Unravelling mechanisms of wood decay fungal community change in the post-genomic era

Lead Research Organisation: Swansea University
Department Name: College of Science

Abstract

About a third of the carbon in the biosphere is in forest ecosystems, mostly in woody plant tissues. Photosynthesis continually adds to this, but in balanced systems a similar amount is broken down to CO2 and H2O, and nutrients are released. The organisms responsible for this decay and cycling are almost exclusively a narrow range of fungi - basidiomycetes and a few ascomycetes. Fungi do not grow in isolation in wood, but form a 3-D mosaic of individuals of the same and different species, which compete with neighbours. Competition leads to community change. Decay rate depends on fungal community composition, climate and the competitive interactions themselves. It is not known how predicted climatic change might influence these interactions and the balance of carbon and nutrient cycling in forests.
Since wood is a solid organic substance, competition for resources is effectively competition for space/territory. Fungi defend and obtain new territory by combative, antagonistic interactions. The overall outcomes are deadlock, where neither species gains headway, or replacement where one species wrests territory from the other, but sometimes partial replacement or mutual replacement. With the complexity of multiple species and environmental conditions, many different antagonistic mechanisms operate. Responses to antagonists include rapid cell division and death, production of pigments, volatile (VOCs) and diffusible organic compounds, and other antimicrobial agents. These responses determine the outcome of interactions, but we do not understand the underlying mechanisms which is crucial for understanding wood decomposition.
Ultimately we want to know how wood decay communities function in natural ecosystems. We will investigate the physiological changes during interactions between species of decay fungi in wood representing the succession from primary coloniser to secondary and tertiary decomposers, under differing environmental conditions. New post-genomic tools allow us to get a complete picture of the genes that are switched on and off during interactions. We will focus on a secondary coloniser Trametes versicolor, and its interaction with another secondary coloniser with which it deadlocks, a primary coloniser that it replaces, and a tertiary coloniser that it is replaced by.
There are 5 main things we want to understand: Firstly, what are the responses of fungal cells during antagonistic confrontation with other mycelia in wood? We will analyse the full complement of transcribed genes, extracellular proteins, VOCs and selected enzymes in the laboratory. Secondly, how are competitive outcomes influenced by environment - temperature, water availability and amount of decay? We will vary conditions and focus on a subset of important genes. Thirdly, are these interaction responses common to wood decay fungi in general? We will interact Trametes versicolor with 15 wood decay species representative of different fungal families and different decay abilities, focusing on a subset of important genes. Fourthly, do responses in the lab reflect the real world? Some of the combinations of fungi paired in wood will be placed on the forest floor, and then changes in expression of important genes measured. Finally, what happens in more complex situations, commonly found in nature, where several wood decay fungi interact with each other simultaneously? We will measure expression of important genes in wood discs colonised with T. versicolor left on the forest floor for 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, allowing natural colonisation from many spores and mycelium in the soil.
This ambitious project uses a logical progression from controlled lab-based experiments to the natural environment using state-of-the-art molecular technologies. It will provide solid foundations for the investigation of complex community-based decay processes, and knowledge to aid the control of timber decay and source novel antimicrobial compounds and other chemicals.

Planned Impact

The core academic findings of the project will have a direct impact on academic researchers into fungal biology and ecology, forestry science, climate change scientists, practitioners in the timber industry, pharmaceutical and chemical industry, woodland managers, and the general public:

Academic beneficiaries: Detailed data on mechanisms of interspecific mycelial interactions, gene expression, metabolic costs and relation between community structure and decay will be important for fungal biologists, fungal ecologists, decomposition ecologists, systems ecologists and modellers. The effects of changing environmental conditions on interactions and decay will also be of relevance to research predicting the impact of climate change on biogeochemical cycling, particularly of carbon.

The timber industry: Loss of stored timber and timber in service through wood decay is a major source of financial loss. Understanding the underlying mechanisms, will be helpful in the long term in developing new diagnostic approaches and perhaps control measures for timber decay.

The pharmaceutical and chemical industry: This project will investigate biochemical processes in under exploited fungi. Fungi generate a wide range of novel chemicals through metabolic processes or the modification of extracellular substrates. Some compounds are produced in pure cultures, while others are produced in response to competition from other microbes or during decomposition. These compounds include major pharmaceuticals e.g. antibiotics such as penicillin, statins for cholesterol control, and cylosporines to prevent transplant tissue rejection, industrially valuable chemicals, e.g. citric acid, and new technologies, such as lignocellulosic breakdown products for biofuels and phenolics.

