BRIdging Disciplines of Galactic Chemical Evolution (BRIDGCE): The Rise of the Chemical Elements

Lead Research Organisation: University of Hertfordshire
Department Name: School of Physics, Astronomy and Maths

Abstract

The main scientific goal of this consortium is to study the chemical evolution of the universe from the Big Bang up to now by using chemical elements as fingerprints of the processes that took place in stars and galaxies. Although light can travel for billions of years and we can nowadays observe the cosmic microwave background emitted at the epoch of recombination, most of the stars that formed in the early universe are long dead, and larger structures like the first halos have merged or been disrupted. It is therefore not possible to observe them directly. Fortunately, stars and galactic structures leave chemical fingerprints in the stars that formed out of their ashes. Thus, in extremely-metal-poor (EMP) stars that have a low enough mass to live longer than the current age of the universe, we can observe the chemical fingerprints of the processes that took place in the early universe. Moreover, we can constrain their properties by comparing theoretical models of stars with observations of EMP stars in the halo of our galaxy, and by generating models of the chemical evolution of galaxies in cosmologically-valid simulations. Furthermore, by simulating stellar and galactic chemical evolution from the early universe until the present day, we can reproduce the entire chemical history of galaxies and the Milky Way in particular. Our research also addresses other key scientific questions: ``How can we explore and understand the extremes of the universe?'' by studying and constraining the properties of supernova explosions and ``What is the nature of nuclear and hadronic matter? '' by improving our knowledge of nuclear reaction rates. These studies linked to the rise of the chemical elements constitute the main scientific goals of the proposed research.


To answer questions like: "What are the properties of the early universe?, Where were the elements we are made of created?", knowledge in various disciplines of astrophysics and nuclear physics is necessary. Indeed, nuclear data (nuclear reaction rates in particular) are a key input for stellar evolution models since nuclear reactions provide the energy that powers stars. This information determines stellar lifetimes, and the composition of their final ejecta. Stars, in turn, provide important feedback into the galaxies they belong to through the light they radiate, their powerful supernova explosions and all the chemical elements they produce. The outputs of stellar evolution models are therefore key ingredients for galactic chemical evolution models. These models follow successive episodes of star formation and trace the history of the enrichment of the elements in various galaxies. The model predictions can then be compared to observations of EMP stars that carry the chemical fingerprints of the cumulative chemical enrichment that preceded their birth. Comparison to observations can thus constrain both the galactic and stellar properties. Stellar evolution models can also be used as virtual nuclear physics laboratories, in which we can test the impact of uncertainties in certain nuclear reaction rates.


To answer these questions, this consortium will adopt a multidisciplinary approach, gathering expertise from world-leading scientists at five UK universities, and will also further its existing intersectoral links with companies developing and producing particle detectors and high-tech shared-memory computer hardware.


Our research will apply innovative techniques across different disciplines and attack this scientific challenge through 4 projects corresponding to 3 different physical scales:

- Galactic and extra-Galactic scales (Project A)

- Stars and their nucleosynthesis (Project B)

- Micro-physics: sensitivity to nuclear and stellar modelling uncertainties (Project C) and the impact of stellar environments on nuclear reaction rates and stellar evolution (Project D)

Planned Impact

The Consortium is cognisant of its role in inspiring and training the next generation of scientists responsible for ensuring the UK's international competitiveness in both the academic and industrial sectors, so our outreach and public engagement activities are a key aspect of our mission. Our investigators and their institutes undertake a spectrum of activities. BRIDGCE will bring a greater breadth and depth to these activities through its interdisciplinary composition.

Application and Exploitation:

Hirschi as part of his ERC project has established a working relation with the Norwegian company Numascale, which develops hardware for shared memory computer clusters. This collaboration opens the door to R&D investments from the private sector and to further European funding. Murphy and the Edinburgh group maintain strong industrial links with partners including the UK company Micron Semiconductor Ltd, in order to develop, for example, silicon strip detectors for advanced implantation detector arrays and for recycling exotic radio-nuclides. Murphy's group is a member of the Nuclear and Plasma Physics theme within SUPA, collaborating towards the creation of the Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-Based Accelerators which will develop new scientific and technological advances in accelerator science.

