resources, and 50 staff trained for continuing and expanding use and dissemination.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Child Development Training and Research Center 
Organisation Child Development Training and Research Center (CDTRC)
Country Ethiopia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Shared via telegram - to a group composed of parents from my Church with 100 members.
Impact 100 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Child Welfare South Africa 
Organisation Child Welfare South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution During the annual 16 days of Activism, Child Welfare asked for financial assistance to print 2,100 tipsheets in Afrikaans, English and isiZulu, to share with communities during community outreach.
Impact 2100 households reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Childline South Africa 
Organisation Childline South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided our COVID-19 parenting resources, including specialist guidance for caseworkers
Collaborator Contribution Utilised our resources in their service delivery and training of their staff
Impact 9807 families reached with child violence prevention advice and assistance
Start Year 2020
 
Description Christelike Maatskaplike Raad 
Organisation Christelike Maatskaplike Raad (CMR)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution The materials were used to train 18 staff members of their Hendrina chapter in Mpumalanga. These staff members work with children in CMR's community-based care programmes. The CMR's Eastern Cape branch has additionally shared the resources with five of their branches. All branches serve roughly 8,000 members overall through their developmental and families programmes.
Impact 8,000 households reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Church Alliance for Social Transformation (C.A.S.T) 
Organisation Church Alliance for Social Transformation (CAST)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources - work in Education and Child Development, Relief Services, Local Economic Development and Sport and Youth Development. The organisation engages with over 5 000 people on a monthly basis, from different communities in KwaZulu Natal and Gauteng. These includes children, teenagers and adults. They have shared materials with all 12 branches in both provinces.
Impact 5,000 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Collaboration between University College London, the University of Cape Town and the University of Oxford 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Since inception of the project, the research team at the University of Oxford has entered into a tripartite collaboration agreement with the University of Cape Town and University College London. This collaboration continues to support a long-standing and established research collaboration between researchers at the University of Cape Town and Oxford. This joint research team actively engages and collaborates to academically conceptualise research design, support data collection activities, produce high-impact research and engage closely with local, national and international partners. This collaboration supports mixed-methods research lead by Dr Elona Toska (co-PI) and Dr Rebecca Hodes (qualitative co-Investigator) at the AIDS and Society Research Unit, University of Cape Town. Co-Principal Investigators (Professor Lucie Cluver & Dr Elona Toska) also provide strategic and conceptual oversight for the team and co-Investigators at the University of Cape Town. This award contributes £247,553 to this inter-disciplinary team of researchers and project & data management capacity at the University of Cape Town (Dr Toska, Dr Hodes, Rebecca Maughan-Brown, Nontokozo Langwenya, Dr Jane Kelly, Dr Wylene Saal, Siyanai Zhou, Raylene Titus, Amanda Swartz, Diana Ocholla, Lameez Mota, Akhona Mfeketo and Marius Coqui). The research team has also entered into collaboration with Professor Lorraine Sherr at University College London.
Collaborator Contribution Firstly, the research team at the University of Cape Town and Professor Sherr have been instrumental in the development of the research design, sampling strategy and data collection tools. This supported was repeated in preparation and planning activities related to pre-COVID follow-up data collection plans for the study. This included overseeing literature reviewing and designing and testing of research tools. Dr Elona Toska has maintained oversight of baseline and follow-up data collection activities with support of Professor Cluver. Dr Rebecca Hodes has led qualitative research activities. Qualitative research took place between May and November 2018. Qualitative research focused exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood. The University of Cape Town also manages partnerships with South-African based partners including PATA, University of Stellenbosch and Sr N Bungane at the University of Fort Hare. In this capacity, lead researchers at the University of Cape Town also provide skills building for early career researchers such as doctoral candidate Siyanai Zhou and Director-General Conny Nxumalo at the National Department of Social Development and post-doctoral students Dr Wylene Saal. Sadly, the research team has lost Director-General Conny Nxumalo due to her recent passing from COVID-19. Through this collaboration, University of Cape Town also provides project management to ensure smooth running of fieldwork operations and successful data collection. This has led to successful recruitment of adolescent mothers (n=1027) and children (n=1124) completing multiple data points. The research team at the University of Cape Town is also contributing to data cleaning of complex adolescent-parent and child dataset. As co-Investigator Professor Lorraine Sherr, has been highly involved since the initial phase of the project. Professor Sherr has provided her expertise to conceptualise the sampling and recruitment strategy of highly vulnerable young mothers. During early engagement, Professor Sherr also supervised literature reviews that were used to inform design of research tools and provided consultation about implementation of child cognitive development assessments. Professor Sherr has subsequently maintained active engagement with lead investigators by providing expert advice on use of child development outcome measures for follow-up data collection. Through additional co-funding awarded, Prof Sherr is supervising a post-doctoral researcher (Dr Katharina Haag) who will focus on conducting quantitative analysis using the HEY BABY Baseline dataset. Prof Sherr has contributed to three publications related to this study and has supported Principal Investigators with key policy engagement activities to ensure maximum impact of research findings. Prof Sherr has also provided supervision to doctoral-candidate Kathryn Roberts, who is conducting quantitative analysis examining mental health and child cognitive development data within the cohort. In addition, Prof Sherr has regularly contributed to review of quantitative research tools, specifically including review of measures on child development and health outcomes as well as mental health measures for adolescent mothers. Throughout baseline data collection, collaborators have provided extensive oversight on research, data collection and data management activities. In addition, researchers have provided feedback on ethical quandaries that arose during baseline data collection and challenges related to ambitiously recruiting a large sample of vulnerable adolescent mothers and their children.
Impact This tripartite collaboration has been crucial for successful inception of the study and unique opportunity to establish data collection activities sooner than planned. We are delighted to report major outputs and outcomes. Set-up and implementation of HEY BABY baseline data collection 2018-19. The research team successfully secured funding through a UNICEF-ESARO Small-Scale Funding Agreement (SSFA) with partners at UNICEF-ESARO (US$45,000) and through Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) from Research England (£187,000). These funds were awarded during completion of the Mzantsi Wakho data collection. Having secured these funds allowed us to set-up HEY BABY data collection earlier than planned. The research team took advantage of established infrastructure and a highly-trained team of local researchers to support the pilot and baseline data collection for the HEY BABY study. This involved piloting new research tools, delivering additional training to the research team about new data collection tools, developing sampling strategy and engaging with local stakeholders and partners to support recruitment efforts. Design and piloting of research tools for two rounds of data collection. The research team based at Oxford, University of Cape Town and University College London developed two additional research tools: 1) adolescent parent questionnaires and 2) adapted Mullen Scales of Early Learning tool. The adolescent parent questionnaire was piloted with adolescent mums who provided feedback on priority concerns of young mothers and framing of questions. For example, young mums felt it was important to include questions about access and quality of creches and day-care. In consultation with researchers at Stellenbosch University, the Mullen Scales of Early Learning was adapted to improve contextual relevance and feasibility of implementation. For example, items that would not be easily recognised by children in the Eastern Cape would be replaced with more appropriate objects. Recruitment of 1042 adolescent mothers and their children: Recruitment of young adolescent mothers (n=1027) and their children (n=1124): The research team developed a sampling strategy that would enable us to include adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who both engaged and did not engage in formal services. This led to the successful recruitment of 1027 adolescent mothers and 1124 of their children. Between March 2018 and July 2019, we interviewed N=1,712 adolescent girls and young women. We utilised seven parallel sampling strategies to reach adolescent girls (including mothers) and adolescents girls living with HIV (10-19 years) who were both engaged and not engaged in services, and that we reached comparison adolescent girls with matched demographic profiles. Through each sampling strategy we collected details of adolescent girls, who were then traced to their communities and interviewed in their homes. First, we included all ART-initiated adolescent girls, irrespective of whether they were engaged in care, in all district health facilities providing HIV services (n=73) between March 2014 to September 2015. This group was re-traced for follow-up interviews in 2018 with 94% retention in the study. Second, we identified all maternity obstetric units (n=9) in the health district and used case files to identify all adolescent mothers. Third, we interviewed neighbouring adolescent girls of those approached through clinic files. Fourth, secondary schools were randomly selected per municipal area (n=43) within the study's catchment area (n=43) within the study's catchment area. Fifth, we used referrals by social workers and NGO service providers to identify adolescent mothers. Sixth, we included community referrals by adolescent mothers themselves. Finally, an advisory group of adolescent mothers devised recruitment methods for especially hard-to-reach adolescent mothers. For each sampling channel, we recorded refusals and consenting adolescents. Through this methodology, research participants included in the sample will report on variable experiences of health services use/access and parenting experiences which will in turn allow the research team to conduct analysis that is both rigorous and policy-relevant. Researcher resilience during COVID-19: Since completing baseline data collection, the Oxford-UCT-UCL research team mobilised to prepare for follow-up data collection to start in April 2020. This involved the review and development of all self-report questionnaires, piloting tools and establishing operational infrastructure. The planned follow-up phase of primary data collection will trace the full adolescent parent-child dyads and collaborating with over 70 health facilities in the study's catchment area to extract data from patient files and medical records. In March 2020, face-to-face research activities were halted due to COVID-19. With leadership from lead investigators, the fieldwork team collaborated closely with research staff to adapt robust data collection methodologies by conducting literature reviews and consulting with experts. A full redesign of research activities and methods took place. Following initial training and pilot testing of new tools, the next phase of remote data collection is now underway with nearly 40% of the cohort followed up. The team has documented these methodological approaches and adaptations through several working papers, conference and webinar presentations. Data cleaning for baseline data: A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Rudgard, Hamed Banougnin, Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Wittesaele, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities for complex relational data collected as part of HEY BABY baseline. The first time-point of this dataset has been prepared and now in use by early career researchers and lead investigators to respond to real-time policy needs that will impact on health services delivery for high-risk adolescent mothers and their children. At present this dataset will includes baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; and (3) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. A smaller team are completing data cleaning for data extracted from over 1000 home-based Road to Health booklets. This requires extensive cross-checking and data validation in order to ensure self-reported data and medical records are internally consistent. This will build a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. Additional data continuously reviewed, cleaned and appended to this dataset to offer unique opportunities for longitudinal analysis. In addition to preparing this dataset, the research team has prepared user-friendly guidance protocols to maximise useability and accessibility of this dataset. Engagement with local stakeholders: Since inception of our previous study (Mzantsi Wakho) the team has engaged closely with policy-makers and implementers at local, national and international levels. This has resulted in close collaboration with local stakeholders such as the Departments of Basic Education and Health. These collaborations have been instrumental in supporting pilot and baseline data collection activities for this project. Meetings with district hospital and healthcare workers have helped us identify key research priorities that will support service delivery that will meet the needs of young parents and their children. Additionally, collaboration with the Department of Basic Education led to meeting opportunities with Learner Support Agents and schools to support research activities and also provide input into on priority research questions regarding attendance of young mothers at