External Collaboration, Innovation and Entrepreneurism: Translational Medicine in Exeter (EXCITEME)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Exeter

Abstract

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

Technical Summary

The MRC Proximity to Discovery scheme awards universities funds to help develop new collaborations, and ways of exchanging knowledge and skills.  The awards can be used to support activities that promote the value of academic-industry partnership, and enhance academic and industry researchers’ understanding of each other’s needs and capabilities.  This may be through people exchanges, creation of technology demonstrators, showcase events, commercialisation workshops and ‘entrepreneurs in residence’ schemes.  Such exchanges of knowledge and skills will boost the most fruitful collaborations between UK universities and life science companies.
 
Description 'Defining the decline in endogenous insulin secretion in Type 1 diabetes diagnosed after 30 years of age (DROPLeT study)'
Amount $14,968,199 (USD)
Organisation Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2020 
End 07/2024
 
Description Australian National Health and Medical Research Council - Development of new therapies for COPD, Project Grant
Amount $886,503 (AUD)
Organisation National Health and Medical Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Australia
Start  
 
Description Deciphering the molecular mechanism of Wnt trafficking in gastric cancer
Amount £546,665 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/S007970/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2019 
End 03/2022
 
Description Development of CRISPR-Cas for drug target validation. (Hetheridge, Winter, Ball, Ono, Schlopp, Tyler)
Amount £619,000 (GBP)
Organisation AstraZeneca 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 04/2022
 
Description Engineering Galleria Mellonella as a model for infection, immunity and inflammation
Amount £386,493 (GBP)
Funding ID NC/T001518/1 
Organisation National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 02/2022
 
Description Evaluating the protective role of a novel mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulphide donor molecule (AP39) against ischemic reperfusion injury in human donation after cardiac death renal transplantation, Project Grant
Amount $162,500 (CAD)
Organisation PSI Foundation 
Sector Academic/University
Country Canada
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2020
 
Description External Collaboration, Innovation and Entrepreneurism: Translational Medicine in Exeter 2 (EXCITEME2)
Amount £24,445 (GBP)
Funding ID MC_PC_17189 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 09/2019
 
Description Fundamental Sciences & Surgical Innovation - The effect of hydrogen sulphide cream on recovery from acute frostbite injury.
Amount £9,539 (GBP)
Organisation Western University 
Sector Academic/University
Country Canada
Start  
 
Description Harnessing academic innovation for the industrial application of CRISPR-Cas technology in the zebrafish, (Winter).
Amount £27,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Royal Society 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 06/2021
 
Description ISSF Seed Corn funding
Amount £8,550 (GBP)
Organisation University of Exeter 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description In-vitro effect of antibiotic loaded bone void filler (Genex) on biofilm formation of bacteria associated with trauma infections
Amount £106,000 (GBP)
Organisation Biocomposites 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description International [space station] C.elegans experiment-2 (space flight-induced muscle wasting)
Amount £481,212 (GBP)
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Make My Day Better Foundation
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Midlands ICURe award
Amount £47,000 (GBP)
Funding ID A multidimensional screening platform for combinatorial drug target discovery 
Organisation ICURE Pharm 
Sector Private
Country Korea, Republic of
Start 07/2020 
End 07/2022
 
Description PhD Studentship
Amount £60,000 (GBP)
Organisation Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Pilot study for application of CRISPR-Cas to drug target validation using zebrafish. (Hetheridge, Winter, Ball, Ono, Schlopp, Tyler)
Amount £45,000 (GBP)
Organisation AstraZeneca 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 04/2021
 
Description Research Equipment Capital Fund Scheme
Amount £166,761 (GBP)
Organisation University of Exeter 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation
Amount $200,000 (USD)
Organisation United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 04/2020 
End 02/2022
 
Description mrc
Amount £572,000 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/V009583/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 03/2022
 
Title Activity Informatics Service - https://www.activinsights.com/services/activity-informatics/ 
Description Activity Informatics Service - https://www.activinsights.com/services/activity-informatics/ 
Type Of Material Physiological assessment or outcome measure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Activity Informatics Service - https://www.activinsights.com/services/activity-informatics/ 
 
Title Developing an in-vitro model in bovine tissue of mechanisms involved in the delivery of oxygen from blood to tissue. 
Description Developing an in-vitro model in bovine tissue of mechanisms involved in the delivery of oxygen from blood to tissue. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - in vitro 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Still active 
 
Title Purchase of the Acquifer advanced plate imager 
Description Purchase of the Acquifer advanced plate imager (£150,000), the first of its kind in the UK. Purchase included industry support (AstraZeneca £25,000 and Ditabis £35,000). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Purchase of the Acquifer advanced plate imager (£150,000), the first of its kind in the UK. Purchase included industry support (AstraZeneca £25,000 and Ditabis £35,000). 
 
Title Research & Development Galleria mellonella breeding colony established 
Description The group have successfully established an R&D Galleria breeding colony, stably generating embryos every two weeks. Larval transfer has been established from the R&D breeding such that early stage embryos (between 0 - 3 hours post fertilisation) could be collected for observation. Interestingly, observation of embryonic development has identified the Galleria developmental window that can be used to inject exogenous DNA constructs. Additionally the group have developed several key protocols including reproducible imaging; antibody and fluorescent dye fixing/staining; microinjection; and transferring and hatching microinjected embryos. Dr Wakefield can also confirm feasibility of generating a transgenic line of TruLarv. Dr Wakefield's laboratory is now one of only a few in the world to have developed methods to reliably inject Galleria embryos 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - non-mammalian in vivo 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact There is already a very well established protocol for generating transgenic / genome-edited Drosophila, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system; however the successful delivery of the project objectives can now provide the stepping-stone needed to explore the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to genetically engineering Galleria 
 
Title Collection of RNA-seq data for 6 compounds (PI - BC) 
Description Collection of RNA-seq data for 6 compounds which will be made publicly accessible after publication of results 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact TBC 
 
Title Collection of RNA-seq data for 6 compounds now available on NCBI GEO (GSE149611 ) 
Description Project- Mechanisms of therapeutic benefit and harm underpinning compounds used for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Collection of RNA-seq data for 6 compounds now available on NCBI GEO (GSE149611 ) 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Collection of RNA-seq data for 6 compounds now available on NCBI GEO (GSE149611 ) 
 
