Reverberations of War: Communities of experience and identification in Germany and Europe since 1945

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: German

Abstract

The project analyses reverberations of the Second World War across Europe through the Cold War and beyond. It sheds new light on the complex legacies of war for generations of Europeans, and, through coordinated in-depth studies, develops a new theoretical approach.

Challenging approaches based on the notion of 'collective memory', the project explores instead the relationships between 'communities of experience' and later 'communities of identification', which may not be closely related to communities of origin. Four particular themes intrinsically connect a later present to a difficult past: reckoning, reconciliation, reconstruction and representation. These are interrelated: a concern for reconciliation may be seen as a means of evading reckoning; the demands of reconstruction may entail a degree of selective repression rather than representation of difficult aspects of the past; ethical responses to the war may themselves exert a normative effect, overriding the possibility of some forms of representation. Each implies - despite the linguistic connotations of 'return' - an attempt to build anew under changed circumstances. Such attempts are coloured by later social, political, and also emotional and cultural contexts, in which imaginative engagements in film and literature play a powerful role in shaping aspirations and perceptions; hence the collaborative approach involving literary scholars as well as historians. Each strand of the project highlights one aspect, while the project as a whole aims to explore interrelations.

The project consists of the following elements, with the case of divided and reunited Germany central to all strands: Legacies of Nazi racial and political persecution in Austria, divided Germany, France and Poland; Transnational activities for reconciliation and peace across Europe and Israel and the values and assumptions underpinning them; The ambiguous legacies of occupation for former occupiers as well as the occupied, in Greece, Italy, West and East Germany; Experiences of migration as a result of war, comparing two communities; The 'emotional legacies' of war transmitted through literature and film of the German-speaking countries, focusing particularly on the possibilities of humour for representing trauma and suffering; Shifting representations of war and its emotional effects in the literature and film of selected communities, with special attention to the normative effects of 'acceptable' emotions on gender; and concluding reflections on the 'Reverberations of War'.

The project explores legacies of war through a transnational and comparative lens, looking at war-related violence as a phenomenon transcending the (changing) borders of European states. It thus develops a deeper understanding of national discourses and specificities as well as discerning the European dimensions and relatedness of the various experiences and discourses. The systematic exploration of communities of experience and identification allows observation and analysis of the evolution of subjectively perceived and narrated experiences of those directly affected through to later frameworks of reference that can be selectively adopted by groups not sharing the original experiences. By focusing both on the transmission processes and the active patterns of 'making sense' of the legacies of the past in different later circumstances, the project highlights both culturally shaped agency as well as changing political and structural contexts. It brings a genuinely multi-disciplinary approach to this complex, highly sensitive area, ranging from insights and provocations in the cultural arena, through familial and social reverberations, to political instrumentalisation and intellectual controversy in public spheres. The collaborative approach promises to develop fruitful new insights into areas which, although already extensively treated seperately, have not as yet been conceived and reconsidered in this integrated way.

Planned Impact

The project's emphasis on the European and transnational dimension of the repercussions of war is vital at a time of further European expansion and integration, contributing to a better understanding of changing historic 'fault lines' at a time when global recession widely entails a return to national discourses.

While there are decreasing numbers of immediate survivors, former combatants, forced migrants, bombed-out, bereaved, and others who lived through the war, people of succeeding generations continue to be marked by and deeply interested in these issues. Those potentially benefitting include: members of the general public with an intelligent concern for the ways in which European culture and society have been shaped by the long-term impact of the Second World War; and professionals, including psycho-therapists, journalists, film-makers, novelists, and policy-makers. The Research Fellows will gain valuable experience in international collaborative research.

The project will inform ongoing debates about memorialisation, initiatives for reconciliation, the improvement of inter-cultural and inter-community understanding, and public education about a highly controversial past. The findings of relations between different communities (Jewish and non-Jewish, for example) in post-war environments such as Poland and Germany, where the issues have been of particular sensitivity, will inform public debate. Discussions on memorialisation, museum exhibits and public education will benefit from the dispassionate investigations of this project.

New source material will be analysed, including oral testimony, memoirs, diaries, letters, war crimes investigation records, and other archival sources of interest to film-makers (documentary and fiction), novelists, journalists and school text-book writers. The project's concern with the transmissibility of emotions across generations has an important practical dimension, reflected in the involvement of a psychotherapist in the project, dealing with the traumatic legacies of conflict.

Those closely involved in the project will benefit by enhancing their skills, knowledge and experience, better equipping them for further academic research and teaching or other employment at a high level. The PhD students and Research Fellows will gain important transferable skills through their experience of workshop and conference organisation, by researching and writing substantial independent works, and by networking with scholars across Europe and internationally. They will have demonstrable facility in inter-cultural communication in several European languages and locations. Close mentoring, support, and work in a stimulating intellectual and collaborative environment will ensure maximum benefit.

The project will make findings accessible in a variety of forms. A website will offer archive materials, filmed interviews, photographs and essays. Dissemination plans include a public event jointly with the German Historical Institute London, the Polish Cultural Institute, the Goethe Institute, the Imperial War Museum, and other relevant institutions. The final Reverberations of War symposium will include sessions exploring the presentation of academic findings in non-academic contexts, with input from film-makers, journalists, politicians, artistic practitioners and therapists.

The PI has an excellent track record of collaborations with public education bodies, including the Imperial War Museum, the Foundation for the Museum KZ Buchenwald, and the Chancellor-Willy-Brandt-Foundation. The PI's experience includes production of a documentary film enhancing the impact of a previous AHRC-funded research project ('The 'Normalisation of Rule'? State and Society in the GDR, 1961-1979'). The DVD, 'Behind the Wall: 'Perfectly Normal Lives' in the GDR?', has enjoyed many public screenings, and has been ad
 
Title Documentary film A small town near Auschwitz 
Description Documentary film exploring the role of the civilian administration and the ghettoisation, deportation and murder of Bedzin Jews in the Holocaust. It is available in three parts on youtube. Each clip has attracted several thousend viewings. Part I one has for example been viewed 2557 times, part two has been viewed 1700 times. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Very positive feedback from viewers. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2XcvGnmHtU
 
Description The project aimed to shift the terrain and parameters of debate beyond nationally-based 'memory' studies by developing new approaches to understanding significant long-term legacies of the Second World War in Europe. It focused on the disturbing legacies that National Socialist violence and genocide perpetrated in Europe had and continue to have in German-speaking countries and communities, as well as on those affected by the Nazi regime. The research examines how those legacies are in turn shaped by a later present. The project investigates in different and interdisciplinary ways how the experiences of violence continue to disrupt a later present. It also considers the ways in which the past is disturbed by subsequent responses to it, as well as pointing to disturbing issues that scholars, writers and artists face when they investigate the past. The different strands of the project consider conflicting, unexpected and often dissonant interpretations and representations of these events, on the part of those who were witnesses, victims and perpetrators at the time and also by different communities in the generations that followed. The individual projects enrich our understanding of the complexity of the ways in which a disturbing past continues to disrupt the present and how the past is in turn disturbed and instrumentalised by a later present.

The project extends our understanding of the legacies of the Second World War, and the ways in which these legacies both affect the present and are in turn shaped by the present. By bringing together historians and cultural critics the project has been able to analyse different but interacting levels: the past itself and those who experienced it; those who actively investigate and interrogate the past; and the disturbing issues that scholars, writers and artists - and their audiences - face, including ethical issues and the wider impact of interventions in the past.

The project has engaged with and also challenged concepts that have become key to analyzing the Second World War and its effects. It offers a critical examination of expectations and norms of representation; it challenges widely used categories such as collective memory; and it provides critical perspectives on ways in which the past has been instrumentalised, whether for political, cultural or historiographical reasons. At the same time, the project has opened up new avenues of inquiry and interpretation that help us to understand better some of the issues with which such approaches have sought to grapple.

Our research has been interdisciplinary: it has taken seriously the ways in which people inhabit a world of physical spaces and cultural meanings, in which works of literature, art and film are significant interventions in historical processes and self-understandings, not only 'representing' but actively affecting the course of history. It is only as historians, film critics and literary scholars work together, drawing also on the insights of the social sciences and psychology, that we have gained a better understanding of the complex reverberations of a violent and still disturbing past.

Our research has in various ways engaged with the key themes of representation, reconciliation, reckoning and reconstruction. We have asked, first, why particular pasts may be acutely disturbing for some groups and not others. Which communities are particularly disturbed by what aspects of the Nazi past? Under what conditions do they (re)interpret and redefine their experiences? And how do different postwar conditions affect the extent to which, and ways in which, different people are disturbed by a disturbing past? Secondly, we have explored questions about the violent past reverberates into the present, elaborating the key concepts of communities of experience, connection and identification. Thirdly, we reflected on our own practice and what issues we ourselves face, as scholars actively engaged in disturbing the past for scholarly (and other) purposes. These issues may be personal, in relation to the immediate objects - or human subjects - of our inquiry; or they may be broader, relating to the wider impact and longer-term implications of the results of our inquiries. We too will be, in due course, a part of someone else's past; our own research on the reverberations of World War Two is part of wider processes of changing the present and shaping the future. Finally, we have considered how disturbing the past really is, and the ways in which our current engagement with it may be a form of fascination or pleasure, or a quest for moral coherence.
Explicitly engaging with recent development and approaches to concepts of collective memory, the project members have sought in this way to develop a new approach to understanding the complexities of the unsettling and ever-changing presence of aspects of a disturbing past.

