Project ACE: Active, Connected and Engaged Neighbourhoods

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bath
Department Name: Department for Health

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Low levels of physical activity in older people are associated with a number of physical and mental health problems. However, older people remain the least active of all age groups. Providing programmes to support increased physical activity can be expensive. However, one lower-cost option is to use volunteers to deliver such programmes. There is some evidence of positive effects in volunteer-based physical activity promotion schemes, but there is a lack of well-developed and evaluated programmes. The Active Connected Engaged Project (Project ACE) aims to develop and evaluate a practical, sustainable and low cost model of using volunteers to promote active ageing. However, before we go to the expense of a large trial (around #2million), it is important to make sure that the methods and procedures for assessing its impact are going to work as intended.
THE ACE PROGRAMME: The ACE programme is based on the latest evidence about what works best in promoting and sustaining physical activity in older people. The programme involves two meetings to engage participants and help them to understand the benefits of increased physical activity. Participants will then choose from a variety of physical activities that are available in their local community. An ACE activator will meet the participant up to 3 further times to review progress and to help to identify and overcome any obstacles they may encounter. Two paid neighbourhood co-ordinators will help to identify and train the twenty ACE volunteers and to identify local opportunites for physical activity.
METHODS: In the first stage of the project, we will develop the ACE programme, the volunteer training course and the role of the neighbourhood co-ordinator. In the second stage, 100 older adults aged 65?85 years with low levels of physical activity will be recruited through advertising campaigns and through promotion at local events. We will use interviews with groups of patients and intervention delivery staff to find out what people thought about the programme, what worked well or badly and how it might be improved. Other information will help us to plan the future trial (e.g. recruitment and attendance rates).
SERVICE USER INVOLVEMENT: Two members of the public will advise on recruitment, measurement and intervention methods, interpreting the findings and explaining the findings to the public.

Technical Summary

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Programmes that effectively increase physical activity in older people will yield large improvements in quality of life, independence, social activity and health and care costs related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia. Unfortunately, little evidence exists for effective interventions and at a national level, resources for prevention are scarce. The Active, Connected and Engaged (ACE) neighbourhoods project will develop and pilot a low cost, pragmatic, and sustainable intervention programme in which retired volunteers promote physical activity. The specific objectives are to: a) refine and manualise the intervention; b) monitor recruitment, retention, attendance and adherence rates; c) determine participant reactions to the intervention; d) estimate the variance in outcome measures to enable calculation of sample size for a future multi-centre RCT and e) estimate resource use/costs and develop methods for economic evaluation.
METHODS: We will conduct a two phase, 24-month pilot study involving two paid neighbourhood coordinators, 20 activity promotion volunteers [ACE activators] and 100 participants. In Phase 1, we will refine the ACE programme, develop the activator training manual and refine the role of the ACE co-ordinators. In Phase 2, 100 sedentary older adults aged 65?85 years will be recruited in two neighbourhoods in Bristol and will be randomised to the intervention and control groups. In the intervention group, the ACE activators will deliver up to five individual sessions over six months to engage and motivate participants and support maintenance, following a theoretically-driven behaviour change model. Controls will receive a booklet with information about local physical activity opportunities and will be offered the ACE programme at the end of the study.
The main outcomes (on which the study is powered) are: Recruitment rate and study completion rate. Intervention concordance (the proportion attending =3 of the 5 individual sessions) and intervention fidelity will also be assessed. To pilot the trial measures, we will assess physical activity (by accelerometry), well-being, neighbourhood quality of life, perceptions of competence, autonomy, relatedness, and resilience, for both intervention participants and volunteers. Focus groups will explore topics related to recruitment, training and delivery of the ACE programme and discuss strategies that facilitate the lifestyle change process and that might improve the programme or the delivery of the research.
OUTPUTS: The main output will be a well-informed and grounded intervention that has potential for generalisation throughout the UK and is ready for evaluation in a definitive effectiveness and cost effectiveness trial.
 
