Astrophysics Research at the University of Leicester

Lead Research Organisation: University of Leicester
Department Name: Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

We will deliver world-class research programmes in astrophysics through the exploitation of data from space missions and ground based telescopes, as well as the development of new theories and the numerical simulation of processes in these areas. We will also develop new instrumental techniques and detectors for future missions and telescopes. The research programme is based mainly around two research groups, with some participation by three others. These groups conduct their own research projects but also have a strong ethos of collaboration on topics of mutual interest.

Our research seeks to understand basic processes in our own and other galaxies, addressing questions of great interest to the wider public. We will search for new planets orbiting nearby stars which may mimic the planets that are present in our own solar system or possibly be very different, such as hot Neptunes, or Super Earths.

We will investigate some of the most extreme environments in our Universe by high energy astrophysics research focusing on extreme phenomena ranging from Galactic black hole binaries, through to active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. These studies will include the feedback processes that link black holes to the evolution of their host galaxies.

We will maintain and enhance a programme in stellar astronomy with emphasis on the astrophysics of white dwarf stars. We will be using high performance computers to simulate these systems theoretically. This in turn will help our observations and vice versa. Through these simulations we will build theories and models of how these extreme systems behave. We will use these simulations to try to understand the `dark' matter which constitutes much of the material
content of the Universe. We will use laboratory experimentation to develop new ways to observe these phenomena, building new instruments for the next generation of space missions.

This work also offers spin-off activities which often drive progress in areas far removed from astrophysics. Our department has an active programme of engagement with the wider community, particularly school age children, who are thrilled to hear about research in the Department. We will maintain a strong commitment to knowledge transfer for academic beneficiaries.

Planned Impact

The applicants offer a diverse skill set that constitute a valuable resource to the private and public sectors. We have extensive experience and expertise in e.g. data analysis and handling, spacecraft and mission management, algorithm design, software engineering and high performance computing. Exploitation of this expertise is supported at all levels within the University. The Department of Physics and Astronomy is committed to
promoting and maximising the impact of our research. The College of Science and Engineering plays a leading role in the Enterprise Agenda for the University and offers dedicated enterprise officers and impact enhancing resources. Further support is provided by the University's Enterprise and Business Development Office, which works with academics and external stakeholders to create maximum impact in the local, provide national, and international community. This structure (i) delivers enterprising impact through the alignment of our research with major global and industrial challenges, (ii) identifies and addresses the opportunities to play a positive role in the economic development of our region and the UK, (iii) utilises research and related activities to develop skills and capability within a broad spectrum of the public and private sectors, (iv) provides expert advice and
guidance to industry and policy makers, (v) ensures that its intellectual property is effectively transferred and disseminated, and (vi) contributes to the wider cultural benefit of society through an enterprising and engaging outreach programme.

The long term impact strategy has four elements:

(1) to support and develop the skills and experience of the applicants;

(2) to ensure that links with public and private sector industries are developed, cultivated and maximised;

(3) to disseminate knowledge, skills and expterise to the benefit of the local, national and international business and civic communities;

(4) to sustain and develop our successful outreach programme with particular emphasis on enhancing our efforts to develop valid outcome measures.

Publications

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De Ugarte Postigo A. (2018) The luminous host galaxy, faint supernova and rapid afterglow rebrightening of GRB 100418A in Astronomy and Astrophysics

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Collaboration G (2018) Gaia Data Release 2. Summary of the contents and survey properties in Astronomy and Astrophysics

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Van Leeuwen F. (2017) Gaia Data Release 1. The photometric data in Astronomy and Astrophysics

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Bianchi Luciana (2018) Using GALEX-SDSS-PanSTARRS-HST-Gaia to understand post-AGB evolution in Astrophysics and Space Science

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Barstow, Martin (2019) White dwarfs as probes of fundamental astrophysics in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society

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Gaensicke, Boris (2019) Evolved Planetary Systems around White Dwarfs in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society

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Roming Peter W. A. (2018) Understanding The Death Of Massive Stars Using An Astrophysical Transients Observatory in Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Sciences