Woodland management: Tree pathogens are a major cause of financial loss, therefore their control is important. Understanding antagonistic interactions will give insights into ways of controlling pathogens. In forestry there is also a need to understand the rate of wood decay and hence nutrient release for continued tree growth.

General public: Though most people do not realize it, fungi are central to our lives. As well as being crucial to ecosystem function they have considerable amenity value as part of the woodland biota, some have yielded major pharmaceuticals and others are food sources or used in production of food. Knowledge of basic fungal biology and ecology of wood decay fungi will underpin future uses of the fungi.
 
Description The project has generated high quantities of high throughout genetic, proteomic and metabolomic data which is still currently being analysed and collated. We have also developed a methodology for the extraction of RNA from wood blocks colonised by competing fungi at the quality to enable HiSeq high throughput sequencing - this was a major challenge for the first part of the project. We have also developed methodology for extracting and analysing intact proteins from the same material. Modelling approaches have also been developed to describe the outcomes of competitive interactions by integrating unsuccessful outcomes (previously ignored aspect of interaction frameworks) and consideration of the size of interaction zones between competing species. In summary, the team has identified the responses of different fungi to different competitors; in particular certain foraging species will alter their foraging behaviour, and presumably resource allocation, in response to existing competitive interactions. Major findings of note to date include:
1) Resource allocation affects interaction outcome. We have observed that more competitive species will actively target less competitive species when presented with a range of options (including medium competitors and uncolonised wood blocks) suggesting a particular adaptations based around efficient resource allocation and possibly ease of access to partially decomposed resource. Subsequent resource available to continue foraging for new wood substrate following a antagonistic interaction is affected by the strength of competitor (ie if more resource is used to replace an antagonist in a resource, less resource is available to generate foraging biomass that emerges from that resource). Therefore, there appears to be a selection pressure to target resources with less energetic cost in accessing resource (NB sterile blank wood block is not necessary ideal for some species as the lignocellulose composite is energetically costly to breakdown compared to replacing a species that has already colonised and started the decomposition process). However, competition outcome is also size dependent, a weaker species occupying a larger connected resource is more able to compete if the same resource is unconnected and scattered through a habitat. That said, we propose a survival of the weakest strategy were the presence of a weakly competing species survives longer against a highly aggressive species if there is another weak competitor present (though not physically connected). Here the strong competitor spreads its resource evenly between the two weaker species, whereas in the presence of a medium competitor or blank wood block the strong competitor appears to direct its entire resource to replacing the single weaker species. The implications for natural populations and why there is not a widespread arms race to become the most competitive species is discussed.
2) Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis is ongoing and manuscripts are just starting to be published, but the main findings to date include: The transcripts and peptides produced by a given fungus during wood decay varies markedly between samples making analysis at he individual gene and protein analysis difficult and may relate to a high level of redundancy within wood decay fungi and the complex nature of the lignocellulose substrate. However, despite individual gene and protein variation, functional classification of transcripts and peptides is remarkably conserved (e.g. hydrolases, cytochrome P450s), this suggests wood decay fungi are biochemically flexible when processing lignocellulose and groups of enzymes appear to have a high degree of functional redundancy which requires much more research to unpick. It was noted that as the wood substrate is both a habitat and food source for a fungus and a significant part of the genetic response to decay is the detoxification of lignin breakdown products and we discuss to what extent these enzymes are co-opted in antagonistic interactions to detoxify antimicrobial compounds produced by a competitor. A number of interesting pathways have been identified in response to competition stress (although analysis is continuing), notably there appears to be a regulation of carbon cycling through the TCA cycle to favour the production of certain amino acids (glutamine in particular), also a shunt from chromistate toward indole and presumably indole-derived alkaloids is detected, a theme is developing around the central role of N-acetyl glucosamine as a key compound in remobilisation of cellular material and links to post-translational modification and signalling in response to competition stress. 3) A further significant finding related to the effect of temperature on decay and competition response. Previous work had shown that temperature change could alter the outcomes of certain competitions between antagonistic species. In this study we showed that a 4 degree increase from 20C to 24C significantly altered the proteome of single species growing on wood (e.g. from the presence of largely oxidative enzymes to a hydrolytic decay enzymes), and altered the proteins isolated from the interaction zone between two competing species (transcriptomic data from such scenarios is still being processed). Such a large shift in molecular response was not expected over a short temperature change and we discuss the possible significance of such responses to habitat range across temperature forest biomes and the possible impact of rapid temperature change on decay communities and the wider forest system.
Exploitation Route The project has developed methodology of extracting RNA and proteins from wood colonised by fungi. High throughput sequencing and proteomic data has been generated and is being analysed for publication. That said, our experience in working with wood systems has allowed us to develop projects with other academics, e.g. mathematical modelling competitive interactions, and aiding a SME carry out tests on a novel environmentally friendly wood protection product, and a 'omics study funded by the US Department of Energy to investigate early stage decay interactions.
Sectors Chemicals,Construction,Education,Energy,Environment,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology,Transport