Description Collaboration with Action Age Alliance to provide a guide for local decision makers implementing active ageing initiatives
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact The AVONet report which was published via Action Age Alliance (weblink available in next section) featured a number of priorities for promotion of active ageing. The first of these priorities was the promotion of active ageing via volunteering initiatives which was captured by the development and delivery of Project ACE (funded by LifeLong Health and Well-being Initiative). This feasibility trial was selected by Public Health England and features in a report published on 13th November 2014 by UK Active as one of only 36 initiatives (out of 952 UK-based programmes) which has the potential for high level impact nationwide (http://www.ukactive.com).
URL http://ageactionalliance.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/AVONet-report-2014-March.pdf
 
Description Consultation on the update of the NICE guideline "Physical Activity and the Environment"
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description MRC-funded project ACE is cited in report published by Public Health England
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/374560/Whatworksv1_2.pdf
 
Description Australia & New Zealand Musculoskeletal (ANZMUSC) Clinical Trials Network Seed Funding Research Scheme
Amount $50,000 (AUD)
Organisation Australia & New Zealand Musculoskeletal Clinical Trials Network 
Sector Academic/University
Start  
 
Description Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences: Strategic Conference Support
Amount £782 (GBP)
Organisation University of Bath 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2013 
End 07/2013
 
Description Impact Acceleration Account- Knowledge Exchange Activities to translate Project ACE to a Community-Wide Programme
Amount £7,645 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/K503897/1 IAA132 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 08/2015
 
Description PhD studentship: ESRC South West Doctoral Training Centre
Amount £43,428 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2012 
End 12/2015
 
Description Tier 2 Advanced Awards -Public Engagement with Research Seed Funding
Amount £4,475 (GBP)
Organisation University of Bath 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 06/2018
 
Description ACE-LINKAGE partnership 
Organisation LinkAge Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The ACE team will support LinkAge to deliver a theoretically sound programme with positive evidence for its feasibility and acceptability. The ACE team will support LinkAge to evaluate the impact of the ACE programme on the health and well-being of their members.It will also help the organisation to develop and apply comprehensive evaluation protocols to their existing initiatives.
Collaborator Contribution LinkAge has officially adopted Project ACE and will include the ACE intervention in the menu of their offered activities. They will maintain the delivery of the ACE intervention in existing LinkAge hubs and expand the provision of ACE in new hubs. They will deliver on-going formal evaluation of the ACE intervention and further build the existing database and refine the intervention. These action will help us to successfully translate the ACE programme from a research intervention to a community programme.
Impact Project ACE was the outcome of the activities of the LLHW-Phase 2 funded multidisciplinary collaborative "AVON Network for the promotion of active ageing". The output of the AVON Network was a guide for promoting physical activity with older people (Stathi et al. 2013. Promoting physical activity in older adults: A guide for local decision makers). The partnership with LinkAge will help us to further evaluate effective and cost-effective ways for promoting physical activity. The immediate outcomes are: 1. The existing ACE participants will continue being involved with Project ACE under the support of LinkAge. 2. We will continue recruiting participants targeting people involved with LinkAge but not physically active.
Start Year 2013
 