schools. These collaborations as well as working closely with local NGOs has also supported recruitment activities allowing us to successfully recruit over 1000 adolescent parents and child dyads. As follow-up data collection activities get underway, onsite fieldwork managers will liaise closely with local stakeholders to facilitate next wave of data collection activities due to start in early 2020. Early dissemination and abstract submissions: Due to the concerted effort of the data cleaning team, lead investigators and early career researchers have been able to conduct preliminary analysis of HEY BABY baseline data to respond to urgent policy questions. As early as December 2019, co-PI Dr Toska and C Wittesaele presented preliminary HEY BABY baseline data analysis at the 20th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) Kigali, Rwanda. Prof Cluver presented on early findings at the Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS webinar on Adolescent Mothers affected by HIV (May 2020). At a UNICEF ESARO webinar (August 2020) lead investigators (Cluver, Toska) presented on preliminary analysis on experiences of adolescent mothers and their children. By mid-2020, Toska et al. published analysis that contributes to evidence on reproductive aspirations and contraception use among adolescent mothers living with HIV. This analysis proposes that among adolescent girls and young women living in HIV-endemic communities, reproductive aspirations and contraceptive practices closely overlap with HIV risk and infection. Authors advocate that tailored service provision must account for these reproductive aspirations and contraception use and support young women to practice dual protection. Findings from qualitative research exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood have also been presented at the 2020 International AIDS Society conference and at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) Science Forum 2020 event which was attended by the South African National AIDS Council's Youth Sector. Relocation of server and review of data storage & Sharing: A South African equivalent data protection legislation called the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) came into effect in July 2020. The research team are now legally and ethically obliged to demonstrate that data collected and stored complies with EU and South African data protection regulations. The UCT-Oxford data management team have completed a comprehensive review of existing data processing activities across all work packages and considered options to ensure best data protection compliance. This review involved an appraisal of data protection and data processing resources available at UCT and Oxford. This review indicated that locating data management activities at UCT would be most cost-effective and allow the team to more effectively ensure compliance with GDRP and POPIA. In the spirit of (1) data protection legislation principles, (2) promoting data sovereignty and (3) addressing North-South inequalities in research, the research team has made a principal decision to house South African data within the esteemed South African institution - UCT. Remote data collection and increased volume of data demands more sophisticated data management support. The volume of data gathered has increased beyond expectation including a greater diversity of remote data collection, management and storage tools. In addition, all office-based and fieldwork researchers have respectively adapted to remote working and this has placed additional demands for more sophisticated data management and information security measures. The review of data processing resources available at UCT indicated that the research team would be able to access bespoke and advanced technologies to better support the team's data management needs at much better value-for-money.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration between University College London, the University of Cape Town and the University of Oxford 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Since inception of the project, the research team at the University of Oxford has entered into a tripartite collaboration agreement with the University of Cape Town and University College London. This collaboration continues to support a long-standing and established research collaboration between researchers at the University of Cape Town and Oxford. This joint research team actively engages and collaborates to academically conceptualise research design, support data collection activities, produce high-impact research and engage closely with local, national and international partners. This collaboration supports mixed-methods research lead by Dr Elona Toska (co-PI) and Dr Rebecca Hodes (qualitative co-Investigator) at the AIDS and Society Research Unit, University of Cape Town. Co-Principal Investigators (Professor Lucie Cluver & Dr Elona Toska) also provide strategic and conceptual oversight for the team and co-Investigators at the University of Cape Town. This award contributes £247,553 to this inter-disciplinary team of researchers and project & data management capacity at the University of Cape Town (Dr Toska, Dr Hodes, Rebecca Maughan-Brown, Nontokozo Langwenya, Dr Jane Kelly, Dr Wylene Saal, Siyanai Zhou, Raylene Titus, Amanda Swartz, Diana Ocholla, Lameez Mota, Akhona Mfeketo and Marius Coqui). The research team has also entered into collaboration with Professor Lorraine Sherr at University College London.
Collaborator Contribution Firstly, the research team at the University of Cape Town and Professor Sherr have been instrumental in the development of the research design, sampling strategy and data collection tools. This supported was repeated in preparation and planning activities related to pre-COVID follow-up data collection plans for the study. This included overseeing literature reviewing and designing and testing of research tools. Dr Elona Toska has maintained oversight of baseline and follow-up data collection activities with support of Professor Cluver. Dr Rebecca Hodes has led qualitative research activities. Qualitative research took place between May and November 2018. Qualitative research focused exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood. The University of Cape Town also manages partnerships with South-African based partners including PATA, University of Stellenbosch and Sr N Bungane at the University of Fort Hare. In this capacity, lead researchers at the University of Cape Town also provide skills building for early career researchers such as doctoral candidate Siyanai Zhou and Director-General Conny Nxumalo at the National Department of Social Development and post-doctoral students Dr Wylene Saal. Sadly, the research team has lost Director-General Conny Nxumalo due to her recent passing from COVID-19. Through this collaboration, University of Cape Town also provides project management to ensure smooth running of fieldwork operations and successful data collection. This has led to successful recruitment of adolescent mothers (n=1027) and children (n=1124) completing multiple data points. The research team at the University of Cape Town is also contributing to data cleaning of complex adolescent-parent and child dataset. As co-Investigator Professor Lorraine Sherr, has been highly involved since the initial phase of the project. Professor Sherr has provided her expertise to conceptualise the sampling and recruitment strategy of highly vulnerable young mothers. During early engagement, Professor Sherr also supervised literature reviews that were used to inform design of research tools and provided consultation about implementation of child cognitive development assessments. Professor Sherr has subsequently maintained active engagement with lead investigators by providing expert advice on use of child development outcome measures for follow-up data collection. Through additional co-funding awarded, Prof Sherr is supervising a post-doctoral researcher (Dr Katharina Haag) who will focus on conducting quantitative analysis using the HEY BABY Baseline dataset. Prof Sherr has contributed to three publications related to this study and has supported Principal Investigators with key policy engagement activities to ensure maximum impact of research findings. Prof Sherr has also provided supervision to doctoral-candidate Kathryn Roberts, who is conducting quantitative analysis examining mental health and child cognitive development data within the cohort. In addition, Prof Sherr has regularly contributed to review of quantitative research tools, specifically including review of measures on child development and health outcomes as well as mental health measures for adolescent mothers. Throughout baseline data collection, collaborators have provided extensive oversight on research, data collection and data management activities. In addition, researchers have provided feedback on ethical quandaries that arose during baseline data collection and challenges related to ambitiously recruiting a large sample of vulnerable adolescent mothers and their children.
Impact This tripartite collaboration has been crucial for successful inception of the study and unique opportunity to establish data collection activities sooner than planned. We are delighted to report major outputs and outcomes. Set-up and implementation of HEY BABY baseline data collection 2018-19. The research team successfully secured funding through a UNICEF-ESARO Small-Scale Funding Agreement (SSFA) with partners at UNICEF-ESARO (US$45,000) and through Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) from Research England (£187,000). These funds were awarded during completion of the Mzantsi Wakho data collection. Having secured these funds allowed us to set-up HEY BABY data collection earlier than planned. The research team took advantage of established infrastructure and a highly-trained team of local researchers to support the pilot and baseline data collection for the HEY BABY study. This involved piloting new research tools, delivering additional training to the research team about new data collection tools, developing sampling strategy and engaging with local stakeholders and partners to support recruitment efforts. Design and piloting of research tools for two rounds of data collection. The research team based at Oxford, University of Cape Town and University College London developed two additional research tools: 1) adolescent parent questionnaires and 2) adapted Mullen Scales of Early Learning tool. The adolescent parent questionnaire was piloted with adolescent mums who provided feedback on priority concerns of young mothers and framing of questions. For example, young mums felt it was important to include questions about access and quality of creches and day-care. In consultation with researchers at Stellenbosch University, the Mullen Scales of Early Learning was adapted to improve contextual relevance and feasibility of implementation. For example, items that would not be easily recognised by children in the Eastern Cape would be replaced with more appropriate objects. Recruitment of 1042 adolescent mothers and their children: Recruitment of young adolescent mothers (n=1027) and their children (n=1124): The research team developed a sampling strategy that would enable us to include adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who both engaged and did not engage in formal services. This led to the successful recruitment of 1027 adolescent mothers and 1124 of their children. Between March 2018 and July 2019, we interviewed N=1,712 adolescent girls and young women. We utilised seven parallel sampling strategies to reach adolescent girls (including mothers) and adolescents girls living with HIV (10-19 years) who were both engaged and not engaged in services, and that we reached comparison adolescent girls with matched demographic profiles. Through each sampling strategy we collected details of adolescent girls, who were then traced to their communities and interviewed in their homes. First, we included all ART-initiated adolescent girls, irrespective of whether they were engaged in care, in all district health facilities providing HIV services (n=73) between March 2014 to September 2015. This group was re-traced for follow-up interviews in 2018 with 94% retention in the study. Second, we identified all maternity obstetric units (n=9) in the health district and used case files to identify all adolescent mothers. Third, we interviewed neighbouring adolescent girls of those approached through clinic files. Fourth, secondary schools were randomly selected per municipal area (n=43) within the study's catchment area (n=43) within the study's catchment area. Fifth, we used referrals by social workers and NGO service providers to identify adolescent mothers. Sixth, we included community referrals by adolescent mothers themselves. Finally, an advisory group of adolescent mothers devised recruitment methods for especially hard-to-reach adolescent mothers. For each sampling channel, we recorded refusals and consenting adolescents. Through this methodology, research participants included in the sample will report on variable experiences of health services use/access and parenting experiences which will in turn allow the research team to conduct analysis that is both rigorous and policy-relevant. Researcher resilience during COVID-19: Since completing baseline data collection, the Oxford-UCT-UCL research team mobilised to prepare for follow-up data collection to start in April 2020. This involved the review and development of all self-report questionnaires, piloting tools and establishing operational infrastructure. The planned follow-up phase of primary data collection will trace the full adolescent parent-child dyads and collaborating with over 70 health facilities in the study's catchment area to extract data from patient files and medical records. In March 2020, face-to-face research activities were halted due to COVID-19. With leadership from lead investigators, the fieldwork team collaborated closely with research staff to adapt robust data collection methodologies by conducting literature reviews and consulting with experts. A full redesign of research activities and methods took place. Following initial training and pilot testing of new tools, the next phase of remote data collection is now underway with nearly 40% of the cohort followed up. The team has documented these methodological approaches and adaptations through several working papers, conference and webinar presentations. Data cleaning for baseline data: A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Rudgard, Hamed Banougnin, Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Wittesaele, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities for complex relational data collected as part of HEY BABY baseline. The first time-point of this dataset has been prepared and now in use by early career researchers and lead investigators to respond to real-time policy needs that will impact on health services delivery for high-risk adolescent mothers and their children. At present this dataset will includes baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; and (3) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. A smaller team are completing data cleaning for