Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: English Faculty

Abstract

When Darwin was developing his theories of evolution he read avidly in popular natural history magazines and sought out information from an army of almost 2000 correspondents. Such engagement with a wide public in the construction of
science became increasingly difficult with the development of professional, and highly specialised science, but the emergence of 'citizen science' projects has suggested a new way forward.
With the creation of vast data sets in contemporary science, there is a need for a new army of volunteers to help classify and analyse the information. The Zooniverse platform, started in 2007 with 'Galaxy Zoo', now has over 800,000
participants who contribute to projects from astrophysics to climate science. Significant discoveries have already been made by these volunteers in the field of astronomy. Yet, the structures by which these volunteers might engage with
professional science, and through which scientists themselves might draw upon their findings, are not clear, and researchers on the project have been turning to nineteenth-century models of communication to find ways of harnessing
this huge popular interest in order to increase the rate of scientific progress.
The information revolution in our own age has parallels in the nineteenth century which saw an explosion of print, and journal publishing; in 1800 there were only around 100 science periodicals, but by 1900 this had jumped to 10,000
worldwide. The project brings together historical and literary research in the nineteenth century with contemporary scientific practice, looking at the ways in which patterns of popular communication and engagement in nineteenth-century science can offer models for current practice. The research is timely since the digital revolution, and open-access publishing, are about to change forever the processes and forms of scientific communication and exchange.
The project will be based at the Universities of Oxford and Leicester, in partnership with three of our most significant institutions: the Natural History Museum; the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, and the Royal Society. Researchers will draw on their historic collections, uncovering the extraordinary range of largely forgotten science journals of the nineteenth century, from the Magazine of Natural History (one of Darwin's favourites), to Recreative Science, or Hardwicke's Science Gossip: an Illustrated Medium of Interchange and Gossip for Students and Lovers of Nature. They will also work with these institutions' science communities, addressing questions about the creation and circulation of knowledge in the digital age, and looking at innovative ways of breaking through the public/professional divide. The Zooniverse will extend the range of its work, creating four new citizen science projects which will both accelerate the rate of scientific growth in these areas, and add an estimated 100,000 to 300,000 to the dedicated ranks of citizen scientists. Drawing on the historical research, it will also develop new tools to enable better systems of exchange between professional science, and this growing army of volunteers. As part of the project there will be public symposia in the Natural History Museum, the Royal Society and the Royal College of Surgeons, as well as an exhibition in the Hunterian Museum, and a performance lecture by Professor Marcus du Sautoy. Science has suffered in the public mind from its seeming aloofness and impenetrability. This partnership between humanities and science researchers aims to break down some of those barriers, and to create a truly productive public engagement with science which will enhance the ongoing development of scientific practice.

Planned Impact

The research will have an exceptionally large range of beneficiaries.
1. It aims to raise to a million, or more, the numbers of non-scientists who participate in the development of scientific research on the Zooniverse platform. Early investigations have shown that many of these volunteers on the 'citizen
science' platforms have no prior experience of science at all, but once their interest is developed they can go on to engage in quite sophisticated further research and calculations. The projects are pitched in such a way as to make them
accessible for all ages, from teenagers through to those in their nineties, and for citizens across the world.

2. The website developed to accompany the research into nineteenth-century science publishing will appeal to an equally broad spectrum of beneficiaries, from amateur naturalists, or astronomers, to members of the public interested in the history of medicine.

3. The talk in the Natural History Museum's popular 'Nature Live' series will be targeted explicitly at school-age children and families, and together with the website could form the basis of school project work.

4. The digitisation of key titles by the Biodiversity Heritage Library will ensure a permanent legacy, which can be enjoyed by future generations who might be tempted by the intriguing Science Gossip, or the Magazine of Natural History. The attraction of these journals is that they are written for a broad audience and need no specialist knowledge; they are also often beautifully illustrated.

5. The exhibition at the Hunterian Museum will give the museum a chance to open up some of its rarely viewed collections, and will enhance public interest in, and understanding of, the development of medicine in the nineteenth century.

6. The public symposia at the Natural History Museum and at the Royal College of Surgeons will offer further opportunities for members of the public to engage with the research and to gain new insight into the 'hidden history' of science
development.

7. The performance lecture by Marcus du Sautoy at the Royal Society, would bring new audiences into that institution, and raise the public profile of questions relating to science and the processes of scientific discovery.

The benefits will be cultural and educational, as detailed above, but also economic. For citizen scientists, who were perhaps turned off from science at school, or had to drop science subjects too early in their education, the project will offer a way to stimulate enthusiasm, and develop new capacities, from detailed focus and application through to the development of complex mathematical skills. These skills will be highly transferable in the labour market; the added
bonus of a sense of achievement, and personal potential, could also lead to a greater sense of ambition and empowerment in the job market. The economic benefits will also extend to science, which will be able to draw on an ever increasing pool of skilled labour to analyse the datasets that are being developed. Finally, as the name suggests, the practice of 'citizen science' will bring a new sense of citizenship and communal engagement. The findings with reference to publication patterns will also be of value in contributing to the current complex debates about online publishing, and the relative merits of commercial and non-commercial models of information exchange. They will have an impact both on commercial science publishing, and also that of scholarly societies, and other public organisations which publish science-related journals.

Publications

10 25 50

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Beck Melanie R. (2018) Integrating human and machine intelligence in galaxy morphology classification tasks in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Boyajian T. S. (2016) Planet Hunters IX. KIC 8462852 - where's the flux? in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Charnley B (2016) Plasmids, patents and the historian in Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences

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Dawson G (2016) DICKENS, DINOSAURS, AND DESIGN in Victorian Literature and Culture

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Dawson G (2015) Up in the Air: Evolution and Victorian Culture in Victorian Review

 
Title An Interview with Sian Bowen 
Description The Constructing Scientific Communities Project interviewed Sian Bowen, Reader in Fine Art at the University of Northumbria and Leverhulme Fellow at the Material Culture of Citizen Science Workshop (St Anne's College, Oxford, 12 May 2017). 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact 35 Views as at January 2018 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhItil0gy1c
 
Title An Interview with Sydney Padua (Constructing Scientific Communities Animator-in-Residence) 
Description Sydney Padua is the Constructing Scientific Communities animator-in-residence, and she's bringing Victorian science journals to life with her playful animations. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact 58 views on You Tube as at January 2018 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8I6QlP0OVKY
 
Title Contagion Cabaret 
Description The Contagion Cabaret provided a theatrical evening of drama, discussion and disease, created by Chipping Norton's theatre's Artistic Director John Terry and Professor Sally Shuttleworth, they were joined by a cast of actors, alongside scientists and literary researchers from Oxford University for an evening of infectious extracts from plays and music, past and present. Professor Sally Shuttleworth (co PI on the Construsting Scientific Communities) and Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (Professor of English and Theatre Studies) both spoke about their research during the performance. Contagious diseases are, of course, no laughing matter. The project was a chance to look at the idea of contagion from varying and contrasting perspectives - thoughtful, heartfelt, irreverent, provocative. And a chance to realise that though the names of the diseases may change, our concerns, our fears, our prejudices echo through the centuries in a remarkably consistent way. And just as a disease may be passed from neighbour to neighbour, so may ideas, spreading through groups of people in patterns that look terrifyingly similar. The Contagion Caberet has been performed at a number of events: 1) Oxfordshire Science Festival, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. 20.6.17 There were 60 people at the performance which was part of a the wider Oxfordhsire Science Festival. Around 8,000 visitors came to 34 Science Festival events 16-21 June 2017 held in a dozen venues, with 77% visiting the Festival for the first time. In exit surveys, 85% of visitors rated the event they had attended as 'good' or 'very good'. The Festival website had around 35,000 page views from bookings opening on 3 May to the end of the Festival and made 80,000 Twitter impressions during the same period. The Festival featured in the Oxford Mail, Oxfordshire PICK Magazine, OX Magazine,Primary Times, BBC Focus Magazine, BBC Radio Oxford and several other blogs and news websites. Over half of attendees to ticketed/paid events came from Oxford (52%) or Oxfordshire (69%) with London as the next most frequent home for ticketholders. https://conscicom.org/2017/05/25/the-contagion-cabaret-oxfordshire-science-festival/ and a trailer for the event https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sbl-oQ-XkI https://www.oxscifest.com/2017-festival-report/ 2) The Chipping Norton Theatre, 27.9.17 50 people attended the event 3) The Contagion Cabaret @ the Curiosity Carnival 29.9.17 200 people attended the event at the Museum of Natural History, Oxford Additional events are planned in 2018 at: The Science Museum 25 April 2018 and the British Academy on 24 May 2018 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Over 300 people have seen the performance and more are planned in 2018. During the University of Oxford Curiosity Carnival event on Friday 29th September 2017 a number of children from the Oxfordshire County Music Service Advanced Musicianship Programme (AMP) attended the Contagion Cabaret performances. Drawing inspiration from this they composed pieces that they then performed at the Contagion Camerata (see separate entry) on 2 February 2018 at St Anne's College, Oxford. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sbl-oQ-XkI
 
Title Contagion Camerata 
Description The Contagion Camerata event on February 2nd 2018 at St Anne's College Oxford featured original musical compositions by local students around themes of contagion, medicine and science, inspired from the performances of the Contagion Cabaret at the Curiosity Carnival held in September 2017. The composers of the Contagion Camerata are all participants of the Oxfordshire County Music Service Advanced Musicianship Programme (AMP). The children had attended a variety of events across the academic year, including workshops, seminars, lectures, and rehearsals, working on harmony, composition, and performance. The 19 compositions that were performed during the evening were by school pupils from Oxfordshire state schools, they attended the University of Oxford Curiosity Carnival - Contagion Cabaret performance, seeking inspiration for their compositions, on Friday 29th September 2017. Dr John Traill subsequently coached students through the creative process, also providing compositional 'building blocks'. Dr John Traill specialises in symphonic and contemporary repertoires, and is committed to making music accessible to all. The event can be seen here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTB04UIynNU Student interviews here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1saw-_u1jZM The composers - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjAlin4hGD4 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact As this event has only recently happened it is too early to assess the impact. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1saw-_u1jZM
 
Title Don't Panic! Promises and Threats of Science and Technology (Being Human Festival) 
Description Following the success of the Public Health Private Pain evening event of medical history and drama held in May 2016, another event was planned in collaboration with the Pegasus Theatre and Museum of the History of Science. Don't Panic! Promises and Threats of Science and Technology was organised as part of the AHRC's Being Human Festival and held at the Museum on Thursday 17 November 2016. The event was designed to be interactive and entertaining and explored hopes and fears about science and technology through film, academic interpretations, discussions and performance by the actors from Pegasus Theatre. The event covered the eruption of Krakatoa, Dorothy Hodgkin's work on penicillin and explored issues of climate change from personal and political perspectives. The event was open to all and free to attend. 30 people attended. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Audience feedback was collated and the event was rated as Excellent and Good. The respondents highlighted the drama performances were the most successful aspect of the evening as well as the variety of topics covered. Respondents indicated that as a result of the event, they had an increased understanding of the humanities and its relevance to everyday life, and were encouraged to find out more. The age range of those who completed the questionnaires was between 20 and 34, but other age ranges were in attendance. The event was filmed and the link to the videos is below. As at January 2018 there were 94 views of the videos. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLScyx6VxEekL7vBnwHzdCfWqQe3haAM-H
 
Title International Womens Day 
Description The project produced a video for International Womens' Day on 8th March 2017 discussing womens contributions to the history of science and medicine. The video featured Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Dr Lee Macdonald and Alison Moulds. It was published on the project's You Tube channel (URL below) and website homepage. It was also circulated within and outside the University of Oxford, to project partners and other institutions, and is being further promoted by the team members as widely as possible on social media. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Viewing figures as at January 2018 204 downloads. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BlmhSntz88
 
Title Mind-Boggling Medical History 
Description Mind-Boggling Medical History is s a fun and interactive way of introducing non-academic audiences to ideas from historical and contemporary science and medicine. The card game will be available both in hard copy and as an online resource. Players are challenged to sort medical facts and theories into three categories: Past, Present and Fictional and can play against one another as both individuals and teams. Simple and entertaining, it invites questions as to the value and purpose of history and introduces participants to new scholarship from the Constructing Scientific Communities project. It is aimed at museum visitors, nursing students and schoolchildren, including those at GCSE level studying Medicine Through Time. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact So far the game has been played at multiple events at museums and through our collaborative partner, the Royal College of Nursing, reaching hundreds of people. By March 2018 250 card packs will be produced which will be distributed freely to those working in museums, education and nursing. The resource will also be freely available online, potentially attracting thousands of people. 
URL http://www.mbmh.web.ox.ac.uk/
 
Title Public Health and Private Pain a Night of Medical History and Drama 
Description On 5 May 2016, a public event was held at the Museum of the HIstory of Science in Oxford entitled Public Health & Private Pain. The event looked at the public and private nature of bodies in the world of medicine and with the assistance of professional actors from the Pegasus Theatre in Oxford, dramatised developments in this field from the 18th century to the present day. Scenes included an extract from Shelagh Stephenson's play An Experiment with an Air-pump (1998) looking at medical ethics issues and genetics; George Bernard Shaw's The Doctor's Dilemma (1906) which also explored medical ethics; a reading from Henrik Ibsen's Ghosts (1881) of a scene where a character has to tell his mother that he has syphilis; two World War I poems by Sassoon and Owen regarding shell shock; a rendition of a historical anti-vaccination song; an extract from Joe Penhall's play Blue/Orange (2000) concerning race and mental health issues. The event was attended by 40 people. The event was advertised widely online and via the project and museum's Twitter accounts. The evening was filmed and the films are available on a blog post written for the project website by Dr Berris Charnley about the event. This can be viewed at the URL below. The videos are also available on You Tube tagged and identified for returning in searches. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The event was a highly successful collaboration between University researchers, the Pegasus Theatre, other institutions and museum and cultural arts partners. It was an excellent example of linking the Constructing Scientific Communities project with University and Museum priorities for knowledge exchange and impact. The event included academics from the University of Oxford and also Birkbeck University of London, which furthered institutional collaborations. The event strengthened links between the Pegasus Theatre, Museum of the History of Science and the University of Oxford. As a result of this very successful event, another was planned with the museum and Pegasus Theatre for later in 2016 (see entry for the Don't Panic event in November 2016 as part of the AHRC's Being Human Festival). Other future collaborations for public engagement events will also be discussed. It was clear after the event that innovative presentation worked very well, and this will be developed further for future event planning. The Director of the Museum of the History of Science was impressed by the event and has invited the project to work with them again in future. The event also publicised the work of the Constructing Scientific Communities project and introduced it to a new audience. The audience were asked to complete feedback questionnaires at the end of the evening. All responses rated the event as Excellent, and the audience was attracted mainly by the topic, the venue and the drama nature of the event. The feedback showed that attendees were interested in finding out more about Zooniverse having heard about the project's work, the event was enjoyable, fun and well put together and was in an excellent and interesting venue. The combination of academic and drama was enjoyed, as was the immediacy and interdisciplinarity of the event. One audience member commented that the event was a perfect example of how the past can inform the present and how historical research can shape policy today. Generally there was interest in finding out more about the subjects covered including the anti-vaccination movement. One comment was that the academics and actors did a brilliant job, the event was well planned, the presenters and actors were engaging and open with just the right amount of information delivered, and it was one of the best events that person had seen at the museum. This person felt that it would put future visits to the museum in a new light and they would think more about the human context. Seeing drama first hand was also highlighted as a very positive aspect of the evening's programme. 
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/10/17/public-health-and-private-pain-a-night-of-medical-history-and-drama...
 