The multi-disciplinary nature of BRIDGCE affords our students and PDRAs broadened training opportunities. They will benefit from our industrial links, particularly in software optimisation alongside experts at Numascale. Designing and optimising advanced simulation codes, and "Big Data" mining as required by our massive datasets, are aligned with UK economic needs, so this training ensures the marketability of our students in diverse career paths. In addition to our postgraduate students and PDRAs staying in academia, others have progressed to highly-skilled jobs in the industrial, financial and public sectors. Our students and PDRAs receive training in data protection and exploitation of intellectual property, in order to maximise and protect current and future exploitation of STFC funded science.

Communications and Public Engagement:

Astrophysicists have unique influence in enthusing the next generation of scientists and building public support for science, and we participate enthusiastically in education and public outreach (EPO). With BRIDGCE science spanning scales from the very small (nuclei) to the very large (stellar and galactic scale), and utilising large scale high-performance computing facilities to generate evolving simulations of astronomical objects like stars (Project B) and galaxies (Project A), our consortium has a unique opportunity to capture the imagination of non-scientists.

All of our institutions have dedicated links with local schools (e.g. Preston Science Partnership, through the Ogden Trust; Bayfordbury Observatory Group Visits at Herts.). One particularly effective dissemination route is via specialised teacher training days which are organised regularly at York, Keele and Herts. in conjunction with their respective science learning centres (SLC), and in Preston at UCLan's Alston Observatory.

Capacity and Involvement:

Alison Laird appeared on BBC Radio 4 to discuss nuclear astrophysics and regularly gives public talks. Gibson employs the outcomes of his STFC-supported research in a wide range of activities. He gives several public lectures per year, most recently as one of the Keynote Speakers at the 2013 European Astrofest, where he shared the stage with Brian Cox and Lucy Hawking.

Keele Observatory and Alston Observatory (Preston) both host weekly events, in addition to special events during Stargazing Live, Transit of Venus, etc. Each observatory accommodates ~1000 people per year, spanning the full spectrum in ages. Herts. runs an open night programme attracting around 2000 public visitors a year at its extensive Bayfordbury Observatory.

Publications

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Belfiore F (2019) From 'bathtub' galaxy evolution models to metallicity gradients in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Cescutti G. (2017) The chemical signature of SNIax in the stars of Ursa minor? in Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana

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Cescutti Gabriele (2018) The Chemical Signature of SNIax in the Stars of Ursa Minor? in American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts #232

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Crnojevi (2015) Galaxy evolution through resolved stellar populations in the nearby Centaurus A group . in Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana

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De Masi C (2019) Is the IMF in ellipticals bottom-heavy? Clues from their chemical abundances in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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De Masi Carlo (2018) The effects of the initial mass function on the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

 
Description We have discovered an ancient star in the centre of our Milky Way using an Australian telescope SkyMapper. This star contains only small amounts of heavy elements and has an unique elemental abundance pattern. We analyzed the pattern as "DNA" of the star and found that there was an energetic explosion, hypernova, at the beginning of the formation of our Galaxy. The result has been published from the Nature in November 2015.
Exploitation Route This result is a clear evidence that the abundance profiling approach (which has been proposed by our journal paper, e.g., Kobayashi et al. 2014, ApJ, 5, L5) can indeed reveal the chemical enrichment history of the Galaxy. This work will be taken forward by the on-going and future observational surveys of elemental abundances using high-resolution multi-object spectrographs, e.g., HERMES-GALAH, WEAVE, 4-MOST which our research team is participating.
Sectors Chemicals

URL http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v527/n7579/full/nature15747.html
 
Description ?ARC Discovery Projects
Amount $399,231 (AUD)
Organisation Australian Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Australia
Start 10/2014 
End 09/2017
 
Description ARC Discovery Projects
Amount $339,500 (AUD)
Funding ID DP170100521 
Organisation Australian Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Australia
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2021
 
Description COST
Amount € 600,000 (EUR)
Funding ID CA16117 
Organisation International Commission of the Palaeozoic Microflora 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 04/2017 
End 04/2021
 
Description RSAA Distinguished Fellow Program
Amount $120,000 (AUD)
Organisation Australian National University (ANU) 
Sector Academic/University
Country Australia
Start 10/2014 
End 03/2015
 