data extracted from over 1000 home-based Road to Health booklets. This requires extensive cross-checking and data validation in order to ensure self-reported data and medical records are internally consistent. This will build a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. Additional data continuously reviewed, cleaned and appended to this dataset to offer unique opportunities for longitudinal analysis. In addition to preparing this dataset, the research team has prepared user-friendly guidance protocols to maximise useability and accessibility of this dataset. Engagement with local stakeholders: Since inception of our previous study (Mzantsi Wakho) the team has engaged closely with policy-makers and implementers at local, national and international levels. This has resulted in close collaboration with local stakeholders such as the Departments of Basic Education and Health. These collaborations have been instrumental in supporting pilot and baseline data collection activities for this project. Meetings with district hospital and healthcare workers have helped us identify key research priorities that will support service delivery that will meet the needs of young parents and their children. Additionally, collaboration with the Department of Basic Education led to meeting opportunities with Learner Support Agents and schools to support research activities and also provide input into on priority research questions regarding attendance of young mothers at schools. These collaborations as well as working closely with local NGOs has also supported recruitment activities allowing us to successfully recruit over 1000 adolescent parents and child dyads. As follow-up data collection activities get underway, onsite fieldwork managers will liaise closely with local stakeholders to facilitate next wave of data collection activities due to start in early 2020. Early dissemination and abstract submissions: Due to the concerted effort of the data cleaning team, lead investigators and early career researchers have been able to conduct preliminary analysis of HEY BABY baseline data to respond to urgent policy questions. As early as December 2019, co-PI Dr Toska and C Wittesaele presented preliminary HEY BABY baseline data analysis at the 20th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) Kigali, Rwanda. Prof Cluver presented on early findings at the Coalition for Children Affected by AIDS webinar on Adolescent Mothers affected by HIV (May 2020). At a UNICEF ESARO webinar (August 2020) lead investigators (Cluver, Toska) presented on preliminary analysis on experiences of adolescent mothers and their children. By mid-2020, Toska et al. published analysis that contributes to evidence on reproductive aspirations and contraception use among adolescent mothers living with HIV. This analysis proposes that among adolescent girls and young women living in HIV-endemic communities, reproductive aspirations and contraceptive practices closely overlap with HIV risk and infection. Authors advocate that tailored service provision must account for these reproductive aspirations and contraception use and support young women to practice dual protection. Findings from qualitative research exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood have also been presented at the 2020 International AIDS Society conference and at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) Science Forum 2020 event which was attended by the South African National AIDS Council's Youth Sector. Relocation of server and review of data storage & Sharing: A South African equivalent data protection legislation called the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) came into effect in July 2020. The research team are now legally and ethically obliged to demonstrate that data collected and stored complies with EU and South African data protection regulations. The UCT-Oxford data management team have completed a comprehensive review of existing data processing activities across all work packages and considered options to ensure best data protection compliance. This review involved an appraisal of data protection and data processing resources available at UCT and Oxford. This review indicated that locating data management activities at UCT would be most cost-effective and allow the team to more effectively ensure compliance with GDRP and POPIA. In the spirit of (1) data protection legislation principles, (2) promoting data sovereignty and (3) addressing North-South inequalities in research, the research team has made a principal decision to house South African data within the esteemed South African institution - UCT. Remote data collection and increased volume of data demands more sophisticated data management support. The volume of data gathered has increased beyond expectation including a greater diversity of remote data collection, management and storage tools. In addition, all office-based and fieldwork researchers have respectively adapted to remote working and this has placed additional demands for more sophisticated data management and information security measures. The review of data processing resources available at UCT indicated that the research team would be able to access bespoke and advanced technologies to better support the team's data management needs at much better value-for-money.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration between University of Oxford and the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA) 
Organisation Paediatric AIDS Treatment for Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our collaboration with the Paediatric Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA) involves: 1) knowledge exchange and 2) financial contribution of £22,500. Knowledge exchange: the research team regularly meets with PATA to share relevant analysis and provide recommendations to inform PATA's implementation activities. Financial contribution: A contribution is costed towards the 2020 PATA healthcare provider intercontinental summit. This forum will be held to review and finalise the adolescent parent module with providers. This will support that attendance of 30 front-line healthcare providers from 23 countries in Africa.
Collaborator Contribution The Paediatric Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA) contributes to this project by providing access to 258-strong network of frontline healthcare providers. PATA will led in hosting the 2020 PATA healthcare provider intercontinental summit. In response to travel restrictions and various COVID-19 lockdown regulations, the PATA 2020 Summit was held via a centralised virtual platform (hub) that is connected to several regional in-country forums. A hybrid virtual summit allowed for a regional online PATA summit, linked to several in-county forums (dedicated forums and in-country meeting sites) and extended to its membership to allow for expanded participation through the central hub. A hybrid format enabled multiple sessions that build upon the PATA 2020 Summit methodology and included unifying and jointly attended prime sessions, with keynote presentations and Q&A. Using data available from baseline data collection, Dr Elona Toska presented evidence and strategies to a large regional audience of frontline healthcare providers. This equipped frontline healthcare providers with evidence to support delivery of services to adolescent and young mothers.
Impact This opportunity allowed the research team to maximise impact of research findings by building capacity amongst healthcare providers from 24 countries in South, East, West and Central Africa. The event was attended by nearly 400 attendees.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration between the University of Oxford and Stellenbosch University 
Organisation University of Stellenbosch
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team has collaborated with Professor Mark Tomlinson at Stellenbosch University's Department of Psychology in the conceptual planning and design of the HEY BABY study. The no-funds collaboration is formally governed by a no-fund collaboration agreement between Oxford University and the Stellenbosch University.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Mark Tomlinson has been involved in the conceptual planning and design of the HEY BABY study, specifically through expertise on investigating early child development. Marguerite Marlow, a doctoral-candidate, supervised by Professor Tomlinson, was highly involved in piloting and training the research team in early child development research tools. In 2018, Marguerite Marlow delivered two week-long training sessions to 40 members of the fieldwork team in South Africa's Eastern Cape. Marguerite Marlow's engagement also involved supporting the adaptation and translation of a research tool that measures motor skills and cognitive development among children of the adolescent mothers involved the study. Baseline early child development data was successfully collected for all but two children of adolescent mothers participating in the HEY BABY study. Since completion of baseline data collection, the research team at Stellenbosch has provided advice about considerations for cleaning and analysis of this data for the study. In addition, in preparation for HEY BABY follow-up data collection, Dr Marlow and Professor Tomlinson's team continue to provide expert advice and training support for early child development research tools and measures. Due to remote data collection in the follow-up phase of this study, the fieldwork team will not collect a second round of early child development data. The first round is being analysed with a focus on the impact of maternal HIV status on children's development.
Impact This collaboration has resulted in the training of 40 data collectors in South Africa. The fieldwork team in South Africa has conducted nearly 1200 child development assessments which will be analysed as part of HEY BABY baseline data. Through this collaboration, the research team has additionally received feedback on additional literature reviews conducted on early childhood development measures for use in comparable cohorts and settings. This informed and led to revisions and further adaptation of research tools originally planned for use for follow-up data collection. Due to COVID-19, the research team are currently not implementing face-to-face research and are reviewing appropriate strategies to collect a repeat measure for children's cognitive development. Professor Mark Tomlinson's research team have provided the research team with guidance about conducting face-to-face research while social distancing restrictions are in place.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration on content development with Clowns Without Borders South Africa 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Project conceptualisation, management, and evidence-based parameters for materials produced.
Collaborator Contribution Creative content through scripting, performance and production, using specialist clowning methods and play/education input.
Impact Over 100 parent-child interaction activities have been created, across a greatly expanded repertoire of formats and media, all adapted to COVID-19 challenges and conditions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration on sexual abuse prevention with Together for Girls 
Organisation Together for Girls
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Assessment of evidence base and adaptation and incorporation into parenting resources.
Collaborator Contribution Data, specialist knowledge and expertise in child sexual abuse prevalence and prevention within DAC countries.
Impact Evidence reviews undertaken to update and strengthen the sexual violence prevention and response components of the parenting resources. This includes focused resources on safety from online sexual exploitation in the print, online and RapidPro text system; inclusion of support for parents on how to respond to child/adolescent disclosure of sexual abuse; support for parents in teaching 'good touch/bad touch' for younger children in the print, online and RapidPro system; and working at national level to include links to child helplines.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with Clowns Without Borders South Africa on the development of an app-based version of the PLH for Teens programme 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Building on existing collaborations with Clowns Without Borders South Africa (CWBSA) since 2013, as reported in previous entries, we have worked collaboratively with CWBSA to develop an app-based version of the PLH for Teens programme. As the dissemination and capacity building partner for the PLH suite of parenting programmes, this has provided an opportunity to contribute towards the conceptualisation of a digital version of one of their programmes. We provide overall coordination and management of the project implementation and lead on scientific aspects of the project. The partnership is based on shared intellectual property and recognition and ensures North-South learning through ongoing research and technical development.
Collaborator Contribution CWBSA has contributed towards the adaptation of the PLH for Teens programme content for a digital audience and provided conceptual input during the iterative development process resulting in a script for the app content. CWBSA have contributed towards virtual co-design sessions resulting in a detailed Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and initial ideas for higher level design of the app, as well as towards the presentation of these ideas.
Impact Cross disciplinary collaboration between researchers and DAC partners on digital parenting platforms; A DAC co-created concept for the design and function of an open-access interactive parenting app to prevent child abuse; An Alpha version of the app for internal testing
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with Nace Mikus (University of Vienna) and Dr Barak Morgan (University of Cape Town) 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As part of the Zifune project, a collaboration between Nace Mikus and Dr Barak Morgan was set up in order to include behavioural experiments and morality tasks in the post-intervention follow-up assessment. These behavioural experiments measure neuroeconomics decision-making and emotional responding, which reflect underlying brain architecture known to be influenced by experience during early childhood and adolescence. The post-intervention follow-up assessment, behavioural experiments and morality tasks were administered by the Zifune data collection team.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are both experienced in the application and analysis of behavioural experiments and morality tasks. Their knowledge and experience in the field allows us to measure the effect that the Zifune intervention programme had on how participants perform these tasks. The setting-up of behavioural experiments and morality tasks, on the laptops used during assessment, was done by Nace Mikus. In addition, he provided training to all data collectors on the administering of the tasks. He is also responsible for the analysis of all data collected from these behavioural experiments and morality tasks.
