BAS Polar Oceans

Lead Research Organisation: NERC British Antarctic Survey

Abstract

This programme works to understand the role of the oceans in influencing the polar ice caps, and regional climate change caused by shifts in ocean circulation. Our aim is to reduce uncertainty in scientific predictions for a future world and to provide Government with scientific assessment of how these issues will affect the everyday lives of people in decades to come. Our two research groups (Open Oceans and Shelf Seas) focus on the rapidly-changing regions of West Antarctica and Greenland, on other polar areas where the current rates of change appear slower but which may be susceptible to dramatic changes in future, and on the broader deep ocean areas of both the Arctic and the Southern Ocean. The British Antarctic Survey has unique capability in these research areas, including leadership of interdisciplinary teams that work across the boundaries of glaciology, oceanography and climate science.

Publications

10 25 50

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Anderies JM (2015) Introduction to focus issue: Nonlinear dynamics for planet Earth. in Chaos (Woodbury, N.Y.)

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Annett A (2017) Silica cycling and isotopic composition in northern Marguerite Bay on the rapidly-warming western Antarctic Peninsula in Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography

 
Description Global sea level is rising, and ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet is contributing a significant fraction of this. Current climate models project sea-level rise of 60 centimetres by 2100, but ice loss from Antarctica could increase this to 1 metre or more. Future Antarctic ice loss is highly uncertain, and this risk must be understood in order to enable humanity to adapt to the possible consequences. Ocean melting of floating glacial ice - known as 'ice shelves' - is the most important trigger of ice loss from Antarctica, and this is a major focus of research for the Polar Oceans programme.
The majority of the ice loss is happening in the Amundsen Sea sector of Antarctica. The Polar Oceans programme has maintained an array of oceanographic moorings in the Amundsen Sea for many years as part of an international collaboration. Our scientists have also participated in a series of cruises to this region, recording the properties of the ocean water in important locations and at the face of the ice shelves. In the past year, a major re-processing of 10 years of observations at the face of Dotson Ice Shelf has confirmed that a decadal cycle of ocean temperature change has controlled the ice loss from its tributary ice streams. The ocean change is related to atmospheric variability travelling all the way from the tropics. This shows that the ongoing ice loss is not caused simply by a gradually warming ocean. The question of whether the ongoing ice loss is caused by historical natural variability or continued human-caused climate change is highly significant to policymakers.
Ice shelves can be as large as France and two kilometres thick, so observing the oceans beneath is extremely difficult. We have perfected the technique of using hot water to drill boreholes through the ice and then deploying instrumentation down the hole to monitor the ocean. Moored oceanographic sensors deployed beneath the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, in the southern Weddell Sea, have shown a signal of gradual slowdown in the ocean currents beneath the ice, compared to earlier measurements obtained by our scientists in the 1990s. An investigation of wider datasets has revealed that this slowdown is consistent with a progressive reduction in sea-ice freezing to the north of the ice shelf, and a gradual warming of the Weddell Sea. These early results are of significant concern, because previous model results have shown that Antarctica can lose ice very rapidly if warmer waters enter the Filcher-Ronne cavity.
The history and fate of Antarctic sea ice is another focus of the Polar Oceans programme. Arctic sea ice is declining rapidly, as expected against a background of global warming, but Antarctic sea ice has actually expanded in area over the last 35 years. A new analysis of satellite observations of sea ice shows that natural variability of the Southern Hemisphere, again caused by interaction with the tropics, has caused a large fraction of this expansion. This is the first time that any of the ice expansion has been firmly attributed to any cause. In addition, new model results and observations have also shown that Antarctic sea ice meltwater plays an important role in converting deep ocean waters to lighter, shallower waters, a conversion that forms a key part of the global ocean circulation.