Description 4MOST - 4-metre Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope 
Organisation Leibniz Association
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Gabriele Cescutti is a scientific member of 4MOST, a fibre-fed spectroscopic survey facility on the VISTA telescope, in particular a member of: "Milky Way Halo High Resolution Survey" that aims to acquire spectra of at least 100,000 such stars and determine their chemical abundance patterns, using stellar atmosphere models and "Milky Way Bulge and Disk High Resolution Survey", the largest high-resolution spectroscopic survey of stars in the Milky Way disk and bulge with high-precision chemical abundances for 2 million stars. In this large collaboration, he does not only contribute to the management of these two surveys, but also be part of the infrastructure working group "Science Simulations" and of the work package Halo HR "Scientific preparation and science analysis".
Collaborator Contribution The 4MOST consortium has been selected by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) to provide the ESO community with a fibre-fed spectroscopic survey facility on the VISTA telescope with a large enough field-of-view to survey a large frac­tion of the southern sky in a few years. The facility will be able to simultaneously obtain spectra of ~2400 objects distributed over an hexagonal field-of-view of 4 square degrees. This high multiplex of 4MOST, combined with its high spectral resolution, will enable detection of chemical and kinematic substructure in the stellar halo, bulge and thin and thick discs of the Milky Way, thus help unravel the origin of our home galaxy. The instrument will also have enough wavelength coverage to secure velocities of extra-galactic objects over a large range in red­shift, thus enabling measurements of the evolution of galaxies and the structure of the cosmos.
Impact You can find on this link the publication of 4MOST: https://www.4most.eu/cms/publications/
Start Year 2013
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation Armagh Observatory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation Keele University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation Liverpool John Moores University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of Hull
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of Portsmouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of Surrey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description BRIDGCE consortium: BRIdge the Disciplines related to the Galactic Chemical Evolution 
Organisation University of York
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I became the chair of this STFC-funded consortium. I am organizing annual meetings and initiating consortium grand application for STFC. Gabriele Cescutti was the founded PDRA in 2015/16 and contributed to this network with his skills on Galactic chemical evolution and also with his participation to the SHYNE project. Fiorenzo Vincenzo succeeded the funded PDRA from 2017.
Collaborator Contribution The BRIDGCE consortium is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the UK and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK.
Impact The main outcomes of BRIDGCE are the following: Facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the UK. Liaise with other national and international networks (e.g. JINA) who share the same goals. Develop synergy between the various expertise available in the UK. Enhance PhD students training in this multi-disciplinary research area. It is possible to find at this link: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/events the events organised by the collaboration, and the this link the talks and publication: http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/bridgce/publications-talks.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EU COST Action ChETEC: Chemical Element as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos 
Organisation Konkoly Observatory
Country Hungary 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Management Committee member of EU COST Action "ChETEC: Chemical Element as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos". I made a major contribtion to the successful proposal "C, N, O, Zn, & Eu: Discriminators of nucleosynthetic yields from the first supernovae or neutron star mergers" for 40 nights on the VLT.
Collaborator Contribution The ChETEC action is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the EU and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the EU.
Impact 600k EUR in total available for short-time visitors and studentship in 2017-2020
Start Year 2017
 
Description EU COST Action ChETEC: Chemical Element as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I am the Management Committee member of EU COST Action "ChETEC: Chemical Element as Tracers of the Evolution of the Cosmos". I made a major contribtion to the successful proposal "C, N, O, Zn, & Eu: Discriminators of nucleosynthetic yields from the first supernovae or neutron star mergers" for 40 nights on the VLT.
Collaborator Contribution The ChETEC action is important for us and for all its partners in order to develope synergy between the various expertise available in the EU and facilitate transfer of knowledge and collaborations related to the origin of the elements across the various disciplines and institutions in the EU.
Impact 600k EUR in total available for short-time visitors and studentship in 2017-2020
Start Year 2017
 
Description GCE collaboration with Trieste 
Organisation University of Trieste
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The former PDRA, Gabriele Cescutti, obtained Marie Curie Fellowship at Department of Physics of the Trieste University, and we continue the collaboration. Gabriele has close collaborator Prof. Francesca Matteucci and her team there.
Collaborator Contribution The scientific experience of Prof. Francesca Matteucci, one of the best chemical evolution modellers worldwide, has helped in prepare scientific material and publish high level papers, frequently in collaboration with her team. At the moment we are dealing with a implement a analytic receipt for spiral arms in a 2d chemical evolution model.
Impact The project is still on going, but the first results have been presented at the conference in Sexten January 2016: http://www.sexten-cfa.eu/images/stories/conferenze2014/bulge/talks/Formevogalaclu-program.pdf
Start Year 2016
 