Impact All data from the behavioural experements and morality tasks has been collected and cleaned by the research team. The data is currently being analysed by Nace Mikus. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in nature as Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are interdisciplinary neuroscientist and the research team has a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with Nace Mikus (University of Vienna) and Dr Barak Morgan (University of Cape Town) 
Organisation University of Vienna
Country Austria 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As part of the Zifune project, a collaboration between Nace Mikus and Dr Barak Morgan was set up in order to include behavioural experiments and morality tasks in the post-intervention follow-up assessment. These behavioural experiments measure neuroeconomics decision-making and emotional responding, which reflect underlying brain architecture known to be influenced by experience during early childhood and adolescence. The post-intervention follow-up assessment, behavioural experiments and morality tasks were administered by the Zifune data collection team.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are both experienced in the application and analysis of behavioural experiments and morality tasks. Their knowledge and experience in the field allows us to measure the effect that the Zifune intervention programme had on how participants perform these tasks. The setting-up of behavioural experiments and morality tasks, on the laptops used during assessment, was done by Nace Mikus. In addition, he provided training to all data collectors on the administering of the tasks. He is also responsible for the analysis of all data collected from these behavioural experiments and morality tasks.
Impact All data from the behavioural experements and morality tasks has been collected and cleaned by the research team. The data is currently being analysed by Nace Mikus. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in nature as Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are interdisciplinary neuroscientist and the research team has a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with Prof Robert Kumsta from Rhur University 
Organisation Ruhr University Bochum
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaboration with Prof Robert Kumsta, from Ruhr University, provided us with the novel opportunity to measure "differential genetic susceptibility to interventions". During a earlier phase of the Zifune Study, the Thula Sana study, it was found that the influence of the original intervention (Thula Sana) was found to be driven entirely by one genotype, 5HTTLPR serotonin transporter molecule gene. This finding dramatically underscored the importance of including genetic information when measuring psychosocial outcomes. During the Zifune phase of the study, we extended this gene-environment study by collecting further DNA samples from participants.
Collaborator Contribution Prof Robert Kumsta is responsible for all the analysis of the DNA samples collected from the Zifune study participants. The gene-environment study was extended to other genes using polygenic scores and get set approaches. Both approaches rely on performing a genome-wide screen using arrays that capture single base variation at >700.000 sites in the genome. Polygenic scores are genetic summary measures, derived from large genome-wide association studies, and capture genetic liability for traits of interest. These scores are increasingly being used to examine gene-environment interactions. Gene set approaches combine polymorphisms of genes involved in certain physiological pathways of interest, e.g. hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis regulator genes, or pro-inflammatory signaling. Both polygenic scores and gene sets will be used in a plasticity score fashion with regard to key outcomes at different ages (e.g. attachment security at 18 months, internalising/externalising behaviours at 12-13 years, social skills at 16-19 years).
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in that Prof Robert Kumsta comes from a genetic psychology background, while the research team includes academics from social science disciplines.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with UK Department for International Development (DFID) 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Department for International Development (DfID)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub policy engagement team was approached by DFID Advisers and specialists at Social Development Direct and that are working on adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). Their team wanted to synthesize recent evidence on what works in development contexts. The Hub responded with an up-to-date summary of the findings we have on AGYW in Africa, including successful interventions/services as well as bottlenecks to development.
Collaborator Contribution The evidence update on AGYW (produced by the Hub) was distributed to DFID Advisers that are working on AGYW well-being, as well as internal audience at Social Development Direct. It was aimed to influence research groups and development groups to increasingly consider the gender vulnerability and risk factors that they may encounter in their respective studies and projects.
Impact The outputs of this collaboration focused on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with UK Department for International Development (DFID) 
Organisation Social Development Direct
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub policy engagement team was approached by DFID Advisers and specialists at Social Development Direct and that are working on adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). Their team wanted to synthesize recent evidence on what works in development contexts. The Hub responded with an up-to-date summary of the findings we have on AGYW in Africa, including successful interventions/services as well as bottlenecks to development.
Collaborator Contribution The evidence update on AGYW (produced by the Hub) was distributed to DFID Advisers that are working on AGYW well-being, as well as internal audience at Social Development Direct. It was aimed to influence research groups and development groups to increasingly consider the gender vulnerability and risk factors that they may encounter in their respective studies and projects.
Impact The outputs of this collaboration focused on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with UNICEF ESARO 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In November 2018 the research team based at Oxford University and the University of Cape Town entered into a Programme Cooperation Agreement with UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office (ESARO). The UNICEF-ESARO Programme Cooperation Agreement aims to build relevant and robust evidence to identify factors affecting adolescent programming and inform provision of services and support. It will also provide expert capacity building to programme implementers, UNICEF country teams and UNICEF partners to provide differentiated services for adolescents. The research team's contribution for the duration of this the UNICEF-ESARO Programme Cooperation Agreement totals US$1,059,304. This includes costs of: cleaning the research data; ongoing training of local research teams in South Africa; ongoing engagement with policymakers; engaging annually with adolescent advisory groups to ensure that the research is adolescent-relevant and adolescent-friendly; and contribution into the dissemination of findings, reviews of evidence, and training of UNICEF staff and partners. This Programme Cooperation Agreement will also make use of two research studies which involved 5 years of data collection, training local research teams in South Africa, and engagement with policymakers in planning the research. This includes 3 years for Mzantsi Wakho data ($2,514,165) and 1 year for HEY BABY data ($793,113).
Collaborator Contribution UNICEF-ESARO will contribute US$400,000 towards 1) staff costs, workshop expenses and travel for the research team and 2) access to evidence-sharing and capacity-building opportunities for UNICEF ESARO country partners. Contributions from the research team and UNICEF-ESARO will support three main programme outputs: (1) generating real-life high-quality evidence on programming for better adolescent health and wellbeing outcomes, (2) provide expert-level knowledge exchange with ESARO country partners to strengthen the provision of differentiated adolescent programmes and (3) build the capacity of UNICEF Eastern and Southern African Regional Country Offices to engage in research and translate evidence into impactful programming. Activities corresponding to these outputs are described below. This contribution will support existing Mzantsi Wakho study and provide co-funding for data cleaning and 2 publications for this project. Programme output 1: data cleaning, merging and analysis on key programming-related research questions conducted on two major studies, manuscript drafting and policy briefs. Programme output 2: webinars, regional meetings, conferences or workshops to disseminate evidence with UNICEF and country partners and allow evidence building on programming for good health and HIV outcomes among adolescents and young people. Programme output 3: capacity building research clinics with priority countries to implement evidence-building tools to strengthen programming for good health and HIV outcomes among adolescents.
Impact Several outputs within three distinct collaboration objectives have resulted from this collaboration. 1) Generating real-life high-quality evidence on programming for better adolescent health outcomes 1a) Publication of articles and high-quality evidence shared to support programming for better adolescent health outcomes Paper 1: Offers evidence supporting adherence among adolescents and tested alternative methods of adherence including long-term ART adherence. Cluver et al. (2021) Associations with adolescent ART adherence in a prospective cohort in South Africa. AIDS (in press) Paper 2: Examines factors affecting successful transition in ART programmes among adolescents and identifies patterns of transition that may be different in ESAR to Western conceptualisations. This analysis examined pathways in HIV care. Pathways were identified by tracing movements across facility and care types. Haghighat, R., et al. "Transition Pathways Out of Paediatric Care and Associated HIV Outcomes for Adolescents Living With HIV in South Africa." JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 82, no. 2, 2019. Key findings and policy messages in the article on adolescent transition pathways are summarised in a policy brief. This will extend the impact of these highly relevant findings to reach programme implementers as well as adolescent healthcare service providers. In addition to the policy brief, findings have been presented in a webinar to UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Country Offices who deliver programming and services for adolescents living with HIV. Furthermore, the policy brief has been disseminated more widely to policymakers and programme implementers. Paper 3: This gender-disaggregated analysis investigates differentiated service delivery models for adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. Toska, E. et al. Predictors of secondary HIV transmission risk in a cohort of adolescents living with HIV in South Africa (under review at AIDS). Paper 4: This manuscript offers analysis from HEY BABY baseline data and compare most effective service approaches to improve adolescent mothers sexual and reproductive health outcomes. Toska, et al. (2020) Reproductive aspirations, contraception use and dual protection among adolescent girls and young women: the effect of motherhood and HIV status. Journal of the International AIDS Society. DOI: 10.1002/jia2.25558 1c) Regular meetings held to discuss ongoing analysis and updates on activities between the research team and UNICEF-ESARO 2) Expert-level knowledge exchange with UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Region country partners to strengthen the provision of differentiated adolescent programmes 2a) Webinar Series: Evidence & Solutions for Adolescents in Eastern & Southern Africa The first webinar of the planned series was successfully held in September 2019. The webinar series provides an opportunity for UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices to learn about the latest evidence and solutions to strengthen their programming and services for adolescents. The webinar was attended by 14 participants from UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices. The webinar presentation slides, and recording were disseminated and shared to all 21 UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices. The first webinar was titled: Beyond the Third 90: Supporting Adolescents Living with HIV To Remain Engaged in Care as They Transition to Adulthood. During the webinar findings were presented from two recent publications: 1. Dr Marisa Casale introduced the webinar by presenting results from a systematic review of Interventions to improve retention in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral treatment among adolescents and youth. 2. This was followed by a presentation by doctoral researcher Roxanna Haghighat, presenting newly identified transition trajectories for adolescents living with HIV. Participants highlighted that was the first they have considered the complexity of transitions in adolescent HIV care and treatment. The second webinar was delivered by the research team in August 2020 and titled 'Adolescents, HIV and motherhood: Emerging findings from South Africa'. This webinar assisted participants to learn to utilise latest evidence and solutions to strengthen programming and services for adolescents living with HIV and adolescent mothers affected by HIV. The webinar focused on (1) Results from a literature review of what we know on adolescent mothers affected by HIV and their children, (2) preliminary analyses on experiences of adolescent mothers and their children from the Mzantsi Wakho & HEY BABY studies in South Africa amd (3) new evidence on adolescents living with HIV, adherence, sexual risk, and violence. 2b) Review of evidence for UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa countries The first review of evidence has been conducted and published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. This systematic review provides an evidence update of empirically evaluated interventions that keep adolescents in HIV treatment and care. Key messages were presented to UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Country Offices during a webinar in September 2019. This included identification of clinic and home-based interventions that show promise in improving adherence outcomes. The systematic review also highlights evidence gap and need to further develop and test multi-faceted interventions that go beyond health facilities. These may be important to address broader social barriers to adherence and retention. In addition, the research team has contributed three additional reviews of evidence that are programmatically relevant to UNICEF ESARO countries. This includes: 1. Roberts, et al. (in press) Understanding mental health in the context of adolescent pregnancy and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review identifying a critical evidence gap. AIDS & Behavior. 2. Toska, et al (2020) Adolescent mothers affected by HIV and their children: A scoping review of evidence and experiences from sub-Saharan Africa, Global Public Health. 3. Haghighat, et al. (2019) The effects of decentralising antiretroviral therapy care delivery on health outcomes for adolescents and young adults in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review 3) Build the capacity of UNICEF ESARO country offices to engage in research and use evidence-building tools in programme implementation Oxford-UCT team provided feedback on a study protocol developed for research by UNICEF Zimbabwe: Prof Lucie Cluver and Dr Elona Toska provided feedback on the strengths of a study protocol drafted by UNICEF Zimbabwe. This included feedback on both the strengths of data collection tools as well as study design. Further feedback was provided in a follow-up meeting which allowed the Oxford -UCT team to provide expert knowledge exchange. The discussion from this meeting supported the implementation of research tools that would enhance the country office's (Zimbabwe) capacity to implement evidence-building tools. Oxford-UCT team provided feedback on a study protocol developed for research by UNICEF Tanzania: In early April 2019, the collaborators met with UNICEF Tanzania to discuss a study on adolescents living with HIV and education. Feedback on this study protocol allowed the country office to ensure that research aims are feasible to answer and applied appropriate research design. This consultation provided the country office with feedback that enhances the country to office to successfully implement evidence-building activities.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP Accelerator Lab Eswatini
Country Swaziland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP in South Sudan
Department The Accelerator Labs
Country South Sudan 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP, Accelerator Labs
Department Ethiopia Accalerator Labs
Country Ethiopia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the African Mathis Initiative (AMI), Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Science (IDEMS) and INNODEMS on the development of an app-based version of the PLH for Teens programme 
Organisation African Maths Initiative
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) Digital project has continued a collaboration with AMI, a Kenyan NGO, IDEMs, a UK Community Interest Company, and INNODEMs, a Kenyan social enterprise, as reported in previous entries. We have engaged collaboratively on a regular basis through meetings, workshops and exchange of ideas to conceptualise, design and develop an app-based on version of the PLH for Teens programme. We support capacity building of AMI interns through providing opportunities to participate in research activities, provide overall coordination and management of the project implementation and lead on scientific aspects of the project. The partnership is based on shared intellectual property and recognition and ensures North-South learning through ongoing research and technical development.