Title Developing an algorithm to adjust for the storage of oxygen in myoglobin in muscle when using commercially available optical techniques to monitor tissue oxygenation in humans. 
Description Developing an algorithm to adjust for the storage of oxygen in myoglobin in muscle when using commercially available optical techniques to monitor tissue oxygenation in humans. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Still active 
 
Description Can mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulfide donors restore normal cellular bioenergetics in primary mitochondrial diseases (PMD)? 
Organisation Isca Biochemicals Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution P2D contribution: Chemicals required to manufacturer the test molecules e.g. synthesis costs of starting reagents. Staff - 1.5 months full-time salary is requested for a post-doctoral chemist to synthesise the compounds needed for all the experiments as they are not retrievable once inside worms or in culture media. Training in peptide chemistry will upskill our chemist, providing valuable knowledge exchange into our team, and will allow the creation of a further test therapy, widening our pipeline and strengthening our IP position. UoE in-kind contribution: C.elegans are a powerful tool for drug research and development and consequently have been established as pre-clinical models used by the Pharma industry. Facilities to conduct this work have recently been introduced to the St. Luke's Campus (Dr. Tim Etheridge's laboratory, Sports & Health Sciences). Dr Etheridge will be providing his time as match, as will Prof. Whiteman. Additionally, existing grant funds currently supporting the chemist will partially offset compound synthesis costs required to enable provision of test materials for this project.
Collaborator Contribution ISCA Biochemicals will provide the peptide backbone and training in solid phase chemistry for our chemist and provide considerable and invaluable in-kind costs (i.e. "value added"; £59,000 in-kind contribution). Direct Contribution: ISCA Biochemicals will provide peptide synthetic resources from our locally-based laboratories in Exeter. This will include synthesis, cleavage, purification by HPLC, freeze-drying and analysis of peptide-based products which will direct cargo chemical entities towards the host mitochondria. Varied synthetic and conjugation techniques and associated equipment (Analytical and Preparative HPLC, Freeze drying, INTAVIS synthesisers) will be put at the disposal of the project and its participants. We anticipate a number of peptides will be required in the 1g-2g synthetic scale with associated conjugations which would be expected to cost in excess of £30,000 (waived) if delivered on a commercial basis. This would be part of our ongoing collaboration within the framework of an existing MTA agreement. Indirect Contribution: Solid phase peptide synthesis requires a unique skill set of highly trained individuals. As such, we ISCA Biochemicals will offer training to the projects' chemist to allow them to be able to acquire the knowledge to synthesise and analyse peptides through a variety of chemistries including the use of solid-phase Fmoc manual techniques. Complete training to allow expertise in these techniques, as opposed to just competency in the process, that can be transferred to other labs (e.g. the chemist's future career) will take approximately 30 days of dedicated laboratory training. ISCA Biochemicals typically charge £300 per day to train individuals, thus we will contribute ~£9,000 (waived) in indirect training costs to this project. Consultancy will also be provided to ensure that appropriate peptide-based entities are synthesised and conjugated with ease of synthesis and application properly considered. Additionally, the peptide synthesis work requires access to interpretation of mass analysis, HPLC etc. that, for comparable work, we typically charge £1,000 for rent and maintenance combined. This project will require at least 8 weeks of use of our facilities and 8 days of dedicated consultancy, therefore, we ISCA Biochemicals will contribute a minimum of £8,000 (waived) in facilities access during this work and contribute at least £4,000 (waived) in consultancy fees towards this research programme. Added value to the project from Isca Biochemicals involvement: Involvement in this project will augment the project in several ways. Firstly, Isca Biochemicals will provide expert training to the chemist in solid phase peptide synthesis, placing them at the forefront of this field and providing key, transferable skills to improve future employability. Secondly, by providing a peptide backbone for a novel mitochondrial-targeting H2S compound, our involvement permits additional mechanistic knowledge, and also further information on the potential efficacy of H2S as a viable therapeutic (i.e. by assessing the utility of alternate mitochondrial delivery routes). Finally, Isca Biochemicals' involvement will maximise the impact arising from this project, since they will provide tangible guidance for compound exploitation of new drug applications into the commercial market.
Impact The activities to date has centred on two themes: i) examining AP39 as a therapeutic for mitochondrial disease and, ii) investigating AP39 as a treatment against sever oxidative stress (as a co-factor in mitochondrial disease). Key results/milestones to date are: 1. Mitochondria-targeted H2S improves the survival and increases the movement rate of animals treated with a severe oxidative insult (paraquat). 2. Samples are collected and awaiting further molecular analyses to probe the mechanisms of improved survival and functional recovery following Mitochondria-targeted H2S treatment during oxidative stress. 3. Characterisation studies of 4 mitochondrial mutants identified two primary mitochondrial mutations that show reduced lifespan and lower movement early on in life (day 2 and 3 of adulthood). 4. Mitochondria-targeted H2S recovers movement defects on day 2 and 3 of adulthood in these 2 functionally impaired mitochondrial mutants. The outputs of this project to date are: 1. Submission and award of a UK Space Agency grant (Etheridge and Whiteman Co-I's; University of Notting as PI) to study hydrogen sulfide as a treatment against mitochondrially-mediated muscle decline during spaceflight: ~£480,000. Funded. 2. The PDRA has been trained in numerous methodologies associated with experimenting and assessing worm lifespan and healthspan, and in performing worm drug screens. 3. The potential IP of Mitochondria-targeted H2S has been advance as improving health in mitochondrial myopathies and in conditions or severe oxidative stress. 4. Generated data towards 2 manuscripts within 6-12 months (i.e. efficacy of AP39 for treating primary mitochondrial disease and oxidative stress). 5. Several research grants (funded) where the use of the compounds developed in this project have been directly applied.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Developing G. mellonella as a model organism to test the in vivo activity of antimicrobial drugs 
Organisation BioSystems Technology Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae are a widely-used model organism for studying the efficacy of antibiotics and antifungal agents. The Industrial partner, Biosystems Technology, produces research grade larvae (TruLarv); a gold standard in the field. Infection is currently assessed over 5 days, through a body colour difference ("melanisation") and/or survival rate. Transgenic Galleria larvae that express GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) within hours of infection would revolutionise their efficacy as a model organism. The first step towards this, and the Aim of this project, is to establish a procedure for stably incorporating foreign genes into Galleria.
Collaborator Contribution BioSystems Technology will fund the salary costs of a Post Doctoral researcher from the company's R&D team who will be based in the laboratory of James Wakefield 0.5 FTE for 6 months. They will also cover the full costs associated with the consumables and equipment required for setting up and maintaining the G.mellonella breeding facility for the 12 month project.
Impact The group have successfully established an R&D Galleria breeding colony, stably generating embryos every two weeks. Larval transfer has been established from the R&D breeding such that early stage embryos (between 0 - 3 hours post fertilisation) could be collected for observation. Interestingly, observation of embryonic development has identified the Galleria developmental window that can be used to inject exogenous DNA constructs. Additionally the group have developed several key protocols including reproducible imaging; antibody and fluorescent dye fixing/staining; microinjection; and transferring and hatching microinjected embryos. Dr Wakefield can also confirm feasibility of generating a transgenic line of TruLarv. Dr Wakefield's laboratory is now one of only a few in the world to have developed methods to reliably inject Galleria embryos, owing to the knowledge transfer between the two parties in this P2D. There is already a very well established protocol for generating transgenic / genome-edited Drosophila, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system; however the successful delivery of the project objectives can now provide the stepping-stone needed to explore the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to genetically engineering Galleria. A PhD student in Dr Wakefield's laboratory will work closely with BST to take this project forwards, beyond the P2D. Dr Wakefield has since secured a PhD studentship with DSTL and has applied for further funding from Innovate (with BST) and NC3Rs (see section 5 for further details).
Start Year 2017
 