The Polar Oceans programme also strives to understand the role of the wider Southern Ocean (and Arctic) in the global climate system. The ocean that rings Antarctica is unique in all the global oceans in that it has a widespread and strong vertical circulation of watermasses. This allows direct and relatively rapid exchange of properties between the deep ocean basin and surface/atmosphere, and visa versa. In particular the Southern Ocean is responsible for 75% of heat and 40% of global ocean carbon sequestration, and thus it is critical to understanding future climate that we know how this vertical circulation may respond to changes in surface winds, heat fluxes and continental runoff/precipitation. Our recent work has shown that many coupled climate models used in the IPCC assessments struggle to consistently represent the dynamics controlling the Southern Ocean circulation, and often produce significantly different projections for changes under climate warming scenarios. This variance in model response across the suite of climate models may feed back onto the wider climate and represent a significant source of uncertainty in global warming projections. Our results show that, amongst other issues, one of the main problems facing the next generation of coupled climate models is a need to more accurately represent the impact of small scale (~50-100 km) eddies on the wider horizontal and vertical circulation of the Southern Ocean. These models have provided the basis for estimating future impacts of climate change and ocean warming on Southern Ocean benthic communities. These high impact results show that for communities south of the Polar Front approximately 79% of species will lose habitable area at suitable temperatures by 2100 under 'business as usual' climate change.
Higher resolution modelling of the Southern Ocean has revealed insights into how wind variability impacts the dynamics and sensitivity of the Southern ocean. We have found that stronger changes in stratification and overturning may result from wind variability changes rather than the strength of the mean winds. This can be traced to robust changes in ocean energetics. The impact of this could be important in understanding past and future climates, where oceanographers usually pay more attention to the mean wind stress instead of how it changed.
As well as assessing and diagnosing issues with the representation of Southern Ocean dynamics in models, the Polar Oceans programme has delivered insights into the processes that drive the vertical exchange of water and subsequent subduction and sequestration of atmospheric heat and carbon. On the continental margin of the rapidly changing west Antarctic peninsula we have made novel use of autonomous ocean gliders to diagnose the extent, location and dynamics driving the movement of relatively warm water from the open ocean onto the continental shelf, where it has been strongly implicated in driving the basal melting of floating ice shelves. These gliders have also recently been fitted with probes to directly measure the mixing of water masses, something that could previously only be roughly estimated, and have made world first microstructure observations on the continental shelf slope. The gliders have also been instrumental in developing a mechanistic understanding of how continental shelf waters are exported from the mouths of deep glacially-carved troughs into the deep Southern Ocean.
This work complements ongoing long term monitoring of the continental shelf waters using more traditional methods on the Antarctic peninsula, where the Polar Oceans programme maintains the longest continuous timeseries of WAP shelf oceanographic observations. This time series has contributed to key diagnostics of the relative importance of sea ice melt vs. changes in continental glacial outflow, as well as novel insights into how interannual variability in sea ice, surface winds and deep warm water impacts shelf water properties, biogeochemistry and Antarctic coastal ecosystems.
Further from the continental margin, Polar Oceans have made major contributions to the mapping and quantification of export pathways of deep, dense waters formed around Antarctica to the wider ocean, where they may spread as far north as the North Atlantic. We maintain moorings and regular ship based hydrographic sections that bisect the main pathways of deep water movement from the Weddell Sea to the wider global ocean. These observations have revealed not only long term trends, suggesting that change in the formation regions of deep water (for example increased continental ice melt) are rapidly transmitted into the deep ocean interior, but also significant interannual variability, which we have linked to changes in winds over the Weddell Sea and Antarctic peninsula. As well as quantifying these pathways we have also made insights into the processes that mediate the export of ventilated Weddell Sea water to the deep ocean; including novel use of autonomous submersibles and profiling Argo floats circulating in natural 'washing machines' that act to exchange water across the topography that forms a natural barrier on the northern flank of the Weddell Sea.
Within the upwelling regions north of the Antarctic margins, Polar Oceans have demonstrated that there is a clear warming of the upwelling limb of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation in observations over the last several decades. They have linked this change to the observed cooling and, particularly, freshening of surface waters and subsequently demonstrated that such anomalies produce similar interior warming trends in realistic ocean models. Furthermore they have demonstrated that competing mechanisms, notably wind stress and overturning increases, do not produce trends of the right sign to explain the observed trend. They have demonstrated that such trends are reproduced in coupled climate models, but note that the models' inability to accurately recreate the physics driving the trend means that they may have significant inaccuracies in their predicted ocean heat uptake under future climate forcing.