Collaborator Contribution IDEMs, AMI and INNODEMS have led two major strands of the project in 2020, a capacity building effort in DAC countries and a co-design and software development process. Through a 21st Century Skills course they have given foundational skills to a small group of school leavers in Kenya who have been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. Through this process a team of 6 app development interns were recruited in Kenya, they have subsequently been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. The outcomes of the capacity building include soft skills (e.g. digital communication skills), technical skills related to development (e.g. skills on html and css to develop web content) and direct contributions to the PLH Digital interventions. Five full days of productive co-design sessions were held virtually resulting in a detailed Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and initial ideas for higher level design of the app. This first stage concluded with a joint presentation of these ideas. The second stage of co-design and development continued and led to the full definition of the specification of the Alpha app, a description of a possible Beta version and internal release of an Alpha app together with specific contextual and technical documentation. Further outputs included an alternative design and second Alpha release of the app for internal testing.
Impact Cross disciplinary collaboration between researchers and DAC partners on digital parenting platforms; Technological and academic capacity building opportunities for 6 DAC youth; A DAC co-created concept for the design and function of an open-access interactive parenting app to prevent child abuse; An Alpha version of the app for internal testing
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the African Mathis Initiative (AMI), Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Science (IDEMS) and INNODEMS on the development of an app-based version of the PLH for Teens programme 
Organisation Innodems
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) Digital project has continued a collaboration with AMI, a Kenyan NGO, IDEMs, a UK Community Interest Company, and INNODEMs, a Kenyan social enterprise, as reported in previous entries. We have engaged collaboratively on a regular basis through meetings, workshops and exchange of ideas to conceptualise, design and develop an app-based on version of the PLH for Teens programme. We support capacity building of AMI interns through providing opportunities to participate in research activities, provide overall coordination and management of the project implementation and lead on scientific aspects of the project. The partnership is based on shared intellectual property and recognition and ensures North-South learning through ongoing research and technical development.
Collaborator Contribution IDEMs, AMI and INNODEMS have led two major strands of the project in 2020, a capacity building effort in DAC countries and a co-design and software development process. Through a 21st Century Skills course they have given foundational skills to a small group of school leavers in Kenya who have been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. Through this process a team of 6 app development interns were recruited in Kenya, they have subsequently been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. The outcomes of the capacity building include soft skills (e.g. digital communication skills), technical skills related to development (e.g. skills on html and css to develop web content) and direct contributions to the PLH Digital interventions. Five full days of productive co-design sessions were held virtually resulting in a detailed Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and initial ideas for higher level design of the app. This first stage concluded with a joint presentation of these ideas. The second stage of co-design and development continued and led to the full definition of the specification of the Alpha app, a description of a possible Beta version and internal release of an Alpha app together with specific contextual and technical documentation. Further outputs included an alternative design and second Alpha release of the app for internal testing.
Impact Cross disciplinary collaboration between researchers and DAC partners on digital parenting platforms; Technological and academic capacity building opportunities for 6 DAC youth; A DAC co-created concept for the design and function of an open-access interactive parenting app to prevent child abuse; An Alpha version of the app for internal testing
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the African Mathis Initiative (AMI), Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Science (IDEMS) and INNODEMS on the development of an app-based version of the PLH for Teens programme 
Organisation Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) Digital project has continued a collaboration with AMI, a Kenyan NGO, IDEMs, a UK Community Interest Company, and INNODEMs, a Kenyan social enterprise, as reported in previous entries. We have engaged collaboratively on a regular basis through meetings, workshops and exchange of ideas to conceptualise, design and develop an app-based on version of the PLH for Teens programme. We support capacity building of AMI interns through providing opportunities to participate in research activities, provide overall coordination and management of the project implementation and lead on scientific aspects of the project. The partnership is based on shared intellectual property and recognition and ensures North-South learning through ongoing research and technical development.
Collaborator Contribution IDEMs, AMI and INNODEMS have led two major strands of the project in 2020, a capacity building effort in DAC countries and a co-design and software development process. Through a 21st Century Skills course they have given foundational skills to a small group of school leavers in Kenya who have been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. Through this process a team of 6 app development interns were recruited in Kenya, they have subsequently been mentored and trained up so that they can contribute to the project and build important transferable skills which should make them highly employable in the future. The outcomes of the capacity building include soft skills (e.g. digital communication skills), technical skills related to development (e.g. skills on html and css to develop web content) and direct contributions to the PLH Digital interventions. Five full days of productive co-design sessions were held virtually resulting in a detailed Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and initial ideas for higher level design of the app. This first stage concluded with a joint presentation of these ideas. The second stage of co-design and development continued and led to the full definition of the specification of the Alpha app, a description of a possible Beta version and internal release of an Alpha app together with specific contextual and technical documentation. Further outputs included an alternative design and second Alpha release of the app for internal testing.
Impact Cross disciplinary collaboration between researchers and DAC partners on digital parenting platforms; Technological and academic capacity building opportunities for 6 DAC youth; A DAC co-created concept for the design and function of an open-access interactive parenting app to prevent child abuse; An Alpha version of the app for internal testing
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the City of Cape Town Policy and Strategy Department 
Organisation City of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through an ongoing partnership with the NGO Harambee Youth Accelerator and J-PAL South Africa, Dr Kate Orkin and her research team have been engaged in an advisory role by the City of Cape Town's Policy and Strategy Department. In particular, the researc team have engaged in labour-market specific advice, including the scaling up of a labour market intervention with Harambee. Dr Orkin gave a presentation on labour market interventions to the City of Cape Town mayoral committee, which was later followed up with a full day evaluation workshop with the public works programme team.
Collaborator Contribution The COVID-19 pandemic led to temporary de-prioritisation of the conversations regarding programme scale-up. However, collaborators in South Africa, based at J-PAL, have continued to engage with this partner and are planning a follow-up workshop on labour market interventions with a particular focus on the City of Cape Town's public works programme - one of the key tools deployed to tackle the fall in employment resulting from the pandemic.
Impact The collaboration is not inter-disciplinary, focusing instead on labour market economics specialists across several partner organisations - Unviersities of Oxford and Duke, as well as J-PAL South Africa. The team is redefining its input into the City of Cape Town's programmes, based on its post-COVID labour market strategy. The team will directly support the design of the strategy and advise on implementation and the need for impact evaluation.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa 
Organisation Department of Basic Education
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution A national school intervention package will be developed, called Health Action in ScHools for a Thriving Adolescent Generation (Project HASHTAG), which are being co-produced in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa. Project HASHTAG aims to promote positive mental health, prevent mental disorders, and prevent a range of risk behaviours. Core components from the Zifune intervention programme, along with findings from the Helping Adolescents Thrive (HAT) evidence review, will be incorporated into the intervention package. The intervention package will be developed by the same research team involved in the development of the Zifune intervention programme. The intervention package will be developed in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa, learners of the targeted age group, as well as parents and teachers.
Collaborator Contribution Project HASHTAG is co-designed with the Department of Basic Education. Resources and structures that are already put into place by the Department of Education will be used for the implementation and sustainability of the initiative.
Impact The collaboration is multi-disciplinary - it includes partners from the Department of Basic Education, learners from the targeted age group, teachers from various involved schools, and members from the Zifune research team who have a background in global health.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa and Vodacom 
Organisation Department of Basic Education
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Following the Zifune project, and in partnership with the Department of Education in South Africa, a national school intervention package will be developed to target bullying in schools. This anti-bullying initiative, called STOP-THINK-CONNECT is based on a model that focuses on the strength and quality of social connection. Core components from the Zifune intervention programme, along with findings from the Helping Adolescents Thrive (HAT) evidence review, will be incorporated into the STOP-THINK-CONNECT intervention package. The intervention package will be developed by the same research team involved in the development of the Zifune intervention programme. The intervention package will be developed in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa, learners of the targeted age group, as well as teachers.
Collaborator Contribution The anti-bulling initiative is co-designed with the Department of Basic Education. Resources and structures that are already put into place by the Department of Education will be used for the implementation and sustainability of the initiative.
Impact The collaboration is multi-disciplinary - it includes partners from the Department of Basic Education, learners from the targeted age group, teachers from various involved schools, and members from the Zifune research team who have a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP Global HIV and Health team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The UNDP Global HIV and Health team started collaborating with the Accelerate Hub since its inception. In September 2019 the Hub hired a research officer that is now based in the UNDP HIV and Health team office in New York. The officer works closely with the team to identify routes to impact and to support an evidence-based approach to increasing adolescent well being in development contexts- specifically in Africa.