Description Development and Validation of a Universal Spectroscopic Device Calibrator for the Assessment of Tissue Oxygenation (VUSCATO) 
Organisation Moor Instruments Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The proposed activity is to develop a robust method of validating non-invasive optical techniques that monitor oxygenation levels in humans. For 50 years techniques such as near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) have significantly advanced our understanding of oxygen delivery to tissue and the dysfunction that occurs in pathological conditions. However the translation of these methods into clinical practice has been limited, in part due to lack of calibration protocols. Poor perfusion of oxygen has been implicated in the complications of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. Progressing these non-invasive techniques from bench to bedside will potentially reduce the financial burden of these conditions on the NHS.
Collaborator Contribution In kind contributions will be provided by Moor Instruments to cover the lease costs of the moorVMS-NIRS and moorVMS-OXY for 9 months along with technical support and consumable costs, including probes, associated with the study. The College will contribute to the academic time (including the estates and indirect costs) for 9 months for the proposed project.
Impact Key milestones accomplished: • Protocol established for in-vitro experiments in bovine tissue to mimic pathological changes in in the oxygen content of skin and muscle. This paves the way for future studies to enhance our understanding of both health and diseased states in the microcirculation. • Methods developed for the incremental deoxygenating of blood through bubbled nitrogen an sequential addition of sodium dithionite (sodium hydrosulfite, Na2S2O4). • Fourteen physiological studies completed on cow tails. • Results provide vital novel data on the need to incorporate myoglobin into commercial algorithms to derive an accurate measure of tissue oxygenation. • These results will feed into the development of a universal spectroscopic device calibrator by Moor Instruments. • The novel hypotheses derived in these studies will be published in both scientific and physiological journals. Project Outcome Non-invasive optical techniques that can monitor the oxygen content of human tissue play a vital role in the clinical arena. Moor Instruments consistently develop such innovative medical and research tools but an understanding of the physiology behind these parameters is incomplete. This research will enable Moor Instruments to optimise their algorithms to provide more accurate measures of tissue oxygenation and to progress with the development of a universal spectroscopic device calibrator. Future Research This novel in-vitro protocol will provide a springboard for new studies into the fundamental relationship between tissue perfusion and tissue delivery to tissue. New pO2 electrodes will be built to study the relationship between the oxygen content directly in muscle with the oxygen content in the blood as derived by the improved algorithms in the Moor Instrument instrumentation. Analysis of existing spectroscopic data in skin and muscle collected from 400 subjects will provide further insight into the transport of oxygen to tissue via haemoglobin and myoglobin.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Development of a high-throughput multiplex screening platform for drug discovery 
Organisation SPT Labtech
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution From the P2D fund, we request salary for a researcher to perform the work (100% FTE, PDRA F32 = £15,224). This project requires well developed molecular biology skills and so an experienced researcher is required. In addition, we request £500 for travel to meet with TTP Labtech during the project and £9276 for consumables (£2140 for additional tips for the mosquito, £1000 for cytometry consumables, £2500 for cell culture reagents and £4136 for the synthesis of new shRNA reagents for the proof of principle screen). From the college, we request salary for the PI and associated overheads for both the PI and PDRA. In addition, the college will provide a Multidrop Combi nL liquid dispenser
Collaborator Contribution TTP Labtech will provide a mosquito HTS liquid handling robot for use in this project (rental costs, warranty and installation). Consumables for the use of this equipment will also be provided. TTP Labtech will provide onsite training to UoE staff on the equipment. TTP will act in an advisory capacity offering FTE time to consult on the project, ultimately leading to assay design and potential higher throughput liquid handling equipment when the project advances.
Impact As described in the original workplan, the two key steps in the project were: Step 1: To establish optimised protocols for multiplex VDA assays (months 1-2) Step 2: To perform a small proof-of-principle screen using the automated platform (months 3-4) Step 1 was completed successfully. Specifically, we performed a range of experiments to optimise the transfection conditions to maximise screen signal and minimise cellular toxicity. This was very successful and we have improved all aspects of screen outputs following these experiments. In addition, we used the mosquito robot to miniaturise the transfection process. We encountered several challenges during this process due to evaporation of small reagent volumes but overcame these following suggestions from TTP Labtech. Based on completion of this step, we are now able to perform screens using 90% less reagent per sample, which leads to a clear cost saving. In addition, data quality from the screens is improved due to the optimised transfection conditions. Step 2 was initiated later than planned due to the challenges encountered during step 1. Nevertheless, we successfully generated a new library of shRNA reagents targeting previously characterised genes. We then used this library to test the new methods for screening that we developed in step 1. Our first attempt at this proof-of-concept screen failed due to technical issues which we overcame with advice from TTP Labtech. Our second attempt was successful and demonstrated robust screen results. We will now continue to test the new screening methods by performing additional screens with the new reagent library. This will serve to test the reproducibility of results between screens using the new methods and will result in a publishable body of work. As a result of this project, the relationship with TTP Labtech has developed into a longer term project to continue the work funded by the P2D award. For example, TTP Labtech is a project partner on a funding application submitted to UKRI. In addition, TTP Labtech have agreed to continue the loan of the mosquito as well as additional liquid handling systems for the next 18 months. Finally, we have discussed the possibility of co-developing a new liquid handling platform following the successes of the P2D project. Key outputs: 1. Funding application for a Future Leaders Fellowship from UKRI with TTP Labtech and Distant Futures as project partners (£1m) 2. Funding application for a Prosperity Partnership award from EPSRC with Distant Futures as a partner (£6.6m) 3. A postdoc in my group has gained significant experience in molecular biology through the optimisation experiments as well as skills in automation 4. I have strengthened my relationship with TTP Labtech and initiated a larger follow-on project including TTP Labtech and Distant Futures. 5. Following additional replicate screens, we have accumulated sufficient data for a high-impact publication reporting the development of the new multiplexed screening platform.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Dried Blood Spot C-peptide: Bringing endogenous insulin secretion testing to every clinic 
Organisation Roche Pharmaceuticals
Country Global 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Contribution from P2D fund: We are applying for the cost to cover a 0.5 lab technician for 3 months and also the cost of procuring a DBS blood spot punch. This is an essential piece of equipment for this project as it makes the blood spots for the assay. This equipment will be utilised beyond this project for the prospective research projects that will utilise this assay. This project is extremely good value for the University of Exeter as all the consumables are being offered in kind by the RDE and Roche Diagnostics. In addition, the state of the art COBAS lines required for the c-peptide measurement and technical and scientific expertise will be provided by the RDE and Roche. Contribution from UoE: The College will cover the time of Dr Tim McDonald and full economic costs of the bid. *In addition, UoE Innovation, Impact & Business will be providing £4580 to go towards the project.
Collaborator Contribution Roche Diagnostics have offered in kind funding for all the kits, calibration and QC material required to support the full evaluation of the C-peptide method. In total the evaluation will require between 10 and 15 kits at a cost of £715 per kit *£7150-£10725 plus ~£500 cal and QC. In addition, Roche have offered collaborative technical expertise for the project from their product specialists to help with the method development and troubleshooting analytical problems faced as the project progresses. The Academic department of clinical biochemistry is offering to accommodate the DBS punch and give dedicated bench space within the blood sciences department at the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS foundation Trust free of charge (normally charges at £200 per m2 per week). In addition we will have unrestricted access to the state of the art COBAS analytical lines to perform the C-peptide assays and plastic consumables, maintenance and overhead cost offered in kind (estimated £900). Because the blood sciences department recognises the mutual benefit of the project (a Senior biomedical scientist and Laboratory Manager) will both act as scientific and technical consultants on the project and will dedicate 1 session a week for three months (~3100). The RD&E will also cover the time of their personnel for the duration of the project.
