International Health Humanities Network

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: School of Health Sciences

Abstract

Health care practitioners around the world are searching for creative new ways of making sense of the human condition and ameliorating distress, often in the face of complex problems and financial austerity. The humanities have a key contribution to make to a variety of healthcare disciplines, but so far the field of medical humanities has been limited by a narrow focus on medicine and a preoccupation with literature, history and philosophy.

This project addresses a pressing need for a broader and strategically inclusive approach to applied humanities in health care. Our term Health Humanities is chosen to represent progress away from this largely medical focus, with a groundbreaking project to develop an International Health Humanities Network (IHHN) aiming to provide a platform for an evolution towards a more inclusive and impactful 'Health Humanities'. Based at the University of Nottingham, but in partnership with an expanding base of UK and international collaborators the IHHN will provide the first internationally accessible focal point for humanities and healthcare scholars to network, find shared objectives, develop resources, contribute to training, and undertake research with health and social care professionals who comprise the majority of the caring workforce, as well as informal carers, service users, self-carers, and charitable and voluntary sector.

The IHHN will spearhead the involvement of humanities disciplines in innovative health and social care practice, offering a pioneering response to the call for social relevance and impact. To begin such an exploration, four invited workshop sessions will be held that focus on the themes of health and well-being in terms of: media and film; ecology/ environment and literature; applied health linguistics; and music. These workshops will act as a starting point in expanding the way the humanities can inform and transform healthcare. The IHHN will encourage collaborative research, further funding applications, and provide a generative field for dissemination and exchange of ideas.

Planned Impact

The health care environment is rapidly changing at both a national and global level and practitioners are seeking new ideas to help them cope with novel challenges presented by policymakers, organizational and economic changes and shifting expectations from clients and the wider public. The health humanities represent a wealth of experience, ideas and techniques for understanding illness experience, increasing empathic reach (valuable especially in transcultural care) and offering new methods for effecting desirable and cost-effective clinical, and self-help changes. Moreover, the presence of an International Health Humanities Network (IHHN)and website will be especially welcome as the division of health care into separate enclaves of different professionals, statutory, private and voluntary providers overlaid by rapid organizational change mean that electronic forums for sharing ideas, experiences and good practice, and facilitating interdisciplinary collaborative work are more vital than ever before.

For those who plan and manage health care, or develop policy, the IHHN and website will provide a source of new ideas and inspiration as well as a valuable indicator of the activities already devised and being practiced.

At present, practitioners in health and social care may be isolated from the movement to engage with the humanities. People in geographically remote areas, those in independent or private practice, practitioners in fields not presently incorporated within the statutory sector, and those within commercial provider organizations may at present have fewer opportunities to involve themselves in the health humanities movement. Therefore the IHHN and website is conceived to invite knowledge dissemination and impact, as well as sharing and participation.

The development and enhancement of the health humanities has a good deal to contribute to the delivery of health care at all levels, increasing the effectiveness of public services and policy. The proposed innovation will play a key role in making the UK's research in this field more globally significant and competitive. Researchers are increasingly keen to be able to show the value and impact of their work in an international context. Practitioners need to show they are aware of current developments in their respective fields. Consumers of health, social care and other therapeutic services are increasingly looking online to enable them to make informed choices about the interventions on offer. The proposed project makes all these outcomes more feasible, at the same time enabling a culturally richer, more empathic and interpersonally sensitive approach in health care.
 
Title Art in the Asylum: Creativity and the evolution of psychiatry 
Description Go to: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/home/events/art-in-the-asylum-creativity-and-the-evolution-of-psychiatry.aspx 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact A major public exhibition on art and mental illness and art as a mode of recovery at Djangoly Gallery, Nottingham 
URL http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/home/events/art-in-the-asylum-creativity-and-the-evolution-of-psychiatry...
 
Description Working with a range of partners, including the Institute of Mental Health and the US National Institutes of Health, the International Health Humanities Network (IHHN) promotes research and collaboration in the emergent field health humanities and encourages the translation of knowledge into healthcare practice. It provides a platform for interested parties to engage in online debate and to forge collaborations between humanities scholars, healthcare practitioners and the public.

Key Activities
The IHHN and its website at www.healthhumanities.org was launched 13th April 2012 and has quickly developed a thriving global community across all continents of over 470 members and distribution list of over 2000 people forming a thriving global community of researchers, academics, services users, clinicians, carers and other professionals all continents. The website remains unique in pioneering health humanities, attracting significant web traffic worldwide, particularly from the US and UK. The IHHN is supported by a top class International Advisory Board of leading scholars and has incorporated impact narratives from a variety of congruent projects, a new blog, key links, presentations and/or podcasts from four AHRC-funded invited UK-based seminars were held at the Institute of Mental Health and the Centre for Advanced Studies, The University of Nottingham, with talks by important scholars examining health-related aspects to ecology, music, language and film media and health. Each of these one-day seminars on average attracted 20 scholars from the subject fields, other humanities and social science disciplines, senior health service managers, clinicians and service users. Where permission was granted, podcasts, Powerpoints or audio files from the seminar days were made available at www.healthhumanities.org. The seminars/ workshops were as follows:
1. Music and Health
Venue: Institute of Mental Health, Jubilee Campus, The University of Nottingham.
Date: 9th March 2012
• Plenary 1: Professor Leslie Bunt (UWE), "Music as an agent for transformation: its place in contemporary health and social care"
• Keynote: Professor Brian Abrams (Montclair State University, US), "Musica Humana: When Music Breaks the Sound Barrier in Music Therapy"
• Plenary 2: Professor Aaron Williamon (Royal College of Music, UK), "Rhythm for Life: Music and wellbeing in older adulthood"

