"Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin" ('Teach the Children English'): Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Lead Research Organisation: Newcastle University
Department Name: School of English Literature,Language an

Abstract

A majority of research on language in Northern Ireland (NI) has focused on deepening our understanding of the history and contemporary diversity of the languages and dialects spoken by the two major ethnic groups (Roman Catholics and Protestants). This scholarly focus reflects aspects of the social conflict endured by the NI population for much of the twentieth century, and heated debates have surrounded the linguistic heritages of these communities (respectively, Irish Gaelic and Ulster Scots). The recent Peace Process has, on the one hand, ensured greater protection for Irish and Ulster Scots, and, on the other, has made NI more attractive to economic migrants. This has resulted in unprecedented inward migration (particularly from the new EU countries) so that ethnic minorities in the region (and the languages they speak) have become increasingly audible and visible. This has led to new sources of tension between certain sectors of the traditional NI populations (particularly young, working-class males) and the new arrivals. Reports in the media following racist attacks have, for instance, proclaimed that these ethnic minorities 'have become the new victims in Northern NI's post-conflict society' (See Visual Evidence Attachment, p.1 (A)-(E)).

This project seeks to understand better the socio-cultural and linguistic impact on NI of its changing population. Another important objective is to compare the experiences of contemporary migrants to NI with those of the NI Diaspora, people who themselves fled abroad in response to historical conflicts, famine and economic depression within the region. By providing insights into the problems with integration experienced by previous generations of migrants from the ethnic majority communities, the lives of future migrants to NI can be improved. The proposal is supported in this endeavour by a research network of national scholars that the PI would lead, its members having interests in bilingualism and social justice. The project will also collaborate with two partners based in Northern Ireland: the Ultach Trust, and the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies, both of which have extensive experience of engaging the wider public. Their mission is to ensure that NI becomes an informed community, confidently and creatively engaged with all aspects of the diverse cultures and languages that the region now supports. The project would also benefit from knowledge exchange activities that the PI will lead involving teachers and young people from primary and post-primary education. The research will also support two linguistic investigations: (i) An investigation of historical archival data that will capitalize on considerable recent research council investment in the digitisation of emigrant letters and personal narratives of migration and return, which the PI would lead and (ii) An investigation of new interviews conducted as part of the planned proposal amongst groups of young people drawn from different social, ethnic and geographic backgrounds, which the RA would lead. This study will draw parallels between similar research projects conducted in England, Scotland and the Republic of Ireland so that comparisons can be made which are both methodological and theoretical in orientation. These two investigations will also be supported by research networks led by the PI that are both international and cross-disciplinary in nature and will result in collaborative outputs including conferences and publications.

Planned Impact

This project has an extensive plan to engage community members from the outset, particularly with educational providers, the heritage industries and the general public, and includes impacts both during and beyond the life of the project.

Six events are planned to increase awareness of the societal issues posed by the increasing ethnolinguistic diversity of Northern Ireland (NI), as (A)-(E) on p.1 of the Visual Evidence attachment demonstrates. This will be achieved by directly engaging with teachers and their students in ways such as those successfully used in other research projects directed by the PI (Visual Evidence, p.2, (I)) i.e.: (i) Two Personal Development for Mutual Understanding (PDMU) workshops for pre-adolescents at St. Anne's, Belfast and St. Patrick's, Donaghmore; (ii) A Continuing Professional Development event on the topic of 'Best Practice in the Teaching of Other Languages through the Medium of Irish' in St. Catherine's College, Armagh which has an Irish-Medium Unit; (iii) Two Masterclasses on ethnolinguistic diversity for secondary school students (St. Brigid's and St. Catherine's, Armagh) and (iv) A Knowledge Exchange event on the topic of 'Best Practices for achieving high levels of attainment by young people in Irish medium units and for whom English is a Second or Other language' for teachers in primary and secondary schools across all sectors of Northern Ireland's non-HEI education system.

The project also includes extensive public outreach, both directly and via the heritage sector. A significant impact output of this project, of interest and benefit to a wide, ethnically diverse audience, is the exhibition at the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies (MCMS) entitled: '"Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin" ('Teach the Children English')' (see examples of some of the images that will be included and the databases and archives they are drawn from in the Visual Evidence attachment, p.2, (F) & (H)). The week-long event and accompanying booklet/CD-ROM elucidate historical and contemporary ethnolinguistic diversity in the region and draw comparisons between the Irish Diaspora in former times and the experiences of inward migrants to NI.

