Parenting in the first 24 hours.

Lead Research Organisation: Durham University
Department Name: Anthropology

Abstract

Although birthing centres are very effective in supporting low-intervention labour and delivery, little is known about whether birthing centres are effective in supporting the transition to parenting in the post-natal period as no research has yet examined this issue. One issue involves the unconventional (sofa-bed) sleeping arrangements in
the Birthing Centre that separate the baby from the parents to a degree that is an impediment to responsive infant care. This study will examine this topic via a
collaborative partnership with the Royal Victoria Infirmary (RVI) Newcastle Birthing Centre who will provide access to a study site, research participants and the support
of their staff. The project will encompass 3 months of immersion in the clinical setting, observing and talking to staff and families, followed by engagement of a small cohort of families in a video ethnography study in order to understand parent-infant interactions and sleep practices from the parents' perspective. This will be followed
by a randomized video intervention study, informed by the preceding qualitative research) to ascertain whether parent-infant interactions and interactions can be
improved by encouraging closer physical proximity between parents and infant during the Birthing Centre stay. Findings from the study will help to inform practice and the
quality of care provided in the Birthing Centre. The research will also contribute to the evidence base underpinning postnatal care provision in the UK and overseas, and
attainment of WHO targets for maternal and infant care.

Publications

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Studentship Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Student Name
ES/P000762/1 01/10/2017 30/09/2027
1908281 Studentship ES/P000762/1 01/10/2017 31/03/2021 Alice-Amber Keegan