2: Ecology, Health and Literature.
Date: 30th March 2012
• Plenary 1: Professor Terry Gifford (Bath Spa University), "Ecopoetry, Healing and Public Health: The case of Ted Hughes"
• Keynote: Keynote: Professor Catrinona Sandilands,
• Plenary 2: Dr Adeline Putra-Jones (University of Exeter), "Borrowing the World from our Children: Gender, Posterity and Well-being in the Climate Change Novel"


3. Impact of Applied Linguistics in Healthcare
Venue: Institute of Mental Health, Jubilee Campus, The University of Nottingham

Date: 26th January 2013
• Professor Brian Brown (De Montfort University), "Re-imaging health through language"
• Professor Srikant Sarangi (Cardiff University), "Janus-Faced Translational Research in Health Communication: Some Reflections"
• Professor Peter J. Schulz (Lugano University, Switzerland), "Between the humanities and health sciences: Health literacy and patients' empowerment"

4 Media and Film in Healthcare
Venue: Centre for Advanced Studies, The University of Nottingham
Date: 28th June 2013
• Professor Danny Wedding (Alliant International University, US),
• Professor Jenny Kitzinger (King's College London, UK),
• Dr Ahmed Hankir (University of Manchester)

International Health Humanities Conference
The original project included the delivery of the 2nd International Health Humanities Conference: Music, Health, and Humanity was held at Montclair State University, New Jersey, on 9-11 August 2012 with major US keynote speakers (Kate Pierson of the B52s, Joel Thome) alongside other prominent UK and US academic speakers. The conference was attended by academics, service users and carers, from all over the USA, Europe (inc. Scandinavia and France), UK, South Africa, Australia and Iran. To date, this conference series has continued with the 7th IHH Conference being hosted by Southampton University in August 2018.

Thematic Advances
This project has delivered the leading network and international conference in the fast-growing field of health humanities, bringing together an unusually rich and diverse body of scholars, clinicians and mental health service users to examine and test the boundaries of how humanities disciplines might be applied in society.
In terms of the conferences, what has been particularly striking is the broad and inclusive range of academic and non-academic speakers and attendees, marking a radical and ground-breaking evolution from the traditional field of medical humanities.
In summary, what has been developed since the initial grant award is the 'engine house' for connectivity worldwide for the new field of Health Humanities.
Exploitation Route The project has brought together non-academic members and contributors including senior health service managers, clinicians, service users and informal carers.
With increasing calls on arts and humanities disciplines to narrate how they contribute to society, this project stands out as a model for doing just that. Indeed, the project was one of only two chosen by AHRC for its POST/RCUK event, 'The Science of Health and Wellbeing', at the House of Commons on 4 June, 2013. IHHN also features in the AHRC publication: Health and wellbeing: The Contribution of the arts and humanities (AHRC, 2013).
The 2nd International Health Humanities Conference funded directly by the award has continued in a series with the 7th IHH Conference being hosted by Southampton University in August 2018. This conference series has yielded diverse programmes with medical concerns being only a part of rather than the whole focus in terms of content and delivery. Nursing and other allied health and social care professionals joined with mental health service users, carers, social scientists and a core body of scholars in humanities disciplines.
The overall project has cultivated exciting connections between people and ideas from different fields of scholarship in the humanities and social sciences alongside key managers and clinicians working in health and social care as well as people who have experienced or continue to experience health challenges as service-users or carers. It has increased public access to non-positivist, interpretative and cultural consideration of health conditions and services through the lens of various arts and humanities. It has provided a legacy for engagement and social practices relevant to the field through a continuation of website-based networking and future conferences. It has demonstrated how quite different academic disciplines, healthcare organisations and the wider public can work together as stakeholders and beneficiaries of applied arts and humanities. Finally, the project has consolidated connections between a now global network in health humanities - something that AHRC strategy emphasises.
Importantly, the IHH Network continues to bring together those committed to applying the arts and humanities for healthcare, health and wellbeing and underpins the sustained development of the field of health humanities. It is the leading research network for health humanities worldwide.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Environment,Healthcare