 
Description The programme of research was the first collaborative interaction between fungal ecologists at Swansea and Cardiff University. The project started early in 2014 and the first 9 months of the project have been getting the key baseline experiments in place and creating a working collaborative group between the two institutions. Some publications have resulted in the early stages of the interaction, in addition to presentations at conferences and public outreach events (see portfolio for more information). An international Symposium has been organised relating to the subject of the grant (Plant Biomass Decomposition by Fungi). Presentation of the work at international conferences has increased and high throughput data is being analysed with the expectation high quality research outputs will be published (NB the postdoctoral researcher associated with the project is currently on maternity leave). A number of international collaborations have been enabled through this research and will continue to develop (Universities of Oslo, Uppsala, Bristol, Maynooth, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Huazhong, Tokyo, Utrecht, Helsinki, and the US Dept of Energy JGI and EMSL). Data analysis is continuing due to the large amount of information but at least 8 further publications are expected in the next 12 to 24 months.
Sector Environment
Impact Types Societal

 
Description GW4+ PhD
Amount £110,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 03/2018
 
Description Swansea University Research Student Allocation
Amount £60,000 (GBP)
Organisation Swansea University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 09/2017
 
Description Swansea University Research Student Allocation
Amount £60,000 (GBP)
Organisation Swansea University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 09/2017
 
Description US Dept Energy JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Project
Amount $67,259 (USD)
Organisation U.S. Department of Energy 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 09/2015 
End 09/2016
 
Description USA Department Of Energy FICUS continuation of existing grant
Amount $70,000 (USD)
Organisation U.S. Department of Energy 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 09/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation Chinese Academy of Sciences
Country China 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation U.S. Department of Agriculture USDA
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation University of Massachusetts Amherst
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation University of Pennsylvania
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Assessing fine structural effects of fungal wood decomposition 
Organisation Uppsala University
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Partner in an international consortium to understand how substrate is decomposed by fungi. Eastwood contributed by providing a biological context to the decay mechanisms aided by knowledge from the current NERC grant and assisted with writing the manuscript.
Collaborator Contribution The consortium was led and driven by Goodell (Massachusetts), other partners provided detailed physical and chemical analysis of the woody substrate during decomposition.
Impact 2. Goodell, B., Zhu, Y., Kim, S., Kafle, K., Eastwood, D., Daniel, G., Jellison, J., Yoshida, M., Groom, L., Venkatesh Pingali, S., O'Neil, H. 2017. Modification of the nanostructure of lignocellulose cell walls via a non-enzymatic lignocellulose deconstruction system in brown-rot wood decay fungi. Biotechnology for Biofuels. 10:179
Start Year 2016
 
Description Multi'omic analsysi of primary wood decay interactions 
Organisation U.S. Department of Energy
Department Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Eastwood was PI and led the consortium to sequence two Primary decay fungi (one used in the NERC study so was invaluable in transcriptome analysis). Eastwood and Boddy (Cardiff) oversaw the preparation of biological materials and supervision of a PhD student who carried out large part of the work.
Collaborator Contribution Other members of the consportium provide advice and support on the analysis of the data. Colleagues at the JGI and EMSL carry out all the sequencing, genome, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of the samples.
Impact Papers being drafted
Start Year 2014
 
Description Multi'omic analsysi of primary wood decay interactions 
Organisation U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Eastwood was PI and led the consortium to sequence two Primary decay fungi (one used in the NERC study so was invaluable in transcriptome analysis). Eastwood and Boddy (Cardiff) oversaw the preparation of biological materials and supervision of a PhD student who carried out large part of the work.
Collaborator Contribution Other members of the consportium provide advice and support on the analysis of the data. Colleagues at the JGI and EMSL carry out all the sequencing, genome, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of the samples.
Impact Papers being drafted
Start Year 2014
 
Description Multi'omic analsysi of primary wood decay interactions 
Organisation University of Helsinki
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Eastwood was PI and led the consortium to sequence two Primary decay fungi (one used in the NERC study so was invaluable in transcriptome analysis). Eastwood and Boddy (Cardiff) oversaw the preparation of biological materials and supervision of a PhD student who carried out large part of the work.
Collaborator Contribution Other members of the consportium provide advice and support on the analysis of the data. Colleagues at the JGI and EMSL carry out all the sequencing, genome, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of the samples.
Impact Papers being drafted
Start Year 2014
 