Impact The aim of this project was to develop and validate a non-invasive Dried Blood Spot (DBS) C-peptide assay that can be used for regular assessment of beta cell function for both research and an NHS clinical service. Attainment: During this project the group have developed a protocol for a sensitive DBS C-peptide assay including: determining appropriate calibration material; establishing minimum eluent volume; optimal eluent buffer; precision of assay; limit of detection; linearity; comparison to peripheral blood (collection ongoing - NIHR CRF are recruiting up to 5 per week); and stability. Volunteers produced blood spots to be measured at the following time points: Day Zero (Baseline), day 3, 7, 10 and 14. Blood spot cards were left at ambient temperature (23-24 degrees) and punched and frozen prior to analysis. Crucially, the results from this work show that Dr McDonald's group have established the stability of blood spot C-peptide as 10 days. This makes it the most stable matrix for this test (blood 6-24 hours, urine 72 hours) and means samples can be collected and sent remotely by research participants/patients. Future impact: Beyond the findings in this P2D, the major output of this project will be a fully validated DBS C-peptide assay that is ready for rapid role out into prospective clinical research studies and potentially integrated into routine clinical practise. The partnership with both Roche and the NHS laboratory allows Dr McDonald's laboratory to embed research studies into diagnostic pipelines, utilising the same systems that would be used once the test becomes routine. This removes the translational barrier of engaging NHS diagnostic infrastructure and expedites adoption by clinicians and healthcare professionals, as seen with the successful implementation of the urine C-peptide and monogenic testing. Once this tool is available to clinicians and clinical academics working in diabetes, new research questions can be addressed that were previously impossible with traditional measures of C-peptide. With the methodology developed, paired with the access to cutting-edge technology in (a new) partnership with a leading manufacturer, the group will be in a unique position to answer new questions about the biology of type 1 diabetes. The manufacturer are currently developing an assay with Dr McDonald's group for DBS eluent that is 1000x more sensitive than any existing assay, which will lead to a new service provision and product creation, and the associated generation of revenues for each party. Dr McDonald has since applied for JDRF funding ($150,000) to employ this methodology in longitudinal beta cell function in late onset type 1 diabetes.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Dried Blood Spot C-peptide: Bringing endogenous insulin secretion testing to every clinic 
Organisation Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital
Department Biochemistry and Immunology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Contribution from P2D fund: We are applying for the cost to cover a 0.5 lab technician for 3 months and also the cost of procuring a DBS blood spot punch. This is an essential piece of equipment for this project as it makes the blood spots for the assay. This equipment will be utilised beyond this project for the prospective research projects that will utilise this assay. This project is extremely good value for the University of Exeter as all the consumables are being offered in kind by the RDE and Roche Diagnostics. In addition, the state of the art COBAS lines required for the c-peptide measurement and technical and scientific expertise will be provided by the RDE and Roche. Contribution from UoE: The College will cover the time of Dr Tim McDonald and full economic costs of the bid. *In addition, UoE Innovation, Impact & Business will be providing £4580 to go towards the project.
Collaborator Contribution Roche Diagnostics have offered in kind funding for all the kits, calibration and QC material required to support the full evaluation of the C-peptide method. In total the evaluation will require between 10 and 15 kits at a cost of £715 per kit *£7150-£10725 plus ~£500 cal and QC. In addition, Roche have offered collaborative technical expertise for the project from their product specialists to help with the method development and troubleshooting analytical problems faced as the project progresses. The Academic department of clinical biochemistry is offering to accommodate the DBS punch and give dedicated bench space within the blood sciences department at the Royal Devon and Exeter NHS foundation Trust free of charge (normally charges at £200 per m2 per week). In addition we will have unrestricted access to the state of the art COBAS analytical lines to perform the C-peptide assays and plastic consumables, maintenance and overhead cost offered in kind (estimated £900). Because the blood sciences department recognises the mutual benefit of the project (a Senior biomedical scientist and Laboratory Manager) will both act as scientific and technical consultants on the project and will dedicate 1 session a week for three months (~3100). The RD&E will also cover the time of their personnel for the duration of the project.
Impact The aim of this project was to develop and validate a non-invasive Dried Blood Spot (DBS) C-peptide assay that can be used for regular assessment of beta cell function for both research and an NHS clinical service. Attainment: During this project the group have developed a protocol for a sensitive DBS C-peptide assay including: determining appropriate calibration material; establishing minimum eluent volume; optimal eluent buffer; precision of assay; limit of detection; linearity; comparison to peripheral blood (collection ongoing - NIHR CRF are recruiting up to 5 per week); and stability. Volunteers produced blood spots to be measured at the following time points: Day Zero (Baseline), day 3, 7, 10 and 14. Blood spot cards were left at ambient temperature (23-24 degrees) and punched and frozen prior to analysis. Crucially, the results from this work show that Dr McDonald's group have established the stability of blood spot C-peptide as 10 days. This makes it the most stable matrix for this test (blood 6-24 hours, urine 72 hours) and means samples can be collected and sent remotely by research participants/patients. Future impact: Beyond the findings in this P2D, the major output of this project will be a fully validated DBS C-peptide assay that is ready for rapid role out into prospective clinical research studies and potentially integrated into routine clinical practise. The partnership with both Roche and the NHS laboratory allows Dr McDonald's laboratory to embed research studies into diagnostic pipelines, utilising the same systems that would be used once the test becomes routine. This removes the translational barrier of engaging NHS diagnostic infrastructure and expedites adoption by clinicians and healthcare professionals, as seen with the successful implementation of the urine C-peptide and monogenic testing. Once this tool is available to clinicians and clinical academics working in diabetes, new research questions can be addressed that were previously impossible with traditional measures of C-peptide. With the methodology developed, paired with the access to cutting-edge technology in (a new) partnership with a leading manufacturer, the group will be in a unique position to answer new questions about the biology of type 1 diabetes. The manufacturer are currently developing an assay with Dr McDonald's group for DBS eluent that is 1000x more sensitive than any existing assay, which will lead to a new service provision and product creation, and the associated generation of revenues for each party. Dr McDonald has since applied for JDRF funding ($150,000) to employ this methodology in longitudinal beta cell function in late onset type 1 diabetes.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Evaluating the protective role of a novel mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulphide donor molecule (AP39) against ischemic reperfusion injury in human donation after cardiac death renal transplantation 
Organisation Western University
Department Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry Western Ontario
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Kidney failure is on the rise. Although kidney transplantation is the best manner in which to treat kidney failure, only a limited number of donor organs are available. To overcome this, centers have begun to transplant kidneys from donors after cardiac death (DCD). This involves the use of organs from donors whose hearts have stopped beating prior to donation. Unfortunately, these kidneys are very prone to injury that occurs as a result of the decreased blood flow and oxygen. This damage leads to increased organ rejection, and poor transplant kidney functions in patients. The investigators' demonstrated in animal models of kidney transplantation that the supplementation of organ preservation solutions with NaHS, a hydrogen sulphide (H2S) donor and a naturally occurring compound in all animals, leads to an impressive improvement in kidney function and recipient survival. The researchers propose to evaluate and understand the protective role of H2S using a novel H2S donor molecule (AP39) which targets the mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, in different clinically relevant DCD models which have been developed in the lab. These findings will not only enable future human clinical trials but will also play a role in improving existing organ preservation techniques and overall transplant kidney function and survival.
Collaborator Contribution TBC
Impact Still active
Start Year 2018
 