Title Science and the Victorian Public (Being Human Festival 2016) 
Description Science and the Victorian Public was held at the University of Leicester on 18 November 2016, and organised as part of the Being Human Festival. The event recreated a Victorian magic lantern show with historical actors presenting a Victorian science lecture with slides on subjects including dinosaurs and geology. After the magic lantern show, the audience members were able to take a closer look at the magic lantern and ask questions of the presenters. The event introduced the audience to nineteenth century science, magic lanterns and also the research activities of the Constructing Scientific Communities project. Lea Beiermann, an intern at the University of Leicester who took part in the event, wrote a guest blog post for the project website about her internship which included a report of the event with video. The blog post and film is available at the URL below. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Feedback questionnaires were completed by some of the audience members who were asked if the event had influenced their thinking about the topic presented. Comments included that the event was insightful, eye-opening, educational and entertaining. It increased awareness of nineteenth century political issues, highlighted how magic lantern shows disseminated information and enabled engagement with science in Victorian times. The event enabled a greater insight into Victorian culture and society, the presenters being in Victorian costume gave the feeling of going back in time and those who had no knowledge of magic lanterns before the event found it extremely interesting and stimulated interest in finding out more about the subject. One audience member who worked in the arts and heritage sector commented that they were inspired to run a magic lantern event for children as a result of the event. 
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/01/09/a-lamp-in-one-hand-and-a-measuring-tape-in-the-other/#more-1871
 
Title The Constructing Scientific Communities Project: An Introduction 
Description The Constructing Scientific Communities Project is a project of the Arts and Humanities Research Council, based at the University of Oxford and Leicester, in collaboration with partners, the Natural History Museum, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons, the Zooniverse, and the Royal Society. This vidoe included interviews with Sally Shuttleworth, Chris Lintott and Gowan Dawson. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact 75 You Tube Views as at January 2018 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KogFQedGKVk
 
Title Vaccination Medicine and the Masses 
Description The Constructing Scientific Communities project and the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons co-curated an exhibition entitled Vaccination Medicine and the Masses which ran from April to September 2016 at the Hunterian. Dr Sally Frampton and Ms Alison Moulds from the project worked with the museum's team on putting the exhibition together. The exhibition traced the history of vaccination from the late 18th century through to the present day through exhibits and multi-media displays including public information films from the 1950s. The exhibition charted the changing relationship between medical professionals and the public and the controversies surrounding the subject. It also highlighted the contributions of lay people to the development of vaccination and how the public have resisted its use. Extracts from the public information films were made into this video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jltqCd2cXDY The exhibition was widely advertised by the project and the Hunterian Museum on websites, and via social media channels. It was extremely successful attracting thousands of visitors. A public symposium along with other public engagement activities were organised as part of the exhibition - these along with blog posts written by members of the project team about the exhibition are reported separately and in more detail under the Engagement Activities section. The public engagement events were all held at the Hunterian Museum as follows: 7 May 2016: People Powered Medicine Symposium 12 May 2016: Museums at Night Event: Vaccination, Yes or No? 17 May 2016: Lunchtime Lecture on Edward Jenner 2 June 2016: Snot, Sick and Scabs (event specifically for children) 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact The exhibition attracted a large number of visitors to the Hunterian Museum and was a highly successful public engagement event. The work of the Constructing Scientific Communities project was advertised to a wider audience, and the visitor feedback collated by the museum and kept on file at the project was extremely positive. The Hunterian Museum have confirmed that there was a total of 38,571 visitors to the museum over the period of the Vaccination exhibition. It was not possible to ascertain how many of these visitors went into the exhibition space, but a significant number will have done so. The figure of 38,571 is counted as the total of families, school visits, higher and further education visits, adult individuals, children and organised groups) The exhibition appealed to all ages and was enjoyed by children and adults. Several children left comment cards that they found it fascinating. The comments from adults were that it was a fascinating, well-presented and informative exhibition which communicated the history of vaccination and contemporary issues on the subject extremely well. Exhibits such as letters of Edward Jenner, and the photographs of smallpox were found particularly interesting by all ages. In addition to the general public, the exhibition was visited by medical professionals at all career stages. Comments from a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons included that it was one of the best exhibitions he had ever seen. One visitor was a senior figure from the UN who worked on the UN's efforts to end malaria and left a comment that it was fascinating and important to remember the lessons of history regarding vaccinations. Other Impacts from the Exhibition (reported separately and in more detail under Engagement Activities) included: A private tour of the exhibition for public health nurses organised through the Royal College of Nursing and given by Dr Sally Frampton and Alison Moulds A blog post by Dr Sally Frampton for the Hunterian Museum website A blog post by Alison Moulds for the Ministry of Curiosity website A feature in the University of Oxford Faculty of English Alumni newsletter Publication Outputs from the Exhibition (reported separately and in full under Publications section): Article by Sally Shuttleworth and Sally Frampton in Nature journal Article by Wendy Moore in the Pharmaceutical journal 
URL https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/museums-and-archives/hunterian-museum/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/vaccinat...
 
Title Video interviews with participants from 'Mind-Reading' workshop 
Description Alison Moulds helped to produce a video from the workshop 'Mind-Reading: Mental Health and the Written Word', Studio Theatre, dlr LexIcon, Dublin (10 March 2017). She recorded participants - including academics, psychiatrists, and patients - sharing their experiences of the event. The video was edited by Kira Allmann. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The interviews encouraged delegates to reflect on their experiences of attending. The video thus helped support the evaluation of the event. The video has since been viewed by those unable to attend the workshop. It has received 29 views. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yiQBm1QzQk
 
Title WeNeedUs 
Description WeNeedUs is an online artwork inspired by and using data from the Zooniverse, commissioned by the Open Data Institute. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The artwork obtained significant press coverage, and has received significant traffic. 
URL http://weneedus.org
 
Title Women in Oxford's History (WiOH) Podcast Series 
Description Between January-December 2016 Alison Moulds was one of the co-ordinators of the Women in Oxford's History (WiOH) podcast project, which was supported by a Graduate Fund from The Oxford Research Centre for the Humanities and the AHRC. The project produced a six-part podcast series exploring the contributions of lesser-known women to the history of the city and the university. Working with a DPhil Candidate in the History Faculty (Olivia Robinson), Alison helped with the design and delivery of the project. She was involved in developing and writing the scripts, recording and editing the podcasts, and marketing the outputs. NB: Alison and her collaborator have now handed over the WiOH project to a new team. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Between the launch on 21 October 2016 and 31 January 2017, there have been 92 downloads or streams of the podcasts via the Oxford website. The project's website has received 1257 views in 2016 and 427 in 2017 up until 28 February. Following the launch of the podcast series, Alison Moulds was interviewed by local television network That's Oxfordshire and participated in a roundtable discussion on women's and gender studies organised by the Gender and Authority Research Network in Oxford. Alison later spoke about the project at the Oxford History Teachers' Network (3 July 2017). She discussed with secondary school teachers how the podcasts could be used in the curriculum. 
URL https://womenofoxford.co.uk/
 
Title You Tube Channel 
Description In February 2017, the project started a You Tube channel to put all films of our events in one place. As this had just been done at the time of submitting this data, and the videos are in the process of being transferred over - this entry will be further updated in due course. We have just started promoting the You Tube channel on Twitter. A page for videos has also been created on the project website so visitors can see all of the videos on one page. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact To be updated further in due course 
URL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4l2HHg-oXQKWQ6dr2QBwRw
 
Description The project is both contributing to the development of scientific communities in the present, and exploring their construction in the past. Research has uncovered, in the nineteenth century, overlapping networks of 'citizen scientists' in such fields as meteorology, astronomy, public health and environment, and economic entomology, all of which anticipate contemporary scientific concerns, with the historic data now contributing, for example, to current climate change research. Other areas covered in the nineteenth century include the role of the numerous natural history journals in fostering communities of amateur naturalists, and the development of 'amateur' forms of medicine, from nursing and the first aid movement through to key forms of medical 'inventions' such as prosthetic limbs. Gowan Dawson's book, Show me the Bone: Reconstructing Prehistoric Monsters in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America (2016) illuminates the close relationship between elite and popular contributions to the development of palaeontology. Project research suggests we should rewrite our understandings of the emergence of professional science, and take more account of the role of expert, but non-professional, contributors in the development of science and medicine. Our research is of particular significance at a time when the emergence of large-scale citizen science projects, and patient-practitioner collaborations in medicine, are opening up new ways of thinking and methodologies for both scientific and medical practice.


Historical research has been matched by contemporary practice. Working with Zooniverse, the world's largest platform for online citizen projects, and in conjunction with the Natural History Museum of London, we developed 'Orchid Observers', an innovative project which combined amateur naturalist work in the field with online analysis of historic herbarium sheets. The preliminary results offer invaluable data on the effects of climate change, as measured by shifting flowering times over three centuries. The research offers a model for new ways of developing museum collections, as well as drawing upon amateur communities for research.

Another citizen science project with the Zooniverse, Science Gossip, created in collaboration with the Missouri Botanical Garden and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, offers a further model for working with Museums and Heritage collections. Science Gossip, which utilizes voluntary public participation to help classify illustrations in nineteenth-century natural history periodicals, allows the Biodiversity Heritage Library to provide image search functions of their vast database, thus improving access to its content and uncovering images of species that would otherwise have been largely inaccessible to modern botanists and zoologists. It has also significantly increased understanding of the role of illustration in natural history, and opened up for further research numerous journals in the area. Both projects demonstrate the enormous potential of working with members of the public in the development of both scientific and historical research.

Our work with the Royal Society on the history of scientific publishing, and the contemporary open science agenda, which resulted in a special issue of Notes and Records of the Royal Society, with contributors including the President of the Indian National Science Academy, Ragavendra Gadagkar, has opened up new directions for contemporary debates on forms of science publishing.


Another citizen science project with the Zooniverse, Science Gossip, created in collaboration with the Missouri Botanical Garden and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, offers a further model for working with Museums and Heritage collections. It has significantly increased understanding of the role of illustration in natural history, and opened up for further research numerous journals in the area. Both projects demonstrate the enormous potential of working with members of the public in the development of both scientific and historical research.
Exploitation Route With the massive development of crowd sourcing and citizen science projects over the last few years our work is ideally placed to help guide future projects in the area. We have developed innovative citizen science projects, as well as demonstrating how humanities researchers can work productively with scientists in a range of areas. On the academic front, our research has brought to the fore the ways in which large numbers of individuals, outside the emerging domain of professional science, were involved in science and medicine, offering models for thinking about the creation of scientific communities, both past and present.

For Museums and Archives, our work has offered exciting new models for opening up the collections, and acting as citizen science hubs. Our citizen science project Orchid Observers is the first to combine active field study with online work on historic herbarium records, and this framework could be developed in a range of museum areas, helping to bring into current scientific use the vast datasets within the manuscript records which are currently largely inaccessible. We have also developed innovative forms of 'visiteering', bringing members of the public in to work on the collections for a day, and are now extending that work to include school pupils. The model is one that could be employed by all forms of museums in the future, both within the UK and internationally.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Environment,Healthcare,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description The citizen science projects with Zooniverse have attracted a very wide participant base and introduced many with little background in science to the possibilities of becoming involved in scientific research. 'Impact' is thus built in to the very process of the research itself. For 'Orchid Observers' we worked with the country's expert Orchid Community to devise the field study. Preliminary analysis suggests that those taking part, photographing the orchids in the field, and then analysing them online, included a far wider constituency, many with little or no experience of orchids, or nature study. The online analysis of the historical herbarium sheets also brought in further contributors, as did the dedicated 'visiteering' days at the Natural History Museum, where individuals from a wide range of jobs and professions took time out to contribute to the project. The overall figures are impressive, with 1860 participants so far. The project reached an even greater number through excellent coverage in the media, including, for example, the BBC. Accuracy of identification, and transcription has also been very high, suggesting the potential for building on this model for drawing in large numbers of the general public into nature study, historic research and scientific practice. The second Zooniverse project, 'Science Gossip', developed in collaboration with the Missouri Botanical Garden, and the Biodiversity Heritage Library, has been hugely successful in drawing members of the public in to engage with the content and illustrations of natural history periodicals of the nineteenth century. The project received enthusiastic endorsement in a range of high-profile arenas, from Scientific American to Nature Conservancy and has been presented to a range of professional audiences, from museum professionals to the 'Taxonomic Data Working Group', and a report on the crowdsourcing techniques employed has been made to the US National Science Foundation. The Biodiversity Heritage Library was originally conceived as a scientific resource, and the work has made the materials far more visible and accessible for scientists; it has also, however, drawn new audiences from across the globe who have engaged with the beautiful, and intriguing illustrations and articles in these largely forgotten sources. Participation has been worldwide, with 9126 contributors so far, with India and Brazil, for example, featuring in the top ten countries. One key feature of the site is the 'Talk' function, which allows participants to discuss their findings with each other, and the project moderator, leading to new streams of historical research initiated by participants (13,774 posts so far from 680 participants). The hidden history of female illustrators is being uncovered in this way. Preliminary analysis of the discussion forum on the site suggests that people in the creative industries have found the site particularly useful. The Missouri Botanical Gardens have highlighted cases of individuals who have drawn on the images from the Biodiversity Heritage Library for art, wallpaper design, and fashion. From April to September the project mounted a major exhibition on the history of vaccination at the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons, with 38,571 visitors to the museum during this period. Drawing on our research, it placed contemporary controversies around MMR in the context of riots and protests against vaccination in the nineteenth century, and recovered stunning early photographic depictions of families with smallpox, used in public education displays over a century ago. Feedback, from all ages, and from members of the medical professions as well as general public, was uniformly positive ('one of the best exhibitions I have ever seen' - a surgeon). A senior figure from the UN, who had worked on combatting malaria, found the historical dimension particularly illuminating and important. We reached a wide range of audiences through a range of associated events, from 'Snot, Sick and Scabs', with interactive games for school children to introduce them to cells, bacteria and viruses, through to a Museum at Night event which included early public health films, performances of Victorian anti-vaccination songs, as well as talks. A symposium, 'People Powered Medicine' brought historians, medical practitioners and representatives of patient groups together to discuss the ways in which patients and members of the public could be involved in medical delivery. One medic commented in feedback that he would now change the way in which took patient notes in future. One aim of the project is to break down the perception that science is only done by adults, in labs. To this end, we hosted at St Anne's College, Oxford the annual conference of the Young Scientists' Journal, the only science journal written and edited entirely by students still at school, bringing 180 young people to the university for workshops and talks (with a keynote lecture by Co-I Professor Chris Lintott), to explore how science can be opened up to the young, not merely as an area to be studied, but also to be practiced. The research of the project has been presented in a wide range of venues, and to audiences of all ages, from talks at the Royal Society, with live webcasts, through to 'Fun Palaces' and Natural History Museum events designed for children and families. We have also given a number of magic lantern shows, recreating the magic of nineteenth-century events. These shows, for which the participants donned appropriate Victorian dress, immersed their audiences in the sights and sounds of nineteenth-century science, and began with an historical introduction explaining the context and significance of the experience that was being recreated. Audience surveys asked the question 'If today's event has influenced your thinking about the topic being presented to you, please state briefly how', which provides an important insight into the nature of the impact of the immersive magic lantern lecture recreation. In particular, the impact was on the historical understanding of the audience, especially for those involved in adult education or children's activities ("Today's event was insightful and entertaining. It links briefly with my studies and will help me look at them in a wider sense"; "It opened my eyes to the importance between entertainment and education"; "I run children's arts events and I have been thinking of doing more heritage projects with them. To show them magic lanterns and get them to do their own magic lantern show would be great and something I can think about"). We have also run two highly successful events combining drama and discussion, in conjunction with the Pegasus Theatre, Oxford, and the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. The two events, 'Public Health, Private Pain', and 'Don't Panic! Promises and Threats of Science and Technology' were sell-out events, using drama, interactive games, and discussion with academics and actors to explore social and ethical dilemmas posed by science and medicine, both past and present. The format was immensely successful, and has suggested the power of collaboration between theatre professionals and academics to produce profound, multi-level engagement with some of the key issues of our time. Building on this work we have also collaborated with Chipping Norton Theatre, and colleagues in the Oxford Medical School to produce Contagion Cabaret, an evening of drama and song, interspersed with short academic talks, to explore the history of ideas of contagion, past and present. We have held performances of various versions at the Chipping Norton Theatre itself, at the Museum for the History of Science, Oxford (as part of the Oxfordshire Science Festival), and at the Pitt Rivers Museum, as part of the Curiosity Carnival, Oxford's largest ever public engagement event which, as part of European Researchers' Night, brought in almost 10,000 participants on the night (many of whom were first time attenders at a university or museum event), as well as 29,000 participants live online. We invited school pupils from the Oxfordshire County Music Service Advanced Musicianship Programme to attend the performance of Contagion Cabaret at the Curiosity Carnival, and interviewed them afterwards on their responses. They then worked with the director of composition, Dr John Traill, to produce musical compositions on the theme of contagion. Contagion Camerata, a public performance of the resulting 19 compositions, all produced by state school pupils, was then held at St Anne's College, on 2 February 2018. We produced a video of the entire concert, and interviews with the pupils, who all noted that the experience had enhanced their understanding of medical science, and of the possible intersections of science and the humanities, and had also helped with their other school work in a range of ways. In our final events with our project partners, the Natural History Museum and the Royal Society, we have reached a range of new audiences. 'Connecting with the Crowd' (June 16, 2017) was a sell-out public event (131 participants) held at the Natural History Museum, and in collaboration with the British Ecological Society, which brought together those who run citizen science projects, and also dedicated volunteers, with talks and workshops to help develop and shape citizen science practice in the future. As part of our collaboration with Zooniverse, a new tool has been developed which enables members of the public, or academics, to build their own citizen science projects. One of the talks demonstrated how it was possible to build a site in three minutes flat. As a result of this tool, the overall number of Zooniverse projects has hugely increased, with the number of participants doubling since our project started, from 800,000 to 1.621,653 (as at 12-2-2018), reinforcing its position as the world's leading provider of citizen science, and opening up projects for public participation across the disciplinary spectrum. At the end of October 2017 we ran an evening event at the Natural History Museum, Pop Sci, which brought in a record crowd of 4,300 attendees, of all ages, who were able to try a range of Zooniverse and other citizen science projects, attend a magic lantern show, or animation workshop, or listen to a reading of a new long poem, inspired by the project, by the award winning poet, Don Paterson. Responses were uniformly enthusiastic, and the Natural History Museum will be changing the format of their future 'lates' events to recreate the participatory element in science which was at the heart of the event's success. Another successful high-profile event was 'The Wisdom of the Crowd' at the Royal Society with Marcus du Sautoy. Drawing on the findings of the project, he involved the packed crowd of over 200, and online participants worldwide, in explorations of the power of mathematical understanding in everyday life, before a lively 30 minute discussion period. The video of the event has so far had 872 views, with 22,000 associated twitter impressions, illustrating popular thirst for engagement in the realms of science and mathematics. More generally the project has developed its media profile over the last year, adding a You Tube account with video and podcasts to the website, blog posts and twitter accounts. A measure of the reach of the project is that the website has so far had over 37,000 views, in over 142 countries, with our partner institutions the Royal College of Surgeons, the Natural History Museum and the Royal Society offering additional engagement with the public through their coverage of the project. A recent development is a further AHRC grant to work on the creation of a game, 'Mind-Boggling Medical History', which has been developed in conjunction with the Royal College of Nursing, and is drawing on project findings to create a fun, yet challenging resource for use in schools, and also medical and nursing training. Overall, the project has had decisive impacts on professional and expert (but non-professional) communities in medicine and ecology, and has opened up new avenues for partnerships with Museums. It has proved particularly successful in drawing members of the public into the arena of science, breaking down barriers, and opening up possibilities of participating in scientific practice to thousands who would previously have felt that science was not for them.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description American Astronomical Society Publications Task Force
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact More open publishing model adopted, and new policy on software publishing accepted.
URL http://journals.aas.org/policy/software.html
 
Description British Academy Council - Professor Sally Shuttleworth
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description British Academy Council and Standing Committee of Council
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description British Society for the History of Science Council - Prof Sally Shuttleworth
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL http://www.bshs.org.uk/about-society/council-and-committees
 
Description POST Note on Environmental Citizen Science
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/briefing-papers/POST-PN-476/environmental-ci...
 