Further north in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, particularly south of Australia and immediately to the west of the Southern tip of Chile there is another important region of vertical transport. Here particular classes of water are formed by winter time cooling and sinking at the surface and subsequently transported northwards into the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic basins. Via high resolution computer modelling, the Polar Oceans Programme have quantified the location and efficiency of these pathways. This work has also led to the development of adjoint model capability, essentially allowing models to be run backwards to examine the role of different forcing factors in setting ultimate subduction values and variability.
Another focus of our work is the effect of polar ocean currents upon biology, and specifically on important fisheries. Recent modelling work has investigated the effects of climate change upon different fish species, considering the effects of ocean warming through increased egg and larval mortality and a reduction in the length of the planktonic (drifting) phase. The latest results show that these pressures lead to reduced dispersal of such species between populations at the basin scale, and increased dispersal locally within groups of islands. This would lead to increased isolation of island populations in a warming world, with implications for the resilience of populations and their ability to adapt to ongoing environmental change, a matter of high relevance to fisheries and ecosystem management.
Polar Oceans have developed a global adjoint ocean model. This novel tool essentially allows us to define a property of interest, say ocean interior heat content away from the surface, and then run the model 'backwards' to determine what external factors (e.g. wind variability or surface heat flux) act to set the property and drive its variability. This has been used to identify influences on the climatically important Labrador Sea heat budget, including identifying a new influence pathway from the African/European continental shelves, and quantifying the relative importance of local vs non-local surface heat fluxes. This tool forms the basis of ongoing work to identify and quantify the processes driving Southern Ocean heat uptake, both in the immediate surface mixed layer, and further afield in subducted regions. Initial results show a surprising lack of sensitivity to the prevailing westerlies over the ACC, but significant roles for heating in the SAMW regions and dynamics controlling the subtropical gyre circulation.
The Polar Oceans group has also started to explore the use of machine learning techniques in oceanographic studies. We have completed an initial study looking at using these techniques to automatically classify Southern Ocean water masses and we are collaborating with colleagues in the Engineering Department of Cambridge University (including joint supervision of a PhD student) to develop methods to remove biases from climate model output.
Exploitation Route Our developments in instrumentation for observing ocean properties and melt rates beneath floating ice are already being put to use by other groups worldwide. Fundamental understanding of the ocean currents beneath ice shelves will enable parameterisations of these effects to be included into climate models. Global models are just starting to include the interaction between ice sheets and oceans, with the aim of projecting sea-level rise over the coming centuries, so our findings will be essential in ensuring that these model projections are accurate. Understanding the Antarctic sea-ice increase is necessary in order to improve the historical sea ice in climate models, which underpins their ability to predict Antarctic climate change.
Similarly, new observations and insights into the role of slope processes in mediating the flow of warm waters into the vicinity of sea-ice and ice shelves will improve our estimates of the rate at which we might expect ice sheets to respond to changes in both ocean properties and wind driven flows. Ongoing observational timeseries monitoring trends and variability of the deep overturning circulation are also a key metric for understanding the response of the global overturning circulation to the ongoing and predicted changes over the Antarctic. Such timeseries are essential for the validation and verification of trends in climate models, where accurately representing the ocean overturning response and consequent feedbacks on climate warming scenarios is critical to accurately estimating future global surface temperatures.
The adjoint ocean tool developed in Polar Oceans has been in high demand from other groups both within and external to BAS. It has been used in diagnosing regions of upwelling for Petrel species foraging patterns, to determine the formation regions and export pathways of nutrients in the thermocline and to diagnose the drivers of subduction variability in the Labrador Sea. It has formed the basis for Polar Oceans collaboration on several grant and studentship proposals and is attracting growing interest across the oceanographic community.
Our expertise in diagnosing and interpreting coupled climate models in the Southern Ocean has been in demand from groups worldwide seeking to understand the impact that a changing climate will have on ecosystems and future fisheries. The physical system underpins future biogeochemical, biological and ecological changes, but is not always simple to interpret. We currently provide the expertise required to understand the caveats that come with complex ensembles of climate models and assist other groups in interpreting their field specific results in the appropriate context.
Sectors Environment