URL http://www.healthhumanities.org
 
Description The IHHN was the first international initiative in the development of the new field of health humanities, pioneered by Professor Crawford in 2007, and which led to the way in spurring a field mission for health humanities. Professor Crawford is the world's first Professor of Health Humanities and has been described as a 'founding father and leader' of this field and to date his work and that of the many local, national and international teams he has inspired have led to the development of over 35 research units or initiatives focused on health humanities in the UK and worldwide which have multiple arts and humanities educational and practice initiatives that benefit healthcare, health and wellbeing alongside postgraduate research. Following this leadership in field mission, we can now see multiple Masters programmes worldwide in the health humanities. The following research units and educational initiatives have emerged in the wake of the creation of the field of health humanities and this important AHRC-funded milestone in delivery of its mission: UK Nottingham University Health Humanities Research Priority Area http://www.healthhumanities.org/nottingham_health_humanities/view/home UCL, Centre for Health Humanities (including MA in Health Humanities) https://www.ucl.ac.uk/health-humanities/courses/ma-health-humanities King's College London, with its CHCI Health Humanities Summer Institute http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2015-2016/CHH/CHCI2016.aspx University of Southampton, The Good Mental Health Cooperative, Health Humanities Supper Club http://goodmentalhealth.org.uk/events/health-humanities-supper-club/ University of the Highlands and Islands, Rural Health Humanities Network https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/research-enterprise/health/rhw/rhhh Glasgow University, Scottish Health Humanities Seminar and Masterclass Series http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/critical/research/fundedresearchprojects/shhsms/ University of Edinburgh, Health Humanities and the Arts program http://www.ed.ac.uk/health Swansea University, Health Humanities Centre http://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanandhealthsciences/research/centres-and-groups/health-humanities/ Ireland Trinity College Dublin, Medical and Health Humanities initiative https://www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub/medical-humanities/ USA University of Texas, Houston, Health Humanities Consortium (US) https://healthhumanitiesconsortium.com/2017-houston/ University of Colorado, Denver, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Minor in Health Humanities http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/CLAS/BachelorsPrograms/ProgramsDegrees/MinorPrograms/Health-Humanities/Pages/default.aspx Duke University, Health Humanities Initiative, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute http://www.fhi.duke.edu/programs/health-humanities.html http://www.fhi.duke.edu/blog/introducing-health-humanities.html University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Health Humanities Program http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/departments___programs/departments/meded/educational_programs/health_humanities/ University of Iowa, Obermann Center for Advanced Studies https://obermann.uiowa.edu/programs/working-symposia/health-humanities-building-future-research-and-teaching Misericordia University, Dallas, BA in Medical and Health Humanities http://www.misericordia.edu/page.cfm?p=1798 Hiram College Ohio, BA in Health Humanities http://www.hiram.edu/centers-of-distinction/litmed/baccalaureate-health-humanities Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Health Humanities Conference: "Arts and the Health Humanities: Intersections, Inquiry, Innovations" 2016 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Health Humanities program http://www.katherineburke.net/health-humanities Case Western Reserve University, Northeast Ohio Medical and Health Humanities and Social Medicine consortium http://thedaily.case.edu/northeast-ohio-medical-health-humanities-social-medicine-consortium/ Stanford University, Health Humanities network https://med.stanford.edu/medicineandthemuse/events/Otherinstitutionsevents.html Indiana University South East, Health Humanities program https://www.ius.edu/mis/concentrations/health-humanities.php HASTAC Health Humanities initiative, US https://www.hastac.org/groups/health-humanities Columbia University, Health Humanities Consortium http://icls.columbia.edu/news/call-for-papers-health-humanities-consortium/ The College of St Scholastica, Duluth MN, BA in Health Humanities http://www.css.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-traditional/academics/arts-and-letters/ba-health-humanities.html The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Health Humanities Journal http://hhj.web.unc.edu/ Montclair State University, New Jersey, hosts of IHH Conference and Health Humanities Research Group https://blogs.montclair.edu/creativeresearch/2012/09/08/montclair-state-university-hosts-the-second-international-health-humanities-conference-music-health-and-humanity-by-brian-abrams-conference-chair/ Drew University https://sites.google.com/drew.edu/medhumconference/ Harvard University, Department of Psychiatry, Health Humanities Research Team http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/14 Canada McGill University, Health Humanities events http://mcgillmed.com/newsletter/submissions/health-humanities-arts-events-greater-montreal-call-submissions University of Toronto, The Health Humanities Learning Lab http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/labs/scope/about/ University of Alberta, Canada, Health Humanities Initiative https://www.ualberta.ca/medicine/programs/ahhm/humanities http://insight2.healthhumanities.ca/ Australia The University of Sydney, Charles Perkins Centre, Health Humanities Research Node http://sydney.edu.au/perkins/research/current-research/health-humanities.shtml http://www.owerder.net/index.php/about-me/my-research/health-humanities-at-cpc The University of Melbourne, Health Humanities and Social Sciences Unit http://mspgh.unimelb.edu.au/research-groups/centre-for-health-equity/health-humanities-and-social-sciences Italy Center for Digital Health Humanities, Italy http://www.centerfordigitalhealthhumanities.com/it/ Spain Seville University, hosts for IHH Conference and Health Humanities Research Group http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/ http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/16 