Description Exploring the Microbial Communities of Diabetic Foot Infections 
Organisation Biocomposites
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution DFU infections are often polymicrobial and whilst the main pathogens have been characterised, less is known about other components of these complex communities and their contribution to the disease process. In recent years an increase in the incidence of resistant strains has complicated the treatment of diabetic foot infections. Furthermore, many diabetic patients have impaired vascular perfusion and systemic antibiotic delivery to the wound site may not be adequate to clear the infection. Studies funded by Biocomposites using local release antibiotic loaded beads containing vancomyin and gentamicin have shown good results in the treatment of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. By improving diagnosis and treatment of infected DFUs it may be possible to prevent amputation, maintain mobility and conserve quality of life.
Collaborator Contribution Biocomposites will also be providing a supply of implant material, STIMULAN Rapid Cure as part of the project; This synthetic high purity calcium sulfate will be combined with a range of antibiotics and used throughout the project. Biocomposites will also provide training and advice at Exeter on the use of their products as part of the project, and share relevant information to ensure the project remains novel, and clinically relevant. Biocomposites will provide in-kind support for attendance to scientific conferences to present research findings.
Impact -Potential funding streams include an EME/NIHR bid. -Potential publications: • Microbial communities of diabetic foot infections This publication will have an emphasis on complex microbial ecology of diabetic foot infections and the difficulty in diagnosis. (Results arising from microbiological culture of tissue homogenates, identification using MALDI, 16S rRNA sequencing of tissue homogenates) • Effect of antibiotic loaded beads on microbial communities from diabetic foot infections - This publication will have an emphasis on difficulty of getting antibiotics to target site, advantages of local delivery. (Results arising from effect of beads on whole tissue homogenates, antibiograms of individual isolates, effect of beads on individual isolates) -Expertise gained: The project will have enabled Julie Fletcher to acquire the following skills and expertise: • Detailed microbiological culture of clinical specimens • Preparation of 16S rRNA libraries • Identification of clinical isolates using MALDI-TOF • Automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the VITEK 2 The antibiotic loaded Stimulan beads have an application in the treatment of diabetic foot infections and the knowledge gained in this project supports this. In addition the antibiotic loaded beads could also have an application in the treatment of: • other wound infections - pressure ulcers, burns, deep skin infections • diabetic foot osteomyelitis and other bone infections • periprosthetic joint infection Antibiotic loaded Stimulan beads could be used in the treatment of diabetic foot infections and diabetic foot osteomyelitis and this project will have provided information to support that application. Outcomes from future clinical trials and clinical use of antibiotic loaded Stimulan beads in the treatment of diabetic foot infections and diabetic foot osteomyelitis will provide a way of measuring translation success.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Mechanisms of therapeutic benefit and harm underpinning compounds used for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease 
Organisation Eli Lilly & Company Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution A dedicated research fellow is required to complete this work on a full time basis. We have chosen 7 compounds which are a priority for neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD. These cover a range of preclinical, in clinical trial, and currently used agents which are suitable to address the research questions around identifying mechanisms of harm and thus the identification of potential novel safe therapeutic targets in a project of this size. RNA-seq offers an unbiased method to determine gene expression changes and is therefore the most appropriate approach for examining changes associated with these compounds in AD where there is very little existing data. It is the gold standard approach and fast replacing microarray technology. Knowledge exchange and partnership development will be an important part of this project so funds have been requested to support travel between Exeter and Lilly for regular meetings on the project and importantly future development opportunities. Matched funding from the College will come from time commitments of all co-Is. The intellectual development of the project is shared between co-Is Creese and Ballard, with Dr Creese managing the overall delivery. Co-I Ballard is an expert in neuropsychiatry of dementia with close links to the pharmaceutical industry, he is well-placed to lead on the transition of this work into a full drug discovery programme. Co-Is Mill and Jeffries have a long-standing relationship with Lilly and have recently completed a project examining epigenetic changes induced by Lilly schizophrenia compounds. They are experts in RNA-seq and functional genomics and have advised on the technical aspects of project delivery. Co-I Whitfield is leading the laboratory work of the Wellcome Trust grant which is contributing resources to this project, he has been involved in the identification of the two compounds and their characterisation in 5xFAD mice. All co-Is will be involved in the analysis, interpretation and dissemination of the data. This project will use existing stocks of SH-5YSY cells and cell culture consumables held by Prof Mill's group. A contribution to costs will also be met from our Wellcome Trust grant. Planned work under this grant includes the RNA-seq profiling of the two compounds identified from that project. We can therefore achieve economies of scale by using funds from this grant to contribute towards salary for the Research Fellow's time and consumables for this application. The split is 2/3 P2D fund (as per costings) and 1/3 Wellcome Trust (additional contributions list below for information). Only the data from C1 and C2 will be shared between projects. The data will be used by each project in distinct ways (Wellcome for targeted changes associated with AD disease mechanisms and P2D for transcriptome-wide changes with a particular focus on off-target activity and neuropsychiatric symptoms). There are no IP or commercial issues with the use of the data in this way. Wellcome Trust grant contributions: Staff - Research Fellow - £4,984.65, Consumables - RNA-seq - £7,179.47; Compounds - £312.60
Collaborator Contribution In-kind time and provision of proprietary compounds by Lilly. We aim to rapidly generate proof of principle data which has immediate follow on potential for future funding. Eli Lilly consulting time is provided in kind, he has been involved in the development of this project and will continue to provide his expertise in drug discovery and functional genomics throughout, including the crucial task of translating of these findings into the next stages of drug development. Lilly will also provide meeting facilities at their research site in Windlesham.
Impact Dr Creese has undertaken all steps of the project up to RNA-seq. Due to significant delays with the sequencing service, complete data is expected in early December 2018. Once data is obtained, he expects to begin the planned bioinformatics analysis. Despite the funding having finished this project has led to 8 weeks of extra post-doc funding via a collaboration with Kew Gardens using a similar design so the planned analysis will be undertaken alongside this new project.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Pilot study for novel zebrafish nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) model 
Organisation AstraZeneca
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This is an interdisciplinary project, bringing together biological assessment of organ specific responses, analytical chemistry to understand uptake kinetics and a modeller to optimise image analysis/processing. All of this supported by industry based toxicology expert(s) and using a state-of -the -art imaging platform with extensive technical support. Most of the practical work will be undertaken by a research technician (30 days), but interpretation and AZ research proposals will require input from a senior research fellow (10 days). Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) is used to provide compound uptake analysis for each test compound (8 days). Data processing requires python scripts which will be developed by a Biosciences modeller (Jeremy Metz, 4 days) who will also provide data processing support as needed. There is one planned visit to AZ, Cambridge to disseminate the results from this pilot study. This is important as it not only provides important face-to-face time with a new scientific lead (and team) within AZ DSM, but it will also provide an opportunity to highlight other potential models for future consideration, to better understand AZ internal funding mechanisms (post-grad and post-doc research), and potentially to meet key stakeholders within DSM to consolidate our existing agreements. The College of Life and Environmental Sciences (CLES) has agreed to fund the PI time (Charles Tyler) and the University overheads as an in-kind contribution to the project
Collaborator Contribution An in-kind contribution is provided by the Acquifer manufacturer to provide technical support/knowhow, and AZ will provide in-kind support to guide test compound selection and to support interpretation of results. Technical leads within AZ DSM and within Acquifer (DITABIS) will provide in-kind support. This is significant as they have imaging and zebrafish specialists who will support all aspects of the proposed project. Importantly they are able to control the imaging platform remotely (when invited) to help with target organ analysis image optimisation. Also, Aqcuifer loan equipment at a a preferential rate as an additional in-kind contribution to the project.