Collaborator Contribution One of the Hub's major goals is to translate research to impact, and the UNDP is a key partner that can strategically engage with the evidence produced throughout the lifetime of the award. The UNDP has contributed to this collaboration through: 1) Providing support and advise in the consolidation of the "Accelerator" concept 2) Participating in the Hubs' strategic advisory group (STRATA) and offering advice on which outcomes would be most useful to international development 3) Identifying potential entry points for youth and adolescent research in their workplans
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary partnership that connects health to other sectors and disciplines (especially to education, cash transfers, social welfare and climate change) . An Accelerate Hub research officer is now placed in the UNDP offices to further support the partnership; this has rippled on to support the inclusion of youth in UNDP country office programmes and to create a platform for supportive evidence from the Hub.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP Regional Service Center for Africa (RSCA) 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the Hub's partnership with the UNDP, we were introduced to the Climate team in UNDP regional service center for Africa (RSCA), based in Ethiopia. The UNDP RSCA leads on UNDP climate change policies and programmes across Africa. The Hub's role including the provision of evidence surrounding successful youth engagement. This supported more youth-inclusive planning within the UNDP RSCA office.
Collaborator Contribution To be able to turn evidence into practice, the UNDP RSCA is a key partner, especially since they're responsible for oversight of all country offices across Africa. They are keen to take up the evidence produced by the Accelerate Hub, as well as our approach to addressing the SDGs. On the other hand, the RSCA also provides the Hub with more contextual understanding on which evidence is most relevant to the UN country offices in Africa.
Impact This collaboration aggregates multiple disciplines to benefit young people, those include: agriculture, health, nutrition and digital technologies. Outputs: In Dec 2019, the RSCA was drafting out a programme promoting agriculture in peri-urban areas. The Hub supported the planning of this programme through highlighting the importance of including youth and digital technologies in agriculture; and the benefit of re-framing agriculture to be more appealing to youth and promote their involvement. The project proposal was submitted to the UNDP regional office in Feb 2020.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP-Global Fund partnership team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Global Fund Partnership team is a group within the global UNDP team that holds the Global Fund grants to Southern and Eastern Africa. We have started collaborating with them for the well-being of Adolescent Girls and Young Women (AGYW). The Global Partnership team is well known for focusing on HIV, TB and Malaria; however, since AGYW are particularly vulnerable to those illnesses, they will be launching an AGYW programme (in 2021) to improve their conditions and promote gender equity. Combining evidence that came up from our studies, the Accelerate Hub will be providing an 'evidence summary' of the interventions/ policies/ services that positively impact AGYW.
Collaborator Contribution The summary will be distributed to UNDP country offices and is intended to guide planning for AGYW programmes in UNDP country offices around Africa. They are keen to have a concrete evidence base for the AGYW programmes they will enroll in 2021.
Impact This work focuses on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Community Advice Offices South Africa (COASA) 
Organisation Community Advice Offices South Africa (COASA)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 3,000 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Community Advice and Law Centre, South Africa 
Organisation Community Advice and Law Service
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting tip sheets and other resources
Collaborator Contribution Shared our resources with 750 schools
Impact 76,000 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Forgotten Voices International 
Organisation Forgotten Voices International
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources - advocating for family strengthening during the pandemic by using tools that will sustain a rhythm of good parenting, thereby propagating a ripple effect as we are intentionally empowering churches to sustain the impact in their respective communities.
Impact 8,042,714 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Forgotten Voices International - Zambia 
Organisation Forgotten Voices International
Department Forgotten Voices international, Zambia
Country Zambia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact 11,274 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Coventry University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation London International Development Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Newcastle University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Royal Veterinary College (RVC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Agency for Research and Development Initiative
Country South Sudan 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Alternativa Institut za brak,semejstvo i sistemska praksa
Country Macedonia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Ateneo de Manila University
Country Philippines 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Bangor University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation Health For Youth Association
Country Moldova, Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation IDEMS International Community Interest Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation University of KwaZulu-Natal
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description GCRF-Newton Fund COVID-19 Parenting Emergency Response Partners and Sub-Partners 
Organisation World Without Orphans
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The PIs identified and brought together institutions and organisations capable of contributing essential expertise to the global dissemination and evaluation of COVID-19 parenting resources. Partner-specific deliverables were established for immediate action. We have convened a monthly meeting of Partners and Sub-Partners addressing common governance matters (e.g., ethics, data management); sharing emerging evidence and examples of effective methods, tools, practices; exchanging contextual and cultural learnings. Our Project Manager administrated the inter-institution formal agreements and budget oversight.
Collaborator Contribution (UKZN) Technical support to improve the cost predictions and analysis of proposed interventions. Additional analysis of household determinants of child wellbeing to inform intervention refinement. (Bangor University) Development of guidelines for remote programme delivery. (World Without Orphans) Translation and dissemination of the Parenting Tips: Church Leaders Guide with associated intensive facilitators/mentors training, embedding in established programmes, production of videos and webinars, pilot studies and onwards development. Countries reached: Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Paraguay, Philippines, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Albania, Romania, Moldova. (UCL) Qualitative evaluation of the Covid-19 parenting tips via remote (Zoom) platform including engaging partner organizations, initiating participant recruitment, in-depth interviews conducted and generation of interview transcripts. Nvivo 12 software and other Microsoft office tools (Excel, Word and PowerPoint) were used for results analyses, as well as drafting and producing the final report for the qualitative study. adaptive testing quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis
Impact Guidelines produced for remote programme delivery: Many partner agencies are in DAC countries. Since the result of COVID-19 is that many of our partner agencies are by necessity now delivering remotely these Guidelines are proving to be an invaluable resource. Furthermore to ensure broad programme roll out across rural areas it is likely that remote programme delivery will be a useful resource even after COVID-19 restrictions are no longer in place. This work has already fed into a large H2020 project involving three LMICs in Eastern Europe. Benefits of the provision of resources for remote delivery include: • Less environmental impact than from physical groups • Less travelling and associated costs for participants and leaders • Convenience for participants so potentially greater accessibility • Possibility of greater partner involvement • If the programme is used/delivered on a 1:1 basis it enables flexible re scheduling of time to suit individual parents Dissemination of Church Leaders' Guide: Animation produced for adaptation by church leaders globally https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GIAYlWUzDhAFWd3DXH8lpRsabHOUN5B2/view?usp=sharing Qualitative interviewing in Paraguay, South Africa, Israel, UK, USA, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Malawi, Macedonia, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan: Study findings highlight the emerging global themes related to complex parenting challenges, and the utility of the parenting tips materials during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific stressors that were widely described by participants included emotional stress, balancing work with parenting, assisting children with schooling from home, keeping children occupied , providing for families, low levels and/or lack of social support, and restrictions on outdoor activities/movement. Additionally, some challenges experienced by adolescent participants revolved around being unable to do what they usually do, including attending school, socializing with their friends and boredom. The parenting tips equipped parents with information and practices which transformed their everyday lives, interactions with their children and the challenges from the parenting pressures. They provided prompts and permissions, enabled communications and offered ways to reduce stress, monitor behaviour, enhance communication and navigate discipline. Participants described the impact of using the parenting tips has had on their families in the course of the current study. Key outcomes included impacting parental behaviour and techniques as well as reduction in harsh disciplinary forms used on children, potentially preventing child abuse during the pandemic. The findings also show the timeliness of the resources as well as the clarity and ease of use were seen as advantages by users. Future direction and possible hurdles related to adaptations needed according to recipient, child age, local context, culture and new challenges. Disciplines involved include: Economics (cost analysis), Clinical and Health Psychology,
Start Year 2020
 
Description Government of Kenya 
Organisation Government of Kenya
Country Kenya 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources - Unicef working with Government
Impact No direct outputs / outcomes yet reported
Start Year 2021
 
Description Government of Lesotho 
Organisation Government of Lesotho
Country Lesotho 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact While there has been no direct reporting from government partners, we are aware that they have disseminated the resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Government of Somalia 
Organisation Government of Somalia
Country Somalia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact No direct contact from government partners, but we are aware that they have disseminated the resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Government of Uganda 
Organisation Government of Uganda
Country Uganda 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources
Impact Makerere University is part of national government and led the distribution of resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Harvest Bible Fellowship Rwanda-Mahoko 
Organisation Harvest Bible Fellowship Rwanda
Country Rwanda 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources with 20 people leading one-to-one meetings.
Impact 440 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Icora FM 
Organisation Icora FM
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources, particularly specialist media pack
Collaborator Contribution Indonsakusa Community Radio commonly known as ICORA FM is a community radio based at Empangeni the Northern part of Kwa-Zulu Natal. It is registered as a non-profit company. Its structure has 7 board members, management that consists of the Station Manager, Marketing Manager, Human Resource & Admin Manager and Production/ Programs Manager. The idea of forming this radio station was born out of the conviction that the station would stimulate and guide the communities to action, under the motto: "The Voice of the Voiceless". Programs that are being broadcast cover topics including teenage pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, child abuse, drug addictions, youth and social development issues, to name a few. Our Mission Statement: To provide adequate and accurate, apolitical, unbiased information in a transparent manner, which empowers our community and create awareness keeping up with times. Numerous broadcasts including and featuring our resources
Impact Audience of 40,427 listeners reached with child abuse prevention information and resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Early Childhood Development Action Network
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation End Violence Against Children
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation End Violence Against Children
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation IDEMS International Community Interest Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Maestral International
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Pan American Health Organization
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation Together for Girls
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation United States Agency for International Development
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation World Childhood Foundation
Country Germany 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Interagency Group 
Organisation World Without Orphans
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our lead PIs identified Interagency Group members and convened meetings, webinars and focus-topic working sessions. Continued engagement was maintained through circulation of monthly newsletters and other updates. Dialogue was expanded through linking Interagency Group members and their onwards contacts with our Global Dissemination and Monitoring & Evaluation teams. This Group is continuing post-award, in the ongoing effort to maintain children and families in the forefront of global agenda-setting.
Collaborator Contribution Senior leadership contributed strategic guidance and networking access to regional and localised programmatic stakeholders. Staff time and expertise provided content development, translation and adaptation of materials; support with regional dissemination, evaluation and advocacy spheres; specialist knowledge on high fragility contexts (such as refugee populations) and faith-based engagement. Technical support included provision and guidance on access via the Internet of Good Things, as well as server space, website management, printing.
Impact Ongoing engagement and wider strategic networking.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Jairos Jiri Association 
Organisation Jairos Jiri Association
Country Zimbabwe 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and disseminated our resources, including disability-specific materials, in their work enhancing the lives of Zimbabweans with disabilities.