The research has led to the following key findings:

Mary Fulbrook's research explores representations of the past among different communities of experience, and patterns of transmission across generations, in the context of public confrontations with the legacies of Nazi terror. Survivors among a wide range of different types and groups of victims of Nazi persecution had divergent post-war experiences of 'return' or unwilling relocation, shaping strategies of coping and bearing witness (or not) under later circumstances; former collaborators, facilitators and perpetrators developed varying responses to political, social and juridical challenges. Exploring patterns of postwar justice, it becomes clear that (West and East) Germans and Austrians largely failed to bring Nazi perpetrators to justice. Moreover, key elite groups were never considered to be 'perpetrators' at all. And while those who were guilty claimed innocence, the innocent victims were plagued by survivor guilt. The second generation in each case had to live with the legacies, whether or not they knew much about the past. The second generation in perpetrator communities, particularly in West Germany, often engaged in identification with and commemoration of victims - but still found it hard to face up to recognising the perpetrators. The landscape of remembrance today is not a good guide to the past.

Furthermore, Fulbrook considers how the past raises difficult emotions - emotions which may be hard to control, which deeply implicate the self or compromise a sense of self-worth at a later date, and which mean that it is impossible to give a dispassionate account of the past. Such emotions do not map neatly onto experiences; they are also affected by the later contexts in which people seek to make sense of a troubling past. Fulbrook explores experiences and admissions of a sense of guilt or shame among different communities after the Holocaust. Focussing on both perpetrators and victims, those who were persecutors and those who were persecuted, she explores the relations between emotional expressions and varying historical situations. Why do the innocent feel guilty, and how do the guilty claim innocence? And how do patterns vary with historical setting, with changing collective actors, emergent cultural interpretations and differing socio-political configurations? On the basis of selected examples, she explores the relations between changing historical circumstances, different communities of experience and identification, and diverse legacies across generations.

Stephanie Bird explored the relationship of comedy and suffering in post-war German-language literature and film. Her book has a number of complementary aims. It seeks to draw critical attention to the comic aesthetic at play in the work of key authors and directors. It examines the ways in which a comic aesthetic is deployed in their work, and how it functions to sustain or complicate the narrative perspective and modes of identification set up by the narrative. Thus comic devices may be used to sustain or challenge structures of empathy and identification that themselves depend upon a particular ethical or political position. Key to the book's enquiry is therefore the question of what comedy contributes to debates around the ethics of representing trauma, victimhood and suffering. It also centrally engages with the importance of comedy for interrogating and challenging our understanding of the notion of trauma and its prevalent use in cultural criticism.
Her book does not analyse comic texts but those where a comic aesthetic is discernible at the margins. This aesthetic crystallizes the question of how we may enjoy portrayals of suffering: by integrating comedy into those portrayals, anxiety arising over the pleasure at others' pain is not contained by conventions of genre or form. Indeed, the relationship of pleasure and suffering is further illuminated by the way in which most of the texts assimilate comedy with the aesthetic modes of melodrama and melancholy, both of which are fundamentally concerned with suffering. Thus a further analytic thread running through the book is be a consideration of what comedy contributes to our understanding of melodrama and melancholy as two very differently evaluated articulations of suffering: melancholy as a privileged, masculine mode of perceiving and melodrama as a trivializing, feminine response.
The book casts significant light on key post-war German language writers and directors: Ingeborg Bachmann, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, W. G. Sebald, Volker Koepp, Reinhard Jirgl, Ruth Klüger, Edgar Hilsenrath and Jonathan Littell. It is unique in using comedy as a starting point for offering new interpretations of their work. In addition, the study engages with central tenets of theories of trauma and representation. It is distinct in arguing for the importance of a comic aesthetic for questioning and resisting the prevalent use and ethical privileging of trauma, traumatic subjectivity and victimhood. Similarly, the focus on comedy leads to a critical appraisal of how empathy and identification are sought and elicited to sustain moral positions and how these positions are also linked to and supported by aesthetic modes, particularly melancholy and melodrama.

Julia Wagner's monograph examines the efforts a small number of individuals made to bring Nazi criminals to justice. The successor states to the Third Reich shared a predicament: they had to integrate millions of former Nazis into their societies; and they often did so at the price of keeping silent about National Socialist crimes and the Holocaust. While the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Republic of Austria were preoccupied with building up their political and economic systems, the task of dealing with the criminal legacy of the Third Reich stayed low on their agendas. Despite the fact that all three governments publicly condemned the crimes of the Nazi regime, little was done to prosecute the perpetrators systematically. Consequently, those who were implicated in the genocide of European Jewry were rarely held responsible for crimes which had cost the lives of millions of people. A small group challenged this cross-societal trend. Private activists working outside the states' authority made it their mission to obtain justice. They investigated the crimes committed in the name of National Socialism against Jews, minorities and political opponents, tracked down those responsible and campaigned for their prosecution. The media soon began referring to some of them as 'Nazi hunters', but in fact the pursuit of Nazi criminals was but one part of a much larger range of activities. Critically, these individual agents also insisted that the courts and police live up to their duties and they co-operated with these agencies on various levels during the investigation of the crimes in question. Furthermore, they organized media campaigns to educate and sensitize the public to their cause.

Her other outputs examine German tourists in Europe and reminders of a disturbing past. A mere decade after World War Two ended in absolute defeat for Germany shattering National Socialist dreams of world domination, Germans in East and West (re-)discovered the desire for international travel. By the mid 1950s going on a holiday was increasingly considered the norm rather than a luxury in West Germany and by 1968 a majority of West Germans were spending their main annual holiday trip abroad. While patterns of East German tourism differed significantly from the West, they were soon allowed to visit other Socialist countries. In the 1970s the number of East Germans undertaking foreign travel rose to up to one quarter of the population. Despite all differences, Germans in East and West were 'world champions' (Hasso Spode) in tourism.
Many German tourists chose to spend their holidays at European countries which had been trampled by 'German soldiers' boots' (Axel Schildt) during World War II. The inhabitants of these places had often suffered brutal persecution and starvation. Now, a few years after the end of the fighting, the locals encountered Germans again - this time not as soldiers but as paying guests.
Her contributions look at the relationship between tourism and the reverberations of the Second World War in Europe. Tourism was the first occasion when large groups of Germans met their former enemies under different circumstances. Most tourists set out to have a good time and enjoy the lighter side of life forgetting about the problems of everyday life for the duration of their holiday. However, they often encountered reminders of the violent past during their stay abroad. These could be incidents of resentment, such as name-calling, refusals on the part of their hosts to serve them or, in rare cases, physical violence. Yet most were more subtle encounters with the past, such as noticing the after effects of the wartime destruction or topics coming up in conversations with locals and other occurrences that triggered reflection about the events which had happened during the war at the very places they were visiting at tourists and elsewhere in Europe. These - often unexpected - reminders were at odds with the dominant narrative of a happy and successful holiday. They challenged the understanding of what it meant to be a tourist. Based on an analysis of the narrative strategies employed in first hand travel accounts by German tourists from East and West she asks how German tourists negotiated and reflected on this incongruity between holidays on the one hand and confrontations with the Nazi past on the other. Travel narratives allow us to explore how tourists tried to make sense of their travel experiences. Wagner argues that we can discern a number of strategies of selectively engaging with and denying aspects of the past. On a more general level, she addresses questions about the role tourism played in postwar Europe. She argues that for German holidaymakers, tourism became an arena for negotiating the legacy of war and for constructing a post conflict identity.

Christiane Wienand investigated discourses, narratives and practices of reconciliation in post-war Europe and Israel. Her research particularly focused on the role of youth and the young generation for reconciliation. She analysed various practices of reconciliation, diverging reconciliation narratives and public discourse on reconciliation from the early post-war years onwards, but with a specific focus on the 1960s and 1970s as these two decades can be seen as the heydays of post-war reconciliation efforts. For her project Christiane explored several case studies of reconciliation activities of young West Germans who traveled to Poland, France and Israel in the 1960s and 1970s in order to undertake practical reconciliation work in social institutions, at war cemeteries, memorials and museums, and in Kibbutzim. These young West Germans (who either lived through the war as children or were born afterwards) formed specific communities of connection and identification as they took over the task of reconciliation from the parent or grandparent generation. Christiane was particularly interested in those young West Germans who did their reconciliation activities under the aegis of two West-German organisations: Aktion Sühnezeichen/Friedensdienste (Action Reconciliation Services for Peace) and the Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge (German War Graves Commission). Both institutions organised work stays for young West Germans abroad, and both organisations placed these activities under the particular notion of reconciliation or atonement.
In her project Christiane combined various perspectives by analysing the ways in which the young reconciliation activists themselves perceived of their activities, how the notion of reconciliation was understood and debated within the two organisations, and how the reconciliation activities were placed and discussed in the wider contexts of German-French, German-Israeli and German-Polish post-war international relations. The primary sources she analysed range from ego documents (diaries, reports, memoirs) and oral history interviews to diplomatic documents, official speeches and newspaper articles. In order to gather her source material Christiane has conducted archive research in archives and libraries in Germany, France and Israel.
Christiane has published the results of her findings in several book chapters, covering various aspects of her research, such as the contested notion of reconciliation, the political mobilisation of reconciliation activists, the historical development and institutionalisation of transnational reconciliation efforts in the post-war decades, and the disturbing aspects of reconciliation. In her monograph Dialog - Versöhnung - Frieden? Die junge Generation in Deutschland und Israel nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, she concentrates on the history of German-Israeli relations and the role the young generation played in setting up and maintaining these relations under the ideas of mutual understanding and reconciliation between Germans and Isralis, Christians and Jews.
An important result of Christiane's research is that a practical and discoursive focus on the youth as reconciliation agents made many reconciliation activities possible and welcomed in the first place. Yet the focus on the young generation at times also led towards obscuring and distracting attention from the violent past that has created the need for reconciliation. A wider ethical question arising from Christiane's research therefore is whether reconciliation can actually be achieved by those generations who have no personal guilt for what happened in the past. In other words: Is there reconciliation without perpetrators?