Impact 13 compounds were analysed using the Acquifer imaging platform. The data was of a much higher standard in terms of reproducibility when compared to the 'manual' approach used to prepare the preliminary data. The Acquifer was also capable of time lapse to show response change over time, a novel feature of this equipment which impressed our AZ partners. Although the data was generally good for showing the main endpoint - severe glomerular filtration damage, ultimately it proved less able to show more subtle or related toxicological endpoints. It was therefore considered too 'niche' for use as an assay within the current kidney safety testing paradigm. The AZ partners did acknowledge that it could be used to test AZ projects where glomerular filtration was thought to be a specific problem and this led to the new discussions via Nicola Powles-Glover (mentioned in previous section). Another UoE academic evaluated the Acquifer whist on loan to us for this project. They are leading a bid for the purchase of this equipment (to be submitted December 2018), to provide HCS within his recent successful £750,000 MRC grant. There is an outstanding action to publish the results of this project. The data produced using the Acquifer was of better quality and more reproducible than the initial 'manual' approach which was used to generate the pre-pilot data. Therefore we now have a very good data set for 13 compounds. However, our AZ partners identified an area of improvement which could be made to the data set which should be addressed to improve the overall quality and allow publication in a high quality journal. We plan to undertake this work in Q1 2019 once existing work commitments are finished. Further outcomes: Funding of £25,000 has been provided by AZ to support purchase of imaging equipment. Funding of over £30,000 has been allocated by AZ for a new 4D-Brain project. Application for capital to purchase the Acquifer to be submitted early December. Discussions with AZ (planned for December and early 2019) to consider application of nephrotox assay developed here, and other zebrafish assays for use within a specific AZ project, (details currently business sensitive). Planned meeting with AZ to discuss potential new post-doc position.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Wrist-worn accelerometry for runners: Exploring features to optimise classification and quantification of training load, while streamlining data for inclusion in healthcare technologies to help prevent injury 
Organisation Activinsights
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Contribution from P2D Fund: A casual RA (£7500) will be responsible for carrying out data analysis and summarising the data outcomes for report writing. Travel (including parking permits) and accommodation for Research Meetings between Cardiff and Exeter and Leicester and Exeter (£530) will support a face-to-face research meeting in the early stages of the 15-week period to help confirm methods of analysis. Skype meetings will be used in the latter stages of the project to finalise the project reports and outputs. Activinsights will cover the cost of their travel to their meetings (£75). Funds for the purchase of a large capacity external hard-drive (consumables: £100) are required to facilitate ease of data transfer between various computers required for the analysis in addition to providing an additional back-up for repeated datasets. In-kind contributions from UoE college - staff time: Dr Vicky Stilesas a Senior Lecturer in Biomechanics (UoE) has expertise in the development of methods utilising objective monitoring of physical activity relevant to bone health, biomechanical analysis of human movement and knowledge of risk factors influencing the development of RRIs. As PI on the previous project, she is well-placed to continue leading this project which will further repurpose the use of activity monitor data to efficiently and accurately monitor training load in runners. Dr Stiles will be responsible for: the overall management of the project; supporting the RA to complete data analysis; working with the external partner to maximise the exchange of expertise with the collaborating partner; leading the writing of draft project outcomes/reports/articles for publication. Dr Isabel Moore as a Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Medicine (Cardiff Met) has expertise in injury surveillance and a background in biomechanical and physiological factors underpinning running performance. With a keen eye for detail and thorough understanding of new and existing methods for monitoring training load data in sports performers Dr Moore will advise on the novel use of accelerometer metrics to monitor training load in runners and contribute to the writing of reports and articles for publication. Dr Alex Rowlands has extensive expertise in physical activity measurement. He will advise on the manipulation of the Sedentary Sphere analysis package to improve the classification of running training days by more accurately distinguishing cycling from running activity. Dr Rowlands will carry out a repeat statistical analysis of the acceleration metrics to allow comparisons to be made with previous study outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The Technical Director of Activinsights will contribute 40 hours including the cost of travel and subsistence for research meetings to support this project. His wealth of expertise in the design and development of activity monitoring devices for health-related research and development of the Sedentary Sphere is crucial in helping repurpose activity monitors to accurately measure training load in runners.
Impact Using the large existing dataset collected in the previous study (250 weeks of data; 250GB), this study aimed to: 1) Apply Sedentary Sphere analysis to 100 Hz data to determine if discrimination between running and other types of training can be improved by consideration of the orientation of the monitor. 2) Down-sample the 100 Hz data to 50, 25 and 10 Hz to assess the effect that lower resolution data has on: a) the ability of existing metrics to independently identify running training days b) the ability of the Sedentary Sphere to independently identify running training days c) the ability of existing metrics to quantify running training load in runners Schedule of tasks and milestones: 1-4 Weeks - Access 250 weeks (250 GB) of raw acceleration data from the existing project Experiment with Sedentary Sphere thresholds (angle and acceleration intensity) to help discriminate between running and other types of training Insert 250 files (100 Hz) into the Sedentary Sphere pipeline to classify training days (Aim 1) Finalise methods for extracting & down-sampling time-series data from existing database (Aims 2a & 2c) Finalise methods for inserting down-sampled data into Sedentary Sphere pipeline (Aim 2b) 5-8 Weeks - Compare the ability of the Sedentary Sphere to classify running and non-running training days with previous study metrics (Aim 1) Down-sample 250 x 100 Hz files to 50, 25 & 10 Hz (Aims 2a,b,c) Obtain classification and training load metrics from 50, 25 & 10 Hz datasets (Aims 2a,b,c) 9-12 Weeks - Compare the ability of metrics to identify training days (Aims 2a & 2b) and quantify external training load (Aim 2c) in runners from down-sampled data (50, 25, 10 Hz) with original 100 Hz analysis (gold standard) Draft summary report including recommendations for industry and output for publication 13-15 Weeks - Complete report and output drafts All of the above has been done. Drafts for outputs will continue to be reworked by the PI, Co-I's and project partner over the coming months in preparation for an Open Access submission to Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise. Outcomes in brief: we can confirm that classification accuracy and levels of agreement between accelerometer-derived measures of training load and existing metrics are not compromised when data is assessed using a lower-sampling frequency (e.g. 50 or 25Hz compared to 100Hz). The comparability of the measures is slightly poorer when using 10Hz data. Use of the Sedentary Sphere analysis tool to improve training day classification accuracy by identifying cycling (to reduce classification error) is complicated by a lack of consistency in arm position. This tool is also sensitive to the wear-location of the monitor, which may have been changed by the user to improve comfort when cycling. This further compromises the use of this tool to improve classification accuracy. If further work is to be done on this in the future, other methods such as frequency analysis of the signal would be advised. Further outcomes: A publication (target journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise; IF 4.5) is currently being prepared using analysis from this project. The analysis undertaken during this project will also enabled us to broaden the scope of this publication to not only include an important methodological update for how this data can be more efficiently/effectively collected in running populations but will also inform the collection of data for longer than a week without compromising accuracy in all other populations. This project therefore benefits more precise measurement of behavioural patterns of physical activity and training relevant to a range of different health and injury outcomes. This project has benefitted the computing and analysis skills of the RA who worked on this project. Working in such an intensive and supervised manner on this project in recent months has fast-tracked his skills which he can now take back and apply to his own research which seeks to extend the application of wrist-worn accelerometry to monitor training load relevant to injury in tennis players. The skills he has learnt on this project can therefore be universally applied and further developed. Working in parallel in this way will further develop healthcare technology that can monitor training load to help prevent the development of injury and overtraining across a number of sports. As detailed in the application, outcomes from this work will help inform the methods used by Activity Informatics to put us in a leading position to analyse large sets of data from military personnel. This will improve our potential to be awarded funds from DSTL to provide this service for new and existing recruits, where increases in physical activity alongside reductions in injury incidence are crucial to the health and wellbeing of personnel.
Start Year 2018
 
