Storage Capacity of CO2 Sequestered in Heterogeneous Reservoirs

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Earth Sciences

Abstract

Carbon Sequestration involves the injection of CO2 into subsurface aquifers and other porous layers in order to store CO2 produced as the product of combustion. A major challenge for sequstration is the prediction of the fraction of the pore space which may be accessed by injection of CO2 and hence which will be available for carbon storage.

Simplified models of flow offer a means to rapidly assess the influence of variations in layer geometry and properties on their CO2 storage capacity. This project will use simplified models to assess controls on storage capacity and build insight into the likely range of capacities in different type rocks (turbidite, fluvial etc), based upon their structures. Specific models for type geometries will address the variation in storage capacity associated with buoyant over-ride of injected CO2, the presence of lower
permeability heterogeneities and the three dimensional reservoir architecture. The models will be combined with a statistical description of the variation in reservoir properties to assess the uncertainties in storage capacity for different types of possible reservoir rock.

This project will involve the development of models and laboratory experiments to explore the trapping efficiency of various types of permeable rock when CO2 is injected into the rock. The work will build from several models of carbon sequestration but focussing on this critical aspect of sequestration.

The student will have access to historical data sets, and will be able to interact with the BP carbon sequestration team as well as being part of a large research effort into carbon sequestration in the BP Institute and more broadly the University of Cambridge.

Publications

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Studentship Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Student Name
EP/S513775/1 01/10/2018 30/09/2023
2111334 Studentship EP/S513775/1 01/10/2018 31/03/2022 Patrick Mortimer