URL https://www.bas.ac.uk/team/science-teams/oceans/
 
Description The group's findings have fed into briefings given to a wide range of stakeholders. This has included: * government ministers * MPs * officials from government departments and agencies * government officials from overseas (Mayors from Guangdong province, China), international organisations (European Bank for Reconstruction and Development; Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources) * regulatory authorities (Prudential Regulation Authority) * business (Jaguar Land Rover, Vestas 11th Hour Racing, Network Rail, Saint Gobain, BNP Paribas), business conferences (Business Green, European Renewables) * students and researchers from other disciplines (BP Institute Masterclass, Leverhulme Climate Justice project, Chemical Engineering Dept, Cambridge) * media professionals (Sheffield Documentary Festival) * the public (Cambridge Science Festival, Ely Science Festival, TEDx talk), community groups and membership organisations (Women's Institute, U3A), school visits (University of Cambridge Primary School). Specific outputs have included policy briefings (CISL briefing on climate and financial risk), online magazine articles, newspaper articles, television and radio interviews, and taught courses (ESA MOOC, Masters in Sustainability, Professional Certificate in Sustainable Business, Professional Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains). * leadership of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Oceans and the Cryosphere. * use of sensitive radar instruments created to observe ice melting rates for monitoring groundwater levels in Morocco * leadership of Foreign and Commonwealth Office report on climate change in the polar regions.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Education,Energy,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Energy & Climate Change Select Committee inquiry into IPCC
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact Emily Shuckburgh was a witness for the Energy and Climate Change Select Committee's inquiry into the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, appearing in person and submitting written evidence.
URL http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/energy-and-climate-change...
 
Description Government advice on climate science
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guidance committee
 
Description Government advice on climate science
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Input to assessments of climate risk in financial sector
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Following an expert dialogue in which Dr Emily Shuckburgh participated, a report was written "Stability and Sustainability in Banking Reform - Are Environmental Risks Missing in Basel III?" Dr Shuckburgh also contributed to the Bank of England's report from the Prudential Regulation Authority on Climate Change Adaptation and the UK insurance sector. The impact to-date is a new recognition in the financial regulation sector that climate change is a potential systemic risk that needs to be accounted for.
URL http://www.cisl.cam.ac.uk/business-action/sustainable-finance/banking-environment-initiative/program...
 
Description Prof Mike Meredith: leadership of Polar Regions chapter in IPCC Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.ipcc.ch/report/srocc/
 
Description NERC LTSM NC
Amount £8,400,000 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/N018095/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2021
 
Description Southern Ocean Carbon and Heat Impact on Climate - SO-CHIC
Amount € 7,989,925 (EUR)
Funding ID 821001 
Organisation European Commission H2020 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 11/2019 
End 10/2023
 
Description Studentship with GW4+ DTP (Gen Hinde)
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2020
 
Description Studentship with SPITFIRE DTP (Rachael Sanders)
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2019
 
Title Seawater stable isotope sample measurements from the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition (ACE) 
Description Haumann, F. A., Leonard, K., Meredith, M. P., Arrowsmith, C., Gorodetskaya, I. V., Hutchings, J., Lehning, M., Leng, M. J., Stammerjohn, S., Tsukernik, M., Weber, Y. (2019): Seawater stable isotope sample measurements from the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition (ACE). doi:10.5281/zenodo.1494915. ace_18_data_d18o_dd_ctd_20190219.csv Contains oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of seawater samples collected from the Niskin bottles mounted on the CTD rosette ace_18_data_d18o_dd_uw_20190219.csv Contains oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of seawater samples collected from the underway line ace_18_data_d18o_dd_other_20190219.csv Contains oxygen isotopic composition of miscellaneous samples: A duplicate seawater sample from the underway line (UW_B); a seawater bucket sample from Cumberland Bay, South Georgia (bucket); terrestrial ice/snow sample from the surface (TS) and 0.5m deep hole (T05) collected on a drifting tabular ice berg; seawater samples from Niskin bottles mounted on the trace-metal rosette (TMR). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This data set contains oxygen and hydrogen isotope measurements from discrete seawater samples that were collected in the Southern Ocean (south of 30 deg S) during the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition (ACE). 637 samples were collected during the period December 24th, 2016 and March 18th, 2017 in the Southern Ocean from the surface ocean using the ship's underway line (UW; 338 samples) and in vertical profiles using Niskin bottles mounted on the CTD rosette (287 samples). A few additional samples were collected from a parallel cast with a trace-metal rosette, with a bucket, and from the surface of a tabular iceberg. All samples were analyzed for their oxygen isotopic composition (reported as permille deviation of the oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 ratio from VSMOW2: DEL18O) and a few samples (80) from the Pacific sector were analyzed for their hydrogen isotopic composition (reported as permille deviation of the hydrogen to deuterium ratio from VSMOW2: DELD) by mass spectrometry at the British Geological Survey. This circumpolar data set provides insights into the hydrological cycle of the Southern Ocean and the processes (precipitation, evaporation, sea-ice melting and freezing, iceberg and land-ice melting) that determine the salinity of a certain water mass. 
URL https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1494915
 