Norway Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Alesund College, Health Humanities Research in discourse studies within the http://www.ntnu.edu/iha/clinical-careClinical care: Advanced nursing practice, innovation and ethics programme. http://www.ntnu.no/ansatte/pacr China Fudan University, China, Department of Public Health, Health Humanities Research Team http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/15 Other information: Crawford's unique place in driving health humanities via his early paper with colleagues in 2010 and his International Health Humanities Network has been noted in key subsequent publications such as Jones et al, 2014a; Jones, 2014b; Garden, 2015; Jones et al 2017 (attached in full or excerpts): Garden, R. (2015) Who speaks for whom? Health humanities and the ethics of representation. Medical Humanities 41: 77-80. Jones, T., Wear, D. & Friedman, L.D. (2014a) Health Humanities Reader (Rutgers UP: New Brunswick), see p. 6. Jones, T. (2014b) 'Oh, the humanit(ies)!', in Bates, V., Bleakley, A. & Goodman, S. (eds) Medicine, Health and the Arts (Routledge: London), pp-27-38, at page 34. Jones, T., Blackie, M., Garden, R. & Wear, D. (2017) 'The Almost Right Word: The Move From Medical to Health Humanities', Perspective. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001518 Notice in Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_humanities Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Health-Humanities-213927768677527/ An early reference to our first conference https://www.nursingtimes.net/health-humanities-feared-by-the-bad-loved-by-the-good/5018154.article Guardian Health article on health humanities https://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/mar/30/health-humanities-here-to-collaborate-not-compete Reference to health humanities on Penn State University LIbraries http://guides.libraries.psu.edu/medicalhealthhumanities Recent paper citing the growth of health humanities https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945967 Another important statement from Association of American Medical Colleges on the growth of health humanities courses although it does not demarcate the shift from health and medical humanities related courses to the field and construct 'health humanities'. https://news.aamc.org/medical-education/article/more-premed-opting-health-humanities-programs/ A review from New York University School of Medicine for our book Health Humanities (2015) which emerged from the earlier and first position paper citing the field in 2010. http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/view/16593 Working with a range of partners, including the Institute of Mental Health and the US National Institutes of Health, the International Health Humanities Network (IHHN) promotes research and collaboration in the emergent field health humanities and encourages the translation of knowledge into healthcare practice. It provides a platform for interested parties to engage in online debate and to forge collaborations between humanities scholars, healthcare practitioners and the public. The IHHN and its website at www.healthhumanities.org was launched 13th April 2012 and has quickly developed a community of over 470 members and distribution list of over 2000 people forming a thriving global community of researchers, academics, services users, clinicians, carers and other professionals all continents. The website has quickly become a leading resource, attracting significant web traffic worldwide, particularly from the US and UK. Within its first year alone it attracted 2,199 unique visitors, 12,699 page views, with 76% of these being longer than 60 seconds. The IHHN is supported by a top class International Advisory Board of leading scholars and has incorporated impact narratives from a variety of congruent projects, a new blog, key links, presentations and/or podcasts from four AHRC-funded health humanities workshops on the themes of music, ecology, language and media/film (see below) and hosts since 2014 the informations for the new AHRC/RCUK Connected Communities large £1.5m research programme 'Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery for Mental Health and Well-Being', led by Professor Crawford at the University of Nottingham. National Seminar Series The series of four invited UK-based seminars were held at the Institute of Mental Health and the Centre for Advanced Studies, The University of Nottingham, with talks by important scholars examining health-related aspects to ecology, music, language and film media and health. Each of these one-day seminars on average attracted 20 scholars from the subject fields, other humanities and social science disciplines, senior health service managers, clinicians and service users. Where permission was granted, podcasts, Powerpoints or audio files from the seminar days were made available at www.healthhumanities.org. The seminars/ workshops were as follows: 1. Music and Health Venue: Institute of Mental Health, Jubilee Campus, The University of Nottingham Date: 9th March 2012 • Plenary 1: Professor Leslie Bunt (UWE), "Music as an agent for transformation: its place in contemporary health and social care" • Keynote: Professor Brian Abrams (Montclair State University, US), "Musica Humana: When Music Breaks the Sound Barrier in Music Therapy" • Plenary 2: Professor Aaron Williamon (Royal College of Music, UK), "Rhythm for Life: Music and wellbeing in older adulthood" 2: Ecology, Health and Literature Date: 30th March 2012 • Plenary 1: Professor Terry Gifford (Bath Spa University), "Ecopoetry, Healing and Public Health: The case of Ted Hughes" • Keynote: Keynote: Professor Catrinona Sandilands, • Plenary 2: Dr Adeline Putra-Jones (University of Exeter), "Borrowing the World from our Children: Gender, Posterity and Well-being in the Climate Change Novel" 3. Impact of Applied Linguistics in Healthcare Venue: Institute of Mental Health, Jubilee Campus, The University of Nottingham Date: 26th January 2013 • Professor Brian Brown (De Montfort University), "Re-imaging health through language" • Professor Srikant Sarangi (Cardiff University), "Janus-Faced Translational Research in Health Communication: Some Reflections" • Professor Peter J. Schulz (Lugano University, Switzerland), "Between the humanities and health sciences: Health literacy and patients' empowerment" 4 Media and Film in Healthcare Venue: Centre for Advanced Studies, The University of Nottingham Date: 28th June 2013 • Professor Danny Wedding (Alliant International University, US), • Professor Jenny Kitzinger (King's College London, UK), • Dr Ahmed Hankir (University of Manchester) The 2nd International Health Humanities Conference: Music, Health, and Humanity was held at Montclair State University, New Jersey, on 9-11 August 2012 with major US keynote speakers (Kate Pierson of the B52s, Joel Thome) alongside other prominent UK and US academic speakers. The conference was attended by academics, service users and carers, from all over the USA, Europe (inc. Scandinavia and France), UK, South Africa, Australia and Iran. The conference generated a book of abstracts During the conference the International Committee met and discussed running the 4th conference at Denver Colorado in 2015 and achieved early negotiations on a merger between IHHN and American Humanities Consortium so as to move the conference cycle to annual events. The theme for the next conference at Denver in 2015, hosted by the University of Colorado is entitled: 'Pop (Bio) Cultures: Politics, Practices and Privilege' and will be hosted by Professor Tess Jones, Editor of Journal of Medical Humanities. Plans for hosting the 2016 are well-advanced and this will ensure a strong legacy for this exciting and groundbreaking scholarly network and collaboration. Moving to an annual conference format, The 3rd IHH Conference on 'TraumaTextualities' took place on 5-7 September 2014 at The University of Nottingham with keynotes from Professors Peter Meineck (New York) and Lars Wieseth (Oslo). The conference explored trauma and texts in the context of health humanities and with a foregrounded topic of warfare. The conference included a mask performance relevant to catharsis and a visual exhibition on World War 1 trauma. The coordinators have been commissioned to provide a special issue on this them for the US-based and prestigious Journal of Medical Humanities. The 4th IHH Conference on ''Health Humanities: The Next Decade (Pedagogies, Practices, Politics)' tool place on 1-2 May, 2015 at the Center for Bioethics and Humanities, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado USA , with keynotes from Professor Sander Gilman (Emory University), Professor Brian Brown (De Montfort U, UK), Professor Alan Bleakley (Falmouth U., UK), and Kirsten Ostherr (Rice University). The 5th IHH Conference took place on 15-17 September 2016 on 'Health Humanities: Creative Practices as Care ' at The University of Seville, Spain, with keynotes from Professor Steven C. Schlozman (Harvard U), Professor Aaron Williamon (Royal College of Music), The 6th IHH Conference on 'Diversity, Cultures, and Health Humanities' took place on 9-11 March, 2017 at McGovern Centre for Ehics & Humanities, Uinversity of Texas, Houston, Texas. The 7th IHH Conference was hosted at Southampton University UK in August 2018. The 8th IHH Conference will be held at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, from March 28-30. The IHHN field mission pioneered by Professor Crawford and his team has inspired the development of to date at least 35 new research units or initiatives focused on health humanities in the UK and worldwide. Thematic Advances This project has delivered 7 international health humanities conferences, ensuring legacy value and continued development of this new and fast-growing academic field, bringing together for the first time an unusually rich and diverse body of scholars, clinicians and mental health service users to examine and test the boundaries of how humanities disciplines might be applied in society. In terms of the conferences, what has been particularly striking is the broad and inclusive range of academic and non-academic speakers and attendees, marking a radical and groundbreaking evolution from the traditional medical humanities conference. The conference programmes have been clearly diverse with medical concerns being only a part of rather than the whole focus in terms of content and delivery. Nursing and other allied health and social care professionals joined with mental health service users, carers, social scientists and a core body of scholars in humanities disciplines. The theme of Health Humanities has become far more visible through www.healthhumanities.org and its sister website: www.madnessandliterature.org. Its membership reveals a global community of scholarship, information and ideas sharing in this area. The website has provided a fresh and informative resource, not least in its impact narratives to assist scholars in their work in this field, and in providing an opportunity for public access to information about particular applications of arts and humanities in terms of health benefits. Additionally, the podcasts or other materials of our eminent speakers have allowed people who were unable to attend the seminars to see the breadth of exploration undertaken. A links section enables individuals to access other resources on Health Humanities based material, and is proving to be an excellent route to collaborative project working. Indeed, the number of partners to the site is impressive and the International Board cohere rich expertise and have proved invaluable tin developing the resource. The various discussions in the national seminars and at the sustained conferences revealed new and innovative ways of considering health humanities, in particular the value of music, ecology, language and film media. As the AHRC revisits its impact agenda, with increasing calls on humanities disciplines to narrate how they contribute to society, this project stands out as a model for doing just that. Indeed, the project was one of only two chosen by AHRC for its POST/RCUK event, 'The Science of Health and Wellbeing', at the House of Commons on 4 June, 2013. IHHN also features in the AHRC publication: Health and wellbeing: The Contribution of the arts and humanities (AHRC, 2013). The overall project has cultivated an exciting inter-animation of people and ideas from different fields of scholarship in the humanities and social sciences alongside key managers and clinicians working in health and social care as well as people who have experienced or continue to experience health challenges as service-users or carers. It has increased public access to non-positivist, interpretative and cultural consideration of health conditions and services through the lens of various arts and humanities. It has provided a legacy for engagement and social practices relevant to the field through a continuation of website-based networking and future conferences. It has demonstrated how quite different academic disciplines, healthcare organisations and the wider public can work together as