Gaelle Fisher's PhD thesis examined the changing associations with the region of Bukovina in Germany since the end of World War II. A former province of the Habsburg Empire, Bukovina was independent from 1775 to 1918, part of Romania until 1940 and is now split in between Romania in the south and Ukraine in the north. Bukovina thus ceased to exist as a political unit after the Second World War and was isolated behind the Iron Curtain for the duration of the Cold War. Yet in the post-war world, it remained a point of reference for a range of individuals and groups who had lived there before 1945. Bukovina's legacy survives in particular in the German-speaking realm where the region is known not only as formerly Austrian but also to have been the home to 120 000 German-speaking Jews and some 80 000 self-identifying ethnic Germans. The vast majority of these people were displaced during or as a result of the Second World War and large numbers perished in the conflict and the Holocaust. But exile organisations of Bukovinians such as the Homeland Society of Bukovina Germans (Landsmannschaft der Buchenlanddeutschen) and the World Organisation of Bukovinian Jews were founded after the war. Bukovinians after World War II can therefore be seen as representatives of wider interest groups such as German "Expellees" (Heimatvertriebene) and Jewish Holocaust survivors. By looking at the changing ways in which they conceptualised and enacted their relationship to the region, therefore, it is possible to compare how Germans and Jews came to terms with both the experience of violence during the war and the shared heritage of Germanness in Central Europe. Adopting a long-term, comparative and socio cultural perspective and drawing on macro, mezzo and micro level sources, this thesis shows that multiple discourses - Bukovina and Bukovinians as 'lost', 'expelled', 'immersed', 'forgotten', 'destroyed' and 'scattered' - coexisted throughout the post-war period. However there were significant variations in emphasis for different stances at different times. This is explained by the combined needs for belonging, compensation and coherence that determined people's approaches to the recent past and were significant regardless of their affiliation or later context. By taking Bukovina as a point of interaction for a range of people, discourses and practices, therefore, this thesis challenges the reliance on conventional national frameworks of understanding and offers a combination of historical, anthropological and social psychological explanations. In so doing, it also challenges the direct link often posited between experience and identification.

For her thesis, Alexandra Hills examined how effects of war or the totalitarian state threaten the integrity of human beings through their exposure to violence, and I explore the uncanny collapse of the animal/human boundary as a result of or metaphor for wartime violence and genocide. The result of the physical disturbance of the body caught in the political force fields of war and violence is the creaturely embodiment of human figures, who can no longer confidently be described as human. The ubiquity of the figure of the creature in Austiran and Italian literature after the Second World War is instrumental to this inquiry into the nature of how the body is warped by its exposure to politics as the notiion of the creature investigates how life is entrapped in the political on the one hand and vulnerable to physical entropy on the other. The concept of the creature encompasses the physical, affective and political figurations of the human body and self caught in political and material structures, and, as I see it, fears, hopes, anxieties and fascination associated with various types of creaturely, or uncannily animal-like, human bodies act as a barometer for attitudes towards victimhood, historical agency and responsibility. Animal-like human beings alienated from society and struggling for survival populate post-1945 novels and films in Austrian and Italian culture and the following questions may help elucidate how creaturely embodiment is linked to the legacies of war and totalitarianism in both Austria and Italy. Does the creature invite compassion on grounds of its presumed innocence and exposure to suffering? How is trauma embodied as a physical scar or stigma, and can a recourse to trauma an physical suffering upset ethical boundaries between victims and perpetrators, and between innocence and guilt? Or are the embodied effects of trauma the stigma of guilt and responsibility, or conversevely the signs of violence and unjust suffering that command compassion and humanity? By engaging with the porosity of self/other, animal/human, and victim/perpetrator binary oppositions, my exploration of creaturely across generations and across timecales has hitherto demonstrated complex investments in the memories of racial persecution, political oppression, conflict and genocide in post-war Italy and Austria. What does the presence of creatures reveal about the attitude to otherness marginalisation and difference in Austria and Italy in the aftermath of the Second World War? These are questions that my chapters address, with reference to authors and directors from Pier Paolo Pasolini and Liliana Cavani, to Elsa Morante, Carlo Levi, Anna Mitgutsch, Thomas Bernhard, Ilse Aichinger and Primo Levi.
Exploitation Route Our research group's interest in communities of experience and communities of connection and identification has contributed particularly to research on victims and perpetrators, but is also of wider relevance in developing ways of understanding the aftermath of collective violence among different groups in changing historical circumstances.

UCL is now cooperating with filmmaker Luke Holland in creating a significant archive of filmed interviews with elderly individuals who played some part as perpetrators, accomplices or bystander-witnesses in Nazi crimes. These activities contribute directly to tnew research on violence and on perpetrators, functionaries, and beneficiaries. This will also play a role in questions of memorialisation, museums, and public education.

The focus on the interrelations between historical developments, questions of justice, cultural representations and self-representations will also have implications for a variety of future research projects.
Sectors Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.reverberations-of-war.net
 
Description The project has aimed to shift the terrain and parameters of debate beyond nationally-based 'memory' studies by developing new approaches to understanding significant long-term legacies of the Second World War in Europe. We have published several articles on this subject and discussed our findings with various audiences at conferences and public engagement events. To this end, we have collaborated with various cultural institutions, such as the German Historical Institute London, the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, and the Polish Cultural Institute. In many individual events (such as Fulbrook's Holocaust Memorial Day lectures and other public lectures) there has been an impact on audiences who have previously concentrated primarily on remembering victims without considering fully questions about perpetrators, including, for example: the extent to which Nazi perpetrators were (or were not) brought to justice after the war; the meaning of guilt; and the extent to which mass collective violence can be adequately dealt with in courts of law or should be addressed in museums, exhibitions and memorial sites. The new perspectives developed in the research project have had an impact on groups ranging from schoolchildren through to interested members of the wider public. They have also been raised in discussion with museum professionals.
First Year Of Impact 2011
Sector Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Post-graduate training course: 'Ethics and Representation'
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Post graduate students develop a more nuanced and critical response to the question of how the violent past is represented in literature and history and the ethical questions raised by different types of representation.
 
Description Post-graduate training course: 'Trauma'
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Post-graduate students in the Humanities develop a more critical and nuanced understanding of trauma, its definition across disciplines, and its use as a critical category.
 
Description Academic Intitiatives Fund
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Department School for European Languages, Culture and Society
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description Academic Intitiatives Fund
Amount £1,600 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Department School for European Languages, Culture and Society
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 10/2014
 
Description C. Wienand was awarded a scholarship in the programme Fast Track: Exzellenz und Fuehrungskompetenz für Wissenschaftlerinnen auf der Ueberholspur
Amount € 2,400 (EUR)
Organisation Robert Bosch Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Germany
Start 10/2014 
End 10/2016
 
Description European Institute small grants
Amount £1,500 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Department European Institute
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description European Institute small grants
Amount £1,000 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Department European Institute
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 10/2014
 
Description FIGS Funding
Amount £1,498 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description German Historical Institute London
Amount £400 (GBP)
Organisation German Historical Institute London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 10/2014
 
Title Interdisciplinary Enquiry 
Description The project is organised in terms of several interrelated elements, each of which explores key questions with respect to different communities of experience and later communities of connection and identification. All elements of the project approach their topics from a European perspective, whether through systematic comparisons of cases, through analysis of 'entangled histories', or investigation of transnational networks and mutual influences. The elements are linked through their attempts to address sources ranging from highly individual 'ego documents' to representations in literature, the mass media or political debates, in the light of a shared analytical framework. Our project thus takes a broad European focus, going beyond the writing of parallel national histories by looking at the experience of war-related violence as a phenomenon transcending the (changing) borders of European states. By looking at long-term legacies through a transnational and comparative lens, we seek to develop a deeper understanding of the national discourses and specificities as well as discerning the European dimensions and relatedness of the various experiences and discourses. While German aggression in World War Two is our point of departure, we are not looking at Germany or any other country as an isolated case but in a constantly changing, wider framework. Secondly, we seek to shift the focus of 'collective memory' studies that tend to posit distinctive communities of memory. We aim instead to explore systematically, with respect to well-defined cases, communities of experience and identification. This allows us to observe and analyse the evolution of conceptions from the subjectively perceived and narrated experiences of those directly affected through to later frameworks of reference that can be selectively adopted by groups not sharing the original experiences. These groups may choose to 'identify' with communities other than those of their own familial, religious, social or political origins. By focusing both on the transmission processes and the active patterns of 'making sense' of the legacies of the past in different later circumstances, we highlight both culturally shaped agency as well as changing political and structural contexts. Thirdly, we bring a genuinely multi-disciplinary approach to this complex, highly sensitive area, ranging from insights and provocations in the cultural arena, through familial and social reverberations, to political instrumentalisation and intellectual controversy in public spheres. Our collaborative approach promises to develop fruitful new insights into areas which, although already extensively treated separately, have not as yet been conceived and reconsidered in this integrated way. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2011 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We have organised a series of international workshops and conferences which were attended by scholars from various disciplines (history, literature and film studies, psychology, sociology). 
 