Description Royal Society Journal Archive Digitisation Steering Group, Prof Sally Shuttleworth
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Scientists and Engineers Working In and With Government
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Served on Expert Group for National Archives Strategy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description John Fell OUP Research Fund
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Funding ID Project Code: AXD07140 John Fell Reference:133/072 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
End 12/2017
 
Title Diagnosis London 
Description Diagnosis London is a collaboration between the Zooniverse, the Wellcome Library and the Constructing Scientific Communities project. The project asks citizen historians to tag information from the Medical Officer of Health Reports of London (recently digitised by the Wellcome Library) which were published between 1848 and 1972. Volunteers will highlight issues of health and welfare as they relate to work, food, housing and pollution and sanitation. The result will be a large, robust dataset that will enrich the history of London's health and which will be of interest to social, local and family historians, epidemiologists, and anyone else with an interest in the topic. Beta testing took place in 2016 and created a very positive response. However, some testers found the site too difficult and work has been undertaken to redesign the site to simplify the tasks. We organised a workshop in February 2017 at the British Academy with leading historians of medicine, representatives from the Wellcome Library and JISC to present research on medical officer of health reports and finalise the format for the redesigned site. Data will be deposited into the Oxford Research Archive at the end of the project. The link to the ORA record is https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:daa0a4f0-58d4-4cd0-990e-da1ba383f90f 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact To be updated when the site is launched. 
 
Title Orchid Observers 
Description Orchid Observers is a collaboration between the Natural History Museum and the University of Oxford. The project is located on the Zooniverse platform and has been developed as part of the Constructing Scientific Communities Project. The website combines field photography and biological recording, with online transcription of historical museum herbarium specimens, in order to investigate how the flowering times of 29 UK orchid species are being influenced by climate change. The data gathered also allow UK orchid distribution and population health to be assessed more widely. Addressing scientific challenges such as climate change requires large datasets from multiple field sites. Orchid Observers aims to create modern records from across the UK and to combine these with historical specimen data, building a 180 year time series of orchid flowering time that can be compared against key climate variables. Participants are invited to photograph orchids in flower in their local area and upload their images and field records to the Orchid Observers website. Here, as well as helping to identify the species recorded within each photograph and to classify their flowering stage, participants can also help to extract phenology information from 15,000 historical herbarium specimens spanning three centuries. Since its launch in April 2015, 55,000 classifications of historical herbarium sheets and contemporary field observations have been completed by 1,860 participants. As part of this, 1,947 field images of orchids have been submitted, identified and classified by the online community. Despite being a comparatively well-studied group, at least 200 of these observations represent new UK locations for the orchid species' concerned, which include rare and threatened taxa. All field observations (2015 flowering season) have been shared with the Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (http://bsbi.org/) for inclusion within their comprehensive database of flowering plant observations from across the UK. Once the complete dataset has been fully verified and analysed for publication, the historical (i.e. herbarium) data and 2015 field observations will be made freely available through the National Biodiversity Network (https://data.nbn.org.uk/) and NHM Data Portal (http://data.nhm.ac.uk/). Full data-sharing is planned for 3rd Quarter 2018. Data will be deposited into the Oxford Research Archive at the end of the project. The link to the ORA record is https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:5a1de8b9-8f22-4f14-8bd3-aea1ac3d4734 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The project has attracted excellent press and media coverage, has participated in public engagement activities and events, and has also featured in academic conference presentations. These are summarised in one entry in the Engagement Activities category entitled Orchid Observers Aggregated Media Coverage and Events The project has been cited as a case study and used as evidence within 1 book chapter and 1 peer-reviewed scientific paper to date. (These publications are recorded in the Publications section of Research Fish) The core scientific and social research is currently underway, with a minimum of two project-focused peer-reviewed publications to be submitted during 2018. This is the first large-scale citizen science project we are aware of that combines field and online approaches. In doing so it brings together outdoor nature enthusiasts and amateur-expert naturalists with an online community of citizen scientists. The large number of posts and thematic content of 'talk' discussions on the website and associated social media channels indicate that the project has been successful from the perspective of the citizen science participants. >10 associated media interviews and press articles (e.g. BBC, Telegraph, Guardian); blogs on the Zooniverse, NHM and National Heritage Science Forum websites; face-to-face public engagement activity reaching up to 31,000 people; discussed as a case study or sole topic in 17 academic conference presentations to date. Inspiration for the co-funded AHRC Constructing Scientific Communities/British Ecological Society academic conference entitled Connecting with the Crowd (June 2017). This one day international, cross-disciplinary conference explored best practices and new perspectives on crowdsourcing citizen science. A total of 131 delegates attended from the UK, mainland Europe and North America. 
URL http://www.orchidobservers.org
 
Title Science Gossip 
Description ScienceGossip.org is a Zooniverse project which has been produced in collaboration with the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) and the Constructing Scientific Communities Project. The website is platform where citizen scientists are able to access randomized pages from a series of 19th century natural history periodicals, and are asked a set of tasks relating to each page which create metadata which is useful for both the BHL and historians. The metadata created by the citizen scientists relates to the illustrations hidden within the pages of these digitized periodicals - and by identifying the location, author, type of illustration and producing related keywords - the BHL is able to improve their image based search function, and historians are able to correlate masses of information on unknown authors and illustrators from the Victorian period. Since its launch in March 2015, 155,432 pages have been classified by 9781 participants. Data will be deposited into the Oxford Research Archive at the end of the project. The link to the ORA record is https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:57958a9e-b690-49cd-86f3-186193e23604 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The project has received excellent press and media coverage which contributed to the number of participants on the project. The coverage is summarised in the Engagement Activities section in an entry entitled Science Gossip Aggregated Media Coverage and Events. 
URL http://www.sciencegossip.org
 
Title Solar Stormwatch II 
Description Solar Stormwatch II is a Zooniverse project that has been produced in collaboration with the University of Reading and the Constructing Scientific Communities Project. The website is platform where citizen scientists are able to track the development of solar weather. Constructing Scientific Communities team member Dr Lee Macdonald contributed materials on the historical origins of research on 'space weather'. See the Stormwatch blog for details https://blog.solarstormwatch.com/?_ga=2.55529323.1522199079.1520932697-1044570024.1512471981 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The Solar Stormwatch II site has, as of March 12, 2018, involved 3029 volunteers, who have contributed 51,539 classifications.   
URL https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/shannon-/solar-stormwatch-ii
 
Description Citizen Science Today 
Organisation Citizen Science Association
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I am editor, and the Zooniverse hosts, Citizen Science Today which is a new kind of overlay journal aimed at citizen science practitioners beyond academia.
Collaborator Contribution The Press Forward team provide the software to power the journal, and it was promoted by the Citizen Science Association to their membership.
Impact Six online issues of multi-disciplinary overlay journal.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Organisation Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution MIT and the University of Oxford made a joint application to the MISTI Global Seed Funds General Fund at MIT in order to hold the Call of the Wild conference in June 2016. The grant was for $27,250 was to cover the international travel costs of staff and students, space and catering costs. Full details of the conference are available at https://conscicom.org/2016/10/21/call-of-the-wild-mit-2016/ Members of the project team who participated in the conference were: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor Chris Lintott, Dr John Tweddle, Dr Berris Charnley, Dr Geoff Belknap, and Matthew Wale. A follow up jointly organised conference, Citizen Science and the Wild, was held in London on 15 June 2017. A conference report is available at https://conscicom.org/past-events/ Members of the project team who participated in the second conference were: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor Gowan Dawson, Dr John Tweddle, Dr Berris Charnley, Dr Geoff Belknap, Matthew Wale. Conference participants also stayed on for
Collaborator Contribution Professor Harriet Ritvo worked with Professor Shuttleworth on applying for the Global Seeds Fund grant and with the organising the Call of the Wild conference at MIT in 2016. She is also a member of the project's Advisory Board and provides in-kind support by advising the project and attending Advisory Board meetings in Oxford. Professor Ritvo worked with Professor Shuttleworth and the team to organise a follow up joint event, Citizen Science and the Wild, held at the Natural History Museum on 15 June 2017. Other academics from MIT presented papers at the Call of the Wild and many of the same academics travelled to London to present at the 15 June 2017 Citizen Science and the Wild conference.
Impact The Call of the Wild conference report is available on the project website here: https://conscicom.org/2016/10/21/call-of-the-wild-mit-2016/ An interview with Professor Ritvo was published in MIT's website: https://shass.mit.edu/news/news-2016-what-is-wild-3-questions-with-historian-harriet-ritvo Citizen Science and the Wild conference report is available on the project website here: https://conscicom.org/past-events/
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with Biodiversity Heritage Library 
Organisation Biodiversity Heritage Library
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We collaborated with BHL to build the ScienceGossip.org citizen science site, looking at 19th century periodicals. This was used by BHL in a formal comparison of modes of citizen transcription, resulting in a positive report on the performance of the Zooniverse platform.
Collaborator Contribution We provided the development and design expertise necessary for the project to succeed, whereas BHL provided access to archives and important domain knowledge.
Impact Report on crowdsourcing techniques, submitted to US National Science Foundation. Dataset on images in 19th century periodicals, made available to humanities researchers.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with Crick Institute 
Organisation Francis Crick Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We are working on a combined human/machine classification scheme for generic high resolution microscopy data which will make use of ConSciCom's understanding of user communities around medical and clinical communities.
Collaborator Contribution Crick are providing data and expertise on machine learning for a suite of such projects.
Impact Projects are currently in beta.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Partnership with Natural History Museum 
Organisation Natural History Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The collaboration led to OrchidObservers.org, the first Zooniverse citizen science project to combine data collection and data analysis. The project ran successfully and produced results of scientific value as well as research on the behaviour of communities. A broader collaboration, in which the NHM will use Zooniverse software to deliver a crowdsourcing platform to a consortium of European museums, has begun and is expected to produce its first projects during 2016.
Collaborator Contribution They provided expertise in handling communities of active field observers, and much of the text and design for the Orchid Observers site. They also have a very thorough needs analysis for natural history museum partners.
Impact Orchid Field Guide (distributed across UK) Redesign of platform for crowdsourcing in natural history museums
Start Year 2015
 
Description Partnership with Tate 
Organisation Tate Britain
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have partnered with Tate to build a transcription project for their collection of artists' notebooks.
Collaborator Contribution We will develop a novel transcription interface, capable of completing full text transcription through the efforts of volunteers.
Impact The project will be launched in 2015; it involves our expertise in citizen science, draws on the research of our historical collaborators, and the Tate's art history expertise.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Partnership with the Royal College of Nursing 
Organisation Royal College of Nursing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution On Mind-Boggling Medical History we are working closely with the Royal College of Nursing to ensure that the game will be a suitable educational tool for nursing students and to ensure we have impact upon nursing education.
Collaborator Contribution RCN audience engagement manager Sarah Chaney is a contracted consultant on the project and has been responsible for coordinating numerous focus groups, the creation of accompanying resources and will also co-ordinate the launch event, to be held at the RCN.
Impact Following the game's launch in 2018 it will be distributed freely to nursing educators to be used in their lectures and classes.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Professor Shuttleworth - Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Principal Investigator, spent three months in Berlin from 4th September - 18th December 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science on a fellowship visit. Professor Shuttleworth carried out project research whilst she was there, attended seminars and facilitated future collaborative activities and links with the Max Planck Institute. She gave one of three symposium talks to the entire Max Planck Institute on the Constructing Scientific Communities project. A workshop - Citizen Science in Historical Perspective - was organised and held on 19 February 2016 with members of the project team (Prof Sally Shuttleworth, Prof Gowan Dawson, Prof Chris Lintott, Dr Geoff Belknap and Dr Sally Frampton) travelling to Berlin for the workshop with members of the Max Planck Institute. The workshop was targeted not only at academics, but museum professionals including the Director of the Berlin Natural History Museum. The programme is available at https://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/en/content/citizen-science-historical-perspective It was also planned that graduates and postdoctoral researchers whose research intersects with the project will visit Oxford for collaborative activities in future. A second workshop, The Material Culture of Citizen Science, was held at St Anne's College, University of Oxford on Friday 12 May 2017. The programme for this workshop is available at https://conscicom.org/past-events/
Collaborator Contribution The Max Planck hosted Professor Shuttleworth as a Visiting Scholar and provided accommodation and access to their facilities for the duration of the visit. The Max Planck paid for the fellowship visit. They co-organised the February 2016 workshop, paid the hotel accommodation for members of the Constructing Scientific Communities team to attend the workshop, and provided in-kind support with the workshop space and some catering costs. Professor Shuttleworth has worked and will continue to work with Professor Lorraine Daston, Director of the Max Planck Institute (and member of the Project Advisory Board) on developing future collaborative activities. Member of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science presented at the second workshop, The Material Culture of Citizen Science, which was held at St Anne's College, University of Oxford on Friday 12 May 2017.
Impact Following on from the 19th February 2016 workshop in Berlin, Citizen Science in Historical Perspective, and the project hosted a return visit by academics from the Max Planck Institute to Oxford on 12 May 2017 for a workshop on The Material Culture of Citizen Science, at St Anne's College. The programme for the workshop can be found here https://conscicom.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/material-culture-of-citizen-science-programme-final.pdf Outputs from the event are 2 blog posts and a video, URLs below: https://conscicom.org/2017/08/09/materials-of-mass-participation-aluminum-and-paper-in-early-twentieth-century-u-s-bird-banding/ https://conscicom.org/2017/09/08/sensing-and-presencing-rare-plants-through-contemporary-drawing-practice/ There is a video interview with Sian Bowen one of the workshop participants: https://youtu.be/jhItil0gy1c This collaboration is multidisciplinary, the disciplines involved are: astronomy, art, literature, history of science, sociology.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Science Gossip 
Organisation Missouri Botanical Garden
PI Contribution The ConSciCom project is investigating the role of naturalists and 'amature' science enthusiasts in the making and communication of science in both the Victorian period and today. Historians at the Universities of Leicester and Oxford are investigating the particular roles of the periodical press in the nineteenth century as an arena in which citizen scientists of the past participated in scientific research. Periodicals and books of the Victorian era were heavily illustrated, but little is known about who made the illustrations and how they ended up in print. The data you create by tagging illustrations and adding artist and engraver information will have a direct impact on the research of historians who are trying to figure out why, how often, and who made images depicting a whole range of natural sciences in the Victorian period. Better understanding the range of individuals who made science through their images will help us ascertain what constituted a nineteenth century scientist and citizen scientist. This is the first Zooniverse project where citizen scientists are both the researchers and the subject of the research. Citizen scientists of today can have a direct impact on how we understand historical and modern notions of what it means to do science. 
Collaborator Contribution The Missouri Botanical Garden are providing content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) to the Science Gossip collaboration.
Impact The project has been very successful among the citizen science participants - who are able to comment on and discuss the finding they have made through the website through the 'talk' function - http://talk.sciencegossip.org There has also been significant discussion through the Biodiversity Heritage Library working group, and at national History of Science conferences as to the merits and limitations of citizen science applied to the humanities, represented through a case study of ScienceGossip. A relationship with Stanford's center for spatial and textual analysis has also been established with the hope of producing a set of data digital data visualization tools.. Since its launch in March 2015, 155,432 pages have been classified by 9781 participants.The project has received excellent press and media coverage which contributed to the number of participants on the project. The coverage is summarised in the Engagement Activities section in an entry entitled Science Gossip Aggregated Media Coverage and Events.
Start Year 2016
 
Title Zooniverse Transcription Library 
Description Additions to the (already open) Zooniverse library of tools to support transcription for upcoming AHRC project; particularly novel is the ability in Javascript to save state between transcription sessions and to divide a complex task into smaller regions of interest. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact This has already influenced the design of the new Zooniverse platform, Panoptes. 
 
Title Zooniverse Upload Module 
Description Software to allow upload of images by volunteers to the Zooniverse platform. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Being used by future projects, notably a collaboration with Moorfields Eye Hospital 
URL https://github.com/zooniverse/Orchids
 
Title Zooniverse transcription in project builder 
Description Adds the capability for text transcription to the Zooniverse project builder 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Increased engagement with cultural organisations, especially libraries 
 
Description 'SciFri' Lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On March 31st 2017 as part of the Natural History Museum's regular 'SciFri' lecture series, Prof Dawson gave a talk on his research to members of staff from London and Tring at the museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description AHRC Science Ignite event (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The AHRC Science in Culture Theme Science Ignite event, held at the Natural History Museum, London on 26th March 2014 invited 15 early career researchers to present their research in 5 minute talks, with 20 slides each displaying for 15 seconds. There were three sections with 5 speakers in each, followed by a networking reception. The event was open to the public and journalists and academics were also invited. Professor Chris Lintott introduced the first session of speakers and Professor Sally Shuttleworth the second. Members of the project team ran a stand in the exhibition area before and after the event displaying the work of the project. The team gave out leaflets, talked to attendees about the project and demonstrated the Zooniverse projects on a large computer screen. Professor Shuttleworth and Professor Lintott were also video interviewed for the event.

Exchange of ideas with a wide range of people from the creative industries, museums and libraries as well as other academics. The videos of the Ignite talks and interviews reached a wide audience. The video entitled "AHRC Science in Culture Ignite Film" containing Professor Shuttleworth and Professor Lintott's interview has had over 900 viewings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLyIzwe-lwzlZWq_ZsRkZYEylOJdOPKkEl
 
Description AHRC Science in Culture Theme: People and Projects 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In 2014, shortly after the project began, Professor Sally Shuttleworth and Dr Sally Frampton provided a question and answer feature for the AHRC Science in Culture Theme website. The post is available at the link below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.sciculture.ac.uk/2014/06/27/ahrc-science-in-culture-theme-people-projects/
 
Description Academic blog: The Victorian Clinic 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Alison Moulds maintains a personal/ academic blog about medicine and health in the long nineteenth century. She began the site during her Masters studies but has continued during her thesis and publishes on her current research project. For example, she has written posts on the Victorian medical-woman movement and fictional portrayals of medical men and women in novels such as Charlotte Bronte's Villette and Anthony Trollope's Doctor Thorne. She also posts on other subjects related to her interests and includes reviews of books, TV series, and exhibitions. Through the site she has been in contact with a variety of individuals including academics, authors of fiction, museums, and special interest groups. As of 12 March 2017, her blog has received over 8,000 views and 5,795 visitors.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
URL https://victorianclinic.wordpress.com/
 
Description Ada Lovelace Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The project co-organised and was a sponsor of the Ada Lovelace Symposium, held at the University of Oxford to celebrate the 200th birthday of Ada Lovelace. Other sponsors included Google and the London Mathematical Society.