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Reindl Nicole (2018) Revealing the True Nature of Hen 2-428 in Galaxies

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Baker SH (2016) Structure and magnetism in Cr-embedded Co nanoparticles. in Journal of physics. Condensed matter : an Institute of Physics journal

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Nixon Chris (2016) Warp Propagation in Astrophysical Discs in Lecture Notes in Physics, Berlin Springer Verlag

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Gentile Fusillo N (2019) A Gaia Data Release 2 catalogue of white dwarfs and a comparison with SDSS in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Wheatley Peter J. (2018) The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Higgins A. B. (2019) SPLOT: a snapshot survey for polarized light in optical transients in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Cashmore Claire R. (2017) Too small to succeed: the difficulty of sustaining star formation in low-mass haloes in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Amaral-Rogers A. (2017) The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Joyce S. R. G. (2018) The gravitational redshift of Sirius B in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Angus C. R. (2016) A Hubble Space Telescope survey of the host galaxies of Superluminous Supernovae in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Tanvir N (2019) The fraction of ionizing radiation from massive stars that escapes to the intergalactic medium in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Dehnen Walter (2017) Symplectic fourth-order maps for the collisional N -body problem in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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King Andrew (2016) Black holes in stellar-mass binary systems: expiating original spin? in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Raimundo S (2019) Modelling the AGN broad line region using single-epoch spectra - I. The test case of Arp 151 in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Zubovas Kastytis (2016) A simple way to improve AGN feedback prescription in SPH simulations in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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King Andrew (2016) Black hole winds II: Hyper-Eddington winds and feedback in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Emmanoulopoulos D (2016) Extensive X-ray variability studies of NGC 7314 using long XMM-Newton observations in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Humphries R. J. (2018) Changes in the metallicity of gas giant planets due to pebble accretion in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Wilson D (2019) Multiwavelength observations of the EUV variable metal-rich white dwarf GD 394 in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Vaughan S (2016) False periodicities in quasar time-domain surveys in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Higgins A. B. (2019) Detailed multi-wavelength modelling of the dark GRB 140713A and its host galaxy in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Heintz K. E. (2018) The luminous, massive and solar metallicity galaxy hosting the Swift ?-ray burst GRB 160804A at z = 0.737 in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Rice Ken (2018) On fragmentation of turbulent self-gravitating discs in the long cooling time regime in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Bayliss D (2018) NGTS-1b: a hot Jupiter transiting an M-dwarf in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Nixon C (2018) The origin of the structure of large-scale magnetic fields in disc galaxies in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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King Andrew (2016) How big can a black hole grow? in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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MacLeod C (2016) A systematic search for changing-look quasars in SDSS in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Dehnen W (2017) Towards time symmetric N-body integration in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Gualandris Alessia (2017) Collisionless loss-cone refilling: there is no final parsec problem in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Lyman J. D. (2016) Hubble Space Telescope observations of the host galaxies and environments of calcium-rich supernovae in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Lamb Gavin P. (2018) Late-time evolution of afterglows from off-axis neutron star mergers in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Kacharov Nikolay (2017) Prolate rotation and metallicity gradient in the transforming dwarf galaxy Phoenix in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Amaral-Rogers A. (2017) The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

 
Description Royal Society Research Grant
Amount £13,055 (GBP)
Funding ID RG170230 
Organisation The Royal Society 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 10/2018
 
Description Creativity and Curiosity - Art meets astronomy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project started as a discussion between artists and astronomers to stimulate new art and engage with new audiences. Events have included exhibitions of the artworks and associated discussion events across the county and abroad.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.creativityandcuriosity.com
 
Description US NSF announcement of discovery of first gravitational wave source with electromagnetic counterpart - Oct 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact US National Science Foundation press release.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/press-release-gw170817
 
Description Various school visits, astronomical society lectures 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Many presentations, 100s of students, excellent questions and discussion. Audience figures are totals for activities during each year.

Improvements in interest in applying for science degrees
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018