Title A working diagnostic tool that will be used for clinical and research studies going forward in a UKAS accredited clinical laboratory 
Description The group have successfully developed a working diagnostic tool that will be used for clinical and research studies going forward in a UKAS accredited clinical laboratory. 
Type Diagnostic Tool - Non-Imaging
Current Stage Of Development Refinement. Non-clinical
Year Development Stage Completed 2018
Development Status Under active development/distribution
Impact Still ongoing 
 
Title Development of pO2 electrodes 
Description Design and development of new pO2 electrodes to invasively measure the concentration of oxygen in muscle. This will be used to compare the oxygenation of blood by optical techniques with the oxygenation in tissue. (This work is being undertaken in the Biophysics Group, College of Engineering, Maths and Physics). 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Still active 
 
Description Chemicals and Environmental Health. Waking up to Planetary Health 2020. Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital and the University of Exeter Medical School. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Prof Tyler was invited to be a keynote speaker at Chemicals and Environmental Health. Waking up to Planetary Health 2020. Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital and the University of Exeter Medical School.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Drug target review webinar 10/02/2021. Title: New methods towards efficient and high-throughput drug target screening 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Ben Housend attended a Drug target review webinar 10/02/2021. Title: New methods towards efficient and high-throughput drug target screening
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Chemicals of Environmental Concern. The 22nd UK-Japan Annual Scientific Workshop on Research into Environmental Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Prof Tyler was invited to give the opening address at the Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Chemicals of Environmental Concern. The 22nd UK-Japan Annual Scientific Workshop on Research into Environmental Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description GlaxoSmithKline Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Adrian Hill invited Dr. Mark Bamford and Dr. Peter Eddershaw from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) to the University of Exeter to introduce their Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) programme in February 2018. Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) is a novel approach to the discovery of new medicines through academic collaborations. GSK have built a team of experienced drug discovery scientists who are dedicated to creating and managing highly integrated collaborations between leading academic researchers and scientists within GSK. Since its inception in 2011, DPAc has formed more than twenty collaborations in Europe and North America. Projects have included both small molecule and biopharmaceutical projects for a broad range of diseases. GSK provided an overview of the programme and subsequent meetings were held between Peter and Mark and those academics who had expressed interest in the programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Global seminar with major pharmaceutical company, 28 Sept 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Accelerating drug discovery using novel genetic screening technologies
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited to participate on an expert panel building a technology roadmap for chronic wound care for a large wound care company 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Still active
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulfide delivery molecules: Pre-clinical studies, 5th World Congress on Hydrogen Sulfide in Biology and Medicine, Toronto, Canada 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact -
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://irnoc.ca/
 