Impact 3,000 households living with disability reached with child abuse prevention resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Jelly Beanz 
Organisation Jelly Beanz
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources, including specialist guidance for caseworkers
Collaborator Contribution Utilised our materials in their therapeutic and other support work with children who have experienced abuse and trauma and their parents/ carers
Impact Reached 5600 families with experience of child abuse with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Kgatelopele Social Development Programme 
Organisation Kgatelopele Social Development Forum (KSDF)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and shared our resources with local households
Impact 2980 households reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Kids Haven 
Organisation Kids Haven
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources including specialist caseworker guidance materials.
Collaborator Contribution Kids Haven look after 150 vulnerable children, providing shelter, protection, education, training and therapy. The organisation is using the materials to train their staff of 20 child care workers, who will also be sharing the materials with their own networks.
Impact 150 vulnerable households reached with child violence prevention resources, and 20 staff trained to disseminate these materials and information throughout their wide networks.
Start Year 2021
 
Description KwaZulu Natal Christian Council (KZNCC) 
Organisation KwaZulu Natal Christian Council (KZNCC)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources. A church leaders group consisting of 50 leaders, and an interface council with 12 different religions meets every Monday. They shared the resources with the group and council. The council works with eight theological training institutions in KwaZulu-Natal, with an average of 30 graduates per institution. The materials were shared with the graduates to use when they start practising. They also have five regional ecumenical organisations who conduct awareness campaigns in different communities about Gender Based issues with community members.
Impact 290 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Learn to Play Botswana 
Organisation Learn to Play
Country Botswana 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution COVID-19 parenting resources provided
Collaborator Contribution Mobile mentoring is a programme we established during lockdown where we called each family every week to see how they are doing, give them weekly play ideas, send play packs home to their children and talked them through the poster info on each poster we created with yourselved - we also sent it on whatsapp to families in need
Impact 3489 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Learn to Play Botswana 
Organisation Learn to Play
Country Botswana 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution COVID-19 parenting resources provided
Collaborator Contribution Mobile mentoring is a programme we established during lockdown where we called each family every week to see how they are doing, give them weekly play ideas, send play packs home to their children and talked them through the poster info on each poster we created with yourselved - we also sent it on whatsapp to families in need
Impact 3489 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Lifeline/Childline Namibia 
Organisation LifeLine/ChildLine
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources, with accompanying guidance materials for caseworkers
Collaborator Contribution Utilised our resources on their helpline calls
Impact 2014 callers to helpline received COVID-19 specific child abuse prevention informed guidance
Start Year 2020
 
Description MOSAIC 
Organisation Mosaic
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Shared our resources with 45 staff members
Impact 45 staff members trained to apply our child violence prevention resources within their therapeutic work with girls and women survivors of domestic violence.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Makerere University Child Health and Development Centre 
Organisation Makerere University
Department Child Health and Development Centre
Country Uganda 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and disseminated our resources
Impact 581,600 households reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Momentum Metropolitan Holdings Limited 
Organisation Momentum Metropolitan Holdings Limited
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution A financial services group, Momentum Metropolitan shared the materials with staff of more than 50 members.
Impact 50 households reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Mother Francisca Mission 
Organisation Mother Francisca Mission Hospital
Country Kenya 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources, reaching participants through positive parenting sessions and home visits.
Impact 594 families reached with child abuse prevention resources.
Start Year 2021
 
Description National Health Laboratory Services of South Africa 
Organisation National Health Laboratory Services, South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since the study started, the research team has built a collaboration with Professor Gayle Sherman at the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) of South Africa. Through this partnership, we will match - using an algorithm developed and tested by the NHLS team - adolescent parent and child laboratory outcomes (HIV test results, viral load, TB tests) to their interview data in 2018-2021. The research will collect secondary data to link adolescent and child medical records to adolescent interviews in collaboration with the NHLS of South Africa. Most adolescent parents and their children access public health services in one of the 79 health facilities with whom our research team works closely. These facilities collect and store health information such as access to PMTCT (prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV) care, child HIV testing and results, and child immunisation records. The study has asked consent from all adolescent parents and caregivers to access this information from their medical files. Upon completion of baseline data collection in July 2019, lead investigator (Dr Toska) and a team of early career researchers (Janina Jochim, Nontokozo Langwenya, Eda He, Roxanna Haghighat, Dr Anna Carlqvist, Siya Zhou & Silinga Dzumbunu) prepared a dataset to facilitate matching of up to 1500 adolescents living with HIV (including adolescent mothers and their children). Facilitated through a formal collaboration agreement with the NHLS team, data is transferred for matching. By early 2020, the team of researchers leading this endeavour completed preparations of the dataset required for the NHLS team to run matching algorithms. The first phase of matching has attempted to identify child laboratory outcomes for all children in the HEY BABY cohort (n=1124). To date, this has results in 315 exact matches and 40 possible matches. This collaboration is actively ongoing to increase the number of matches between the cohort sample and the laboratory outcomes. In the next phase of this collaboration, the research team will aim to identify laboratory outcomes ((HIV test results, viral load, TB tests) for the completed adolescent cohort including adolescent mothers.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Gayle Sherman at the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) of South Africa will use participant information collected by the research team to match study participants to data stored at the NHLS repository. Professor Sherman's team has provided consultation about type of information the research team should collect from participants - for example, variations in name spellings - in order to maximise possibility of accurately matching research participants to data sorted at the NHLS.
Impact This will enable us to use social science data and methods to identify what can help with health outcomes measured through rigorous biomedical tests. The collaboration with NHLS extends the existing medical records data collection that the team has been already conducting, by ensuring that data available from health facilities outside the catchment area are included in the dataset, with adolescent patient and caregiver consent.
Start Year 2018
 
Description National Institute for Medical Research Tanzania 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and disseminated our resources in their work and networks
Impact 30 members of staff disseminated child abuse prevention resources to unknown number of families within their professional networks and communities
Start Year 2020
 
Description Parent and Educational Training 
Organisation Parent and Educational Training (PTY) Ltd
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and distributed these resources to participants on their parenting programmes.
Impact 3500 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Partnership with Oak Foundation 
Organisation Oak Foundation
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Oak Foundation and the Accelerate Hub have identified the potential for a strategic advocacy partnership to embed CSAE and violence prevention into the SDG agenda. The Hub is planning to jointly contribute to a series of advocacy and policy engagement activities to improve research uptake and capacity building. This includes: A) launching a strategic advocacy and impact portfolio; B) focusing on executive leadership for African policymakers (including politicians and officials) in collaboration with the Mandela School of Government at the University of Cape Town (UCT), and; C) building the influencing capacity of early career researchers by developing a cohort of African researchers with expertise in both research and in policy engagement and influencing. This programme is planned to be executed over a period of four years - from 2020 to 2024.
Collaborator Contribution Through strategic advice, knowledge exchange and additional funding - the Oak foundation collaboration has: A) increased the capacity of the Accelerate Hub to work on policy engagement, advocacy and influencing; B) positioned the Hub's evidence on violence prevention in global platforms to increase research uptake and operationalization.
Impact So far, the partnership brings a range of multi-discipline skills and expertise from across the academic, policy, humanitarian and international development sectors. The collaboration has enabled the Hub to research the impacts and predictors of violence prevention in African contexts, for example, this includes the impacts of violence prevention on education, mental health, teen marraige, adolescent pregnancy, HIV risks, and youth employment. These findings have been formulated into academic and policy publications - including the latest publication titled "the parenting vaccine". On the other hand, the partnership has also strengthened ECR research and policy engagement skills through partnership with APHRC as a part of the joint mandate to strengthen executive leadership. The Hub and the Oak Foundation will continue to build on this collaboration over the coming months.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Partnership with UNDP Accelerator Labs 
Organisation UNDP, Accelerator Labs
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution In 2020, the UNDP Accelerator Lab headquarters signed a collaboration agreement with the UKRI GCRF. This agreement allowed for multidiscipline partnerships across the Accelerator Labs and the Accelerate Hub. The Hub is particularly close with the Gambia and the South Sudan Accelerator Labs, we supported them through evidence provision throughout their program cycles; this included joint program planning, considerations of vulnerable populations, program evaluation and report writing. The Hub also helped in expanding the Lab's exposure and audience reach by organizing joint webinars.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have provided many opportunities for evidence uptake, therefore supporting the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub's work through evidence-based programming, strengthening youth engagement, and operationalizing the Sustainable Development Goals. The South Sudanese UNDP Accelerator Lab, for example, delivered a financial literacy training program and providing seed capital for out-of-school adolescents based on evidence from early-career researcher Samuel Bojo. The Lab also continues to emphasize the value of combined interventions in their day-to-day programming. The Gambia Accelerator Lab has also used the Accelerate Hub's evidence to design a youth employment program - this brought together partners from across government, civil society and the private sector. Based on the Hub's advice, the program included vocational skills trainings, motivational sessions, youth engagement and program follow-up to assess its impact.
Impact This partnership allowed for innovative multidiscipline collaborations, this included: connecting with companies like M-Gurush (a private telecommunications company in South Sudan) to provide free SIM cards to adolescent girls and young women; strengthening engagement with early- and mid- career academics through joint webinars, and; Accelerator Lab evidence-based program planning, implementation and evaluation.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Partnership with UNICEF Innocenti 
Organisation UNICEF
Department Innocenti Research Centre
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In 2020, the Accelerate Hub build on our existing links with UNICEF Innocenti. The key highlights of this partnership was the jointly written policy brief titled "Beyond Masks: Societal impacts of COVID-19 and accelerated solutions for children and adolescents". More than 40 Accelerate Hub researchers - including early career researchers from ten different countries - contributed to the joint brief. The publication is now on UNICEF Innocenti's official website.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Priscilla Idele, the deputy Director of the UNICEF's Office of Research-Innocenti HQ has been a member of the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub's advisory board since 2019. As the partnership across our teams was strengthened over the last two years, UNICEF Innocenti has continued to provide opportunities for research uptake. Their contribution to the partnership included invitations for internal UNICEF meetings, support in the Hub's COVID-19 response, and jointly writing a policy brief in late 2020.
Impact Tens of researchers, practi and policymakers from UNICEF Innocenti and the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub contributed to this partnerships; many represent different disciplines including social protection, public health, child protection and humanitarian aid. The partnership resulted in a jointly writing a policy brief in late 2020.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Partnership with the Global Fund on Adolescent Girls and Young Women 
Organisation Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub has launched a new project in collaboration with the Global Fund for TB, AIDS and Malaria which will improve HIV impacts for adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). This project has a focused goal: to support AGYW HIV incidence reduction and optimal HIV-related outcomes in five focus countries, Lesotho, eSwatini, Cameroon, Kenya and Mozambique. The highly-experienced and impact-driven team-led by the University of Cape Town in South Africa (UCT)-will assess existing (or potential, in Cameroon) frameworks and their corresponding service packages. The team will assess existing and potential frameworks and service packages, make recommendations on how they can be refined to ensure they are evidence-informed, cost-effective and aligned with latest technical guidance.