stakeholders and beneficiaries of applied arts and humanities. Finally, the project has consolidated connections between international researchers - and indeed to a global network in health humanities - something that AHRC strategy emphasises. Future Initiatives and Collaboration Following the success of the International Health Humanities Network, Professor Crawford led a large team to a successful application to the large grant programme of Connected Communities, achieving a £1.5m five year grant to investigate Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery. Professor Crawford was also invited to create and direct two new bodies at The University of Nottingham: 1. Nottingham Health Humanities (funded by the Centre for Advanced Studies), launched June 28th 2013 and already with a membership of over 75 scholars from diverse disciplines and faculties; 2. Centre for Social Futures at the Institute of Mental Health, to spearhead social and cultural research in mental health. This centre, established in December 2013 has already generated 10 Integrated Research Groups, with a team of over 50 researchers. Nottingham Health Humanities can be found at: http://www.healthhumanities.org/nottingham_health_humanities/view/home. The Centre for Social Futures can be found at: http://www.institutemh.org.uk/x-about-us-x/our-centres/centre-for-social-futures. During the project period, Charley Baker was appointed as Associate Editor of Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. Professor Crawford has been invited to advise on the formation of various health humanities centres and programmes emerging globally. With the support of the Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) at the University of Nottingham, Crawford extended the network of health humanities scholarship with appointment of two Visiting International Fellows: Professor Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu (Stanford University) and Professor Gail Horstein (Holyoke College, US), presenting multiple talks in the university and in local NHS Trusts, and, in addition, offering research advice/ surgeries to a range of scholars. Professor Crawford, Professor Brian Brown, Charley Baker, Dr Victoria Tischler and Brian Abrams have written the first manifesto book for Health Humanities worldwide to be published by Palgrave London in January 2015. Professor Crawford, Brian Brown and Andrea Charise have been commissioned to write the Companion for Health Humanities (forthcoming 2019). During the period of the award, Professor Crawford became Director of both the Centre for Social Futures, Institute of Mental Health and Nottingham Health Humanities. He won Internal Assignment of the Year 2013 for Health Humanities in recognition of 'outstanding temporary assignment' with Unitemps. He was appointed to the Advisory Board for Social Welfare, British Library, The Cultural Value Project, Assessment Panel (AHRC), Science in Culture Advisory Committee and Assessment Panel (AHRC). He was appointed as Adjunct Professor, NTNU, Norway, to the International Advisory Board of Medical School, Arts and Humanities, University of Colorado, Denver, and as International Supervisor to Citizenship: psychosocial processes, culture and diversity, University of Seville, Department of Psychology. He was also nominated for the Eileen Skellern Lecture for his work in advancing health humanities in mental health. Professor Crawford has continued his leadership in driving the field of health humanities by instituting the first national medal in health humanities, co-sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wellcome (launches in 2018). See: http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/newsevents/news/ahrc-launches-health-humanities-medal/
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Education,Healthcare
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Development of health humanities research units worldwide
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The IHHN was the first international initiative in the development of the new field of health humanities, pioneered by Professor Crawford in 2008, and which led to the way in spurring a field mission for health humanities. Professor Crawford is the world's first Professor of Health Humanities and has been described as a 'founding father and leader' of this field and to date his work and that of the many local, national and international teams he has inspired have led to the development of over 35 research units or initiatives focused on health humanities in the UK and worldwide which have multiple arts and humanities educational and practice initiatives that benefit healthcare, health and wellbeing alongside postgraduate research. Following this leadership in field mission, we can now see multiple Masters programmes worldwide in the health humanities. The following research units and educational initiatives have emerged in the wake of the creation of the field of health humanities and this important AHRC-funded milestone in delivery of its mission: UK Nottingham University Health Humanities Research Priority Area http://www.healthhumanities.org/nottingham_health_humanities/view/home UCL, Centre for Health Humanities (including MA in Health Humanities) https://www.ucl.ac.uk/health-humanities/courses/ma-health-humanities King's College London, with its CHCI Health Humanities Summer Institute http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/eventrecords/2015-2016/CHH/CHCI2016.aspx University of Southampton, The Good Mental Health Cooperative, Health Humanities Supper Club http://goodmentalhealth.org.uk/events/health-humanities-supper-club/ University of the Highlands and Islands, Rural Health Humanities Network https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/research-enterprise/health/rhw/rhhh Glasgow University, Scottish Health Humanities Seminar and Masterclass Series http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/critical/research/fundedresearchprojects/shhsms/ University of Edinburgh, Health Humanities and the Arts program http://www.ed.ac.uk/health Swansea University, Health Humanities Centre http://www.swansea.ac.uk/humanandhealthsciences/research/centres-and-groups/health-humanities/ Ireland Trinity College Dublin, Medical and Health Humanities initiative https://www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub/medical-humanities/ USA University of Texas, Houston, Health Humanities Consortium (US) https://healthhumanitiesconsortium.com/2017-houston/ University of Colorado, Denver, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Minor