A hugely successful two day symposium on 9th and 10th December 2015 was attended by around 300 delegates including leading figures in the history of computing, digital technology companies, academics, students and also interested members of the public. The presentations were interdisciplinary and included computer scientists, mathematicians, graphic artist and historians. Professor Shuttleworth chaired a panel during the symposium, and members of the project team (Project administrator Alyson Slade, Drs Sally Frampton and Jim O'Donnell) ran a stall to publicise the Constructing Scientific Communities projecty and demonstrate Zooniverse citizen science projects. On 8th December, a workshop was organised for graduate students and early career researchers on the cultural legacy of Ada Lovelace

Professor Shuttleworth's discussions with Sydney Padua, the graphic artist she met at the symposium, have led to plans for Sydney to give a seminar for the project on Lovelace and Babbage soon and also for her to work with us to produce some graphic art work for the project in the near future.

The conference was podcasted and the recordings are available at: https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/ada-lovelace-symposium-celebrating-200-years-computer-visionary
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/adalovelace/
 
Description Amateur Surgeon or Dutiful Citizen - The First Aid Movement in the 19th Century 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Sally Frampton wrote a blog post for the Remedia history of medicine website entitled Amateur Surgeon or Dutiful Citizen - The First Aid Movement in the Nineteenth Century.

Enquiries have been made with Remedia as to how many people accessed Dr Frampton's article. As of 11 February 2016, the article had 330 views, and was shared on Facebook 60 times. It was also linked to by other History of Science blogs/websites.

The piece also reached readers via Twitter. The Remedia Twitter account has just under 600 followers (as of February 2016) and the tweet publicising Dr Frampton's article was retweeted by 11 people. These 11 people included historians, academics, a medical organisation, and the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. The article therefore reached a wider audience on Twitter than just Remedia followers.


To be confirmed
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://remedianetwork.net/2015/11/02/amateur-surgeon-or-dutiful-citizen-the-first-aid-movement-in-th...
 
Description Apollo Hammersmith Festival of reason 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk at Festival of Reason at Apollo Hammersmith to 4000 people a night for two nights.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Apple 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Insights into public engagement in science influenced designs for software for new Apple Watch.

Apple made changes to planned designs based on our insights into how people engage with complex-seeming science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Article for BMJ Medical Humanities Blog on the male doctor/ female patient relationship 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a short article entitled 'From awkwardness to impropriety: conceptualising the male doctor's embarrassing body in Victorian medical literature' for the BMJ Medical Humanities Blog. It looked at anxieties surrounding the male doctor/female patient relationship in medical writing and fiction during the nineteenth century. It drew on her research with the Royal College of Surgeons' collection of medical journals. Alison was invited to contribute this article following a paper she delivered at the 'Embarrassing Bodies' conference at Birkbeck, University of London (17 June 2016). She is awaiting statistics to understand what impact the piece has had.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://blogs.bmj.com/medical-humanities/2016/07/12/embarrassing-bodies-the-male-doctorfemale-patient...
 
Description Articles for English Review A-Level magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Alison Moulds has written two articles for English Review, a magazine aimed at A-Level students. The first piece, 'Who are the Detectives? Class, Gender and Identity in Crime Writing', was published in November 2017. This was well-received by the magazine, which then commissioned a further article from her. Her second piece - 'Above Suspicion? Reliability and Respectability in Detective Fiction' - has been accepted for publication. It largely focuses on Agatha Christie's novel The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926) and draws on Alison's doctoral research about the representation of the country doctor in popular fiction.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact in 2014, Chris Lintott was interviewed for the BBC Radio 4 programme The Life Scientific in which he discussed citizen science, astronomy, Galaxy Zoo, presenting The Sky at Night and working with the late Sir Patrick Moore. The programme is available at the Iplayer link below.
It is not possible to ascertain how many people will have heard the programme, but the audience number is likely to be high and the programme is available internationally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b046kwpv
 
Description BBC Stargazing Live 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact We ran an online project in association with the BBC's Stargazing Live show.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Being Human - Conversations on Nature 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This event held on 18 November 2014 at the University of Leicester was part of the national Being Human Festival of the Humanities organised by the School of Advanced Study University of London in partnership with the AHRC, British Academy and Wellcome Trust.

Conversations on Nature was an evening of talks and activities for the general public at the University of Leicester, and was specifically designed for public engagement as an introduction to citizen science, its history, and how people today can contribute to scientific research. The event was attended by a mixture of the public and University of Leicester staff and students, all of whom were an interested and engaged audience keen to ask questions and have discussions with the project team.

The event recreated the Victorian conversazione which brought science to the wider public and the event aimed to do the same to engage a modern audience with our research. Natural history illustrations from periodicals and and books of the period were on display for the public to look at, including Science Gossip and The Geologist. Having actual Victorian periodicals for the public to leaf through themselves proved a very successful format. More delicate items were on display only.

The main focus of the evening was a magic lantern show, where members of the project team, some dressed in Victorian costume, displayed images from natural history, science, maps and microscope slides. A blog post was written for the project website detailing the event with photographs, for which the URL is given below.

We had very positive feedback from the audience - collected through a questionnaire. The University of Leicester library was able to highlight some of its excellent periodical collection, and there was increased participation between the university and the Natural History Museum, who had participated in the event. The event, in augmented form, was also produced again at the Royal Society in 2015.

In addition to the increase in requests for further information indicated below, there was an inc
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://conscicom.org/2014/12/04/conversations-on-nature-at-the-university-of-leicester-library/
 
Description Being Human - People Power 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 20th November 2014, the project took part in the national Being Human Festival of the Humanities organised by the School of Advanced Study University of London in partnership with the AHRC, British Academy and Wellcome Trust.

People Power was an evening of citizen science talks and activities for the general public at the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford. The event was specifically designed for public engagement, as an introduction to citizen science and to suggest ways in which people can participate. The evening was aimed at schoolchildren at GCSE and A Level age, as well as members of the general public. The age range of attendees was from 14-70s.

Professor Sally Shuttleworth introduced the evening, and provided a brief overview of the Constructing Scientific Communities project. Two short talks followed on the history of citizen science - Dr Sally Frampton's talk focused on the role of the public in the history of vaccination, and Dr Will Abberley from the Faculty of English discussed amateur animal psychology in Victorian Britain. Dr Victoria van Hyning from the Zooniverse team then talked about 21st century citizen science projects. Interactive activities took place around the museum - Dr Abberley ran an activity on animal psychology, the Zooniverse team enabled people to try citizen science projects for themselves and Dr Sally Frampton ran the Unbelievable Truth of Medical History game which invited the public to decide whether medical history statements were fact or fiction. The evening ended with a question and answer session with the project team. A blog post with video footage from the event is available on the project website for which the URL is below.

The evening was very successful and extremely positive feedback questionnaires were collected in from the audience afterwards. Audience members comments showed that the format of short talks, engaging activities and opportunity for discussion and questions worked very well. Comments included that participants were inspired to find out more about the topics presented, take part in citizen science projects, and enjoyed learning about historical and contemporary citizen science.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLScyx6VxEekL0dt7JoeHIV2lD0eFz0D47
Time Lapse of People Power: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKo39Nks2-c&list=PLScyx6VxEekL0dt7JoeHIV2lD0eFz0D47?dex=1
People Power at the Museum: Sally Shuttleworth Introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rw9xutRlb1Q&list=PLScyx6VxEekL0dt7JoeHIV2lD0eFz0D47?dex=2


Increased interest in participation in Zooniverse citizen science projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://conscicom.org/2014/12/02/people-power-at-the-museum-of-the-history-of-science-oxford/
 
Description Biodiversity Heritage Library - 10th Anniversary Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 12th April 2015, Prof Gowan Dawson and Dr Geoff Belknap attended the Biodiversity Heritage Library's 10th anniversary event held at the Natural History Museum. This was a public event highlighting the BHL's work and impact on the global science community. Prof Dawson and Dr Belknap spoke on Different Perspectives: Multi Disciplinary Use of the BHL - The Case of Science Gossip.

The feedback afterwards was that Prof Dawson and Dr Belkap's presentation was pitch perfect and fitted in very well with the other presentations which together gave an overview of the BHL's work past and present. Science Gossip was quoted frequently in the two days of business meetings following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://blog.biodiversitylibrary.org/2016/05/bhl-day-celebrating-10-years-of-open.html
 
Description Blog Post: Vaccination: Medicine and the Masses Exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Sally Frampton wrote a blog post for the Royal College of Surgeons Library website on the exhibition which the project co-curated with the RCS - Vaccination, Medicine and the Masses, to publicise the exhibition which ran from April to September 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/library-and-publications/library/blog/vaccination-medicine-masses/
 
Description Blog post for BAVS on BBC TV series Quacks 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In September 2017, Alison Moulds wrote a blog post on the BBC comedy series Quacks for The Victorianist, the postgraduate blog of the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS). As at 6 February 2018, it had received 378 views. When BAVS Postgrads Tweeted about the blog post it received 10 Re-Tweets and 18 likes, including engagement from the Wellcome Collection, who called it a 'wonderful review'. Alison has also heard that the blog post was read by members of the production team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://victorianist.wordpress.com/2017/09/22/review-of-quacks-bbc-2017/
 
Description Blog post for Ministry of Curiosity on vaccination exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a blog post about her experiences of co-curating the exhibition 'Vaccination: Medicine and the Masses' (at the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons) for the website the Ministry of Curiosity (which is about London museums and culture). The post was intended to raise the profile of the exhibition and act as a reflective account of Alison's formative experiences as a guest/co-curator. As at 24 February 2017 the blog post had received 1872 views.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://theministryofcuriosity.blogspot.co.uk/2016/06/guest-post-alison-moulds-on-guest.html
 
Description Blog post for Queen Mary (University of London) 'History of Emotions' website on the doctor-patient encounter in Victorian medical writing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In 2016 Alison Moulds wrote a guest blog post entitled 'Representing emotion in the doctor-patient encounter in Victorian medical writing' for the Queen Mary (University of London) History of Emotions website. This drew on her thesis research and referenced some of the medical journals she has been working with in the Royal College of Surgeons collection. The blog post was published around the time the 'Vaccination: Medicine and the Masses' exhibition opened and ahead of some public engagement events so was used to raise the profile of these activities. On 31 January 2017 we were informed the blog had received 258 users and 335 page views. 14% of these readers then went on to read something else on the website which is positive news for them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://emotionsblog.history.qmul.ac.uk/2016/04/representing-emotion-in-the-doctor-patient-encounter...
 
Description Blog post for Royal College of Surgeons website on Arthur Conan Doyle's The Stark Munro Letters 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a short blog post entitled 'Medical fiction for popular readers: The Stark Munro Letters (1895)' for the library section of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) website. This discussed a novella by Arthur Conan Doyle and its reception by medical journals. The post drew on material taken from the RCS collection, publicising Alison's engagement with this project partner. As at 19 January 2017 the post had received 61 unique views. The RCS's Tweet about the blog post received 50 clicks, 32 likes and 21 ReTweets. (We also publicised it through the Constructing Scientific Communities Twitter account.) On the RCS Facebook page it received 9 'likes' and 2 'loves'. We are aware of at least one person (based at the RCS Library) who read the book for the first time as a result of the blog post.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/library-and-publications/library/blog/the-stark-munro-letters/
 
Description Citizen Science (Forum Panel discussion) London School of Economics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Berris Charnley was invited to sit on a panel discussion at the London School of Economics. The panel were asked to consider a radical proposal to rethink the distinction between scientist and citizen. From medicine and GMOs to cyber-security and climate change, scientific research is vital to modern life. On the other hand, many of us struggle to get to grips with its increasing complexity. How does this fit with our ideals of democracy? And in an era of mistrust of experts, does science have a legitimacy problem? These were some of the questions that the panel discussed. The link below shows the discussion which has had over 40,000 downloads.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/website-archive/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/pla...
 
Description Connecting with the Crowd - a public conference at the Natural History Museum, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This one day cross-disciplinary conference held on June16th explored best practices and new perspectives on crowdsourcing citizen science. Crowdsourcing projects and platforms abound, involving over one million citizen scientists in the analysis or interpretation of images and data online. This conference aimed to showcase the latest tools, technologies and approaches available to engage and collaborate with diverse audiences online, and to invite delegates to help shape the future of crowdsourcing.
131 delegates from a wide variety of backgrounds attended, including representatives of universities and NGOs, charities, research organisations and students. Prof Chris Lintott (Professor of Astrophysics and co-founder of the Zooniverse crowdsourcing platform, University of Oxford) and Prof Dan Rubenstein (Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Director of the Program in African Studies at Princeton University) were among the speakers who delivered a varied programme of 17 presentations and speed talks. They shared their experiences of developing and running crowdsourcing projects, showcased the different platforms and technologies available, and reflected on the participant experience and strategies to maximise the impacts of crowdsourcing.
In between the packed schedule of talks we had plenty of time for coffee, discussion, networking and two interactive formats to build capacity for crowdsourcing. Demonstrations at the Project Showcase gave delegates the chance to meet platform developers and project owners to discuss in detail how projects are created and view demonstrations of how different platforms work. A particular highlight was seeing Dr Grant Miller from the Zooniverse team demonstrating how to build a citizen science project from scratch in under 3 minutes! The Collaborative Wish-list Wall allowed delegates to share their ideas, questions and wishes for future functionality on crowdsourcing platforms - information which can be shared with platform developers to inform future investment.
Evaluation forms were distributed to all delegates on the day, and were completed by 39 delegates (30% return rate). When asked to give an overall rating for the conference from 1 (poor) to 10 (excellent), respondents gave an average score of 8.8. 87% of respondents said that the most useful aspect of the day was the presentations, and 95% rated the conference as meeting or exceeding their expectations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLScyx6VxEekKp0Ch1OPbmq5viy2gX-jEQ
 
Description Constructing Scientific Communities: Project Website Visitor and Countries Data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This entry is to record the statistics for the project website and its international reach. The data is up to date as of 9th February 2018 and will be updated again for subsequent reports.
Since the project website was launched in 2014, its posts have received 37,048 views from 142 countries.
The top 10 countries in order of visitors are: United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Germany, Brazil, Australia, India, Spain, France, Italy.
We have received views from these countries, in order of visitors: (following Italy) Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, Switzerland, Belgium, Russia, Ireland, Greece, Sweden, Norway, Austria, New Zealand, Mexico, Israel, Philippines, Poland, China, Taiwan, Colombia, South Korea, South Africa, Hungary, Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong, Singapore, European Union, Romania, Thailand, Argentina, Turkey, Malaysia, Czech Republic, Pakistan, Indonesia, Chile, Bulgaria, UAE, Bangladesh, Ukraine, Kenya, Luxembourg, Serbia, Saudi Arabia, Estonia, Costa Rica, Malta, Vietnam, Egypt, Peru, Nigeria, Albania, Brunei, Sri Lanka, Croatia, Tanzania, Ecuador, Slovakia, Nepal, Fiji, Georgia, Venezuela, Slovenia, Iraq, Uruguay, Lithuania, Isle of Man, Latvia, Lebanon, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Morocco, Tunisia, Iceland, Paraguay, Cyprus, Barbados, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Cote d'Ivoire, Qatar, Uganda, Kuwait, Guernsey, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Jordan, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Ghana, Rwanda, Angola, Senegal, Iran, Palestine, Yemen, Trinidad & Tobago, Oman, Mozambique, Myanmar, Belize, Moldova, Kazakhstan, Cambodia, Dominica, Zambia, Solomon Island, Cameroon, Bahrain, Haiti, Panama, Kyrgyzstan, French Polynesia, Armenia, Macau, Boliva, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bhutan, Syria, Anguilla, Jersey, Mauritius, Guatemala, Madagascar, Maldives, Mongolia, Gabon, Aruba, Belarus, Guam
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017,2018
URL http://www.conscicom.org
 
Description Contagion Cabaret - a theatrical performance of drama, discussion and disease 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Members of the project collaborated with The Chipping Norton Theatre to create the Contagion Cabaret, a theatrical evening of drama, discussion and disease. The purpose was to reach a wide audience, and to set contemporary social issues associated with the spread of disease in historical perspective. Songs and extracts from plays and hstorical newspaper accounts, were interspersed with short talks from members of the project, and medical practitioners from Oxford Medical School. The project was a chance to look at the idea of contagion from varying and contrasting perspectives - thoughtful, heartfelt, irreverent, provocative. And a chance to realise that though the names of the diseases may change, our concerns, our fears, our prejudices echo through the centuries in a remarkably consistent way.
Versions of the Contagion Cabaret have been performed at a number of events:
1) Oxfordshire Science Festival, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. 20.6.17
There were 60 people at the performance which was part of a the wider Oxfordshire Science Festival. Around 8,000 visitors came to 34 Science Festival events 16-21 June 2017 held in a dozen venues, with 77% visiting the Festival for the first time. In exit surveys, 85% of visitors rated the event they had attended as 'good' or 'very good'. The Festival website had around 35,000 page views from bookings opening on 3 May to the end of the Festival and made 80,000 Twitter impressions during the same period. The Festival featured in the Oxford Mail, Oxfordshire PICK Magazine, OX Magazine,Primary Times, BBC Focus Magazine, BBC Radio Oxford and several other blogs and news websites. Over half of attendees to ticketed/paid events came from Oxford (52%) or Oxfordshire (69%) with London as the next most frequent home for ticketholders.
https://conscicom.org/2017/05/25/the-contagion-cabaret-oxfordshire-science-festival/ and a trailer for the event https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sbl-oQ-XkI
https://www.oxscifest.com/2017-festival-report/
2) The Chipping Norton Theatre, 27.9.17
50 people attended the event which was performed in the intimate bar area of the theatre. The discussion was very lively afterwards, with attendees noting that the performances had changed their understandings of the ways diseases might spread. They were particularly interested in the parallels between responses to AIDS in contemporary culture, and to sexual diseases in the nineteenth century.
3) The Contagion Cabaret @ the Curiosity Carnival 29.9.17
200 people attended the event at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford, see separate entry on The Curiosity Carnival
Additional events are planned in 2018 at: The Science Museum 25 April 2018 and the British Academy on 24 May 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/05/25/the-contagion-cabaret-oxfordshire-science-festival/
 
Description Cultures of Knowledge Seminar (Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Shuttleworth, along with Dr Victoria van Hyning from the Zooniverse team, participated in the University of Oxford Cultures of Knowledge seminar series on 10th November 2014 with a presentation entitled 'Constructing Scientific Communities in the 19th and 21st Centuries: Science Periodicals and the Zooniverse. Questions and discussions followed after the seminar.