Title Communities versus collective memory 
Description By holding a series of interdisciplinary workshops a model of critical enquiry was developed based on the notion of communities of experience, identification and connection. This model is a response to the weakness of the collective memory model and the often weakly theorised notion of memory. By drawing on the more nuanced categories of the different types of communities that relate to events in the past, the process whereby the past is narrativised in various contexts and how it continues to have an impact in the present can be analysed with greater nuance. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2010 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact
 
Description CEGESOMA Centre for Historical Research and Documentation on War and Contemporary Society, Belgium 
Organisation Centre for Historical Research and Documentation on War and Contemporary Society (CEGESOMA)
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I will contribute to the strands within the general theme of War and Fiction: 1° The multiform historical experience of war is essential for Europe's collective identity, memory and remembrance, as well as national memorial regimes 2° The topic of war is omnipresent in (influential) works of fiction 3° Tiction has always been an important way to deal with the personal traumatic legacy of war, which has created a varied body of qualitative work; 4° 'War Fiction' typically deals with contested memories, which are, highly interesting to discuss and analyse.
Collaborator Contribution The Action aims to create an analytical model that can transcend current scholarly fragmentation. Besides some standard academic deliverables, several concrete dissemination scenarios will bridge the gap towards cultural practicioners (such as museums and educational institutes). 'Fiction of War' is the concrete thematic angle to overcome the main challenges. While this angle can transcend academic and national fragmentations, it can also create possibilities to assess possibilities of broader public involvement.
Impact Planned outputs include: The main deliverables are: 1° internal Working Groups reports, workshops/seminars, a series of peer reviewed journal articles (book chapters) specifically referring to this Action and preferably with an equal presence per Working Group (WG). 2° A digital platform/website : to communicate information on the progress of the Action (WG's for instance, seminar programme), create awareness of the Action in non-academic target audiences, in the final stage: communicate the dissemination scenarios 3° an academic publication which elaborates the final transnational and interdisciplinary model 4° practically usable concrete 'scenarios' (for instance a museal scenario, and educational programme) used to offer field practitioners tools to translate the often complex and theoretical insights to more easily accessible formats for non-academic stakeholders: certain civil society ngo's (such as heritage and remembrance organizations), policy makers, the general public. The development of such practical tools (scenarios) is one of the essential aims of the Action (and a specific Work Group will be dedicated to it). 5° if relevant at the end of the Action : a report with recommendations aimed at the relevant European-national-regional policy makers and civil society organizations
Start Year 2014
 
Description EI 
Organisation University College London
Department European Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has collaborated with the European Institute on several occasions. We have also organised a series of events which were sponsored and promoted by the European Institute, including the workshop Transmission of a troubled past (May 2012), the conference Disturbing Pasts. Reverberations of the Second World War in Germany and Europe (July 2014) and the workshop Only doing my duty. Perpetrators in relation to state sanctioned violence as well as the film series Portraying perpetrators (2013-ongoing). Members of our research team (Stephanie Bird, Gaelle Fisher) have introduced films at the European film day. One member of our research team (Julia Wagner) has written a blogpost about her research for the European Institute blog. Julia Wagner is also involved in an ongoing project concerning the creation of short film clips about the research of historians, literary scholars and other academics (working title: why study Europe?).
Collaborator Contribution The European Insitute has contributed financially to several of our events. They have promoted our various events via their website and newsletter. We have coorganized several events (for details see previous section).
Impact Two workshops, one conference, one online publication, one film series, two presentations at European film day
Start Year 2013
 
Description Final Account Archive - Luke Holland 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution ZEF Productions and UCL are creating a significant archive of filmed interviews with elderly individuals who played some part as perpetrators, accomplices or bystander-witnesses in Nazi crimes. The collaboration between UCL and ZEF concerns the completion of the collection process and the cataloguing, securing, and academic evaluation of the full set of filmed interviews, in order to produce a complete and accessible archival collection. This will place the interviews and associated material in a secure legacy environment, where, in due course, its research and education purposes can be most effectively realised.
Collaborator Contribution The data is provided by ZEF Productions Ltd. Derived from the master files, the data will be encoded as MPEG-4 at a bit rate of 1000 Kbps using the open-source multimedia framework, FFmpeg. The collaboration with UCL academic colleagues and UCL Library Services' Digital Collections service, focuses on: developing access and distribution protocols; initiating the curation of the collection; ensuring that the material is properly assessed and contextualised, and that appropriate safeguards are in place before any of it is released. As the majority of interviews are conducted in languages other than English, the translation and subtitling of interviews will be a further priority.
Impact The archive will be accessible for research from the summer of 2015 onwards. In the first instance, named researchers at UCL will evaluate the material and produce a handbook. In subsequent years, the archive will be made available for research, teaching and memorial purposes.
Start Year 2014
 
Description GHIL 
Organisation German Historical Institute London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The GHIL hosted the conference Only doing my duty. Perpetrators in relation to state-sanctioned violence in October 2014. Members of our research team organised the conference (invited the speakers, helped to organise travel, organised accomodation) and gave papers at the conference or chaired sessions.
Collaborator Contribution The GHIL hosted the conference. They offered technical support and refreshments. Members of the GHIL staff partipated in the conference by giving papers or contributing to the discussion. They promoted the event in their newsletters and will publish a conference report.
Impact This was an exploratory workshop which brought together experts in the field who might collaborate in the future.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Jörg Echternkamp 
Organisation Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We invited Professor Echternkamp to spend 6 weeks at UCL. During this time we gave him the opportunity to present his research and participate in meetings, workhsops and discussions.
Collaborator Contribution He attended our workshops and gave interesting feedback on our research.
Impact One member of our research team (C Wienand) has published an article in a volume edited by J Echternkamp.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Jena Center 20th Century History 
Organisation Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU)
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Mary Fulbrook was a visiting professor at the Jena Center during the summer term 2013. During this time she delivered a series of public lectures which will be published as a book in due course.
Collaborator Contribution The Jena Center invited Professor Fulbrook and arranged a series of public lectures.
Impact The lectures will be published in due course.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum
Country Poland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Friedrich Schiller University Jena (FSU)
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (NIOD) Amsterdam
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Jetzt und Einst
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Pedagogical University of Kraków
Country Poland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation University College London
Department Institute of Education (IOE)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation University of Vienna
Country Austria 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perpetrator project 
Organisation Yad Vashem
Country Israel 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our research team has been instrumental in forming this collaboration. We approached individual members in order to develop a research project on perpetration, complicity and benefiting from mass violence. We organised a two-day conference for all partners to meet and discuss ongoing research and grant bids.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner will work on one aspect of the overall research theme on perpetration, complicity and benefitting from mass violence under the macro-violent context of Nazi violence. NIOD will be conducting research on collaboration in occupied States; Jena on Germany; Vienna on denunciation in Hungary; Yad Vashem on the perception of perpetration from the perspective of the victims; Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków on the representation of perpetrators in museums; the Auschwitz museum will develop and show a new exhibition on the theme; and the IOE will develop educational materials and policy recommendations for the teaching of perpetration in schools and universities; Jetzt und Einst will develop commercial applications for the research.
Impact We are currently working on grant bids. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary: Pedagogy Literary and film criticism History Museology
Start Year 2014
 
Description Ute Frevert 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Co-organized a conference on shame and shaming in the 20th century. Conceptualisation, Planning
Collaborator Contribution Hosted the conference, paid for accomodation and travel
Impact The conference has resulted in further collabroation. Some participants have attended further events and are contributing chapters to the forthcoming volume "Disturbing Pasts"
Start Year 2012
 
Description 12 June 2019 BBC Radio 4 Today Programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 12 June 2019 BBC Radio 4 Today Programme (with an estimated audience of 10,484,000):
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 28 February 2019: Interviewed for documentary 'Blowback. the 9/11 Wars in Global Films'. (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9457264/?ref_=nm_knf_t1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Terence McSweeney, a writer and lecturer, is working on a project connected to a book under contract to Edinburgh University Press called Blowback: The 9/11 Wars in Global Film. He is filming a short documentary with the same name and has interviewed me about my research in relation to cultural trauma, comedy and representations of violence.

The film will be screened later in 2019 at UK AHRC events, plus in the US at Indiana University in Bloomington where he iscurrently a Research Fellow at the Lilly Library.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description A public lecture entitled 'Comedy, Trauma and Nazi Perpetration' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 79 people attended the lecture which presented the key problematic of the book relating to the Reverberations of War project and discussed two case studies. Attendees commented afterwards that it made them think about the particular authors in a new way or about the relationship of trauma and comedy in a new way.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Advice given to a small group of experts from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum regarding their refreshing of their exhibition which reaches millions of visitors, 14 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Advice given to a small group of practitioners from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum about the ways in which to refresh their exhibition in the light of recent historical research and new approaches. This will inform their revised exhibition, reaching millions of visitors in due course.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Awkward Auschwitz 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We organized a session at the UCL Festival of Arts. There was a lively discussion. A member of the audience and colleague blogged about the event.

Some members of the audience came to events we organised later on. Audience members reported that their views on Auschwitz and how we think about it had changed and sent positive email asking for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events/2014/06/05/auschwitz-revisited/
 
Description BBC radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact BBC radio 4 interview on 'Welcome Money' Monday 4 Nov. A radio programme marking thirty years since the fall of the Berlin wall, reaching a national and inernational audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Blog_AwkwardAuschwitz 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This blogpost about our session at the UCL Festival of Arts 2014 broadcast the event to a wider audience.

There was a lively and interesting discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events/2014/06/05/auschwitz-revisited/
 
Description Blogpost_tourism 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This blogpost was published in the newsletter of the European Institute which goes out to over 18,000 people, including UCL alumni.