Title Summary of BODC holdings for ORCHESTRA 
Description CRUISE DATASET DESCRIPTION EXPECTED DATE STATUS JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7308) @ 1810m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7309) @ 1960m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN9394) @ 2110m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7313) @ 2260m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE39 (SN4413) @ 2034m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE39 (SN4716) @ 1884m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6273) @ 1809m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8351) @ 1959m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6182) @ 2259m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8355) @ 2409m 01/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7316) @ 3590m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8111) @ 3589m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7297) @ 3510m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6260) @ 3509m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7314) @ 3410m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7299) @ 3310m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6203) @ 3309m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7294) @ 3210m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6244) @ 3209m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7311) @ 3110m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN8076) @ 3010m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6275) @ 3009m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7310) @ 2910m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8352) @ 2909m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7302) @ 2810m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8088) @ 2809m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN5883) @ 2709m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN9379) @ 2610m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6178) @ 2609m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP1 mooring- SBE37 (SN7307) @ 2509m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- SBE37 (SN7288) @ 2991m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN1430) @ 2990m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8097) @ 2907m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- SBE37 (SN7290) @ 2808m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN1415) @ 2807m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- SBE37 (SN7291) @ 2708m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6262) @ 2707m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN1404) @ 2507m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8360) @ 2407m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6181) @ 2257m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8093) @ 1957m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- SBE39 (SN4713) @ 1882m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6242) @ 1807m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6213) @ 1657m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP2 mooring- Aquadopp (SN8362) @ 1507m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP3 mooring- SBE37 (SN7386) @ 1722m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP3 mooring- Aquadopp (SN9378) @ 1168 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP3 mooring- SBE37 (SN7383) @ 11439m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP3 mooring- Aquadopp (SN9392) @ 1143 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP3 mooring- SBE39 (SN4897) @ 11230m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- SBE37 (SN2956) @ 2931m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- RCM11 (SN592) @ 2893m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- SBE39 (SN4418) @ 2194m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- RCM11 (SN532) @ 2187m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- SBE37 (SN2707) @ 1838m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP4 mooring- RCM11 (SN521) @ 1831m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6000) @ 3346m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6236) @ 3296m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN5993) @ 3196m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6112) @ 3096m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6263) @ 2946m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6180) @ 2796m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6198) @ 2646m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP5 mooring- Aquadopp (SN6226) @ 2496m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP6 mooring- SBE37 (SN8267) @ 2319m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP6 mooring- Aquadopp (SN9264) @ 2288m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR20150309 (JR272D, JR310) 2015/17 OP6 mooring- Aquadopp (SN9250) @ 1978m 30/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 49 CTD casts 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Underway water samples for salinity and oxygen, d18O 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 CTD bottle data 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 48 LADCP profiles 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Continuous underway nav, met and tsg 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Water samples for salinity and d18O analysis from small boats 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Water samples for Salinity and d18O analysis from CTD bottles 01/11/2016 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Underway JR15006 Migration to Series- Navigation and bathymetry 31/12/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Underway JR15006 Migration to Series- Meteorology 31/12/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 Underway JR15006 Migration to Series- Surface Hydrography 31/12/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR15006 SADCP (75 kHz) 01/11/2016 00:00 No further action required JR15006 Water samples collected in pools on land for salinity and d18O analysis 01/11/2016 00:00 No further action required JR15006 Ice core samples for salinity and d18O analysis 01/11/2016 00:00 No further action required JR16002 Water samples for d18O analysis from CTD bottles 31/07/2017 00:00 Auditing in progress JR16002 Continuous underway nav, met and tsg 01/07/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 30 CTD casts 01/07/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 30 LADCP profiles 01/07/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 CTD upcast data 01/07/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 Water samples for salinity, oxygen and SBE35 01/06/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 Navigation and Bathymetry Migration to series schema (NAV) 20/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 Continuous surface hydrography data - migration to series schema (SURF) 20/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 Continuous Meteorological Data - Migration to series schema (MET) 20/11/2017 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16002 3 Deep Apex float deployments 01/07/2017 00:00 No further action required JR16002 SADCP data from cruise JR16002 30/06/2017 00:00 No further action required JR16004 CTD profiles for A23 repeat section 22/03/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR16004 LADCP profiles for A23 repeat section 22/03/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17001 SADCP measurements for JR17001 30/06/2018 00:00 Auditing in progress JR17001 41 CTD casts 30/06/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR17001 41 LADCP casts 30/06/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR17001 8 XBT deployment 30/06/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR17001 5 Slocum gliders deployed (#632, 633, 408, 330, 424) 30/06/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 1 Seaglider deployment (# 640) CTD, EcoPuck, dissolved oxygen, optode, PAR, acousonde 30/06/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 1 SW Waveglider deployed 30/06/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 4 Deep Apex floats deployed (#21, 18, 19, 20) 30/06/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 3 Arvor AI2600 floats deployed (#16FR091, 16FR092 and 16FR093) 30/06/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider (BAS) #632 - near real time dataset 23/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider (BAS) #633 - near real time dataset 23/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider #424 (NOC) - near real time dataset 01/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider #408 - near real time dataset 01/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider #330 - near real time dataset 01/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Slocum Glider (NOC) #424 - microstructure data 01/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JR17001 Water samples from 41 CTD casts (salinity, oxygen, SBE35 data) 30/06/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17001 Underway: navigation series 30/06/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17001 CTD-upcast data from 41 stations (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen) 30/06/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17001 Underway: meteorology series 30/06/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17001 Underway: sea surface hydrography series 30/06/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JR17003 60 CTD casts (temperature/conductivity sensors, dissolved oxygen, transmissometer, fluorometer, PAR) 31/08/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR17003 60 LADCP casts (Down and upward looking) 31/08/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JR17003 SADCP (75 kHz) 31/08/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 CTD casts 31/10/2018 00:00 Ingestion completed JC159 LADCP profiles 31/10/2018 00:00 No further action required JC159 Multibeam Bathymetry data from EM122 01/07/2018 00:00 No further action required JC159 Oxygen and nutrient data from CTD bottles 27/09/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 DIC and Alkalinity samples from CTD bottles 27/09/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 Salinity samples from CTD bottles 27/09/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 Continuous underway measurements (Navigation and Bathymetry, Meteorology, Surface hydrography) 31/10/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 SADCP (75 kHz) 31/10/2018 00:00 Processing in progress JC159 SADCP (150 kHz) 31/10/2018 00:00 Received 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Glider data is visible through the MARS portal 
URL https://orchestra.ac.uk/data/
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation Alfred-Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation National Oceanography Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation Norwegian Polar Institute
Country Norway 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
Department Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation University of Groningen
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Diverse international collaborations with leading marine/polar institutes 
Organisation Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Collaborator Contribution There is a huge range of national/international partnerships that underpin the Polar Oceans research programme; above are key examples of with whom we collaborate - but there are many others.
Impact Very many research papers and key findings have derived from these collaborations - see separate sections for details.
Start Year 2015
 