These seminars are open to all but primarily aimed at academics and professionals in the field of digital humanities. Approximately 25-30 people attended.

The talk was podcasted and is available at the URL below. It has not been possible to find out how many people have listened to the podcast. However, the seminar was advertised on Twitter, and also live-tweeted on the day. The Cultures of Knowledge Twitter account has over 1,500 followers.


TBC
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.culturesofknowledge.org/?page_id=5105
 
Description Digital Transformations Lecture by Professor Andrew Prescott 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 17th February 2015, the project team organised a visit by Andrew Prescott, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Glasgow and AHRC Leadership Fellow for Digital Humanities. Professor Prescott gave a public lecture at St Anne's College entitled Digital Transformations, in which he discussed how to develop and use digital humanities in the academic community. The lecture was open to all and an advertisement for the talk is provided at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/digital-transformations
 
Description FORCE2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk on ConSciCom topics to an audience of publishers and developers working in publishing.

We are actively developing software with several attendees.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description From Citizen Science to Citizen Humanities - 19th Century History in the Digital Age 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Geoff Belknap wrote a piece for the University of Leicester website on the Constructing Scientific Communities project, how the public can participate in research and produce knowledge and participate in our Science Gossip project with Zooniverse. The blog post is available at the URL below. Enquiries were made but it was not possible to find out from the University of Leicester Press Office how many people viewed the post online. However, it will have reached a combination of academic staff, administrative staff and students across the University.

The website shows that it was shared to a wider audience via Facebook 'Likes' 38 times and shared to other social media a further 9 times.



The project was highlighted within the University of Leicester community, and created a better understanding of what we are doing and how it reflects larger questions in humanities and digital humanities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/think-leicester/science-and-environment/2015/from-citizen-scienc...
 
Description Fun Palaces at the Oxford Playhouse 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Sally Frampton, Dr Berris Charnley and Dr Geoff Belknap, together with Simone Duca from Zooniverse, took part in the programme of activities Fun Palaces organised at the Oxford Playhouse theatre on Saturday 3rd October 2015. Fun Palaces is a nationwide event which runs arts and science activities for the general public. Fun Palaces is a very family orientated event, and so the audience included children of all ages as well as adults.

Zooniverse citizen science projects were demonstrated, the team put on a Victorian magic lantern show and had general discussions with the public about citizen science and the work of the Constructing Scientific Communities project. Project leaflets were available and distributed.

The children were especially interested in the interactive elements of the event with the Zooniverse citizen science projects, asked lots of questions and were keen to talk to the project team members. Many of the parents also expressed interest in citizen science and asked the team about future project activities and ways in which their children could become involved in science activities generally in the Oxford area. The event was extremely successful in engaging the interest of children in particular.



The team had some very good conversations with parents and children and many were interested in taking part in citizen science projects on Zooniverse. Project leaflets were also available and handed out to audience members.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://funpalaces.co.uk/about/
 
Description HG Wells, War of the Worlds - radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact As part of Radio 4's Mars season, Professor Sally Shuttleworth from St Anne's College, Oxford is one of the participants discussing HG Wells' science fiction novel The War of the Worlds. The programme explored the startling array of ideas that fuelled the HG wells' classic and gives it its lasting impact. The host Francis Spufford was joined by Professor Sally Shuttleworth and space scientist Maggie Aderin-Pocock to consider Martian evolution and appearance in a terrifying close encounter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08h065d
 
Description How the Victorians Made Dinosaurs 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Gowan Dawson gave a talk at Rugby Art Gallery and Museum on 8th May 2015 on the Sydenham Crystal Palace and public involvement in 19th century science as part of the Dinosaurs at Dusk event. The event was part of their 'Museums at Night' programme, which was attended by 2000 people. Professor Dawson's talk had approximately 30 attendees and he took questions from the audience afterwards. The evening featured in the local press, and the URL for an article is below.


Not known. The event and Professor Dawson's talk was reported in the local press, for which a URL is provided below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://rugbyobserver.co.uk/news/dinosaurs-roam-rugby-museum-5762/
 
Description Illustrating the Natural World. From Victorian Periodicals to Citizen Science 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 24th April 2015, Dr Geoff Belknap gave a talk to Natural History Museum staff about the work of the project and the involvement of the Natural History Museum. This was part of the NHM's SciFri series of talks for staff members and approximately 40 people attended. Dr Belknap's talk resulted in questions and discussions with the audience members afterwards.

The talk was filmed and is available at the URL below. At the time of entering this onto Research Fish, the clip had received 20 views.

Member of staff at the Natural History Museum, which constituted the primary audience, came away with a better understanding of the research project - Constructing Science Communities - and how Dr Belknap's research in particular and the project as a whole relates to the museum.

The talk was filmed and is available on You Tube, for which the URL is given below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC-tPcb214E
 
Description In Our Time radio discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sally Shuttleworth was one of the panellists in the In Our Time episode hosted by Melvyn Bragg. The discussion was on Elizabeth Gaskell's novel North and South, published in 1855 after serialisation in Dickens' Household Words magazine. The novel has become valued for its insights into social conflicts and the changing world in which Gaskell lived.
Comments from the BBC - Many listeners told us they were inspired to read more Gaskell (Gaskell's OUP version did well on the Amazon charts edition and moved up 150k places). However, the main leap was in the Wordsworth Classics version, which is the first one promoted on the Amazon site. Around 2.5m people heard the programme live, and over the month another 3m people listen to the podcasts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08h0654
 
Description Inaugural Professorial Lecture - Prof Gowan Dawson 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 24 February 2015, Professor Gowan Dawson gave his inaugural professorial lecture at the University of Leicester. The lecture was entitled Show Me the Bone or How the Victorians Made Their Dinosaurs. The lecture was open to the public and the audience was a combination of academic and administrative staff from the University of Leicester, undergraduate and postgraduate students and interested members of the public. Professor Dawson took questions afterwards. This inaugural lecture led on to Professor Dawson working with the Friends of the Crystal Palace Dinosaurs group which in turn led to his appearance on BBC's The One Show. (A separate entry has been inputted for the One Show)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www2.le.ac.uk/news/events/2015/february/inaugural_gowan_dawson
 
Description Inside Science 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Received several emails from interested listeners!

Contributed to decision to invite me to chair session for UK learned sciences publishers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Interview with 19 Journal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor Gowan Dawson, Dr Geoff Belknap and Alison Moulds were interviewed for a podcast by Carolyn Burdett of the 19 - Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century journal at Birkbeck University of London. The interview discussed the work of the Constructing Scientific Communities project.

At the time of inputting this entry, the interview had received 62 views, but no further impact is known at the present time. The interview was published in podcast and transcript form at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.19.bbk.ac.uk/articles/10.16995/ntn.756/
 
Description Lost Late: Night at the Museums 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event was held on 17th November 2017 at the Pitt Rivers Museum and Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of the national Being Human Festival. 4000 people were in the museum during the event. 80 people attended Professor Sally Shuttleworth's talk and 75 people played the Mind Boggling Medical History game during the evening.
Professor Sally Shuttleworth presented a talk entitled - A Lost Victorian Utopia: Living to 100, at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford as part of the Lost Late: Night at the Museum event. This talk looked at a Victorian blue-print for a city of health and happiness, where everyone could live to 100. Using cartoons from Punch and other journals, it explored popular comic responses to what were seen as the health fads of the day. The talk was enjoyed by 80 people who engaged in animated discussion.
During the evening post doctoral researcher Dr Sally Frampton on the Constructing Scientific Communities project as well as PI on the Mind Boggling Medical History AHRC funded grant presented the Mind Boggling Medical History card game. The game explores the weirder side of medical history and current practices in health and medicine. This educational game is designed to challenge preconceptions about history and show how ideas in medicine change for a variety of reasons. Over 75 adults and children played the game over the evening, providing constructive feedback on the questions posed. The event reached relevant audiences, including schoolteachers who are one of the groups the finalised game will be promoted and distributed to.
Lost Late: Night at the Museums was an evening of talks, tours, performance and more, exploring lost and found worlds. Themed around 'Lost Late: Night at the Museums', the evening saw humanities researchers, academics and community groups from across Oxford come together for a night of dance, theatre, and music performances, games, interactive talks, music & film installations, bite-size talks, projections and art. The museums came alive with researchers for a whole evening with the themes of Lost and Found, surrounded by the fantastic museums' collections.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/lost
 
Description Magic Lantern Event, Royal Institution London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public event in the wonderful atmospheric old lecture theatre of the Royal Institution following an all day academic symposium on Victorian Science and the Magic Lantern. Professional magic lanternist, Jeremy Brooker, gave a performance introducing the audience to the various ways in which lantern slides had been used in Victorian publiclectures and entertainments, focusing on John Tyndall's use of the Magic Lantern during his period at the Royal Institution. The show attracted a diverse audience of over 100 people, including many magic lantern enthusiasts. There was discussion between the Constructing Scientific Communities team and the audience following the show. Attendees reported that they had new understanding about how science was communicated in the nineteenth century.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/02/10/magic-lantern-and-science-workshop-17-march-2017/
 
Description Market Research Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk to MRS conference on online behaviours and community building; comments from attendees indicated they had changed thinking following talk.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Museums at Night Vaccination Yes or No (Part of Vaccination Medicine and the Masses Exhibition) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Museums at Night: Vaccination Yes or No was a free public event held on 12 May 2016 from 6-9pm at the Hunterian Museum Royal College of Surgeons to celebrate the opening of the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses exhibition. The event was open to all over the age of 14. Visitors were able to view the exhibition, see public health videos about vaccination, and medical historian Richard Barnett gave a talk on pathology and public health accompanied by images of infectious diseases from his book The Sick Rose. Visitors were able to learn about the anti-vaccination movement, and hear for themselves the songs and poems that were popular in the late 19th century. At the event, Oskar Cox Jensen, a cultural historian and musician with an interest in 19th century songs performed three anti-vaccination movement songs which were well known in the period. The event was filmed and a blog post by Dr Sally Frampton about the event was published on the project website with the films, which is available at the URL below.

142 people attended the event.

The event introduced the history of vaccination to the general public, and presented the anti vaccination movement in an entertaining and informative style through performance, and was a very successful evening.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/09/15/why-poison-yours-but-dont-make-me-a-prey-to-vaccination-songs-of-th...
 
Description NHM Library and Archives Blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Geoffrey Belknap wrote a short blog entry for the Natural History Museum Library and Archives Blog, introducing myself and the work for the AHRC funded project that I am doing at the museum.

Had a number of fellow NHM staff members comment on how they found the project interesting and that they were happy to be informed of the research that was going on in the library and archives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.nhm.ac.uk/natureplus/community/library/blog/2014/07/02/behind-the-scenes?fromGateway=true
 
Description Natural History Museum Lates event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Science is a cornerstone of modern society but sharing the work of scientists can often be a challenge. At Pop science, we explore some of the different ways that science can be and has been shared with the world over the generations. From television to poetry, animation to photography when Constructing Scientific Communities took over the Natural History Museums Lates evening on 27 October 2017 it gave the public an opportunity to explore some of the ways that people have engaged with and explored science from early Victorian naturalists to the latest citizen science. During the evening over 4,300 people (breaking previous records for a Lates event) attended and were able to engage with the following activities:
1) Animation: Sydney Padua has made numerous animations derived from illustrations found in 19th century natural history periodicals which have featured in Conscicom's Science Gossip project and which are drawn from the digitised collections of the Biodiversity heritage Library. At the event Sydney demonstrated the animation process to the audience through a series of mini workshops.
2) Magic Lantern Show: Conscicom's Geoff Belknap and Richard Fallon donned Victorian outfits to project 19th century science on to the walls of the Natural History Museum, as they performed a series of magic lantern shows. Magic lanterns shows were a hugely important technology for the circulation of scientific knowledge in the nineteenth century, exhibiting a wide range of scientific imagery.
3) Makayla Lewis: Makayla Lewis https://makaylalewis.co.uk/ is an academic with expertise in human-computer interaction. She is also an accomplished sketcher and runs sketchnote workshops, sharing her process of visual thinking. At the event Makayla ran a live gallery drawing activity. There is a gallery of the drawings that participants made via the link below. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B1yGEQsd6hjwa2JOX0Q2MjhKWUU?usp=sharing
4) Mind-Boggling Medical History: Visitors had the opportunity to play this medical history card game, which challenged them to sort past from present and fact from fiction in medicine.
5) Don Patterson performed (with musical accompaniment!) new poetry written especially for the Constructing Scientific Communities project. https://twitter.com/KiraAllmann/status/923993158421303296
6) Dr Phil Fowler - Bash the Bug - "Watching people walk around the NHM with animal masks/faces painted holding a beer is not something you see every day. I enjoyed talking about antibiotic resistance and showing BashTheBug.net to people; we were talking to people non-stop from 5.30-9.30pm." There's a nice blog here: http://bashthebug.net/2017/10/30/an-evening-at-the-london-natural-history-museum/
7) Mike Waller - London Wildlife Trust - "We had a great time with lots of good conversations so well worthwhile!" Further blog posts about the event https://blog.zooniverse.org/2017/11/10/a-late-night-at-the-museum/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://blog.zooniverse.org/2017/11/10/a-late-night-at-the-museum/
 
Description Orchid Observers Aggregated Media Coverage and Events 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Press & Media
• BBC South East Today
While the finest collections of cultivated flowers go on public display today at the Chelsea Flower Show, some of the rarest wild orchids can actually be found right on our doorstep here in the South East. But now wildlife experts are warning these delicate plants are under threat. Charlie Rose reports. https://www.facebook.com/BBCSouthEastToday/videos/10153298254363648/
• BBC Earth, 21 May 2015, Orchid spotters help map climate change http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150520-orchid-spotters-help-map-climate-change
• BBC News, Science & Environment, 26 July 2015, Orchid spotters map shifting blooms http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33652194
• The Telegraph, 28 July 2015, Nature Notes - Orchids bloom at 200 new sites
• The Telegraph, 28 July 2015, Save the orchid - and the Earth - with the Natural History museum http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/11764824/Save-the-orchid-and-the-Earth-with-the-Natural-History-Museum.html
• The Guardian, 21 July 2015, Orchid Observers: a citizen science project http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2015/jul/21/orchid-observers
• Country Walking magazine, June 2015, p12 - Ey-up orchid!
• The Professional Gardener magazine, 25 June 2015 - Calling all orchid enthusiasts!
Articles
• Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland - BSBI News, April 2015 - Calling on the UK botanical community to help collect flowering time observations for UK orchids in 2015
• NHM Evolve magazine: Issue 24/Summer 2015 - Orchid Observers
• Larkhill and Westdown Conservation Group Newsletter, Edn. 24, August 2015 - Dutch and British scientists visit SPTA(C) [this is a Ministry of Defence newsletter]
Blogs
• Zooniverse - Orchid Observers http://blog.orchidobservers.org/
• National Heritage Science Forum (NHSF) 5 July 2015 - Orchid Observers Project https://nationalheritagescienceforum.wordpress.com/
• National Biodiversity Network (NBN) 29 April 2015 - Collecting flowering time observations of UK orchids to research the impacts of climate change http://www.nbn.org.uk/News/Latest-news/Orchid-observers.aspx
Public Engagement activities and events
Orchid Observers interactive stand at:
• Big Nature Day - Natural History Museum, London, Saturday 23rd May 2015. Event visitor number: 5,000 (minimum estimate based on timed counts). http://www.bto.org/news-events/events/2015-05/big-nature-day-natural-history-museum-london
• Fascination of Plants Day - Natural History Museum, London, May 18 2015. Visitor numbers: 8-16 years: 371, Adults: 598, Overall total: 969 http://www.plantsci.org.uk/events/fascination-plants-day-2015
• Lyme Regis Fossil Festival - 1-3 May 2015 http://www.fossilfestival.co.uk/. NHM marquee, biodiversity section, estimated visitor number to marquee: 10,000 (minimum), direct interaction with AMC stand (i.e. orchid observers): 2,748.
• Science Uncovered at the Natural History Museum (Major UK contribution to EU Researchers' Night) - September 2015 and October 2016. Projected visitor number based on past 5 years = 12,000.
• Pop Sci NHM Lates, Natural History Museum, London, October 27th 2017. A dedicated Constructing Scientific Communities late night opening event. Total visitor number 4,000.
Websites/forums
• Main project website - http://www.orchidobservers.org
• NHM - Orchid Observers http://www.nhm.ac.uk/take-part/citizen-science/orchid-observers.html
Academic conferences
Orchid Observers has been discussed as a case study at the following academic conferences:
• Citizen Science Association Inaugural Conference, San Jose, February 2015
• Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland National Recorders' Conference, Shrewsbury, April 2015
• Australian Citizen Science Association Inaugural Conference, Canberra, July 2015
• Wales Biodiversity Partnership Annual Conference, Aberystwyth, September 2015
• ECSITE (European Association of Museums and Science Centres) Annual Conference, Trento, Italy, June 2015
• Refloating the Ark Conference, Manchester, June 2015
• Real World Science Conference, London, September, 2015
• NBN Crowdsourcing Data Capture Summit, September, 2015
• Association of Science and Technology Centers Conference, Montreal, October 2015
• Biotic Response to Environmental Change conference, London, November 2015
• European Citizen Science Association Conference: innovation in open science, society and policy, Berlin, May 2016
• Call of the Wild, MIT, Boston, June 2016
• UCL Physical Geography lunchtime seminar series, March 2017
• Citizen Science Association Conference, St. Paul, Minnesota, May 2017
• Citizen Science and the Wild, London, June 2017
• Connecting with the Crowd, London, June 2017
• Ashmolean Natural History Society, Oxford, October 2017
Forthcoming
Oxford University Institutional Seminar Series on citizen science, March 2018
2018 Innes Lecture, John Innes Centre, April 2018
NB - Orchid Observers has been used as an exemplar project at a wide range of VIP tours within the NHM
Academic papers and book chapters
• Ballard HL, Robinson LD, Young AN, Pauly GB, Higgins LM, Johnson, RF and Tweddle, JC (2016) Contributions to conservation outcomes by natural history museum-led citizen science: Examining evidence and next steps. Biological Conservation, doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2016.08.040 (Orchid Observers is one of the projects that is analysed and cited within the paper)
• Robinson LD, Cawthray JL, Lee D, Tweddle J (2016) Citizen science: authentic science research at the natural history museum, In: Museum participation: new directions for audience collaboration, McSweeney K, Kavanagh J (Eds). Museums Etc. (Orchid Observers is cited as an innovation case study)
Other`
• The Orchid Observers Identification Guide to 29 species of UK Orchid that was produced as part of this project has been distributed to 1,000 people in printed form and is available from Zooniverse and NHM websites for download.
• Connecting with the Crowd conference June 2017 - see separate final report
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018
URL http://www.orchidobservers.org/
 
