Modelling Solid-State Sources of GHz-THz Electromagnetic Radiation

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Faculty of Engineering

Abstract

The development of new solid-state sources of GHz-THz electromagnetic radiation is of current interest with potential applications in communications and medicine. It has
recently been shown that graphene-based materials are particularly promising due to the high electron mobility and configurability of the device structures. To develop new
devices, it is important to understand the coupling of such high frequency sources not only with each other but also with their environment. The George Green Institute for
Electromagnetics Research and the School of Mathematical Sciences have developed new models for the propagation of fields generated by complex sources in arbitrary
environments. These methods are very general, and include full wave computation tools, as well as formalisms using exact boundary integral equations. The student will use a
selection of these tools to study the radiation pattern of solid-state high frequency sources, and optimise their configurability in space and time. Near-field effects on the
far-field radiation will be studied by looking at coupling to the source, and, in the case of graphene, plasmonic excitation. The project will involve the student working in a large cross-disciplinary collaboration that links Electronic and Electromagnetic Engineering with theoretical and experimental researchers from Mathematical Sciences and Physics at Nottingham and Physicists at Loughborough University.

Studentship Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Student Name
EP/N50970X/1 01/10/2016 30/09/2021
1830170 Studentship EP/N50970X/1 01/12/2016 30/11/2019 Shakirudeen Olamide Lasisi
 
Description We have developed a new mathematical and computational model that improves on existing models (e.g. the delta gap model), using the Boundary element method.
It can be used to describe certain power supply/feed structures in high frequency applications (e.g. capacitive structures, antennas) with finite gap widths. Using this methods ensures that conservation of energy is fulfilled and suitable for applications where current is allowed to travel from one port of a device to the other instantaneously without the need to model radiation from the feed. This model represents a first step to our ability to model the tunnelling current that passes through the very thin layers of Graphene in the Terahertz source under consideration, and it's non-linear current-voltage relationship. In extension, this affects our ability to model the near and far-field radiations. Details of this are recorded in the respective conference proceeding.

Secondly, a major objective of this research is to understand the coupling of solid-state high frequency sources. We have findings on the ability to achieve mutual coupling and frequency synchronisation between multiple high frequency sources when placed side-by-side. Furthermore, increased radiated power can be recorded when 2 or more sources have the same frequency. Using new mathematical formulations we are able to model this electromagnetic behaviour computationally.

Thirdly, we have made new formulations for the boundary element method that allow us to model devices with dielectric materials sandwiched between perfect electric conductors. We have extended our feed and load model to be used with this new formulation to enable e.g. voltage excited layered hetero-structures. We are working on making this applicable to infinitely thin sheets.
Exploitation Route By extending the capabilities of our current methods.
For example, how to model a tunnelling space of finite area with finite transit time. This will lend itself to many devices (e.g. diodes, transistors) which function via such principles.
Including the multi-physics of the device will allow more data to be extracted.
Incorporating the complex conductivity found in materials like Graphene.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Electronics,Healthcare,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Other

 
Description COST Action IC1407 Prague Czech Republic
Amount € 620 (EUR)
Funding ID COST-TS-ECOST-TRAINING_SCHOOLIC1407-010419-106893 
Organisation European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 04/2019 
End 04/2019
 
Description COST Action IC1407 Valetta
Amount € 680 (EUR)
Funding ID COST-TS-ECOST-TRAINING_SCHOOLIC1407-190418-095709 
Organisation European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 04/2018 
End 04/2018
 
Description Innovation Placement Funding
Amount £2,540 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2019 
End 12/2019
 
Description Kristof & Mark 
Organisation Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research location, Carrying out agreed tasks and research
Collaborator Contribution Expertise, Intellectual Input, Software, Personal Network
Impact The collaboration is multidisciplinary involving: Department of Physics, and Department of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Outcomes include: DOI: 10.1109/ICEAA.2017.8065531 DOI: 10.14293/s2199-1006.1.sor-.ppjrr4b.v1
Start Year 2016
 
Description Kristof & Mark 
Organisation Loughborough University
Department Department of Physics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research location, Carrying out agreed tasks and research
Collaborator Contribution Expertise, Intellectual Input, Software, Personal Network
Impact The collaboration is multidisciplinary involving: Department of Physics, and Department of Industrial and Applied Mathematics Outcomes include: DOI: 10.1109/ICEAA.2017.8065531 DOI: 10.14293/s2199-1006.1.sor-.ppjrr4b.v1
Start Year 2016