Collaborator Contribution The Global Fund team will jointly work with our team on recommendations for policy and practice so that they are i) aligned with technical guidance for Global Fund programmes, ii) evidence-informed, iii) cost-effective, iv) appropriately tailored geographically and for sub-populations, and v) work synergistically as a combination of interventions to maximize impact. While the immediate work will support five countries, it can also identify lessons learned and inform effective programming across all Global Fund's 13 AGYW priority countries.
Impact This exceptionally strong multi-disciplinary team is led by the UKRI GCRF's network, this includes: University of Cape Town (Toska, Maughan-Brown), with University of Oxford (Cluver, Langwenya), University College London (Sherr), London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (Birdthistle, Floyd) and expert consultants with extensive experience of Global Fund regional and country-level programs (Ferguson, Johnson-Darkoh, Odenyo). Strategic leadership is based in Sub-Saharan Africa (Dr Elona Toska, UCT), with Prof Lucie Cluver, Oxford/ UCT, Prof Lorraine Sherr, UCL, and Dr Chris Desmond, University of KwaZulu-Natal. A strong team at UCT (Toska, Maughan-Brown, Kelly, Mfeketo) will provide management and financial oversight. Country-level engagements will build on existing partnerships with UNICEF's Eastern and Southern Africa (Laurie Gulaid, Alice Armstrong) and Western and Central Africa (Dr Landry Tsague, Dr Prerna Banati) regional offices, and UNFPA Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office (Renata Tallarico) with the goal of facilitating effective linkages to country offices and national programs. Additional value will be added through country-specific consultants (i.e. Tamarabang-Cameroon, Langwenya-eSwatini, Odenyo-Kenya, Mozambique, Kelly-Lesotho). The partnership will combine evidence generation and synthesis with country-level, regional and international engagement with key stakeholders to co-develop recommendations to improve national AGYW approaches.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Partnership with the Kenya Social Assistance Unit (SAU) at the Kenya Social Protection Secretariate 
Organisation Ministry of Labour, Social Security and Services
Department Social Protection Secretariat (SPS)
Country Kenya 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Mind & Behaviour Research Group led by Dr Kate Orkin held a half-day event with the Social Assistance Unit and the Social Protection Secretariat on 27th of November, 2019 to present the design of the Kenya Aspirations trial, gather questions from policymakers as it relates to future work, and discuss the best ways to engage in dissemination with the team in the upcoming months. Tentative plans were put in place to hold a follow up dissemination event with the unit in May 2020. These plans have been delayed by COVID-19, but the team remain in touch with SAU. We received input from SAU on areas where evidence would be useful in the design of cash transfers related to COVID19, which informed some briefs we developed (see below).
Collaborator Contribution The feedback from members of SAU informed the design of fieldwork for the Kenya Adolescents project, which began fieldwork in February 2021.
Impact These consultations (in November 2019 and by email and phone during COVID) informed the design of a series of policy briefs on how cash transfers can be designed to maximise efficacy during COVID-19 pandemic. These briefs responded to issues raised by SAU. The briefs cover: - How cash transfers might prevent negative impacts on education: https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/node/233 - Effects of cash transfers on intimate partner violence: https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/node/234 - How to encourage people to share cash transfers with those not receiving them: https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/node/228 - How labelling unconditional cash transfers can encourage people to use them in particular ways: https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/node/226
Start Year 2019
 
Description Partnership with the Sudanese Ministry of Energy 
Organisation Government of South Sudan
Department Ministry of Energy & Mining
Country South Sudan 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In 2021, a partnership was launched with the Ministry of Energy, Sudan; it is jointly led by the Social Policy and Intervention Department at Oxford University, the Engineering Department at Oxford University, and the Engineering Department at the University of Khartoum. The collaboration looks at electricity access as an accelerator for population wellbeing - improving employment, health, gender equality and education. A Hub early-career-researcher led a series of high-level stakeholder engagement sessions and one systematic review to collect recommendations and suggestions on the multi-dimensional impacts of electricity access.
Collaborator Contribution The Ministry of Energy and the university of Khartoum contributed to the collaboration through a strengthening the projects' networks within and across ministries and academic institutions. The University of Khartoum, for example, streamlined communications with engineering students to collect their recommendations while also strengthening their academic capacity. The Ministry of Energy, on the other hand, was interested in strengthening research and evidence uptake within their decision making routes.
Impact The partnership has so far organised five high-level focused group discussions bringing together regional specialist in electrical engineering, conflict recovery, anthropology, health system strengthening, higher-education education and policy. The team also plans to encapsulate the recommendations into a policy brief in collaboration with the Minister of Energy himself.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Partnership with the UNDP Global Youth Team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In October 2019, the Hub started a partnership with the Global UNDP Youth team in New York. The Hub has agreed to provide evidence to the youth team (especially on adolescent health and its benefit across SDGs), and assist with our in-team academic expertise.
Collaborator Contribution The Global UNDP Youth team is responsible for oversight of all the UNDP teams that are working on youth development, they are also the organisational focal point for other UN agencies that want to start projects/ policies surrounding the well-being of young people. The Youth team has been eager to use the evidence arising from the Hub to improve on their current programmes as well as start planning new ones.
Impact The outputs from this partnership connect adolescents' health to multiple disciplines (education, violence prevention, political capita...etc). So far we have been working with the Youth team on a call of action for violence prevention, on an external UN webinar, on youth engagement in UN programmes and on focusing further on African services/ projects.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Partnership with the World Food Programme 
Organisation World Food Programme, Johannesburg
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has embarked on a new partnership with the World Food Programme' Regional Bureau for Johannesburg. This partnership on focuses on the wellbeing of HIV-affected adolescents including adolescent mothers and their children in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Using the Hub's longitudinal data sets, we examined whether food security is associated with HIV infection risks (such as transactional and age-disparate sex, risk behaviours). The WFP and Accelerate Hub have also organised regular monthly evidence updates inviting colleagues across the WFP Regional offices in Eastern and Southern Africa.
Collaborator Contribution The partnership started in Sep 2019, when the The World Food Programme (WFP) Southern Africa Regional Office in Johannesburg offered the Hub's team an opportunity to write a joint policy brief on WFP's approach to HIV- sensitive social protection, and its impacts on poverty and hunger across Eastern and Southern Africa. The team has since provided a plethora of opportunities to the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub to not only influence their internal programming, but to also influence other WFP Regional Offices and their external partners. The WFP has provided catalytic funding for a novel study focused on assessing the linkages between HIV, food security, social protection and their directionality. The WFP Johannesburg has also organized three joint sessions to date to facilitate evidence-sharing across WFP sub-teams. Their team is also exploring evidence uptake points in WFP programming, routes to strengthen WFP datasets in-country, and key messages to share with their networks and funders.
Impact A stronger evidence base is needed to build a conceptual framework of the linkages between food, nutrition, HIV and social protection. This needs to acknowledge the bi-directional and cyclical relationships between HIV, food and nutrition, and the role of social protection in shaping these relationships. The latest findings in this analysis suggest that the adolescent mothers are a key vulnerable population and may have increased risk of economically-driven HIV risks.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Reabetswe Support Group 
Organisation Reabetswe Support Group
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provide COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Shared with staff and children in a school, sent materials home with students.
Impact 71,218 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Refugee camps in Rwanda 
Organisation Proof Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided our COVID-19 parenting tip sheets and other materials
Collaborator Contribution Shared the tips and further resources in a print magazine distributed to six refugee camps every three months
Impact Child violence prevention information and materials reached over 170,000 refugees
Start Year 2021
 
Description Research collaboration to apply quantitative causal inference methods to adolescent accelerators 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Department of Statistics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have provided insight on the evaluation of adolescent accelerators and access to data for analysis
Collaborator Contribution They have provided insight on complicated statistical methods used to explore causal estimates of effect
Impact Disciplines: Epidemiology Mathematics"
Start Year 2020
 
Description SOPISDEW 
Organisation SOPISDEW
Country Cameroon 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Local distribution of our resources through a Church seminar on fathers' involvement, and a helpline for parents who need support, and reaching families through door-to door visits.
Impact 53,240 families reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Safaricom 
Organisation Safaricom PLC
Country Kenya 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources, especially specialist media-pack
Collaborator Contribution Safaricom is the leading communications company in Kenya, with the widest Network coverage. They disseminated our resources throughout their customer base, and adopted our COVID-19 parenting theme song as their ringtone.
Impact 1,900,000 users of Safaricom reached with child abuse prevention information and resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Safe Motherhood Alliance Zambia 
Organisation Safe Motherhood Alliance
Country Zambia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution They distribute the tip sheets in their newborn kits, which go to between 100 and 1,000 new mothers every month (figures depend on the level of COVID-19 lockdown in Zambia each month).
Impact Minimum 1,000 (anticipated many multiples of that) families reached with child abuse prevention resources, at time of heightened intensity.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Safer Spaces 
Organisation Safer Spaces
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution SaferSpaces is an interactive platform consisting of 175 organisations working towards violence and crime prevention, and promoting community safety. They have published our materials on their website and in their digital newsletter.
Impact 1115 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Save the Children, South Africa 
Organisation Save the Children
Department Save the Children South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Shared our materials via WhatsApp and Facebook. We are using the materials we adapted from your covid 19 ones. We have since used your materials as a model and designed a few more to use in our own Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting programme. It has tips on Warmth and Structure, how children think and feel at different stages, developing long term goals and using behaviour challenges as opportunity to model non-violent problem solving and regulating and co-regulating with your child.
Impact 113,303 families reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Seriti 
Organisation Seriti Institute
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and disseminated our resources in their local community work
Impact 2256 households reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description Sonke Gender Justice 
Organisation Sonke Gender Justice
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources
Collaborator Contribution Utilised and disseminated our resources throughout their programmes and networks
Impact 902,000 households reached with child violence prevention resources
Start Year 2021
 
Description South African Broadcasting Corporation 
Organisation South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC)
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provided COVID-19 parenting resources, particularly specialist media pack
Collaborator Contribution Numerous broadcasts including and featuring our resources
Impact Audience of 6,800,000 viewers/listeners reached with child abuse prevention resources
Start Year 2020
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation African Union Development Agency
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation International AIDS Society (IAS)
Department Collaborative Initiative for Paediatric HIV Education and Research
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation New York University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Oak Foundation
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UN Women
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNAIDS, Eastern and Southern Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNDP, Accelerator Labs
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation
Department Economic and Social Research Council