Description Orchid Observers: investigating the impact of climate change on the UK's orchids 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A talk was given by Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Dr John Tweddle (Head of the Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity, Natural History Museum) and Dr Kath Castillo (Project Officer, Constructing Scientific Communities, Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity, The Natural History Museum) to 50 members and non-members of The Ashmolean Natural History Society of Oxfordshire.
Understanding how the UK's flora and fauna is responding to climate change is one of the key challenges of our time. The illustrated talk reviewed the findings of the Orchid Observers citizen science project. This collaborative research project draws together information from historical museum specimens and contemporary field observations to investigate how flowering phenology within the UK's charismatic and ecologically important orchids may have been influenced by climate over the last 150-years. The speakers discussed what their findings mean for the future of the UK's orchid populations, along with the vital roles that the UK's dedicated communities of online and field-based citizen scientists play in this and related research. Examples of historical orchid specimens from London's Natural History Museum were available to view after the talk, along with free copies of a field guide to 29 of the UK's wild orchids.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Oversight Committee: Researchers' Night 2017, University of Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sally Shuttleworth was a member of the Oversight Committee for Curiosity Carnival, European Researchers' Night 2017 at the University of Oxford. She was a member of the planning committee for Oxford's largest public engagement event which saw 42,496 people engaged with the live activities of Curiosity Carnival either as visitors to the events or remotely via online means. Constructing Scientific Communities also played a major role on the night, with Mind boggling Medical History, Contagion Cabaret, and Quantum Physics stories for children. See entry in Public Engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ox.ac.uk/curiosity-carnival
 
Description Oxford Internet Institute : Crowdsourcing for Politics and Policy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion, and was referred to in many of the conference's subsequent sessions.

Several contacts from companies developing crowdsourcing platforms.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Oxford Martin School Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Dr Sally Frampton and Dr Geoff Belknap gave a presentation as part of the Oxford Martin School seminar series entitled Trusting the Crowd: Solving Big Problems with Everyday Solutions. This event was open to the public. The presentation 'Dear Mr Darwin' - What can we learn from 19th century citizen science was broadcast live on the Oxford Martin School website and then made available as a podcast.

The presentation was attended by approximately 30 people and the video on the Oxford Martin School website has received over 300 viewings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/event/1849
 
Description Oxford Open Doors - St Anne's College 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley and Dr Sally Frampton took part in the Oxford Open Doors event at St Anne's College. The Open Doors event is organised by the Oxford Preservation Trust annually where over 200 buildings in Oxford are open to the public. Many of the buildings provide tours, talks and other events. The event is aimed at the general public and draws a local, national and international audience of all ages.

The Constructing Scientific Communities project ran a programme of talks and interactive citizen science activities at St Anne's College during the afternoon of Sunday 13th September 2014. The Open Doors event was in conjunction with Professor Shuttleworth's other project, Diseases of Modern Life: 19th Century Perspectives, which also gave short talks during the afternoon.

Dr Charnley and Dr Frampton demonstrated Zooniverse projects in the lecture theatre large foyer area, gave three mini-talks on citizen science, answered questions and had general discussions with the public. Project leaflets were distributed and the audience were able to try out citizen science projects for themselves on laptops.

Comments from the public on the day included that they thought the project was very exciting and were keen to keep up with the project news and events via the website, and also participate in projects on Zooniverse.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://conscicom.org/2015/08/10/citizen-science-at-oxford-open-doors-sunday-13-september-2015/
 
Description People Power: How citizen science can change historical research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Geoff Belknap wrote a blog piece for the Guardian's science blog site, The H Word which was published on 26 April 2016, and entitled People Power: How citizen science can change historical research. It has not been possible to obtain the exact number of views from the site, but as it is a globally available publication with a large readership, it will have reached a high number of readers. The piece highlighted how citizen science is being used in the Humanities and discussed Constructing Scientific Communities' own citizen science project with Zooniverse, Science Gossip. The piece was also advertised via the project's own website and Twitter account.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.theguardian.com/science/the-h-word/2016/apr/26/how-citizen-science-could-change-historic...
 
Description People Powered Medicine Symposium (part of Vaccination Medicine and the Masses Exhibition) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On Saturday 7 May 2016, the project held a one day public symposium at the Royal College of Surgeons, entitled People Powered Medicine. This was an event organised as part of the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses exhibition and was open to medical humanities researchers, medical practitioners and the general public. The event was CPD accredited for medical practitioners. The symposium programme was organised chronologically, and discussed patient and public involvement in medicine and healthcare from 1800 to the present. It brought together historical and contemporary perspectives to consider the relationships between medical professionals and the public. The symposium also included a private viewing of the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses exhibition which had opened the week before.

The day opened with introductions by Professor Sally Shuttleworth, and David Ward, Vice President of the RCS. The first keynote was by Ruth Richardson of King's College London who spoke on the Carer as a Critical Friend. The first panel on Patient Preference in Late 19th and Early 20th Century Medicine comprised papers by Kristin Hussey of Queen Mary University of London on Victorian eye surgery, patient choice and the 1893 trial of the Indian oculists, and Claire Brock of the University of Leicester on Patient Resistance in the Early 20th Century. The second panel on Patient Communities, Patient Consumers: Exercising People Power in Post-War Britain comprised papers by Roberta Bivins of the University of Warwick on Building Communities, Changing Practice and Alex Mold of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on Patient-Consumers? Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Post-war Britain. The final panel on Bodies, Patients and Publishing: Medicine and the Public Today comprised papers by Tom Gillingwater of the University of Edinburgh on Bringing Anatomy Out of the Shadows, and Rosamund Snow of the University of Oxford and British Medical Journal on From body parts to curriculum setters - the changing role of the patient. The final keynote was given by Christopher McKevitt of King's College London on Symbolic acts, strategic gains: patient and public involvement in the English NHS and the day closed with reflections by Nicholas Markham of the Royal College of Surgeons, Christopher McKevitt, Ruth Richardson and Professor Shuttleworth.

Following the symposium, Dr Sally Frampton and Alison Moulds carried out interviews with some of the speakers and attendees, and records of these interviews have been kept on file. Questions included whether their views on public participation in medicine had been impacted by the day's discussions, and whether there is anything they will do differently in their work afterwards. Feedback from these interviews included that the range of papers in chronological order was a good idea; the day was fascinating and raised awareness about the current interest in hearing patient voices; the conference was outstanding value; a good mix of topics were covered; a determination to incorporate more patient and public involvement in work; reinforcement of the sense of the patient as agent; strengthened resolve to do more work on the social history of patients and practioner interaction; good networking opportunity and a chance to make new contacts which would benefit work and research; a change in viewpoint from regarding the patient as a living patient to regarding the patient as such from conception through to death; the connections between the 19th and 21st century issues were made very well; very educational day; greater and increased awareness of the work of the British Medical Journal in developing policies on patient involvement; generally very thought provoking. A comment received by the Royal College of Surgeons from one doctor who attended, was that he would be completely changing how he records his patient notes in future as a direct result of the discussions at the symposium.

A full report of the day was published on the project website, with photographs and films of the presentations and a Storify collation of the numerous live tweets throughout the day. This report is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/09/26/people-powered-medicine-symposium-videos-available-online/
 
Description People Powered Medicine videocast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On May 7 2017 a one day symposium was held at the Royal College of Surgeons investigating public participation in medicine and healthcare from the nineteenth century to today. It was organised by the ConSciCom project (conscicom.org) and the Royal college of Surgeons, the event was filmed and the is now available on You Tube.
6 Videos
People-Powered Medicine: Introduction by Sally Shuttleworth (ConSciCom) and David Ward (RCS): 24 views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2d9cUawHOAk&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=1
Alex Mold (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine): Patient-Consumers? Patient Organisations and Health Consumerism in Post-war Britain. 11 Views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAi2GR7AVDU&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=2
Christopher McKevitt (King's College London) Symbolic acts, strategic gains: patient and public involvement in the English NHS: 34 views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OThWj9oPs00&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=3
Claire Brock (University of Leicester): Patient Resistance in the Early Twentieth Century: 5 views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tu1z9GqQMWc&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=4
Kristin Hussey (QMUL): "Don't you think the Moorfields doctors knew better than this Indian?" Victorian eye surgery, patient choice and the 1893 trial of the Indian oculists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu6HamF3YjA&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=5
Tom Gillingwater (University of Edinburgh): Bringing anatomy out of the shadows. 34 views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNgJ0bivOmo&list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q?dex=6
Blog post with video footage at URL. https://conscicom.org/2016/09/26/people-powered-medicine-symposium-videos-available-online/
Impacts: 113 views as at January 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLScyx6VxEekI1NiAZfDvkmukWueO_0v7Q
 
Description People Powered Science - Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 21st May 2015, Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor Chris Lintott and Dr Berris Charnley took part in this event as part of the Royal Society's Cafe Scientifique series. This was an informal discussion event, open to the general public, about the history of citizen science and how it is being used today to advance scientific research. The discussion included the Constructing Scientific Communities project which was promoted at the event.

The Royal Society collated feedback questionnaires after the event. 50 of the 61 attendees completed the form. Half of the replies were first time attendees to the Royal Society event.

100% found the event enjoyable/very enjoyable, and 100% said they would come to a Royal Society event again. Comments indicated that there was interest in finding out more about the project.

The event was audio recorded and the URL for the recording is provided below.

The event generated interest among the audience at trying Zooniverse projects and becoming involved in citizen science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/05/citizen-science/
 
Description Podcasting workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kira Allmann the projects communication specialist has taught at the following podcasting workshops, where the content from The Conversationalist, the Constructing Scientific Communities podcast, was used as a teaching tool.
- Sounding Out Research: Lessons from Podcasting in Academia - 'Projecting the Arts': Conveying Research in the Humanities through TV, Radio, Podcasting and Projection Art, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities, University of Oxford, 21 November 2017
- Podcasting for Public Engagement Workshop - Training session, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), 7 November 2017
- Podcasting for Academics: Crash Course & Workshop - AHRC-TORCH Public Engagement with Research Summer School, University of Oxford, 12-14 July 2017
- Podcasting for Public Engagement Workshop - Training session, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), 9 May 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/media/podcasts/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: "Dressing up" Research: Impact and Public Engagement, Past and Present 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sally Shuttleworth produced a blog post for the project website titled "Dressing up" Research: Impact and Public Engagement, Past and Present.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/06/22/dressing-up-research-impact-and-public-engagement-past-and-present/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: A Lamp in One Hand and a Measuring Tape in the Other 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lea Beiermann, Guest blogger and ConSciCom intern, produced a blog post for the project website called A Lamp in One Hand and a Measuring Tape in the Other.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/01/09/a-lamp-in-one-hand-and-a-measuring-tape-in-the-other/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: A Thing of Beauty 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Geoff Belknap wrote a blog post for the project website called A Thing of Beauty in which he discussed some the fascinating discoveries he has made whilst researching nineteenth century periodicals, specifically Science Gossip. The post received 150 views.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2015/01/02/a-thing-of-beauty
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Arabella Kenealy (1859-1938): Medical woman, author and eugenicist 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a blog post on a Victorian medical woman and eugenicist called Arabella Kenealy, whom she discovered during her doctoral research. As at 14 March 2018, the blog has had 29 views. It generated discussion on Twitter about approaches to women's history and why not all 'pioneers' can/ should be reclaimed as sources of inspiration or proto-feminist icons. The article appears as part of a series of blog posts in which ConSciCom researchers share the little-known periodicals and personalities they uncovered in the course of their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://conscicom.org/2018/03/09/arabella-kenealy-1859-1938-medical-woman-author-and-eugenicist/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Asylum Tourism - The House of Horrors? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This blog post was a guest contribution to the project website by Mary Chapman, who was invited by Dr Sally Frampton to write a post for us. At that time, Mary Chapman was about to commence her doctorate at Leeds University on the impact of gendered psychological medicine on urban women, 1845-1900. In the blog post, Mary discussed public interest in asylums in the nineteenth century. The post received 300 views and through Twitter promotion, will have brought in new visitors to the project website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/02/29/asylum-tourism-the-house-of-horrors/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Call of the Wild Symposium at MIT 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley produced a blog post for the project website following the "Call of the Wild" symposium in Boston held in June 2016 which was co-organised with MIT. Members of the project team travelled to Boston to participate and present.

The blog post featured the conference report with full details of the symposium, and a link to a blog post on MIT's website featuring an interview with Professor Harriet Ritvo (member of the ConSciCom Advisory Board).

Following this event, plans were discussed and made for a second symposium with MIT, following on from the Call of the Wild, which has now been scheduled for June 2017 at the Natural History Museum in London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/10/21/call-of-the-wild-mit-2016/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Christmas and the Victorian Medical Press 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a festive-themed blog post for the project website on 'Christmas and the Victorian Medical Press'. It received 62 views.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/12/15/christmas-and-the-victorian-medical-press/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Citizen meteorology, Victorian style: the meteorological balloon ascents of 1852 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lee MacDonald produced a blog post for the project website about Citizen meteorology, Victorian style: the meteorological balloon ascents of 1852.
The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/10/11/citizen-meteorology-victorian-style-the-meteorological-balloon-asce...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Going Into Rooms and Saying Things 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley produced a blog post for the project website "Going Into Rooms and Saying Things" discussing several recent conference presentations he had made and his research on Eleanor Ormerod. The post contained a film recording of one of Dr Charnley's papers on "Writing Miss Ormerod's Biography", links to the conference report and audio recordings from an academic conference attended at the Royal Society on "The Future of Scholarly Scientific Communication". It also discussed how Dr Charnley planned to use Storify to collate tweets from future events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2015/06/18/going-into-rooms-and-saying-things-academic-presentations/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: In Defence of 'Stamp Collecting' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Matthew Wale produced a blog post for the project website called In Defence of 'Stamp Collecting'.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/06/29/in-defence-of-stamp-collecting/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Launch Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This blog post for the project website showcased the launch event held on 6 November 2014 at St Anne's College, Oxford for Constructing Scientific Communities and also Professor Shuttleworth's other research project, Diseases of Modern Life: 19th Century Perspectives (ERC funded). The event was introduced by Professor Shuttleworth and each of the postdoctoral research assistants gave a short presentation to a full lecture theatre of St Anne's College Fellows and students, University of Oxford academics, and invited representatives from universities, museums and scientific institutions. Discussions after the event with those present, led to plans for future related activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2014/11/19/project-launch-event-at-st-annes-college
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Margaret Todd (1859-1918): Medical woman and author 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a blog post on a Victorian medical woman called Margaret Todd, whom she discovered during her doctoral research. As at 1 March 2018, the blog has had 37 views. Alison's Tweet about the blog post was shared by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh's Archive and the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland's Heritage Centre. The article appears as part of a series of blog posts in which ConSciCom researchers share the little-known periodicals and personalities they uncovered in the course of their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://conscicom.org/2018/02/09/margaret-todd-1859-1918-medical-woman-and-author/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Materials of Mass Participation: Aluminum and Paper in Early Twentieth Century U.S. Bird Banding 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Etienne Benson, Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences, Department of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania produced a blog post for the project website, the titled was Materials of Mass Participation: Aluminum and Paper in Early Twentieth Century U.S. Bird Banding.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/08/09/materials-of-mass-participation-aluminum-and-paper-in-early-twentie...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Medical Mirror (1864-70) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a blog post on a Victorian journal called the Medical Mirror, which she discovered during her research at the Royal College of Surgeons. As at 1 March 2018, the post has had 32 views. It appears as part of a series of blog posts in which ConSciCom researchers share the little-known periodicals and personalities they uncovered in the course of their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://conscicom.org/tag/victorian-scientists-and-periodicals/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Midland Medical Miscellany (1881-95) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Moulds produced a blog post on a Victorian journal called the Midland Medical Miscellany, which she discovered during her research at the Royal College of Surgeons. As at 1 March 2018, the post has had 27 views. It appears as part of a series of blog posts in which ConSciCom researchers share the little-known periodicals and personalities they uncovered in the course of their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://conscicom.org/2018/02/23/midland-medical-miscellany-1881-95/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: People Powered Science 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley produced a blog post for the project website on People Powered Science, which attracted 140 views. In it he discussed the work of the project, and his own research into Eleanor Ormerod.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2015/05/14/people-powered-science/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: People Powered Science II 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Berris Charnley has been working some more on the people part of people powered science. he has been looking through the Zooniverse's forums (each of the more than 100 projects hosted on the platform has a space for communication) and talking to some scientists. One interesting feature has started to emerge. The blog post for the project website is titled People Powered Science II.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/07/04/people-powered-science-ii/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Rogues and Wild Relatives: Purity and Wildness in Early 20th Century Genetics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley produced a blog post for the project website on the subject of genetics, plant breeding and expertise on domestication and breeding of plant varieties. The post contained a film of his talk at the Call of the Wild conference at MIT in Boston in June 2016. https://youtu.be/opt21_oTOR8
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/10/05/rogues-and-wild-relatives/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Sensing and Presencing Rare Plants through Contemporary Drawing Practice by Sian Bowen, Leverhulme Fellow & Reader in Fine Art at the University of Northumbria 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sian Bowen, Leverhulme Fellow & Reader in Fine Art at the University of Northumbria produced a blog post for the project website titled Sensing and Presencing Rare Plants through Contemporary Drawing Practice.