Description AVONet and Action Age Alliance 
Organisation Age Action Alliance
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Iam a member of the Scientific Support Panel of the Public Health and Active Lifestyles Working Group of the Age Action Alliance.
Collaborator Contribution Age Action Alliance have endorsed the AVON Network guide and have promoted the priorities for physical activity programmes as these are presented in the AVON Network guide. A member of the Age Action Alliance is also a member of the AdvisoryCommittee for Project ACE.
Impact The partnership has led to a number of knowledge exchange activities. We are currently working towards submitting a grant application for the ESRC funded Knowledge Exchange opportunities scheme. The Age Action Alliance is a network which brings together organisations and older people, in partnership. Drawn from civil society and the public and private sectors, it takes a positive approach to ageing and seeks practical ways to improve services and support to older people. Members bring their distinctive skills to work collaboratively, achieving more in partnership than they can as individual organisations or sectors. Our focus is on the most disadvantaged and preventing exclusion and deprivation in later life.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Active People: Promoting Healthy Life Expectancy. Health Integration Team 
Organisation Bristol Health Partners
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaborators include: HIT director: Professor Selena Gray, Professor of Public Health, UWE Bristol •HIT director: Dr Afroditi Stathi, Senior Lecturer in Physical Activity, Ageing and Health, University of Bath •Dr Kelechi Nnoaham, Interim Director of Public Health, Bristol City Council •Claire Lowman, Active Bristol Lead, Bristol City Council •Professor Yoav Ben Shlomo, University of Bristol •Dr Ulrich Freudenstein, Research Liaison and board member, Bristol Clinical Commissioning Group •A lay member Other collaborators include: •Dr Kyra Neubauer, Consultant Geriatrician, North Bristol NHS Trust •Dr Pamela Akerman, Health Improvement Consultant, Avon, Gloucestershire & Wiltshire Centre, Public Health England •Dr Fiona Cramp, Associate Professor in Musculoskeletal Health & Director of Postgraduate Research Studies, UWE •Dr Kiron Chatterjee, Associate Professor in Travel Behaviour, UWE •Mark Davis, independent researcher in physical activity •Dr Chris Dyer, Consultant Geriatrician, Royal United Hospital, Bath •Dr Marcus Grant and Dr Adrian Davis, Co-Directors of SHINE HIT •Professor Ken Fox, Emeritus Professor of Exercise and Health, University of Bristol •Dr Bruce Laurence, Director of Public Health, Bath and North East Somerset Council •Professor Robin Means, President of the British Gerontological Society & Professor of Health and Social Care, UWE •Professor Graham Parkhurst, Professor of Sustainable Mobility, UWE •Dr Keith Stokes, Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology, University of Bath •Dr Nicola Walsh, Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, UWE
Collaborator Contribution The Improving Health in Later Life HIT's research includes looking at current interventions to encourage older people to exercise, what data is currently available and which interventions work both locally and elsewhere. Key contributions made by the research team and the partners include: •A comprehensive review of the existing provision for promoting physical activity in older people •A comprehensive review of the existing provision of educational programmes targeting public and community groups •A critical review of the evidence base for the existing provision •A review of existing local data sources, for example local government quality of life surveys •Partnerships with third sector and commercial organisations to address emerging issues and uncertainties in the field •Identification of key interventions with commissioners and partner organisations •Development of implementation and monitoring plan for key interventions •Submission of collaborative research proposals to the National Institute of Health Research
Impact No outputs or outcomes yet. The HIT team started their activities in 2014. Outputs/outcomes are expected to result after 2017.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Active People: Promoting Healthy Life Expectancy. Health Integration Team 
Organisation University of Bath
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaborators include: HIT director: Professor Selena Gray, Professor of Public Health, UWE Bristol •HIT director: Dr Afroditi Stathi, Senior Lecturer in Physical Activity, Ageing and Health, University of Bath •Dr Kelechi Nnoaham, Interim Director of Public Health, Bristol City Council •Claire Lowman, Active Bristol Lead, Bristol City Council •Professor Yoav Ben Shlomo, University of Bristol •Dr Ulrich Freudenstein, Research Liaison and board member, Bristol Clinical Commissioning Group •A lay member Other collaborators include: •Dr Kyra Neubauer, Consultant Geriatrician, North Bristol NHS Trust •Dr Pamela Akerman, Health Improvement Consultant, Avon, Gloucestershire & Wiltshire Centre, Public Health England •Dr Fiona Cramp, Associate Professor in Musculoskeletal Health & Director of Postgraduate Research Studies, UWE •Dr Kiron Chatterjee, Associate Professor in Travel Behaviour, UWE •Mark Davis, independent researcher in physical activity •Dr Chris Dyer, Consultant Geriatrician, Royal United Hospital, Bath •Dr Marcus Grant and Dr Adrian Davis, Co-Directors of SHINE HIT •Professor Ken Fox, Emeritus Professor of Exercise and Health, University of Bristol •Dr Bruce Laurence, Director of Public Health, Bath and North East Somerset Council •Professor Robin Means, President of the British Gerontological Society & Professor of Health and Social Care, UWE •Professor Graham Parkhurst, Professor of Sustainable Mobility, UWE •Dr Keith Stokes, Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology, University of Bath •Dr Nicola Walsh, Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, UWE