Description Multi'omic analsysi of primary wood decay interactions 
Organisation University of Minnesota
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Eastwood was PI and led the consortium to sequence two Primary decay fungi (one used in the NERC study so was invaluable in transcriptome analysis). Eastwood and Boddy (Cardiff) oversaw the preparation of biological materials and supervision of a PhD student who carried out large part of the work.
Collaborator Contribution Other members of the consportium provide advice and support on the analysis of the data. Colleagues at the JGI and EMSL carry out all the sequencing, genome, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of the samples.
Impact Papers being drafted
Start Year 2014
 
Description Multi'omic analsysi of primary wood decay interactions 
Organisation Utrecht University
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Eastwood was PI and led the consortium to sequence two Primary decay fungi (one used in the NERC study so was invaluable in transcriptome analysis). Eastwood and Boddy (Cardiff) oversaw the preparation of biological materials and supervision of a PhD student who carried out large part of the work.
Collaborator Contribution Other members of the consportium provide advice and support on the analysis of the data. Colleagues at the JGI and EMSL carry out all the sequencing, genome, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of the samples.
Impact Papers being drafted
Start Year 2014
 
Description SBRI Demonstration Stage research project for the novel wood treatment 
Organisation Commons Visions
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We provide research assistance to the grant. The team will analyse treated wood blocks for their recalcitrance to fungal decomposition
Collaborator Contribution Visions Commons LTD is in the process of commercialising a novel ecologically sensitive wood protection product and is progressing into demonstration phase.
Impact Testing of effectiveness of the product in the field is still underway
Start Year 2014
 
Description Wood decay in the Serpulaceae 
Organisation University of Oslo
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Eastwood was a Co-I on a genome sequencing project via the US Dept of Energy Joint Genome Institute with the Universities of Oslo (Kauserud, Skreded) and Uppsala (Hogberg). Eastwood was involved in directing the analysis, analysing data and writing publications. Postdoc onthe NERc grant (Moody) worked on the comparative analysis of cytochrome P45 genes which directly linked to the NERC grant research. Boddy provided expertise in a comparative assessment of the competitiveness of decay species (also linked to the NERC grant)
Collaborator Contribution Kauserud and Skrede (Oslo) oversaw the analysis of the programme, supervising a PhD student and Postdoc. Skrede oversaw the drafting and submission of outputs and coordinated activity of all partners. Hogberg provided input on the analysis of the results and writing of manuscripts.
Impact Balasundaram, S.V.a, Hess, J.a, Durling, M.B.b, Moody, S.C.c, Thorbek, L.a, Progida, C.a, LaButti, K.d, Aerts, A.d, Barry, K.d, Grigoriev, I.V.d, Boddy, L.e, Högberg, N.b, Kauserud, H.a, Eastwood, D.C.c, Skrede, I. 2018. The fungus that came in from the cold: dry rot's pre-adapted ability to invade buildings. ISME Journal. In press DOI: 10.1038/s41396-017-0006-8
Start Year 2014
 
Description Wood decay in the Serpulaceae 
Organisation Uppsala University
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Eastwood was a Co-I on a genome sequencing project via the US Dept of Energy Joint Genome Institute with the Universities of Oslo (Kauserud, Skreded) and Uppsala (Hogberg). Eastwood was involved in directing the analysis, analysing data and writing publications. Postdoc onthe NERc grant (Moody) worked on the comparative analysis of cytochrome P45 genes which directly linked to the NERC grant research. Boddy provided expertise in a comparative assessment of the competitiveness of decay species (also linked to the NERC grant)
Collaborator Contribution Kauserud and Skrede (Oslo) oversaw the analysis of the programme, supervising a PhD student and Postdoc. Skrede oversaw the drafting and submission of outputs and coordinated activity of all partners. Hogberg provided input on the analysis of the results and writing of manuscripts.
Impact Balasundaram, S.V.a, Hess, J.a, Durling, M.B.b, Moody, S.C.c, Thorbek, L.a, Progida, C.a, LaButti, K.d, Aerts, A.d, Barry, K.d, Grigoriev, I.V.d, Boddy, L.e, Högberg, N.b, Kauserud, H.a, Eastwood, D.C.c, Skrede, I. 2018. The fungus that came in from the cold: dry rot's pre-adapted ability to invade buildings. ISME Journal. In press DOI: 10.1038/s41396-017-0006-8
Start Year 2014
 
Description Biology Rocks! 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An information stand, with games and activities for children, was held in the National Museum of Wales as part of the outreach event 'Biology Rocks!'. The event was very busy with hundreds of attendees. The stand was very popular and we handed out lots of leaflets and stickers about fungi.