Description International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration 
Organisation New York University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Melting at Thwaites grounding zone and its control on sea level (MELT). MELT is an ice-based project to understand how warm waters are affecting the Thwaites Glacier at the grounding line - the point where the glacier goes afloat to become ice shelf. This will allow the glacier's potential sea-level contribution to be more accurately predicted. Hot water drilling will be used to make access holes through the glacier to monitor the ice column and the underlying water. Icefin, a state-of-the-art remotely-operated vehicle containing instruments such as conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors, an acoustic Doppler current profiler, a camera, a dissolved oxygen sensor and a multi-beam echosounder, will be deployed via the boreholes to examine the waters beneath the ice shelf. Ocean moorings will be used to monitor the ocean conditions for a year or more and ground-based phase-sensitive radar (ApRES) will monitor the basal melt rate. The project will also use repeated airborne radar flights to study the way the ice flows in this area, and seismic surveys to study the ocean floor beneath the ice shelf. Data gathered in the field will enhance our understanding of how ocean conditions are affecting the melt rate of Thwaites Glacier. When this is combined with ice sheet models it will allow the glacier's potential sea-level contribution to be more accurately predicted.
Collaborator Contribution The US partners will deploy numerical modelling and remote sensing techniques to leverage the field observations.
Impact Collaboration just begun.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Joint UK-US partnership in the DynOPO project 
Organisation Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This NERC award has funded the fieldwork, equipment and scientist/technician time for a major programme investigating the dynamics that control dense water export from the Southern Ocean. The UK participants provide expertise on ocean dynamics, physical oceanography, marine technology (including deep-ocean moorings and an autonomous submarine), and numerical modelling.
Collaborator Contribution NSF have funded a parallel project, led by Prof. Kurt Polzin of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Massachusetts. This is providing extra ocean equipment, and allowing the participation of Prof. Polzin in the fieldwork elements and analyses. There is also participation from Profs. Sonya Legg and Stephen Griffies of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, who are adding unique capability in ultra-high resolution modelling and climate modelling.
Impact Collaboration has greatly enhanced the planning of the field campaign, which is very soon to commence. Collaboration will strengthen the quality and impact of subsequent outputs, due following completion of the fieldwork.
Start Year 2015
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation Princeton University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
Department Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of Gothenburg
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of Newcastle
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation University of Tasmania
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation Washington State University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description ORCHESTRA as an enabler of community science 
Organisation Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Collaborator Contribution Aside from extensive collaborations within the ORCHESTRA centres and the Met Office, active ORCHESTRA related collaborations are ongoing with three separate grant bids into the RoSES call and two large grant bids (SOO-SPLENDID/TICTOC). Active collaborations are underway with researchers from the University of Newcastle, University of Southampton, University of Gothenburg, Washington State University, L'OCEAN Paris, the University of Tasmania, and very many others. These collaborations have strengthened ORCHESTRA science by enabling and drawing benefit from non-NC funded science, and is in line with the ethos of LTSM science enabling the broader community.
Impact See Publications, many of which are direct collaborations with non-ORCHESTRA institutes.
Start Year 2016
 