Collaborator Contribution The Improving Health in Later Life HIT's research includes looking at current interventions to encourage older people to exercise, what data is currently available and which interventions work both locally and elsewhere. Key contributions made by the research team and the partners include: •A comprehensive review of the existing provision for promoting physical activity in older people •A comprehensive review of the existing provision of educational programmes targeting public and community groups •A critical review of the evidence base for the existing provision •A review of existing local data sources, for example local government quality of life surveys •Partnerships with third sector and commercial organisations to address emerging issues and uncertainties in the field •Identification of key interventions with commissioners and partner organisations •Development of implementation and monitoring plan for key interventions •Submission of collaborative research proposals to the National Institute of Health Research
Impact No outputs or outcomes yet. The HIT team started their activities in 2014. Outputs/outcomes are expected to result after 2017.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Active People: Promoting Healthy Life Expectancy. Health Integration Team 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaborators include: HIT director: Professor Selena Gray, Professor of Public Health, UWE Bristol •HIT director: Dr Afroditi Stathi, Senior Lecturer in Physical Activity, Ageing and Health, University of Bath •Dr Kelechi Nnoaham, Interim Director of Public Health, Bristol City Council •Claire Lowman, Active Bristol Lead, Bristol City Council •Professor Yoav Ben Shlomo, University of Bristol •Dr Ulrich Freudenstein, Research Liaison and board member, Bristol Clinical Commissioning Group •A lay member Other collaborators include: •Dr Kyra Neubauer, Consultant Geriatrician, North Bristol NHS Trust •Dr Pamela Akerman, Health Improvement Consultant, Avon, Gloucestershire & Wiltshire Centre, Public Health England •Dr Fiona Cramp, Associate Professor in Musculoskeletal Health & Director of Postgraduate Research Studies, UWE •Dr Kiron Chatterjee, Associate Professor in Travel Behaviour, UWE •Mark Davis, independent researcher in physical activity •Dr Chris Dyer, Consultant Geriatrician, Royal United Hospital, Bath •Dr Marcus Grant and Dr Adrian Davis, Co-Directors of SHINE HIT •Professor Ken Fox, Emeritus Professor of Exercise and Health, University of Bristol •Dr Bruce Laurence, Director of Public Health, Bath and North East Somerset Council •Professor Robin Means, President of the British Gerontological Society & Professor of Health and Social Care, UWE •Professor Graham Parkhurst, Professor of Sustainable Mobility, UWE •Dr Keith Stokes, Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology, University of Bath •Dr Nicola Walsh, Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, UWE
Collaborator Contribution The Improving Health in Later Life HIT's research includes looking at current interventions to encourage older people to exercise, what data is currently available and which interventions work both locally and elsewhere. Key contributions made by the research team and the partners include: •A comprehensive review of the existing provision for promoting physical activity in older people •A comprehensive review of the existing provision of educational programmes targeting public and community groups •A critical review of the evidence base for the existing provision •A review of existing local data sources, for example local government quality of life surveys •Partnerships with third sector and commercial organisations to address emerging issues and uncertainties in the field •Identification of key interventions with commissioners and partner organisations •Development of implementation and monitoring plan for key interventions •Submission of collaborative research proposals to the National Institute of Health Research
Impact No outputs or outcomes yet. The HIT team started their activities in 2014. Outputs/outcomes are expected to result after 2017.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Active People: Promoting Healthy Life Expectancy. Health Integration Team 