in Health Humanities http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/CLAS/BachelorsPrograms/ProgramsDegrees/MinorPrograms/Health-Humanities/Pages/default.aspx Duke University, Health Humanities Initiative, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute http://www.fhi.duke.edu/programs/health-humanities.html http://www.fhi.duke.edu/blog/introducing-health-humanities.html University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Health Humanities Program http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/departments___programs/departments/meded/educational_programs/health_humanities/ University of Iowa, Obermann Center for Advanced Studies https://obermann.uiowa.edu/programs/working-symposia/health-humanities-building-future-research-and-teaching Misericordia University, Dallas, BA in Medical and Health Humanities http://www.misericordia.edu/page.cfm?p=1798 Hiram College Ohio, BA in Health Humanities http://www.hiram.edu/centers-of-distinction/litmed/baccalaureate-health-humanities Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Health Humanities Conference: "Arts and the Health Humanities: Intersections, Inquiry, Innovations" 2016 Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Health Humanities program http://www.katherineburke.net/health-humanities Case Western Reserve University, Northeast Ohio Medical and Health Humanities and Social Medicine consortium http://thedaily.case.edu/northeast-ohio-medical-health-humanities-social-medicine-consortium/ Stanford University, Health Humanities network https://med.stanford.edu/medicineandthemuse/events/Otherinstitutionsevents.html Indiana University South East, Health Humanities program https://www.ius.edu/mis/concentrations/health-humanities.php HASTAC Health Humanities initiative, US https://www.hastac.org/groups/health-humanities Columbia University, Health Humanities Consortium http://icls.columbia.edu/news/call-for-papers-health-humanities-consortium/ The College of St Scholastica, Duluth MN, BA in Health Humanities http://www.css.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-traditional/academics/arts-and-letters/ba-health-humanities.html The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Health Humanities Journal http://hhj.web.unc.edu/ Montclair State University, New Jersey, hosts of IHH Conference and Health Humanities Research Group https://blogs.montclair.edu/creativeresearch/2012/09/08/montclair-state-university-hosts-the-second-international-health-humanities-conference-music-health-and-humanity-by-brian-abrams-conference-chair/ Drew University https://sites.google.com/drew.edu/medhumconference/ Harvard University, Department of Psychiatry, Health Humanities Research Team http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/14 Canada McGill University, Health Humanities events http://mcgillmed.com/newsletter/submissions/health-humanities-arts-events-greater-montreal-call-submissions University of Toronto, The Health Humanities Learning Lab http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/labs/scope/about/ University of Alberta, Canada, Health Humanities Initiative https://www.ualberta.ca/medicine/programs/ahhm/humanities http://insight2.healthhumanities.ca/ Australia The University of Sydney, Charles Perkins Centre, Health Humanities Research Node http://sydney.edu.au/perkins/research/current-research/health-humanities.shtml http://www.owerder.net/index.php/about-me/my-research/health-humanities-at-cpc The University of Melbourne, Health Humanities and Social Sciences Unit http://mspgh.unimelb.edu.au/research-groups/centre-for-health-equity/health-humanities-and-social-sciences Italy Center for Digital Health Humanities, Italy http://www.centerfordigitalhealthhumanities.com/it/ Spain Seville University, hosts for IHH Conference and Health Humanities Research Group http://www.ihhcsevilla2016.es/ http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/16 Norway Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Alesund College, Health Humanities Research in discourse studies within the http://www.ntnu.edu/iha/clinical-careClinical care: Advanced nursing practice, innovation and ethics programme. http://www.ntnu.no/ansatte/pacr China Fudan University, China, Department of Public Health, Health Humanities Research Team http://www.healthhumanities.org/index.php/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/projects/project/15 Other information: Crawford's unique place in driving health humanities via his early paper with colleagues in 2010 and his International Health Humanities Network has been noted in key subsequent publications such as Jones et al, 2014a; Jones, 2014b; Garden, 2015; Jones et al 2017 (attached in full or excerpts): Garden, R. (2015) Who speaks for whom? Health humanities and the ethics of representation. Medical Humanities 41: 77-80. Jones, T., Wear, D. & Friedman, L.D. (2014a) Health Humanities Reader (Rutgers UP: New Brunswick), see p. 6. Jones, T. (2014b) 'Oh, the humanit(ies)!', in Bates, V., Bleakley, A. & Goodman, S. (eds) Medicine, Health and the Arts (Routledge: London), pp-27-38, at page 34. Jones, T., Blackie, M., Garden, R. & Wear, D. (2017) 'The Almost Right Word: The Move From Medical to Health Humanities', Perspective. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001518 Notice in Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_humanities Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Health-Humanities-213927768677527/ An early reference to our first conference https://www.nursingtimes.net/health-humanities-feared-by-the-bad-loved-by-the-good/5018154.article Guardian Health article on health humanities https://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/mar/30/health-humanities-here-to-collaborate-not-compete Reference to health humanities on Penn State University LIbraries http://guides.libraries.psu.edu/medicalhealthhumanities Recent paper citing the growth of health humanities https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945967 Another important statement from Association of American Medical Colleges on the growth of health humanities courses although it does not demarcate the shift from health and medical humanities related courses to the field and construct 'health humanities'. https://news.aamc.org/medical-education/article/more-premed-opting-health-humanities-programs/ A review from New York University School of Medicine for our book Health Humanities (2015) which emerged from the earlier and first position paper citing the field in 2010. http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/view/16593
 