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/09/08/sensing-and-presencing-rare-plants-through-contemporary-drawing-pra...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Show Me The Bone 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Gowan Dawson produced a blog post for the project website about his book, Show Me the Bone: Reconstructing Prehistoric Monsters in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America (2016, University of Chicago Press). In the post, Professor Dawson discussed how his work on the Constructing Scientific Communities project influenced his research in the final stages of writing his book. The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/05/23/show-me-the-bone/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Sir: I am not a medical man, but.': Laypeople and Medical Journals in the Nineteenth Century 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Sally Frampton's blog post for the project website Sir: I am not a medical man, but.Laypeople and Medical Journals in the Nineteenth Century received 236 views. In the post, Dr Frampton discussed her research into medical periodicals highlighting some of her discoveries
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://conscicom.org/2014/08/26/sir-i-am-not-a-medical-man-but-laypeople-and-medical-journals-in-th...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Sydney Padua: Imaginary Engines- Lovelace, Babbage and the Analytical Engine 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Berris Charnley produced a blog post for the project website following a seminar given by animator and graphic artist Sydney Padua. The seminar, given as part of our Science, Medicine and Culture in the 19th Century series, resulted from Professor Shuttleworth meeting Sydney Padua at the Ada Lovelace symposium in December 2015. The blog post containing wonderful sketchnote images by artist Makayla Lewis, is available at the URL below.

Our work with Sydney Padua is ongoing, and her graphic artwork which she will produce for the project will be reported in due course.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/09/26/sydney-padua-imaginary-engines-lovelace-babbage-and-the-analytical-...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: The Immortality of a Week - Correspondence Columns of the Medical Periodicals 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In this blog post for the project website, Dr Sally Frampton discussed her research into nineteenth century medical periodicals, and included images taken from some of the periodicals she has worked on. The post attracted over 100 views.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2015/04/08/immortality-of-a-week-the-correspondence-columns-of-medical-periodi...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: The Victorian origins of 'space weather' 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lee MacDonald produced a blog post for the project website called - The Victorian origins of 'space weather'.

The post is available at the URL below and also on the Solar Stormwatch Blog (a Zooniversie project) https://blog.solarstormwatch.com/2017/10/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/05/03/the-victorian-origins-of-space-weather/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: The Woman (Doctor) Question and Nineteenth Century Medical Journals 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds wrote a blog post for the Constructing Scientific Communities project website entitled The Woman (Doctor) Question and Nineteenth Century Medical Journals. It was one of the most read posts on the project website, attracting 1109 views. In the post, Alison discussed her doctoral research work and her discoveries on working with the collections held at the Royal College of Surgeons.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://conscicom.org/2015/01/29/the-woman-doctor-question-and-nineteenth-century-medical-journals/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: The Zoologist (1843-1916) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Matthew Wale produced a blog post for the project website about the nineteenth century proliferation of periodicals including The Zoologist (1843-1916).

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://conscicom.org/2018/02/02/the-zoologist-1843-1916/
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Why are Medical Journals so dull?" A Potted History of Tedium in Medical Journalism 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sally Frampton produced a blog post for the project website about "Why are Medical Journals so dull?" A Potted History of Tedium in Medical Journalism.
The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/06/12/why-are-medical-journals-so-dull-a-potted-history-of-tedium-in-medi...
 
Description Project Website Blog Post: Work peculiarly fitting to a lady': Elizabeth Beckley and the early years of solar photography 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lee MacDonald produced a blog post for the project website called 'Work peculiarly fitting to a lady': Elizabeth Beckley and the early years of solar photography

The post is available at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/2017/03/09/work-peculiarly-fitting-to-a-lady-elizabeth-beckley-and-the-early-y...
 
Description Public Lecture on Kew Observatory and the origins of solar-terrestrial physics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lee Macdonald did 3 public lectures at Newbury Astronomical Society (Berkshire), British Astronomical Association at Burlington House, London and at the William Herschel Society, Bath. Approximately 50 people attended each event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description Public interview with bestselling author Kate Summerscale on 'Detecting Victorian Crime' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On December 6th 2017 Professor Gowan Dawson interviewed author Kate Summerscale in a lecture entitled 'Detecting Victorian Crime'. Professor Gowan and Ms Summerscale discussed her fascination with crime in the Victorian age, the emergence of the figure of the detective in the period, and how she researches and writes her award-winning books.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www2.le.ac.uk/news/events/2017/december/detecting-victorian-crime-kate-summerscale
 
Description Public lecture on Jane Austen's Persuasion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds delivered a one-hour public lecture at the Jane Austen Study Day at the Department for Continuing Education in Oxford (20 May 2017). Her paper was entitled 'The Sense of an Ending: Rewriting the Close of Persuasion'. The audience included around 100 members of the public (including school teachers) and Alison received positive verbal feedback afterwards. Some audience members indicated her talk had encouraged them to look at adaptations differently.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Radio 4 - The Split Second 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Geoff Belknap was consulted for the research for a BBC Radio 4 programme The Split Second, which was broadcast in February 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08c0s41
 
Description Royal College of Nurses Tour of the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses Exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 18th July 2016, Dr Sally Frampton and Alison Moulds organised and gave a tour of the project's exhibition, Vaccination Medicine and the Masses, at the Hunterian Museum Royal College of Surgeons. This tour was specifically for a group of public health nurses and organised in collaboration with the Royal College of Nursing. All participants were members of the RCN and were led by Helen Donovan, the RCN's professional lead for public health with a specialism in immunisation and vaccination. A guided tour of the exhibition was given by Dr Frampton and Ms Moulds, and the group had discussions about the history of vaccinations and the objects on display. The group were all very interested in the history of vaccination and enjoyed sharing stories from their careers on the subject. The feedback was that the tour was very much enjoyed by all, and it was also an opportunity to publicise the exhibition and the work of the Constructing Scientific Communities project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Science Gossip Aggregated Media Coverage and Events 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project has been very successful among the citizen science participants - who are able to comment on and discuss the finding they have made through the website through the 'talk' function - http://talk.sciencegossip.org There has also been significant discussion through the Biodiversity Heritage Library working group, and at national History of Science conferences as to the merits and limitations of citizen science applied to the humanities, represented through a case study of ScienceGossip. A relationship with Stanford's center for spatial and textual analysis has also been established with the hope of producing a set of data digital data visualization tools.
The combined audience for all press and events taken together will be significant, both nationally and internationally:
USA SCIENCE MAGAZINES:
Science Gossip was covered by US national science magazines including:
Scientific American - http://www.scientificamerican.com/citizenscience/zooniverse-science-gossip/
Popular Science - http://www.popsci.com/citizen-sciencegoes-meta
Nature Conservancy - http://blog.nature.org/science/2015/07/07/citizenscience- gossip-victorian-journals-biodiversity-naturalist-history/
ACADEMIC PRESENTATIONS/CONFERENCES:
The Missouri Botanical Garden presented on the project to a variety of groups at US national and international conferences including the Visual Resources Association, Museum Computer Network, Taxonomic Data Working Group, Digital History and Philosophy of Science, and library conferences (IFLA and DLF). It has also been presented as a key outcome for the Biodiversity Heritage Library @10 conference held at the Natural History Museum
MEDIA:
Science Gossip also received excellent coverage in the media, and a selection is below:
Biodiversity Heritage Library - http://blog.biodiversitylibrary.org/2015/03/zooniverse-releases-science-gossip.html
Library Journal - http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2015/07/technology/wisdom-of-the-crowd-digitalcollections/
Pukka Plants - http://www.pukkaplants.co.uk/plants/zooniverse-science-gossip/
Nerd in the Brain - http://nerdinthebrain.com/2015/03/06/science-fun-gossip-in-the-zooniverse/
Humanities Net - https://networks.h-net.org/node/9782/discussions/63139/zooniverse-project-callspublic-reveal-victorian-natural-history
Young Thinkers Guild - http://www.youngthinkersguild.com/citizen-science-project-science-gossip/
Outbound Adventurer - http://outboundadventurer.com/the-absolute-best-citizen-scienceadventures/
The Cheat Sheet - http://www.cheatsheet.com/technology/10-fun-tech-products-you-dont-want-tomiss-this-week.html/?a=viewall
Prolific Oaktree http://www.prolificoaktree.com/cloud-software/27-science-gossip-overview-ofcitizen-science-project-to-classify-drawings
The Persistent Scientist http://persistentscientist.com/category/getting-started/
The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/science/the-h-word/2016/apr/26/how-citizen-science-could-change-historical-research-crowdsourcing
INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPATION
The project had international reach, and the top 11 countries for participants on the Science Gossip site are (in order of greatest number first): USA, Germany, UK, France, India, Brazil, Canada, Australia, Italy, Spain and Mexico.
TWITTER
Science Gossip has also been extensively promoted on Twitter.
PRIZE SHORTLIST
Science Gossip was a finalist in the Ayrton Prize - organised by the British Society for the History of Science for outstanding web projects and digital engagement in the history of science, medicine and technology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018
URL http://www.sciencegossip.org/
 
Description Science Story Video with Royal Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Video recorded on the history of citizen science as part of Royal Society's Science Stories series: https://royalsociety.org/journals/publishing350/science-stories/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Science Uncovered 2014 (Natural History Museum, London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project took part in the Natural History Museum Science Uncovered event on 26th September 2014 which was attended by 8,500 people. The event was open to all so was attended by a wide range of people including schoolchildren, researchers and academics. The event is a highlight of the NHM's events year. Dr Geoff Belknap took part in a soapbox style presentation, where he answered questions from the general public on the question of whether you need to be a professional to be a scientist. Representatives from the Zooniverse team also attended and demonstrated the Zooniverse projects on a large computer screen. Dr Belknap wrote a piece for the project website on the event for which the URL is below.

This was a highly effective mode of reaching a wide and diverse audience. It offered intense and individual debate with a large number of people throughout the evening.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://conscicom.org/category/news/
 
Description Science Uncovered 2015 (Natural History Museum, London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In 2014, the project took part in the Science Uncovered event at the Natural History Museum in London, and repeated the same activities for the 2015 event. The same information therefore applies again for 2015.

The event is a highlight of the NHM's event calendar and is attended by approximately 9,000 people. The event was open to all so was attended by a wide range of people including schoolchildren, adults of all ages, researchers and academics. Dr Geoff Belknap took part in a soapbox style presentation, where he answered questions from the general public on the question of whether you need to be a professional to be a scientist. Representatives from the Zooniverse team also attended and demonstrated the Zooniverse projects on a large computer screen. This prompted questions and interest in participating in citizen science projects on Zooniverse.

This was a highly effective mode of reaching a wide and diverse audience. It offered intense and individual debate with a large number of people throughout the evening.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Science with a Million People 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 27 November 2015, Professor Chris Lintott gave a 60 minute talk entitled 'Science with a Million People' at the Royal Society. This was an event open to the public, but was also part of the programme for an academic one-day symposium organised by the Constructing Scientific Communities project. The symposium was entitled The End of the Scientific Journal? Transformations in Publishing and the event concluded with Professor Lintott's public lecture. Therefore the audience was a mixture of academics (some international) who attended the symposium, and members of the public. All of the Constructing Scientific Communities project team were also in attendance.

The End of the Scientific Journal was the subject of a blog post written by one of the participants, Cameron Neylon and available at: http://cameronneylon.net/blog/the-end-of-the-journal-what-has-changed-what-stayed-the-same/

A Storify of tweets by Dr Berris Charnley from the event was collated at https://storify.com/IPBio/the-end-of-the-scientific-journal-transformations-

Professor Lintott's lecture was filmed and streamed live. The video is available at the URL below. The Royal Society have confirmed that around 25 people watched it live on the day, and since then there have been 574 viewings (information up to date as of 2 February 2016)

A questionnaire was handed out by the Royal Society to the audience, and one third of the questionnaires were returned at the end. The results were Topic and Format 95% good or excellent, and Speaker Expertise and Communication Skills 100% good or excellent. Audience members signed up for various updates from the Royal Society as follows: 43% for public events, 14% for scientific conferences, 5% for fundraising, 19% for science policy updates, 9% for education.

Comments on the talk were excellent speaker, wouldn't have minded a longer lecture, excellent lecture delivered with confidence.

The audience expressed an interest in future topics, namely light and sound, cycles of evolution, technology, big data, internet of things, string theory and medical and scientific content to appeal to the younger generation. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STcipbqyAqA 974 views as at January 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/11/science-million-people/
 
Description Science, Medicine and Culture in the 19th Century Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Science, Medicine and Culture in the 19th Century Seminar Series will be ongoing throughout the project. Invited speakers will hold seminars 2-3 times per term at St Anne's College co-organised with Professor Shuttleworth's ERC funded project, Diseases of Modern Life: 19th Century Perspectives. Details of the seminar series are available on the project website Events page. The seminars are open to all - undergraduate and graduate students, as well as academics, and are advertised on events websites within and outside Oxford. The seminars held to date are:

22.10.2014. Professor David Trotter (University of Cambridge). Signalling Madly: Telegraphy and Obsessive Behaviour in Late Nineteenth Century Fiction.

12.11.2014. Professor Pietro Corsi (University of Oxford). Across Boundaries: The Business of Scientific Periodicals in Early Nineteenth Century Europe

03.12.2014. Dr Susannah Wilson (University of Warwick). Decadents, Innocents and Medical Men: Morphine Addiction in Fin-de- Siècle France

20.01.2015. Alison Byerly (Lafayette College, Pennsylvania). Virtuality and Presence: Victorian Media and the Attenuation of the Self

04.02.2015. Professor Clare Pettitt (King's College, London). Mermaids, Cables and the Deep Sea: The Fin de Siècle and the Telegraphic Imaginary

18.02.2015. Professor Laura Marcus (University of Oxford). Rhythmics: The Work of Rhythm in the Nineteenth Century

03.03.2015. Professor Bernard Lightman (York University, Toronto). Lost in Translation: Scientific Naturalists and Their Language Games

13.05.2015. Lee Macdonald (University of Leeds). The magnificent services which it has rendered to science': Astronomy and Meteorology at Kew Observatory

27.05.2015. Matthew Paskins (University of Leeds and The Open University). For the Sake of a Dibbling Stick: the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, and inventive communities, 1800-1830

10.06.2015. Professor Rachel Bowlby (Princeton University). Commuters: From the Nineteenth Century to Now

28.10.2015. Dr Madeleine Wood (Queen Mary University of London). A 'heart hard as a nether millstone': The relational dynamics of Victorian 'addiction

11.11.2015. Dr Claire Jones (King's College London). Septic Subjects: Infection and Occupational Risk in British Hospitals, 1870-1970

25.11.2015. Professor Karen Sayer (Leeds Trinity University). Radical Requiems: The return of the past in British agriculture, 1850-1950

03.02.2016. Dr Sam Alberti (Royal College of Surgeons of England). Casting no doubt: Plaster Heads in Victorian/Edwardian Science and Medicine

17.02.2016. Professor Graeme Gooday (University of Leeds) Medical and technological limits: exploiting, evaluating and alleviating adult hearing loss in Britain up to the Great War.

10.05.2016. Dr Anne Secord (University of Cambridge). The Politics of Participation: Early Nineteenth Century Scientific Citizens

18.05.2016. Sydney Padua (Animator and Graphic Artist). Imaginary Engines- Lovelace, Babbage, and the Analytical Engine

07.06.2016. Dr Staffan Müller-Wille (University of Exeter). Names and Numbers: "Data" in Classical Natural History, 1758-1859

19.10.2016. Dr Andrew Mangham (University of Reading) Have ye ever seen a child clemmed to death?' Elizabeth Gaskell and the Physiology of Starvation

09.11.2016. Dr kitt price (Queen Mary University of London). Psychic Dreams and Newspapers in the Late Nineteenth Century

01.02.2017. Professor Barbara Taylor (Queen Mary University of London). Pathologies of Solitude

22.02.2017. Dr Helena Ifill (University of Sheffield). Medical Authority, (pseudo)Science and the Explained Supernatural in Late Victorian Female Gothic Fiction 10.5.17 Professor Ursula Martin, University of Oxford. Ada Lovelace in Her Mathematical Context
24.5.17 Dr James Emmott, Oxford Brookes University. On The Stratification of Language
24.10.17 Dr Helen Cowie, University of York. From the Andes to the Outback: Acclimatising Alpacas in the British Empire
7.11.17 Professor Martin Willis, Cardiff University. The Good Places of Sleep: Nineteenth-Century Utopian Fictions and Sleep Research
21.11.17 Professor Kirsten E Shepherd-Barr, University of Oxford. Infectious Ideas: Mechanisms of Transmission in the 19th Century
30.1.18 Professor Oliver Zimmer, University of Oxford. Time Tribes: How the Railways Made Communities (1840-1900)
13.2.18 Dr Ryan Sweet, University of Leeds. Normalcy Interrogated: Prosthetic Hand Users in Victorian Sensation-Fiction Narratives
27.2.17 Dr Jana Funke, University of Exeter. 'Sexo-Aesthetic Inversion': Transgender Subjectivities in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Literature and Science



Higher project profile and creation of community of engaged scholars. Attendees included local authors and health workers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017,2018
URL https://conscicom.org/category/events/
 
Description Snot Sick and Scabs event for children 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 2 June 2016, an event was organised specifically for children and held at the Royal College of Surgeons. Snot Sick and Scabs invited children to come along and be scientists and discover cells, bacteria and viruses through a range of interactive games and exhibits. The event was held in three identical sessions during the day. Feedback questionnaires were collated after the event. The comments included that the children enjoyed the audience participation, the activities and games, the engaging presenters, and the interesting facts presented in a fun, interactive and educational way. The majority of those who completed the feedback rated it as excellent, and for many it was the first time they had been to an event at the Royal College of Surgeons.