Organisation University of the West of England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaborators include: HIT director: Professor Selena Gray, Professor of Public Health, UWE Bristol •HIT director: Dr Afroditi Stathi, Senior Lecturer in Physical Activity, Ageing and Health, University of Bath •Dr Kelechi Nnoaham, Interim Director of Public Health, Bristol City Council •Claire Lowman, Active Bristol Lead, Bristol City Council •Professor Yoav Ben Shlomo, University of Bristol •Dr Ulrich Freudenstein, Research Liaison and board member, Bristol Clinical Commissioning Group •A lay member Other collaborators include: •Dr Kyra Neubauer, Consultant Geriatrician, North Bristol NHS Trust •Dr Pamela Akerman, Health Improvement Consultant, Avon, Gloucestershire & Wiltshire Centre, Public Health England •Dr Fiona Cramp, Associate Professor in Musculoskeletal Health & Director of Postgraduate Research Studies, UWE •Dr Kiron Chatterjee, Associate Professor in Travel Behaviour, UWE •Mark Davis, independent researcher in physical activity •Dr Chris Dyer, Consultant Geriatrician, Royal United Hospital, Bath •Dr Marcus Grant and Dr Adrian Davis, Co-Directors of SHINE HIT •Professor Ken Fox, Emeritus Professor of Exercise and Health, University of Bristol •Dr Bruce Laurence, Director of Public Health, Bath and North East Somerset Council •Professor Robin Means, President of the British Gerontological Society & Professor of Health and Social Care, UWE •Professor Graham Parkhurst, Professor of Sustainable Mobility, UWE •Dr Keith Stokes, Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology, University of Bath •Dr Nicola Walsh, Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation, UWE
Collaborator Contribution The Improving Health in Later Life HIT's research includes looking at current interventions to encourage older people to exercise, what data is currently available and which interventions work both locally and elsewhere. Key contributions made by the research team and the partners include: •A comprehensive review of the existing provision for promoting physical activity in older people •A comprehensive review of the existing provision of educational programmes targeting public and community groups •A critical review of the evidence base for the existing provision •A review of existing local data sources, for example local government quality of life surveys •Partnerships with third sector and commercial organisations to address emerging issues and uncertainties in the field •Identification of key interventions with commissioners and partner organisations •Development of implementation and monitoring plan for key interventions •Submission of collaborative research proposals to the National Institute of Health Research
Impact No outputs or outcomes yet. The HIT team started their activities in 2014. Outputs/outcomes are expected to result after 2017.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with Prof Sherrington (and colleagues) at the Active Ageing and Health theme lead at the world-renowned Institute of Musculoskeletal Ageing, University of Sydney 
Organisation University of Sydney
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The preparation of a successful collaborative grant application, delivery of three invited seminars and one workshop on public engagement with research and meetings with colleagues from the School of Public Health. These activities have resulted in a successful grant application (see Further Funding section), a co-authored publication (in preparation), and an invited visit by Prof Stamatakis of the University of Birmingham.
Collaborator Contribution Leading the preparation of a successful collaborative grant application, facilitating of delivery of three seminars by Dr Stathi and one workshop on public engagement. Hosting research and meetings with colleagues from the School of Public Health. These activities have resulted in a successful grant application (see Further Funding section), a co-authored publication (in preparation)
Impact A successful grant application (see Further funding section) to fund a peer-volunteer support to promote participation in group-based fall prevention exercise: multi-stakeholder and end-user consultation to adapt the UK ACE model for Australia. Chief Investigator: Anne, Tiedemann, University of Sydney).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Partnership with Bristol Health Partners: Implementing Project ACE in Bristol 
Organisation Bristol Health Partners
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I lead the implementation of Project ACE in selected areas in Bristol. I will provide the training and the evaluation of this programme.
Collaborator Contribution Bristol Health Partners have kindly provided the financial support to deliver Project ACE in selected communities.
Impact This study will commence in April 2017. The expected outputs include publications/reports in relation to the outcomes of this study; presentations at local events about the implementation of the programme in Bristol; inclusion of the above outputs as evidence for the development of the Impact Case Study which the Chief Investigator will submit in REF2021.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Partnership with St Monica Trust: Implementing Project ACE in Bristol 
Organisation ST Monica Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I will lead the implementation of Project ACE in diverse communities in Bristol. I will lead the training and evaluation activities.
Collaborator Contribution Financial and in kind support
Impact This study will commence in September 2017. The expected outputs include publications/reports in relation to the outcomes of this study; presentations at local events about the implementation of the programme in Bristol; inclusion of the above outputs as evidence for the development of the Impact Case Study which the Chief Investigator will submit in REF2021.
Start Year 2017
 