Raising the profile of fungi in the wider community; many people (adults and children alike) were really interested and said they planned to use the material we gave them and attend fungus walks/ forays.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://events.cardiff.ac.uk/view/biology-rocks/
 
Description Conference Organisation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Organisation committee of the second Symposium on Plant Biomass Conversion by Fungi held in Utrecht the Netherlands, August 28-19th 2017. Networking and discussion of science and future collaboration. Postgraduate student participation was encouraged and supported by prizes for the best talk and best poster. Combined with Women in Science event held at the same time and after the symposium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.westerdijkinstitute.nl/BioloMICSNews.aspx?Rec=7718
 
Description Conference talk Society for General Microbiology (Loughborough) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation at the Society for General Microbiology focused meeting on "Emerging challenges and opportunities in Soil Microbiology"

Made links to other researchers and have started a formal collaborative link with colleagues in Dundee
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.sgm.ac.uk/en/events/conferences/index.cfm/focused-meeting-emerging-challenges-and-opportu...
 
Description Invited speaker at Plant Biomass Degradation by Fungi symposium Utrecht University 27th February 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk on genomics or decay fungi at the inaugural symposium of Plant Biomass Degradation by Fungi to an international audience of approximately 80 academic researchers and industry representatives
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited talk to the British Federation of Women Graduates November 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Outreach activity to promote fungal biology by giving a presentation and leading a discussion at a meeting organised by the British Federation of Women Graduates.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Molecular Microbial Ecology Group annual Meeting 2017, Newcastle University - "Life in the day of pioneer decay communities in attached tree branches" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Group member presented a talk at Molecular Microbial Ecology Group annual Meeting 2017, Newcastle University, entitled: "Life in the day of pioneer decay communities in attached tree branches"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Plenary at the ISMS Congress 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Plenary presentation at the International Society for Mushroom Science Congress Amsterdam , May 2016. Entitled: Fungal wood decay: Evolution, ecology & exploitation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Poster at ECFG PAris, April 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster presentation with international colleagues at the European Conference on Fungal Genetics, Paris, April 2016. Entitled: Exploring specialization in wood decay mechanisms in the harmful houseinvader Serpula lacrymans using an evolutionary transcriptomics approach
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Poster presentation at the Genetics Society of America Fungal Gentics Conference, Asilomar, California, 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster entitled 'Interspecific interactions between saprotrophic Agaricomycetes, the associated gene expression and the impact on the wood decay community' presented at the 28th Fungal Genetics meeting of the Genetics Society of America meeting, Asilomar, California. Main aims were to disseminate research and network with academic colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at the Microbiology Society Conference, Birmingham, April 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of research at International conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Second poster at ECFG, Paris 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster presentation with international colleagues at the European Conference on Fungal Genetics entitled: Invasiveness of the harmful house-invader Serpula lacrymans - population
genomics of the Japanese and European populations
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Swansea Science Cafe talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Approximately 70 people attended a Science Café talk on appreciating the impact of fungi on ecosystems, consisting of a 45 minute presentation and a further 30-45 mintues questions and discussions.

General public engagement
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk 1 at the British Mycological Society Invasive Fungus meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk entitled Investigating the development of early successional decomposer communities in wood under abiotic and biotic stress delivered to the British Mycological Society's Invasive Fungus meeting September 2015 for dissemination of research and networking
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk 2 at the British Mycological Society meeting on the Invasive Fungus September 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk entitled 'Modelling mycelial invasion in multi-species fungal communities' given at the British Mycological Society's Invasive Fungus meeting September 2016, aimed at presenting scientific data and networking with the academic community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk at MMEG conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation at a conference entitled: 'How the smoky polypore chews wood (and deals with the toxic consequences) by the postdoctoral researcher on the grant. Aim was to promote the research done by the group and the postdoc was successful in winning prize for best presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk at the Genetics Society of America conference on Fungal Genetics, Asilomar, California, March 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of scientific advances to a largely academic audience and make connections with discipline-specific colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk at the Microbiology Society Annual Conference March 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation on recent scientific advancements entitled Weapons, defence systems and lunch: the proteomics of competing wood-decay fungi at the Microbiology Society's Annual meeting, aimed at disseminating research and networking with academic colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015