The author was contacted by several individuals with questions about her research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/european-institute/highlights/2013-14/tourism
 
Description C. Wienand was panelist in a public discussion panel on the lasting impact of the Second World War in Europe 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact My contribution to the panel were referred to by other panelists and were discussed among the people attending the discussion panel.

After the discussion panel, I was approached by several people who wanted to know more about my research and wanted to be provided with historical literature that captures the points I made on the panel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description CRRASH: Comedy in Sebald 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description City Talk 105.9 (24 October 2012: 60,000) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The programme discussed and promoted Mary Fulbrook's book A small town near Auschwitz.

This impact activity promoted the research undertaken by a member of the research team and created public awareness for the subject. The station has 60,000 daily listeners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Dan Snow's 'History Hit' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dan Snow's 'History Hit'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://tv.historyhit.com/watch/36008368
 
Description David Bankier Memorial Lecture at Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, 26 February 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Delivered public lecture at Yad Vashem, Israel's central Holocaust Memorial site, which served to open up new avenues for discussion and debate about the role of 'bystanders' and the supposed 'lessons' of the Holocaust.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description December 2012 international conference Shame and Shaming in the 20th century, organized by M. Fulbrook and J. Wagner on behalf of the research group and in collaboration with Ute Frevert (Max Planck Institut für Bildungsforschung Berlin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The conference provided a forum for intense scholarly exchange on the importance of emotions, particularly the emotion of shame, in culture and society of the 20th century. It also was a great forum to present and discuss the research of our research group with international experts of the history of emotions.

The conference led towards continuing collaboration with several scholars from Germany, Poland and the Netherlands.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-4718
 
Description Discussion panel at Humboldt-Universität Berlin (M. Fulbrook) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Panel contribution was discussed among people attending the discussion

Publication of a newspaper article in the daily newspaper Tagesspiegel about the panel discussion: http://www.tagesspiegel.de/wissen/humboldt-universitaet-der-schatten-der-ddr/3625544.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
URL https://www.hu-berlin.de/pr/pressemitteilungen/pm1012/pm_101209_02
 
Description FIGS Friday Forum on Interdisciplinarity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions about the nature of interdisciplinary and its relevance in academic research.

Discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/jfigs/figs-friday-forum/index/edit/interdisciplinarity
 
Description FIGS Friday Forum on Silence 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/jfigs/figs-friday-forum/silence
 
Description Festival of Arts 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact There was a lively discussion and a blog documenting the event.

We had a very good discussion with members of the audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Film series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An ongoing film and discussion series called "Portraying Perpetrators". Each month we screen a feature film or documentary which offers a different take on the subject of perpetrators, their motivations and the consequences of their actions. We have shown films from/set in Argentina, Poland, Greece, Germany and elsewhere. The series will continue throughout this academic year. The films are introduced by an expert and there is a discussion afterwards. These events are often well attended with several members of the audience attending regularly. The discussions are always lively and interesting.

The film series has sparked their interest in our research. Some members of the audience regularly come to events which we organise. They have suggested new films. Audience members have also reported that they think about questions of perpetration and complicity in new and complex ways.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/multidisciplinary-and-intercultural-inquiry/portraying-perpetrators
 
Description Forum of European Philosophy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussions afterwards

Email exchanges with interested audience members and discussion afterwards
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description Fraternal Order of Bendiner-Sosnowicer on 31 March 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact lively discussion.

Survivors and members of families from the Bedzin area were present. Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities.
The significance of this impact was as diverse as the audiences. Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities. In the German press, for example, an open letter to Fulbrook in a Rheinland newspaper thanked her for both enlightening the writer about the 'the big question of how it was ever possible for the "Third Reich" to have developed in what was a "Kulturnation"' as well as making aspects of the writer's own troubled relationship with his 'ordinary perpetrator' father more comprehensible. Fulbrook has also received many personal e-mails. One German wrote: 'On a personal level it was a veritable eye opener of how we as a family have rationalised my own grand-father's role in the fascist system'. An American wrote: 'Most importantly, you have made me ask myself a very uncomfortable question. Where in 2012 are our blinkers?' A child of survivors wrote that this is 'a personal and important book that should generate a lot of discussion about the German organizational structure that allowed the murder of our Polish Jewish families to happen with bureaucratic precision and antiseptic decision-making. And then convinced themselves that they were innocent.' Many more could be quoted.
Fulbrook's research also contributed to changing the way in which the legacy of a German administrator was commemorated by his successors. Central to Fulbrook's research [d] was the complicated legacy of Udo Klausa (the former Nazi civilian administrator of Bedzin and the first post-war Director of the Rhineland Regional Council (LVR) in North-Rhine Westphalia 1954-1975). On 30 May 2012 Fulbrook delivered a public lecture at Düsseldorf University to an audience including current representatives of the Rhineland Regional Council. As a result of Fulbrook's research the Rhineland Regional Council withdrew from their website an adulatory biography of Klausa and amended their public exhibitions.
Research on the GDR also reached a wide public through panel events and media presentations, leaving an online legacy in podcasts and transcripts. These ranged from an event with the President of the Humboldt University Berlin, through small discussions with former dissidents and Christians in a church in East Berlin, to an interview with Geraldine Doogue on 'Saturday Extra', Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio National, 7 November 2009 (weekly audience 126,000). The significance of Fulbrook's work on 'perfectly normal lives' in the GDR for German self-understandings and public debates is reflected in both popular and scholarly reviews, including the prestigious daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (14 Jan 2009), the Göttingen Institute for Research on Democracy (18 May 2010) and the Institute for Civic Education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Haye-on-Wye 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Between November 2012 and July 2013 Fulbrook also delivered public talks at home and abroad, including two of the biggest UK literary festivals at Oxford and Hay-on-Wye where audience numbers averaged some 400 and included members of the general public, along with historians, educators and people with personal connections to the Holocaust.

The significance of this impact was as diverse as the audiences. Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities. In the German press, for example, an open letter to Fulbrook in a Rheinland newspaper thanked her for both enlightening the writer about the 'the big question of how it was ever possible for the "Third Reich" to have developed in what was a "Kulturnation"' as well as making aspects of the writer's own troubled relationship with his 'ordinary perpetrator' father more comprehensible. Fulbrook has also received many personal e-mails. One German wrote: 'On a personal level it was a veritable eye opener of how we as a family have rationalised my own grand-father's role in the fascist system'. An American wrote: 'Most importantly, you have made me ask myself a very uncomfortable question. Where in 2012 are our blinkers?' A child of survivors wrote that this is 'a personal and important book that should generate a lot of discussion about the German organizational structure that allowed the murder of our Polish Jewish families to happen with bureaucratic precision and antiseptic decision-making. And then convinced themselves that they were innocent.' Many more could be quoted.
Fulbrook's research also contributed to changing the way in which the legacy of a German administrator was commemorated by his successors. Central to Fulbrook's research [d] was the complicated legacy of Udo Klausa (the former Nazi civilian administrator of Bedzin and the first post-war Director of the Rhineland Regional Council (LVR) in North-Rhine Westphalia 1954-1975). On 30 May 2012 Fulbrook delivered a public lecture at Düsseldorf University to an audience including current representatives of the Rhineland Regional Council. As a result of Fulbrook's research the Rhineland Regional Council withdrew from their website an adulatory biography of Klausa and amended their public exhibitions.
Research on the GDR also reached a wide public through panel events and media presentations, leaving an online legacy in podcasts and transcripts. These ranged from an event with the President of the Humboldt University Berlin, through small discussions with former dissidents and Christians in a church in East Berlin, to an interview with Geraldine Doogue on 'Saturday Extra', Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio National, 7 November 2009 (weekly audience 126,000). The significance of Fulbrook's work on 'perfectly normal lives' in the GDR for German self-understandings and public debates is reflected in both popular and scholarly reviews, including the prestigious daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (14 Jan 2009), the Göttingen Institute for Research on Democracy (18 May 2010) and the Institute for Civic Education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description History Today 'Travels Through Time' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact History Today's 'Travels Through Time'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.historytoday.com/podcast/travels-through-time-15-%E2%80%93-mary-fulbrook-1939-45
 
Description Interdisciplinary event, Psychoanalysis Unit: 'Trauma' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Email exchanges with interested members of the audience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Interview on Arlene Bynon Show on Sirius XM satellite radio on Monday 11 Nov on Armistice Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on Arlene Bynon Show on Sirius XM satellite radio on Monday 11 Nov on Armistice Day
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Interview on BBC World Service on Berlin Wall anniversary on Saturday 9 Nov 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on BBC World Service on Berlin Wall anniversary on Saturday 9 Nov. BBC says they have "an audience of millions around the world every weekend [and] also rebroadcast across the US on public radio".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Interview on GDR schools on 12 Nov. in CNN 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on GDR schools on 12 Nov. in CNN; 
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/09/europe/berlin-wall-30-years-schools-grm-intl/index.html
 
Description Interview on LBC radio on Saturday 9 Nov. afternoon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on LBC radio on Saturday 9 Nov. afternoon about the fall of the Berlin Wall
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Interview with Afua Hirsch at the Holocaust Memorial, Berlin, 9 March 2018, for a documentary film 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact This interview wil form part of a TV documentary about approaches to shameful nation pasts, to be shown in the summer of 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Interview with CNN in relation to recent war crimes trials 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview with CNN in relation to recent Nazi war crimes trials
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://edition.cnn.com/2018/12/14/europe/germany-nazi-war-trials-grm-intl/index.html
 
Description Interview with Mary Fulbrook 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Interview with Professor Mary Fulbrook
Posted on April 27, 2012 by kseegobin

SEN Journal: Online Exclusives would like to present the following interview with Professor Mary Fulbrook, a Professor of German History and Vice-Dean (Interdisciplinarity), Faculty of Arts and Humanities at University College London. She was one of the keynote speakers at the 2012 ASEN Conference.