Description AGE UK - Brunel Care 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions about the feasibility of volunteering as a way of promoting active ageing in the community.

At the end of the presentation, members of AGE UK Bristol asked for more information about Project ACE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description AGE UK annual conference, London, 19th October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact More than 300 delegated attended my invited talk "Every step matters" during the Annual Conference of the Age UK organisation. The talk focussed on implementation of the REACT and ACE programmes to community settings. It sparked several questions and many organisations approached me after the session to get more information about the REACT study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006
URL http://www.ageuk.org.uk/professional-resources-home/conferences/its-never-too-late/
 
Description Active Ageing presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Postgraduate students at the School for Sport and Exercise Sciences attended a day conference dedicated to research on physical activity promotion.

Several students asked for measures and protocols we have used in our ageing and physical activity studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Celebrating Age Festival, Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Workshop Facilitator
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact During the Celebrating Age Festival (June 2012 in Bristol) we held and Exhibition stand (jointly with University of Bristol).

This activity led to an increased number of inquiries of potential participants in Project ACE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Expert network+ Active Ageing Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Workshop Facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Expert network+ Active Ageing Conference, 1212, Aix-en-Provence, France.
2hr workshop - ACE- Increasing activity and social engagement amongst older adults.

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description GULP lecture series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk was very well attended and sparked questions and discussions at the end of the presentation.

After my talk, several people of the audience wanted more information about initiatives in their local communities and they expressed their inspiration in listening that just leaving home once a day can contribute to good levels of physical activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bristolhealthpartners.org.uk/latest-news/ageing-well-lecture-26-february/
 
Description Opening keynote "Every step matters. It is never too late for active ageing". 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Afroditi Stathi was Invited to deliver the opening keynote of the 26th International Congress of Physical Education and Sports, Greece, 18-20 May: Title: "Every step matters. It is never too late for active ageing".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to a cross-sector event: ELEVATE - The UK's first cross-sector event in health, performance and physical activity. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited talk: Designing and implementing peer-volunteering initiatives for inactive older adults. Project ACE.

Approximately 50 people attended this talk which sparked questions and discussion afterwards. Since then, several organisations have approached me to discuss the wider implementation of Project ACE in UK
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.elevatearena.com/speakers/afroditi-stathi
 
Description Radio Interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview with Ben McGrail at BBC Somerset radio on promotion of active ageing

The radio interview generated some interest for Project ACE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00yy730
 
Description Radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview on promotion of healthy and active ageing. It generated interest from people who wanted to know more about Project ACE and the recruitment process.

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio Bristol Interview 21/05/12 Bristol JW Interview Morning talk programme 5/10 minute interview. Overview of ACE
This was and invited interview by Radio Bristol to provide an overview of project ACE.


n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Symposium at the World Congress on Aging and Physical Activity, Glasgow 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact 40 people attended the symposium with the title: Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing Daily Activity in Older Age

No notable impact. I had some good discussions with colleagues about future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012