Description Mitochondrial Medicine, Cambridge, December 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Matt Whiteman- Mitochondrial Medicine, Cambridge, December 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Physics of Biological Oscillations Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Invited to speak at the Physics of Biological Oscillations Conference in Lancaster, 27-30 November 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.physicsoflife.org.uk/physics-of-biological-oscillators.html
 
Description Presentation at SLAS conference 26/01/2021. Title: New methods towards efficient and high-throughput drug target screening 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Ben Housden was invited to give a presentation at SLAS conference 26/01/2021. Title: New methods towards efficient and high-throughput drug target screening
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description South West Fly meeting, Bristol University, 30 Jan 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Accelerating drug discovery using Drosophila screens
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.bris.ac.uk/neuroscience/events/diary/2019/fly-30jan.html
 
Description South West Zebrafish Meeting University of Bristol (Tyler, Winter and Ball) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact A talk/presentation - South West Zebrafish Meeting University of Bristol (Tyler, Winter and Ball)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Translational Funding Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In January 2018, IIB hosted a seminar at the Living Systems Institute (UoE) as part of a series of events focussed around Biomedical Translational research which featured an external speaker, Dr Nicola Shepherd, as well as academic and professional services staff. We have since noticed greater interest from academic staff from a broad range of Colleges and have engaged with them accordingly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description UMDF annual symposium, Alexandria, Washington DC, June 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Matt Whiteman- UMDF annual symposium, Alexandria, Washington DC, June 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description University of Sheffield 3rd June 2019, Title: Accelerating drug discovery using novel genetic screening methods in Drosophila 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Ben Housden attended the University of Sheffield 3rd June 2019, Title: Accelerating drug discovery using novel genetic screening methods in Drosophila
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019