Description A drop in the Southern Ocean 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A movie of research in the Southern Ocean (http://vimeo.com/97260669) was constructed from footage from a DIMES cruise, shown in a number of schools across England and Wales, and accompanied by a short talk by two DIMES scientists. This was used to raise school kids' awareness of oceanography and science. Many schools reported on great interest in science careers from many of their pupils in the months following the movie / talk session.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://vimeo.com/97260669
 
Description Academic Consultancy to BBC for series "Frozen Planet 2", Mike Meredith 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This series is the successor to BBC's hugely successful Frozen Planet, which reached an audience of 500 million people globally. Prof Mike Meredith has been contracted by the BBC to serve as Academic Consultant for the production of its sequel. This work is underway; the series is due for broadcast in 2021, and will reach an audience similar to its predecessor.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Boland Cambridge Primary outreach 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Emma Boland took part in outreach at the University of Cambridge primary school in January on the topic of the Polar Regions with Reception-aged children.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Breakfast briefing for MPs on climate change 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Breakfast briefing held at Royal Society for MPs on climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Cambridge Science Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Cambridge Science Festival event "Sensing the climate: how do we measure our changing planet?" as part of the Cambridge Centre for Climate Science. This includes a presentation on how oceanographers take observational measurements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description DynOPO connection with ORCHESTRA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Strong media interest surrounded the DynOPO cruise, which is a separately-funded NERC project but one that connects strongly to ORCHESTRA and uses data that ORCHESTRA will be producing (moorings etc). Interviews were given by the ORCHESTRA PI (Mike Meredith) on BBC R4 Today programme, Sky TV News, various local radio outlets. ORCHESTRA participant Povl Abrahamsen was featured on the BBC website, plus numerous newspapers (Times, Guardian, Mail etc).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description ORCHESTRA online and media 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An ORCHESTRA web domain for ORCHESTRA (www.orchestra.ac.uk) has been secured, and a wiki has been set up using that domain. Maintenance of facebook and twitter accounts has been ongoing to highlight ORCHESTRA progress and achievements. Direct engagement with the public via podcasts, TV and radio interviews and popular science book publications, as well as participation in science festivals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017