Vesselina Ratchev and Karen Seegobin interviewed Professor Fulbrook at the 2012 ASEN Conference, held at the London School of Economics and Political Science on 27-29 March, 2012.

1. What are the main themes you've been working on this year?

I've been dealing with the issue of collective memory, but am trying to replace it with communities of experience, connection and identification.

2. What is the best book on nationalism that you've read in the past year?

I've been reading too many books, I can't just pick one [on being pressed what stood out]. There is an author I knew of but suddenly read a lot of his books. It's Vladimir Nabakov.

3. What new directions are nationalism studies taking?

My interest in nationalism is related to Holocaust and German nationalism and nation-state construction in that domain. Within this field, I think that we're looking into much wider and more interesting questions. In the last few years there has been a shift from what were getting to be quite sterile debates about intention and functionalism and that kind of thing, to looking at perpetrators and victims and the role of ordinary Germans. I think Holocaust research is developing massively in various directions.

4. What was the key piece of news from the last year that you found the most interesting?

I guess what's interested me the most are debates over Putin, which is entirely unrelated to my scholarship, but is what I've found most interesting in the news.

SEN Journal: Online Exclusives would like to thank Professor Fulbrook for taking the time to be interviewed. For more on the topics discussed, please see the following SEN articles, which can be found in the print edition:

Conforti, Y. (2012), Zionist Awareness of the Jewish Past: Inventing Tradition or Renewing the Ethnic Past?. Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 12: 155-171.

Cooter, A. (2011), Neo-Nazi Nationalism. Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 11: 365-383.

Tjaden, J. D. (2012), The (Re-)Construction of 'National Identity' through Selective Memory and Mass Ritual Discourse: The Chilean Centenary, 1910. Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 12: 45-63.
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This online interview gave Professor Fulbrook the opportunity to explain her research to a wider audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://senjournal.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/interview-with-professor-mary-fulbrook/
 
Description Jewish Book Council in May 2012 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In A Small Town near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust, Fulbrook explored the development of Nazi racist policies and genocide in Bedzin, a small town and county in Eastern Upper Silesia, just 25 miles north of Auschwitz. Some 85,000 Jews were deported through the linked ghettos of Bedzin-Sosnowiec; almost all the Jewish citizens of Bedzin, around half the total population of this town, were murdered as a result of Nazi oppression; yet it has virtually escaped the attention of historians. Moreover, the role of mid-level civilian functionaries in creating the preconditions for the Holocaust has only recently become the subject of historical research. Civilian administrators have also almost entirely escaped public conceptions of 'perpetrators', who are generally seen as those engaged in direct physical acts of violence rather than the behind-the-scenes administration of ghettoization and policies of stigmatisation, exploitation, expropriation and starvation. Fulbrook's research focused primarily on the role and later self-representations of the Landrat (chief executive or principal civilian administrator) of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, who went on to a successful postwar career in the West German civil service as the first Director of the Rhineland Regional Council. Based on a range of sources, including private letters from the Landrat's wife during the war, contemporary archival sources, the records of subsequent legal investigations, the Landrat's 1980 memoirs, and survivor testimonies and oral history interviews, the book explores the implications of 'systemic violence' and the role of German civilian administrators as 'Hitler's willing functionaries'. It also reflects on the character of later memories, in an effort to probe beyond the familiar focus on acts of physical violence and atrocities, and on the subjective role of the historian in confronting this history. The talk sparked questions and a discussion afterwards.

Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities.
The significance of this impact was as diverse as the audiences. Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities. In the German press, for example, an open letter to Fulbrook in a Rheinland newspaper thanked her for both enlightening the writer about the 'the big question of how it was ever possible for the "Third Reich" to have developed in what was a "Kulturnation"' as well as making aspects of the writer's own troubled relationship with his 'ordinary perpetrator' father more comprehensible. Fulbrook has also received many personal e-mails. One German wrote: 'On a personal level it was a veritable eye opener of how we as a family have rationalised my own grand-father's role in the fascist system'. An American wrote: 'Most importantly, you have made me ask myself a very uncomfortable question. Where in 2012 are our blinkers?' A child of survivors wrote that this is 'a personal and important book that should generate a lot of discussion about the German organizational structure that allowed the murder of our Polish Jewish families to happen with bureaucratic precision and antiseptic decision-making. And then convinced themselves that they were innocent.' Many more could be quoted.
Fulbrook's research also contributed to changing the way in which the legacy of a German administrator was commemorated by his successors. Central to Fulbrook's research [d] was the complicated legacy of Udo Klausa (the former Nazi civilian administrator of Bedzin and the first post-war Director of the Rhineland Regional Council (LVR) in North-Rhine Westphalia 1954-1975). On 30 May 2012 Fulbrook delivered a public lecture at Düsseldorf University to an audience including current representatives of the Rhineland Regional Council. As a result of Fulbrook's research the Rhineland Regional Council withdrew from their website an adulatory biography of Klausa and amended their public exhibitions.
Research on the GDR also reached a wide public through panel events and media presentations, leaving an online legacy in podcasts and transcripts. These ranged from an event with the President of the Humboldt University Berlin, through small discussions with former dissidents and Christians in a church in East Berlin, to an interview with Geraldine Doogue on 'Saturday Extra', Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio National, 7 November 2009 (weekly audience 126,000). The significance of Fulbrook's work on 'perfectly normal lives' in the GDR for German self-understandings and public debates is reflected in both popular and scholarly reviews, including the prestigious daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (14 Jan 2009), the Göttingen Institute for Research on Democracy (18 May 2010) and the Institute for Civic Education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description July 2014 international interdisciplinary conference Disturbing Pasts, organized by J. Wagner and C. Wienand on behalf of the research group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Our conference brought together scholars from various disciplines (history, literature, sociology, film studies, cultural studies), working in the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland and France. Apart from those speakers who were invited after a selection process following a call for papers, all six members of our research group gave a paper. The papers given at the conference led to intense discussions and scholarly exchange during the conference.

After our conference we carefully selected a number of papers for publication in our edited volume Reverberations of the Nazi Past in Germany and Beyond (forthcoming with Bloomsbury Academic in October 2015). With the authors of the papers we remained in close contact throughout the editorial work for the publication. The conference also resulted in building up new individual scholarly contacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.hsozkult.de/conferencereport/id/tagungsberichte-5952?title=disturbing-pasts-reverberation...
 
Description July 2014 public lecture by author Lisa Appignanesi, OBE, organized by Alexandra Hills, Julia Wagner & Christiane Wienand on behalf of the research group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact the lecture sparked a lively discussion with the audience

people from the audience approaches us and wanted to be informed about future public events organized by our research group
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/multidisciplinary-and-intercultural-inquiry/cmii-events-publication/appignanesi...
 
Description Lecture at the Bookworm Café, Beijing: 'Representing Trauma and the Possibility of Comedy' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion about trauma in general and also how relevant it is in representations of China's past.

--
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.ucl.ac.uk/jfigs/figs-news-publication/stephanie-bird-beijing
 
Description Lecture to U3A, London Nov. 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Lecture to U3A Nov. 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Lunch- time lecture by Professor Mary Fulbrook 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A very good discussion about how the Holocaust is commemorated.

--
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events/tag/professor-mary-fulbrook/
 
Description March FiGS Fiday Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact 2013, Organiser UCL Faculty Institute of Graduate Studies Forum on Home, http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ah/figs/figs-friday-forum/home-forum
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Mary Fulbrook: Many public engagement events including Holocaust Memorial Day lectures and talks to diverse audiences 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Mary Fulbrook frequently gives public lectures including to schools, to the Historical Association, and to interested members of the general public on the occasion of, for example, Holocaust Memorial Day (Yad Vashem 2014, Glasgow 2015, Sussex 2017), or in the context of such interest (eg Simon Wiesenthal Institute Annual Lecture, Vienna 2015).

Responses have indicated that the lectures make a significant impact. eg one email from an organiser (of the Sussex event) said: "It was great to hear you speak in Sussex yesterday and I would like to thank you for participating in our Holocaust Memorial Day. Your lecture was brilliant - so broad in scope and so sharp-edged in argument. I heard many, many positive comments and this morning we received an email from a school teacher from Shoreham-by-Sea who told us that even her youngest students were taking pages and pages of notes and continued to discuss the themes you brought up in your lecture on their way home. Wonderful!" There have been many similar comments and letters to his effect.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
 
Description May 2014 In conversation with Alexandra Senff at the 'Transmission of a Troubled Past' event, UCL. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact --
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description New Views of an Old Master? W. G. Sebald reconsidered 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

Positive verbal feedback from members of the audience after the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Newstalk Radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The programme focused on Mary Fulbrook's research and the book A small town near Auschwitz. In A Small Town near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust [d], Fulbrook explored the development of Nazi racist policies and genocide in Bedzin, a small town and county in Eastern Upper Silesia, just 25 miles north of Auschwitz. Some 85,000 Jews were deported through the linked ghettos of Bedzin-Sosnowiec; almost all the Jewish citizens of Bedzin, around half the total population of this town, were murdered as a result of Nazi oppression; yet it has virtually escaped the attention of historians. Moreover, the role of mid-level civilian functionaries in creating the preconditions for the Holocaust has only recently become the subject of historical research. Civilian administrators have also almost entirely escaped public conceptions of 'perpetrators', who are generally seen as those engaged in direct physical acts of violence rather than the behind-the-scenes administration of ghettoization and policies of stigmatisation, exploitation, expropriation and starvation. Fulbrook's research focused primarily on the role and later self-representations of the Landrat (chief executive or principal civilian administrator) of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, who went on to a successful postwar career in the West German civil service as the first Director of the Rhineland Regional Council. Based on a range of sources, including private letters from the Landrat's wife during the war, contemporary archival sources, the records of subsequent legal investigations, the Landrat's 1980 memoirs, and survivor testimonies and oral history interviews, the book explores the implications of 'systemic violence' and the role of German civilian administrators as 'Hitler's willing functionaries'. It also reflects on the character of later memories, in an effort to probe beyond the familiar focus on acts of physical violence and atrocities, and on the subjective role of the historian in confronting this history.