Description Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery: Connecting Communities for Mental Health and Well-Being
Amount £1,500,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/K003364/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2013 
End 04/2018
 
Description Mutual Recovery for Mental Health and Wellbeing through Creative Practice
Amount £14,676 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/J011630/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2012 
End 05/2013
 
Description Research Networking
Amount £36,293 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/N006429/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2016 
End 10/2017
 
Description Research Networking
Amount £37,804 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2018
 
Description Seed Awards
Amount £28,822 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description September 2010, November 2011, April 2012, May 2013, July 2013 ? The Reading Agency Mood Boosting Books promotion (with BBC Headroom in 2010) 
Organisation Reading Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Consultancy work involving reviewing a list of fiction for the promotion and endorsing the list to ensure no triggering or potentially harmful material was on it. The promotion, consisting of a reading list of mood boosting material that will be distributed throughout libraries in England, forms part of the overall work on Bibliotherapy that I am involved in. The third cycle of work, in April 2012, involved reviewing lists designed for Young People and Older Adults. The second cycle of the work, in November 2011, attracted the attention of The Guardian newspaper: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2012/jan/10/mood-boosting-reading
Start Year 2010
 
Description International Health Humanities Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Account of network in AHRC (2013) Health and wellbeing: The contribution of the arts and humanities. AHRC: Swindon.

This network is the leading international network for health humanities worldwide
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org
 
Description Invited speaker, School of Health Sciences, University of Southampton. Paper: 'Health Humanities and Compassionate Design of Care'. 16 July. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lively discussion among a mixed audience of health and social care practitioners and managers and also the public on how the arts and humanities can advance more compassionate environments in hospitals and clinical sites, not least shared or community-crossing engagement in creative practices.

The event led to local plans led by Sandy Walker in the School of Health Sciences to create a new health humanities research group at Southampton University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Radio Broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio Interview: Mark Dennison Breakfast Show, BBC Radio Nottingham, 9.50am, 21 May 2013. On mental health, creative practice and mutual recovery, health humanities.

Public awareness and understanding of issues related to mental health, the role of arts and humanities in enhancing health and well-being
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Radio broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Radio interview of add-on project related to health humanities. Alan Clifford, BBC Radio Nottingham (Guest Frances Finn), 1720, 4 December 2013

Public information giving on health humanities and creative practice as mutual recovery
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Transforming healthcare with the humanities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview posted by Emma Thorne.

Increased information requests about health humanities and Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery Programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/researchexchange/2013/07/09/transforming-healthcare-with-the-humanitie...
 
Description Webpages and archive on Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact These webpages afford an overview of the Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery programme and the beginnings of an archive of its work as part of a five-year study. To best afford connectivity, the webpages are enfolded within the larger and established website for the IHHN at www.healthhumanities.org


The webpages have assisted with early communications of the programme but is still in progress at this early stage of research investigation and prior to substantial research findings reporting.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org/creative_practice_mutual_recovery/
 
Description Website and archive: www.healthhumanities.org 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is the leading website and archives for the field of health humanities worldwide. In addition to its large membership, international advisory board, it comprises impact narratives, workshop information and podcasts, a blog, a link to Nottingham Health Humanities, where the field of health humanities have been originated with Professor Paul Crawford as the world's first professor of Health Humanities, related projects and activities, such as Creative Practice as Mutual Recovery.

This website has led the international movement of health humanities. It is the leading site for informations in this field. It has excellent metrics of use.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.healthhumanities.org