Description HERMES-GALAH 
Organisation Anglo Australian Observatory
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am on the Science Team for high-resolution multi-element spectrograph (HERMES) for the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).
Collaborator Contribution I contributed to the designig of the high-resolution spectrograph on the AAT and to the planning of the Galactic Archaeology survey (GALAH). The survey is on-going, and I am on a few papers in preparation.
Impact The spectrograph has been successfully developed and installed on the AAT in 2013. The Galactic Archaeology survey (GALAH) has also been started.
Start Year 2008
 
Description HERMES-GALAH 
Organisation Australian National University (ANU)
Department Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am on the Science Team for high-resolution multi-element spectrograph (HERMES) for the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT).
Collaborator Contribution I contributed to the designig of the high-resolution spectrograph on the AAT and to the planning of the Galactic Archaeology survey (GALAH). The survey is on-going, and I am on a few papers in preparation.
Impact The spectrograph has been successfully developed and installed on the AAT in 2013. The Galactic Archaeology survey (GALAH) has also been started.
Start Year 2008
 
Description Metallicity gradients through cosmic epochs with Cambridge 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Department of Pharmacology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The recent advancements in observational instruments in astronomy are triggering theorists to develop new physical models to interpret and understand them. Our contribution in the collaboration is to develop new theoretical methods and models to understand how the metallicity gradients within galaxies have formed and evolved through cosmic epochs and which physical processes have determined their formation and evolution. The tools that we are using and developing are up-to-date cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, including a detailed chemical feedback from Supernovae and stellar winds. Furthermore, we have developed a novel spectrophotometric model, which we use to reproduce the color gradients and the integrated spectra of the observed galaxies.
Collaborator Contribution The Astrophysics Group at the Cavendish Laboratory contribute to our collaboration from an observational point view, by providing their high expertise in the data processing and analysis.
Impact We are going to publish a first theoretical paper attached with the first release of the data for the metallicity gradients within the MaNGa survey galaxies. In the last year, we have published two papers on peer-reviewed international Journals.
Start Year 2016
 
Description SHYNE (Stellar HYdrodynamics Nucleosynthesis and Evolution) 
Organisation Keele University
Department School of Physical and Geographical Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Study of the most important reaction rates and what precision in nuclear physics experiments is desirable for astrophysics applications by means of a stochastic model, in particular s-process in low-mass stars. A few journal papers published by the group.
Collaborator Contribution Study of the most important reaction rates and what precision in nuclear physics experiments is desirable for astrophysics applications by means of a stochastic model, in particular s-process in massive stars and r-process.
Impact It is possible to find on the website the outcomes resulted from this project among which the purchase of a new cluster, comprising 1000+ cores and part of it uses the high-tech shared-memory hardware from numascale, see http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/shyne/numascale for more details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description SHYNE (Stellar HYdrodynamics Nucleosynthesis and Evolution) 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department School of Physics and Astronomy
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Study of the most important reaction rates and what precision in nuclear physics experiments is desirable for astrophysics applications by means of a stochastic model, in particular s-process in low-mass stars. A few journal papers published by the group.
Collaborator Contribution Study of the most important reaction rates and what precision in nuclear physics experiments is desirable for astrophysics applications by means of a stochastic model, in particular s-process in massive stars and r-process.
Impact It is possible to find on the website the outcomes resulted from this project among which the purchase of a new cluster, comprising 1000+ cores and part of it uses the high-tech shared-memory hardware from numascale, see http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/shyne/numascale for more details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description WEAVE 
Organisation Paris Institute of Astrophysics
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am a member of Galactic Archaeology Science Team, and gave a talk at the Team Meeting in Paris in Jan 2016.
Collaborator Contribution The high-resolution multi-object spectrographs is being built, will be installed on the WHT, and the survey will be started in ~2019.
Impact No output yet since the survey has not started yet.
Start Year 2016
 
Description WEAVE 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Department of Physics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am a member of Galactic Archaeology Science Team, and gave a talk at the Team Meeting in Paris in Jan 2016.
Collaborator Contribution The high-resolution multi-object spectrographs is being built, will be installed on the WHT, and the survey will be started in ~2019.
Impact No output yet since the survey has not started yet.
Start Year 2016