Environmental determinants of objectively measured physical activity and overweight and obesity in adolescents

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bristol
Department Name: Sch of App Community and Health Studies

Abstract

Bristol University has a strong commitment to making the results of its research accessible to the public and is committed to becoming a world leader in science engagement, driven through Professor Kathy Sykes, the Collier chair for Public Engagement in Science and Engineering. The nature of much EHS work is applied, and we have good links with Prof. Sykes. The University also works jointly with @Bristol, a hands-on science centre to work with the community and engage young people and teachers. EHS and University websites and Faculty of Social Sciences and University newsletters will include brief non-technical descriptions of the study, the results and their implications. With the support of the University external relations department, press releases will be produced to disseminate findings of publications to the public. The results of the study will be provided to participating schools and research staff will help the principles of activity measurement and GPS be integrated into the children?s learning.

Technical Summary

Being physically active is important for the optimal physical development of children. In addition being active with other children may enhance social development through assisting children to gain independence, improve self-esteem and make social contacts. There is concern that neighbourhoods around homes and schools are becoming less conducive to walking or cycling as well as active play, with parental concerns for safety leading to greater reliance on motorised transport and consequently lower levels of physical activity. Lower levels of physical activity are suggested to be an important factor leading to the development of obesity. National surveys indicate that 25-35% of adolescents are insufficiently active for the maintenance of good health, but we know little about the physical activity patterns of young people, where they go to be active, and how their neighbourhood and distance to school and other amenities may affect the amount of activity they do. We have a strong track record in measurement of physical activity in children, and we will be the first group to combine expertise in human geography and behavioural sciences to provide state of the art measurement of physical activity patterns and their environmental and social determinants in young adolescents. The focus will be young adolescents in the last year of primary school and the first year of secondary school, as this transition phase often triggers a decline in physical activity. As a result activity promotion and policy will be better informed, targeted and directed.

Publications

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Cooper AR (2010) Patterns of GPS measured time outdoors after school and objective physical activity in English children: the PEACH project. in The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

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Cooper AR (2010) Mapping the walk to school using accelerometry combined with a global positioning system. in American journal of preventive medicine

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Cooper AR (2012) Active travel and physical activity across the school transition: the PEACH project. in Medicine and science in sports and exercise

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Harding SK (2015) Longitudinal changes in sedentary time and physical activity during adolescence. in The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

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Jago R (2012) Friends and physical activity during the transition from primary to secondary school. in Medicine and science in sports and exercise

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Page AS (2009) Independent mobility in relation to weekday and weekend physical activity in children aged 10-11 years: The PEACH Project. in The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity

 
Description NICE Guidelines PHG17
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guidance committee
 
Description Annual grant round
Amount £246,051 (GBP)
Organisation World Cancer Research Fund 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Global
Start 11/2010 
End 11/2014
 
Description BRU
Amount £4,500,000 (GBP)
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2012 
End 03/2017
 
Description FP7
Amount € 440,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 03/2012 
End 02/2017
 
Description MRC population health
Amount £684,981 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/J000345/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2012 
End 12/2014
 
Description NPRI 4
Amount £684,981 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/J000345/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2012 
End 12/2014
 
Description Public Health Research
Amount £286,000 (GBP)
Funding ID 10/3001/04 
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2011 
End 12/2013
 
Description Public Health Research
Amount £743,500 (GBP)
Funding ID 11/3050/01 
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2013 
End 08/2015
 
Description Research Grant
Amount £773,234 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/J003492/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2012 
End 03/2014
 
Title Accelerometer-GPS data combining 
Description We have developed script written in Stata to batch combine accelerometer and GPS data, based upon the time stamp of eachg data source. 
Type Of Material Physiological assessment or outcome measure 
Year Produced 2009 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Development of this method allows the environmental context of physical activity location and level to be described and has enabled this method to be used in other studies (e.g. the EPSRC funded iConnect study) 
 
Description I.Family 
Organisation Leibniz Association
Department Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS GmbH
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Work package "Physical activity and the environment
Impact NA
Start Year 2011
 
Description Brent presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation of pilot data at Brent Healthy Schools Conference "Tipping the scales - Tackling childhood obesity in schools"

No measurable impacts
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2008
 
Description Bristol stakeholders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact A half-day seminar was held at a local hotel, comprising presentations from the research team and question generating activities involving the attendees

Feedback was excellent and we have been approached by participants from the health, education and transport sectors to explore collaborative working.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2009
 
Description Play England 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience Health professionals
Results and Impact Play England National Conference, Sheffield, March 2008. Presentation: "Play and children's health - implications for policy"

No measurable impacts
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2008
 
Description School dissemination 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Each participating primary school was provided with a large laminated poster describing the overall results for the school.

Schools very happy to facilitate research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2007,2008
 
Description Web site 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact We have developed a study website to provide information to participants, their parents, schools and other lay individuals.

No measurable impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2007,2008,2009