It helped to create historical awareness about the Holocaust and its legacy and promoted Fulbrook's award-winning book. The station has 237,000 daily listeners. Very positive feedback
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Night waves 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Professor Fulbrook was interviewed about her work on BBC Radio 3 Night Waves (27 September 2012; 1.9m weekly station listeners).n A Small Town near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust, Fulbrook explored the development of Nazi racist policies and genocide in Bedzin, a small town and county in Eastern Upper Silesia, just 25 miles north of Auschwitz. Some 85,000 Jews were deported through the linked ghettos of Bedzin-Sosnowiec; almost all the Jewish citizens of Bedzin, around half the total population of this town, were murdered as a result of Nazi oppression; yet it has virtually escaped the attention of historians. Moreover, the role of mid-level civilian functionaries in creating the preconditions for the Holocaust has only recently become the subject of historical research. Civilian administrators have also almost entirely escaped public conceptions of 'perpetrators', who are generally seen as those engaged in direct physical acts of violence rather than the behind-the-scenes administration of ghettoization and policies of stigmatisation, exploitation, expropriation and starvation. Fulbrook's research focused primarily on the role and later self-representations of the Landrat (chief executive or principal civilian administrator) of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, who went on to a successful postwar career in the West German civil service as the first Director of the Rhineland Regional Council. Based on a range of sources, including private letters from the Landrat's wife during the war, contemporary archival sources, the records of subsequent legal investigations, the Landrat's 1980 memoirs, and survivor testimonies and oral history interviews, the book explores the implications of 'systemic violence' and the role of German civilian administrators as 'Hitler's willing functionaries'. It also reflects on the character of later memories, in an effort to probe beyond the familiar focus on acts of physical violence and atrocities, and on the subjective role of the historian in confronting this history.

This programme showcased the Fulbrook's work and promoted her book A small town near Auschwitz which sold thousands of copies worldwide. 1.9m weekly station listeners. The feedback was very positive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Oct. 2014 Public discussion panel (with Jens-Jürgen Ventzki and Naomi Tadmor) organized by J. Wagner and C. Wienand on behalf of the research group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The public panel discussion organized by J. Wagner and C. Wienand on behalf of the Reverberation of War research group sparked a lively discussion at the event.

The event resulted in a continuing contact with the two panelists, the German author Jens-Jürgen Ventzki and the British historian Prof. Naomi Tadmor. Furthermore, several people who were in the audience of the public panel discussion got back in touch with us afterwards, asking to be informed about future events and exchanging their views with us.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.reverberations-of-war.net/mediapool/97/974195/data/Perpetrators-homepage-logo.pdf
 
Description Oct. 2014 workshop on Defining Perpertrators in Relations to State-Sanctioned Violence, organized by J. Wagner and C. Wienand on behalf of the research group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The workshop's aim was to discuss current research on "perpetrators", which emerged as an important topic from our internal research group workshops. The participants (coming from the UK, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands and the United States of America) all gave short presentations and then engaged in a lively discussion about themes, approaches and methods.

The workshop resulted in international interdisciplinary academic collaborations (both with the individual members of the research group, as well as with the research group itself).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.reverberations-of-war.net/mediapool/97/974195/data/Perpetrators-homepage-logo.pdf
 
Description Opinion piece reflecting on anniversaries and history, in the Canada Globe and Mail on Saturday 9 Nov: 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Opinion piece reflecting on anniversaries and history, in the Canada Globe and Mail on Saturday 9 Nov:
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-a-poppy-is-not-enough-on-remembrance-day-let-us-unde...
 
Description Oxford Literary Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Between November 2012 and July 2013 Fulbrook also delivered public talks at home and abroad, including two of the biggest UK literary festivals at Oxford and Hay-on-Wye where audience numbers averaged some 400 and included members of the general public, along with historians, educators and people with personal connections to the Holocaust.

The significance of this impact was as diverse as the audiences. Individuals from both Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds around the world have emphasised how much the book has affected their understanding of themselves, their families and communities. In the German press, for example, an open letter to Fulbrook in a Rheinland newspaper thanked her for both enlightening the writer about the 'the big question of how it was ever possible for the "Third Reich" to have developed in what was a "Kulturnation"' as well as making aspects of the writer's own troubled relationship with his 'ordinary perpetrator' father more comprehensible. Fulbrook has also received many personal e-mails. One German wrote: 'On a personal level it was a veritable eye opener of how we as a family have rationalised my own grand-father's role in the fascist system'. An American wrote: 'Most importantly, you have made me ask myself a very uncomfortable question. Where in 2012 are our blinkers?' A child of survivors wrote that this is 'a personal and important book that should generate a lot of discussion about the German organizational structure that allowed the murder of our Polish Jewish families to happen with bureaucratic precision and antiseptic decision-making. And then convinced themselves that they were innocent.' Many more could be quoted.
Fulbrook's research also contributed to changing the way in which the legacy of a German administrator was commemorated by his successors. Central to Fulbrook's research [d] was the complicated legacy of Udo Klausa (the former Nazi civilian administrator of Bedzin and the first post-war Director of the Rhineland Regional Council (LVR) in North-Rhine Westphalia 1954-1975). On 30 May 2012 Fulbrook delivered a public lecture at Düsseldorf University to an audience including current representatives of the Rhineland Regional Council. As a result of Fulbrook's research the Rhineland Regional Council withdrew from their website an adulatory biography of Klausa and amended their public exhibitions.
Research on the GDR also reached a wide public through panel events and media presentations, leaving an online legacy in podcasts and transcripts. These ranged from an event with the President of the Humboldt University Berlin, through small discussions with former dissidents and Christians in a church in East Berlin, to an interview with Geraldine Doogue on 'Saturday Extra', Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio National, 7 November 2009 (weekly audience 126,000). The significance of Fulbrook's work on 'perfectly normal lives' in the GDR for German self-understandings and public debates is reflected in both popular and scholarly reviews, including the prestigious daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (14 Jan 2009), the Göttingen Institute for Research on Democracy (18 May 2010) and the Institute for Civic Education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Panel Presentation: Learning to Remember, Learning to Forget 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 members of the general public attended the presentation by all six members of the project, which sparked questions and discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Participation in panel discussion, Foreign Affairs, Berlin, 31 January 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Participation in an expert panel debate on 'The Undead Past' hosted by Foreign Affairs, Berlin, with an audience including many journalists, thus reaching a far wider audience in due course. Also participation in a podcast.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Pears Institute Holocaust Memorial Day lecture 18 Feb. 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Pears Institute Holocaust Memorial Day lecture 18 Feb. 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Podcast on "Good Law, Bad Law" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Podcast on "Good Law, Bad Law"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.law-podcast.com 
 
Description Podium discussion at King's Place, 3 March 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Podium discussion at King's Place, 3 March 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.kingsplace.co.uk/whats-on/words/reckonings-who-cares-about-bringing-nazis-to-justice/
 
Description Press response to publication of A small town near Auschwitz by Mary Fulbrook 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In A Small Town near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust [d], Fulbrook explored the development of Nazi racist policies and genocide in Bedzin, a small town and county in Eastern Upper Silesia, just 25 miles north of Auschwitz. Some 85,000 Jews were deported through the linked ghettos of Bedzin-Sosnowiec; almost all the Jewish citizens of Bedzin, around half the total population of this town, were murdered as a result of Nazi oppression; yet it has virtually escaped the attention of historians. Moreover, the role of mid-level civilian functionaries in creating the preconditions for the Holocaust has only recently become the subject of historical research. Civilian administrators have also almost entirely escaped public conceptions of 'perpetrators', who are generally seen as those engaged in direct physical acts of violence rather than the behind-the-scenes administration of ghettoization and policies of stigmatisation, exploitation, expropriation and starvation. Fulbrook's research focused primarily on the role and later self-representations of the Landrat (chief executive or principal civilian administrator) of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, who went on to a successful postwar career in the West German civil service as the first Director of the Rhineland Regional Council. Based on a range of sources, including private letters from the Landrat's wife during the war, contemporary archival sources, the records of subsequent legal investigations, the Landrat's 1980 memoirs, and survivor testimonies and oral history interviews, the book explores the implications of 'systemic violence' and the role of German civilian administrators as 'Hitler's willing functionaries'. It also reflects on the character of later memories, in an effort to probe beyond the familiar focus on acts of physical violence and atrocities, and on the subjective role of the historian in confronting this history. In the few months between publication (September 2012 in the UK, December 2012 in the USA) and July 2013, A Small Town near Auschwitz, sold 5,145 copies worldwide (hardback and ebook). It received acclamatory reviews in the international literary press. The New York Review of Books called it a 'milestone in Holocaust historiography' (20 June 2013; circ. 135,000). The Times Literary Supplement (15 February 2013, circ. 100,000) suggested that 'few bring the professional and the personal into such compelling conjunction'. Jonathan Yardley, reviewing what he called 'this fine book' in the Washington Post (1 December 2012, digital and print daily readership 474,767), says that the account is 'absolutely necessary to an understanding' of the events and their wider significance. Even the Methodist Recorder (8 March 2013, 22,000) stated the book had relevance for understanding the human capacity for 'complicity in evil acts'.

