Social Aspects of Health across the Life Course Programme

Lead Research Organisation: London Sch of Hygiene and Trop Medicine

Abstract

The aim of the programme is to further our understanding of the social aspects of health and wellbeing for specified individuals and populations to inform the design, implementation and evaluation of interventions, as well as contribute to policy development. We will work primarily across the HIV and Non-Communicable Disease themes in close collaboration with the associated programmes. The main geographical focus is Uganda but the programme will contribute to cross-Africa studies and intervention development as appropriate. Our methodological and theoretical work will be of international relevance. The proposed programme builds on core elements of our past work by investigating health across the lifecourse. We anticipate that the programme, which embraces health economics, will continue to grow and will provide training and mentoring to Ugandan and international staff and students. Translational research is an important aspect of all our work and we aim to contribute to the development and testing of interventions. This programme will focus on different stages of the life course and specific populations: 1) Children and adolescents; 2) Key (at-risk) populations; 3) People 50 years and older.

Technical Summary

The aim of the programme is to further our understanding of the social aspects of health and wellbeing for specified individuals and populations to inform the design, implementation and evaluation of interventions, as well as contribute to policy development. We will work primarily across the HIV and Non-Communicable Disease themes in close collaboration with the associated programmes. The main geographical focus is Uganda but the programme will contribute to cross-Africa studies and intervention development as appropriate. Our methodological and theoretical work will be of international relevance. The proposed programme builds on core elements of our past work by investigating health across the lifecourse. We anticipate that the programme, which embraces health economics, will continue to grow and will provide training and mentoring to Ugandan and international staff and students. Translational research is an important aspect of all our work and we aim to contribute to the development and testing of interventions. This programme will focus on different stages of the life course and specific populations: 1) Children and adolescents; 2) Key (at-risk) populations; 3) People 50 years and older.

Publications

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