124 people attended the event over three sessions, and 65 of these were children under the age of 15.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Society for Scholarly Publishing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk led to a very useful three days of discussion, and subsequent conversation amongst the publishers who were there.

I have been invited to speak to several publishers (OUP, IoP) and to chair a seminar for a UK organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Spotlight - Faculty of English Alumni Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In August 2016, the project was featured in Spotlight - the Faculty of English Language and Literature Alumni Newsletter. The piece publicised the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses exhibition co-curated by members of the project team, and also the associated public engagement events held in May 2016 attached to the exhibition.

The newsletter is emailed out to 12,000 alumni and is also publicly available on the Faculty website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.english.ox.ac.uk/alumni-home.html
 
Description St Pauls Summer School, Tower Hamlets 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Plenty of schoolchildren asked questions; summer school was for wide range of pupils from local schools.

Invite already received for next year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Symbiology Workshop, University of Exeter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Professor Sally Shuttleworth attended and spoke on 'Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries 'at the Symbiology Workshop at the University of Exeter in June 2014. This was an interdisciplinary workshop involving humanities scholars and biological scientists. This was a collaboration with the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter.

Exchange of information across academic disciplines and with interested members of the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Symposium: Doctor, doctor: global and historical perspectives on the doctor-patient relationship 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Working with a DPhil Candidate in French, Alison Moulds co-organised a one-day symposium 'Doctor, doctor: Global and historical perspectives on the doctor-patient relationship' (St Anne's College, University of Oxford, 24 March 2017). It was sponsored by a Medical Humanities Programme Grant from The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and St Anne's College provided financial support for the venue and catering costs. The ConSciCom project gave practical assistance and helped to co-ordinate the St Anne's funding.
This interdisciplinary symposium featured over 30 speakers (from countries including the United States, Russia, and Switzerland) and attracted around 70 attendees. The event brought together medical practitioners, academic researchers, art and theatre practitioners, and members of the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://doctorpatient2017.wordpress.com/
 
Description Taipei Planetarium Public Talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk on citizen science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk at Birkbeck Arts Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Moulds gave a talk on Jukes de Styrap's The Young Practitioner (1890), an advice guide for aspiring medical men, at 'Victorian Things', a free public event held as part of Birkbeck Arts Week (16 May 2017). There was an audience of about 30 people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/victorian-things-tickets-33214456333#
 
Description Talk at MicroPasts Project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Jim O'Donnell gave a presentation to a knowledge exchange workshop run by the AHRC funded MicroPasts Project at University College London on 23 September 2015. His talk discussed how Zooniverse evaluates user engagement and successful citizen science. Dr O'Donnell also participated in a panel on Crowd Sourcing and Crowd Funding for Universities and Academic Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The audience was made up of researchers with an interest in crowdsourcing in the humanities or the heritage sector.

After the event, Dr O'Donnell had a discussion with a representative from the Science Gallery at King's College London, which will open later in 2016. The Science Gallery are very interested in future collaborative activities with Zooniverse. A blog post on the workshop was written by one of the participants which contains further detail on the content of the day, and is at the URL below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://research.micropasts.org/2015/11/12/initial-reflections-on-the-micropasts-knowledge-exchange-w...
 
Description Talk at Royal Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A series of talks at the Royal Society covering topics drawn from the intersection of citizen science and the humanities, directly influenced by the ConSciCom project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Talk: Hammersmith Apollo 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk as part of event at Hammersmith Apollo on discovering the unexpected.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description The Anti-Vaccination Movement and Public Health in the Nineteenth Century 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 4th October 2016, Professor Sally Shuttleworth gave a presentation to the Royal College of Nursing as part of their launch event for an exhibition on public health nursing. Professor Shuttleworth's talk was part of a panel discussion on the controversial history of vaccinations. There were approximately 70 people in attendance. The event was filmed and is available at the link below.

Feedback questionnaires were completed by audience members and a summary was provided by the RCN. No one scored the event below 4 out of 5, and the majority rated it the full 5 out of 5. Many comments were received on the day about how useful the event was for revalidation, how much the historical elements were enjoyed and the integration of these two elements into the speakers programme. Feedback received after the event complimented the speakers and the informative and useful content of the discussions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rcn.org.uk/library/exhibitions-and-events/previous-events
 
Description The Conversationalist Podcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the 19th century, scientific institutions, voluntary organizations, and even private individuals hosted what were known as 'conversazione,' evening gatherings to showcase science and the arts. These events varied from the homespun and intimate to the lavish and spectacular. At these sometimes cacophonous, occasionally brandy-soaked events, world-renowned scientific professionals mingled with amateur explorers and enthusiasts as well as the general public. There were lectures, displays, performances, and, of course, conversation! Episode 1 - Conversazione. In this episode, we learn about the inspiration for this podcast series - 'conversazione' - public events in the Victorian period that brought together scientific professionals and the general public for a bit of food, drink, conversation, and science.
Interviews with: Professor Sally Shuttleworth, Professor Gowan Dawson, Cory Mason, Tom Nicolson.
Episode 2 - Crowdsourcing Historical Research. In this episode, we talk about how historians can use crowdsourcing technology to support their research by looking at the ScienceGossip.org, a research project hosted on the Zooniverse platform that uses citizen science to understand the history of citizen science.
Interviews with: Dr Geoffrey Belknap (University of Leicester), Tom Nicholson (Oxford Artisan Distillery), Cory Mason (Oxford Artisan Distillery)
Episode 3 - Volcanos and Citizen Science at the Royal Society. In this episode, we talk to Royal Society Librarian, Keith Moore, about how the Royal Society crowdsourced information about a 19th century volcanic eruption. Keith takes us on a tour of the Royal Society archive, and at the end of the episode, Chris Thorogood, Head of Science & Public Engagement at the Oxford Botanic Garden, tells us about botanicals and booze.
Interviews with: Keith Moore (Royal Society), Dr Chris Thorogood (Oxford Botanic Garden).
Episode 4 - Domestic Science in the 19th Century. n this episode, we talk to Dr Berris Charnley (University of Oxford) and Dr Donald Opitz (DePaul University) about domestic science in the 19th century - scientific endeavours that took place in the home. We also hear from Cory Mason and Tom Nicholson (The Oxford Artisan Distillery) about some favourite 19th century cocktails that have - thankfully - fallen out of favour today!
Interviews with: Dr Berris Charnley (University of Oxford), Dr Donald Opitz (DePaul University), Cory Mason (The Oxford Artisan Distillery), and Tom Nicholson (The Oxford Artisan Distillery).
In this podcast, we invite you to join our own version of these classic Victorian affairs - a cocktail party with experts on the history of science. Conversazione were about information but they were also very much about entertainment, so we ask our guests in each episode to regale us with a story about the history of science that will captivate us for a drink or two.
Podcasts - Total listens (to all episodes): 1,133. From iTunes (or Mac platform): 173. From other sources (including soundcloud): 960 as at January 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://conscicom.org/media/podcasts/
 
Description The Curiosity Carnival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Curiosity Carnival on Friday 29 September was a chance to find out what research is really all about, meet researchers, ask questions and discover how research affects and changes all our lives. The night was a huge festival of curiosity - a city-wide programme of activities across the University of Oxford's museums, libraries, gardens and woods. There was a wide range of activities for all ages and interests - live experiments, games, stalls, busking, debates, music, dance and a pub-style quiz. Oxford's Curiosity Carnival 2017 joined hundreds of other European cities in celebrating European Researchers' Night. The Carnival brought 10,000 people into Oxford to engage with Oxford University research.
The Constructing Scientific Communities team were involved in a number of events:
1) Contagion Cabaret at the Natural History Museum, Oxford (see earlier entry). There were over 200 in the audience.
Reviews from school age children on the performances and how it has affected their thinking. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjAlin4hGD4 A new event is planned for February 2nd 2018 at St Anne's college where the children who watched the Contagion Cabaret performance at The Curiosity Carnival have composed music around themes of contagion, medicine and science.

http://www.ox.ac.uk/curiosity-carnival/whats-on
https://diseasesofmodernlife.org/2017/10/03/songs-cakes-and-games-thoughts-on-performing-baking-and-playing-our-research-at-oxfords-curiosity-carnival/

2) Mind-Boggling Medical History at the Curiosity Carnival
Broad Street, Oxford
During the afternoon of the Curious Carnival the Mind Boggling Medical History team set up in Broad Street in the centre of Oxford to demonstrate and allow the public to play the Mind Boggling Medical History game, over 100 people participated during the 6 Hours that the team were demonstrating.
Primary audience - General Public, also university staff and students
3) Kanta Dihal at the Curiosity Carnival
Quantum physics for children - a talk for primary school children and their parents, in 2 rounds of c.20 attendees each time.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://diseasesofmodernlife.org/2017/10/03/songs-cakes-and-games-thoughts-on-performing-baking-and-...
 
Description The Guardian Website: Citizen science - from studying bees or seaweed to solar storm-watching 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 14th October 2014, an article on citizen science was published on the Guardian's website which featured Dr Chris Lintott and the Zooniverse project.

It has not been possible to find out the exact number of views but it will have reached a large number of readers across the globe and publicised how people can get involved with citizen science through the Zooniverse site.

The piece was further publicised on the project website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/oct/14/citizen-science-bees-nature-seaweed-solar-storm
 
Description The One Show - BBC1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Gowan Dawson was filmed for the One Show, which was broadcast on 27 January 2015. Professor Dawson was interviewed by Gyles Brandreth for a feature on the Victorian dinosaur models in Crystal Palace which are being restored. This television appearance was a result of working with the Friends of Crystal Palace Group, which itself resulted from Professor Dawson's inaugural professorial lecture (see separate entry for the lecture)

The One Show attracts an average audience of approximately 5 million people.

The programme is available at the URL below at just after 34 minutes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06yg6yn/the-one-show-27012016
 
Description The Return of Instant Photography 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Geoff Belknap's research led to him being contacted by a science journalist working with the Open Mind website which is a bilingual Spanish and English site on science and innovation published by the Spanish banking corporation BBVA. Dr Belknap was contacted for expert input into an article on the return of analog instant photography. Dr Belknap was quoted towards the end of the article (URL below) and a link was also given to his recent book.

No impact information is available as yet - as the article had only just been published at the time of reporting this activity. To be updated in future if impact arises.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/the-return-of-instant-photography/
 
Description The Science of Baby Laughs - Radio 3 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Sally Shuttleworth participated in the BBC Radio 3 flagship Sunday Feature programme 'The Science of Baby Laughs' made as part of the New Generation Thinkers radio programmes with the AHRC. The programme was broadcast on 15 November 2015 and is available at the URL below. The programme was selected to feature as BBC Radio's Pick of the Week one week later on 22 November 2015.

It is not possible to obtain audience figures from BBC Radio 3, however the programmes will have reached a significant number of listeners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06p4s5y
 
Description The Sorcerer's Apprentice Edward Jenner. Lecture (part of Vaccination Medicine and the Masses Exhibition) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of the Vaccination Medicine and the Masses exhibition public engagement events in May 2016, a lunchtime lecture was given by Professor Gareth Williams on The Sorcerer's Apprentice Edward Jenner. The lecture was held on 17 May at the Hunterian Museum Royal College of Surgeons and was attended by 52 people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Torquay Museum Talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk on citizen science to Torquay Museum society
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Twilight Science Event at the Royal Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 29th June 2015, members of the project team took part in the Twilight Science programme of interactive evening events at the Royal Society. This was part of the Royal Society's Summer Science Exhibition 2015. This event was run specifically for adults.

Further to the very successful format for the Conversations on Nature event at the University of Leicester in November 2014 (see separate report), the Twilight Science event again included a recreation of a Victorian conversazione and a magic lantern show of scientific images. As in Victorian times, this brought science to the wider general public. In addition, Twilight Science featured The Strolling Players, a history of science theatre group starring the project's Dr Geoff Belknap. The Strolling Players, in Victorian costume, performed a short play called 'The Tables Turned' which featured a debate on Victorian spiritualism.

Members of the Zooniverse team also demonstrated citizen science projects.

There was a great deal of interest in the magic lantern by the audience members afterwards and members of the project team took part in questions and discussions afterwards. There was interest in participation in citizen science projects.

A blog post on the event was written for the project website featuring photographs, for which the URL is given below.

The whole evening was extremely successful and was an engaging, effective way of reaching a wide audience of interested people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://conscicom.org/2015/07/10/tables-turned-at-the-royal-societys-twilight-science/
 
Description Twitter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This entry relates to the project Twitter account. As of February 2018, we have published 2,300 tweets, with 982 followers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017
URL https://twitter.com/conscicom
 
Description Twitter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lintott's twitter feed covers items of interest in citizen science, and now has more than 25000 followers
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://twitter.com/chrislintott
 
Description UK Disability History Month workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Sally Shuttleworth was asked to speak at this University of Oxford event on November 23rd 2017. She discussed the similarities of stress and overwork in both education and professional life in the Victorian era, alongside the same issues that we face today. Although we are clearly living in a radically altered world, there are nonetheless startling similarities in the ways the problems of overwork have been framed and debated, then and now. She also looked at the history of public health campaigning, and spoke alongside disability campaigner Marie Tidball.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/work-time-and-stress-historical-and-contemporary-perspectives
 
Description Why We Write 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 27 January 2017, the project and the Royal Society co-organised a public evening talk entitled Why We Write. The talk was given by novelist and scientist Professor Sunetra Gupta, and discussed how scientists write and why. The talk included a panel discussion with historians of science who talked about how and why eminent scientists over the past 300 years kept a diary. The public talk followed an academic workshop on Scientific Diaries which was also co-organised by the project and Royal Society.

The talk was attended by 62 people, some of these were the general public and others had stayed on from the earlier academic workshop. Feedback questionnaires were completed. The event was very successful and received very good feedback. Project leaflets were given to all attendees.

The event was advertised on the project and Royal Society websites, social media accounts as well as to contacts and history of science mailing lists. 36% of the attendees who completed the questionnaires heard about the event via social media, 29% through word of mouth, 18% from the Royal Society website, 14% from another source and 4% from an online event listing. Respondents were asked to rate the topic, format, expertise of the speaker and communication skills of the speaker. Topic - 100% excellent/good, Format - 90% excellent/good, Expertise - 93% excellent/good and Communication - 93% excellent/good. No one ticked poor or very poor for any of the categories.

Comments included: Enjoyed the personal view of science and the connections over time; Excellent - very interesting way to show the work of the research group in science history; Very interesting. The only suggestion for improvement was for audience questions after the first part of the talk.

The project and the Royal Society will consider topics for similar jointly organised events in the future including the performance lecture event with Professor Marcus du Sautoy towards the end of the project. https://conscicom.org/2017/01/12/scientists-and-their-diaries-events-at-the-royal-society/ The event was also recorded as at January 2018 there have been 1470 views of the video.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cohkYrDUW4
 
Description Wisdom of the Crowd - Marcus du Sautoy event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In the final event of the Constructing Scientific Communities project Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE FRS presented a night of interactive experiments exploring the power of crowds in answering certain numerical questions at the Royal Society, London. This exciting interactive event, which drew on Constructing Scientific Communities research, was attended by over 200 people and was streamed live. From guessing the weight of a cow or the number of sweets in a jar, there is evidence that the average of a crowd's guesses can deliver surprisingly accurate results. Professor du Sautoy carried out a number of live interactive quizzes and experiments to test these ideas and look at how these principles can be harnessed for citizen science projects.
The event had a significant impact on social media. The most popular tweet for 2017 for the @conscicom account was for the Marcus du Sautoy's lecture, having 21,992 impressions. https://twitter.com/conscicom/status/935101571083403264 The YouTube video below has had over 870 views, as at 6.3.18.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVTyGjqqX6o
 
Description Young Scientists Journal Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact On 18th October 2016, the Constructing Scientific Communities project was one of the sponsors for the very successful Young Scientists Journal Conference 2016 and hosted the event at St Anne's College. The YSJ is the world's peer review science journal written and edited exclusively by 12-20 year olds. It publishes research papers and articles in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics and in 2016 celebrated its tenth anniversary. The day comprised two keynote speakers, and a programme of exciting workshops, together with a poster competition for students to showcase their own research projects. The event was sold out to capacity and attended by around 140 students aged 14-18 from across the country together with their teachers.

The Constructing Scientific Communities project was well represented at the conference. Professor Sally Shuttleworth gave one of the welcome addresses and highlighted the work of the project in her opening remarks. Professor Chris Lintott was one of the event's two keynote speakers, giving two talks to the students on The Universe Through A Million Eyes, which highlighted how they could take part in Zooniverse's citizen science projects to contribute to future scientific discoveries. Zooniverse itself was represented by Grant Miller, who ran one of the day's workshops on the subject of People Powered Research. A full listing of the programme for the conference is available on the YSJ website.

The day received a lot of excellent publicity via live tweets which were collated into a Storify and tweeted further. The Storify is available on the project website at the URL below which contains a link to the YSJ website for a conference report and photographs.

As a result of our involvement with the Young Scientists, Professor Sally Shuttleworth was invited to become an Ambassador with the journal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://conscicom.org/2016/10/19/young-scientists-journal-conference-2016/
 
Description media interview (Chemistry and Industry Magazine) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gowan Dawson gave an interview to a journalist for Chemistry and Industry Magazine which will be used as part of an article on citizen science for the Christmas 2014 issue.

Too early to say.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.soci.org/Chemistry-and-Industry