In the few months between publication (September 2012 in the UK, December 2012 in the USA) and July 2013, A Small Town near Auschwitz, sold 5,145 copies worldwide (hardback and ebook). It received acclamatory reviews in the international literary press. The New York Review of Books called it a 'milestone in Holocaust historiography' (20 June 2013; circ. 135,000). The Times Literary Supplement (15 February 2013, circ. 100,000) suggested that 'few bring the professional and the personal into such compelling conjunction'. Jonathan Yardley, reviewing what he called 'this fine book' in the Washington Post (1 December 2012, digital and print daily readership 474,767), says that the account is 'absolutely necessary to an understanding' of the events and their wider significance. Even the Methodist Recorder (8 March 2013, 22,000) stated the book had relevance for understanding the human capacity for 'complicity in evil acts'.
The research has had an impact on public understanding of the contested German past. Pathways include public lectures, radio broadcasts, newspaper coverage, and the production of two documentary films as well as A Level source materials and school textbook chapters. The reach has included diverse audiences in Europe, the USA, Australasia and elsewhere. It has improved the knowledge and understanding of students and teachers in the UK, professionals involved in public history activities in Germany and interested members of the public. In the Rhineland, it has led to changes in how the legacies of former officials are commemorated. The research has been of particular personal significance to people variously grappling with the continuing legacies of Nazism and the Holocaust, and the East German dictatorship.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013
 
Description Public lecture at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences in Berlin, 27 June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences on behalf of the German Ministry of Labour on the occasion of the publication of a commissioned multi-author report on the Reich Ministry of Labour under Nazism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public lecture at the German Federal Archives, 21 September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture to members of the general public as well as archivists and other professionals at the German Federal Archives in Berlin.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public lecture by C. Wienand on the history of Action Reconciliation in Israel at Beit Ben Jehuda (Jerusalem) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lecture on the history of Action Reconciliation in Israel, given to volunteers of this organization in Beit Ben Yehuda, Jerusalem; followed by discussion with the volunteers and sponsors of the organization

After my talk, I was approached by the public relations officer of the organization in Berlin and invited to deliver a comment, and to be panelist on a discussion panel at the organization's annual meeting in Berlin in May 2013.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Public lecture for Holocaust Memorial Day, Trinity College Dublin, 20 Feb, 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture for Holocaust Memorial Day, Trinity College Dublin, 20 Feb, 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Public lecture for Holocaust Memorial Day, UCL, 30. Jan. 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture for Holocaust Memorial Day, UCL, 30. Jan. 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Public lecture in the former SS ceremonial site of Wewelsburg, Sep. 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture in the former SS ceremonial site of Wewelsburg, Germany, Sep. 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Radio City 97.7 (24 October 2012; 428,000) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact This programme focused on A small town near Auschwitz by Mary Fulbrook. In A Small Town near Auschwitz: Ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust, Fulbrook explored the development of Nazi racist policies and genocide in Bedzin, a small town and county in Eastern Upper Silesia, just 25 miles north of Auschwitz. Some 85,000 Jews were deported through the linked ghettos of Bedzin-Sosnowiec; almost all the Jewish citizens of Bedzin, around half the total population of this town, were murdered as a result of Nazi oppression; yet it has virtually escaped the attention of historians. Moreover, the role of mid-level civilian functionaries in creating the preconditions for the Holocaust has only recently become the subject of historical research. Civilian administrators have also almost entirely escaped public conceptions of 'perpetrators', who are generally seen as those engaged in direct physical acts of violence rather than the behind-the-scenes administration of ghettoization and policies of stigmatisation, exploitation, expropriation and starvation. Fulbrook's research focused primarily on the role and later self-representations of the Landrat (chief executive or principal civilian administrator) of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, who went on to a successful postwar career in the West German civil service as the first Director of the Rhineland Regional Council. Based on a range of sources, including private letters from the Landrat's wife during the war, contemporary archival sources, the records of subsequent legal investigations, the Landrat's 1980 memoirs, and survivor testimonies and oral history interviews, the book explores the implications of 'systemic violence' and the role of German civilian administrators as 'Hitler's willing functionaries'. It also reflects on the character of later memories, in an effort to probe beyond the familiar focus on acts of physical violence and atrocities, and on the subjective role of the historian in confronting this history.

It helped to promote research conducted by a member of the research team and communicated the results of Fulbrook's research on the Holocaust and its legacy to radio listeners. The radio station has 428,000 listeners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Radio lecture in German on Deutschlandfunk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A radio lecture to more than one million listeners which enhanced public understanding of the legacies of Nazism and generations in communist East Germany
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/generationen-diktatur-und-alltag-kein-ganz-normales-ddr.1184.de.html?...
 
Description Schools lectures, textbook writing public events 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Research on the GDR also reached a wide public through panel events and media presentations, leaving an online legacy in podcasts and transcripts. These ranged from an event with the President of the Humboldt University Berlin, through small discussions with former dissidents and Christians in a church in East Berlin, to an interview with Geraldine Doogue on 'Saturday Extra', Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio National, 7 November 2009 (weekly audience 126,000). The significance of Fulbrook's work on 'perfectly normal lives' in the GDR for German self-understandings and public debates is reflected in both popular and scholarly reviews, including the prestigious daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (14 Jan 2009), the Göttingen Institute for Research on Democracy (18 May 2010) and the Institute for Civic Education.

Fulbrook's research has influenced the teaching of modern German history in secondary schools, and been used to develop widely used educational resources. In 2007, she released a documentary film on the GDR, Behind the Wall: 'Perfectly Normal Lives' in the GDR, based on the AHRC-sponsored collaborative research project and using archival material, location footage, and oral history interviews. 1,000 copies of the film were distributed and it has been adopted for teaching and extracurricular purposes in universities and public education centres in the USA, Europe and the UK, such as QMUL; benefits for learning outcomes include the 'appeal to students to learn about individual experience via filmed interviews' [8]. Sections of the film were also adopted as teaching materials for the OCR A Level history syllabus.
Fulbrook was requested to write chapters 5 and 6 in Dictatorship and Democracy in Germany 1919-1963 (Heinemann: OCR History A Level, 2008), and collate research-based sources for the accompanying LiveText materials and CD Rom. These materials were based on Fulbrook's GDR research, and constituted a major section of the module 'Germany under Democracy and Dictatorship' in the OCR History A Level Board's revised syllabus. Since its adoption in 2008, over 6,500 copies have been sold and the newly revised materials have been positively reviewed by secondary educators for The Historical Association.


Between 2008 and 2013 Fulbrook delivered 15 lectures in Sovereign Education programmes around the UK to audiences averaging 200-300 A level students and teachers. Sovereign Education state that her presentations 'have always been a highlight for the students and their teachers' and 'are aware of the valuable contribution she has made to their A level understanding and performance'. Indeed, 'many go away inspired to continue their studies in history at university'. Their evaluation records cite an 'animated and enthusiastic speaker who engaged the students with a good range of useful, relevant material and ideas'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013
 
Description September 2013 workshop with Polish colleagues organized by J. Wagner and C. Wienand on behalf of the research group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Our workshop provided an opportunity to exchange ideas and our latest research with with Polish colleagues.

The workshop resulted in continuing collaboration, most importantly with Piotr Trojanski from the Auschwitz Museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Short Film on 'Comedy and Trauma' for the public facing 'In Search of Europe' series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The film was a short film of c. 15 minutes designed to make the research strand on comedy and trauma accessible to a wider audience. It was situated within UCL's European Institute series of films 'In Search of Europe', showcasing research on European topics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Stanley Burton Holocaust Memorial Lecture, Leicester, May 2019; 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Stanley Burton Holocaust Memorial Lecture, Leicester, May 2019;
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Talk delivered at the Cologne Citizens Centre (Buergerzentrum|) on 6 December 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A tak given to intersted citizens in Cologne about the Nazi past of a former prominent civil servant in North-Rhine Westphalia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk to Oxford History Society 5 Feb 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Talk to Oxford History Society 5 Feb 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UCL Film Day. Introduction to film viewing in Bloomsbury Theatre, followed by schools' workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Talk sparked question and discussion afterwards.

The organiser asked whether I would do this again and reported extremely positive feedback forms.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We set up a website to showcase our research and promote our events.

People have the opportunity to get in touch with us or get information about upcoming events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015
URL http://www.reverberations-of-war.net
 
Description Workshop 'SPEAKING SUBJECTS: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ORAL HISTORY IN THE EASTERN BLOC' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Keynote at workshop 'SPEAKING SUBJECTS: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ORAL HISTORY IN THE EASTERN BLOC'

This event raised awareness for challenges when working with personal testimonies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
URL http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/seelang/2010-October/037497.html
 
Description comment by C. Wienand on historical dimension of the current work of the non-profit organisation Action Reconciliation Services for Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The comment engaged the members of "Action Reconciliation Services for Peace" in a discussion about the historical traditions of their organisation.

Several people approached me individually afterwards and wanted to continue an exchange of thoughts. Among them was (a) the current president of Action Reconciliation, Dr. Elisabeth Raiser, and (b) Dr. Daniel Gaede, paedagogian working at the German memorial site of Buchenwald. With both I remained in contact via email, on the phone and at other events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description keynote speach at LSE 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

positive feedback reported.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/ASEN/Conference/PastConferences/2012/Conference%20Ke...