Similarly, a Continuing Professional Development activity on language and migration at the Ulster American Folk Park (UAFP) will better equip the tour guides of the museum to disseminate current research in a form that will engage the wider public, thus providing an additional, indirect and long-term benefit. There are two public lectures scheduled at MCMS. The first is entitled: 'The Genesis of Old and New Ethnolects in Northern Ireland' and it directly involves Omagh Ethnic Communities Support Group; it is timed to occur in Race Relations week for maximal impact. The second is entitled: 'What do Young Irelanders and the New Kids on the Block have in common?' and is scheduled to coincide with a popular public event, the Literature of Irish Exile Autumn School.

The creation of Research Network (A) (detailed in section 5 of the Case) ensures the high calibre and extensive reach of the impact to a wider community because participants in Research Network (A) have world-class expertise in bilingualism, language policy and social justice. Moreover, the participation of three language-policy focused charities, the Ultach Trust (UT), Bilingualism Matters (BM) and staff from the Ulster Centre on Multilingualism (UCoM), will provide an avenue for influencing public policy both during and beyond the life of the project. Furthermore, the participation of these three charities increases the effectiveness of these organisations themselves, thus compounding the benefit to the community in general, and especially to speakers of linguistic minority and regional languages in NI.
 
Title From Home to Here: Stories of Languages Old and New - Arpilleras 
Description Fostering engagement with textiles as sources for learning about war, conflict, political violence and their impact on linguistic diversity, the exhibition has generated important tangible outcomes. Textiles displayed were: The day we will never forgetZimbabwean arpillera, Collective work by Killarney girls, facilitated by Shari Eppel, Solidarity Peace Trust Zimbabwe, 2012Photo Shari EppelConflict Textiles collection. Provenance Killarney Girls, Zimbabwehttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=263From Far away come their storiesRepublic of Ireland arpillera, Deborah Stockdale, 2010Photo Martin MelaughConflict Textiles collectionhttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=42Life with and without BeesEnglisharpillera, Janet Wilkinson, 2014Photo Janet WilkinsonConflict Textiles collection. Donation from Janet Wilkinsonhttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=271Our Lady of WordsEnglisharpillera, Linda Adams, 2015Photo Rory McCarronConflict Textiles collectionhttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=368Auf der Flucht 1945 / Fleeing in 1945German arpillera, Mara Loytved-Hardegg, 2010Photo Martin MelaughConflict Textiles collectionhttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=316 Any time and everywhere -Anna Frank's universalityGerman arpillera, Heidi Drahota, 2011Photo Heidi DrahotaHeidi Drahota collectionhttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=270¿Dónde están? / Where are they?Chileanarpillera, Anonymous, 1980sPhoto Martin MelaughConflict Textiles collection. Provenance Theresa Wolfwood, Victoria, Canadahttp://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts/fulltextiles/?id=234 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact First, a new network of scholars and practitioners has evolved; Second, members of the public have had the opportunity to better understand research on different aspects of indigenous languages and the relationship between language and cultural practices; Third, public views have changed with respect to the indigenous status of e.g. Irish Sign Language and heritage languages. As one audience member put it: "[I have learned that] sign languages may be considered indigenous.that issues here in N.I. are not dissimilar to language contentions elsewhere in the world." 
URL https://cain.ulster.ac.uk/conflicttextiles/search-quilts2/fullevent1/?id=211
 
Description (1) Prior to this research there had been no studies on the linguistic consequences of migration to NI. Hence, comparisons of variation across the British Isles, as advocated in the sociolinguistic model argued for in Tagliamonte (2003), could not yet be made. Through this research, it has become clear that the linguistic characteristics of NI English are governed by similar internal and external processes as those which have been discovered in other varieties not just in the British Isles but elsewhere in the English-speaking world too.

(2) The experiences of historical emigrants from Ireland is not dissimilar in many respects to those of contemporary immigrants to the region.

(3) Diverse social groups (e.g. Irish Medium versus non Irish medium educated teenagers) in NI hold different attitudes towards minority and regional languages and their speakers.

(4) Migratory movements in and out of Ireland differ across historical time and those of the twenty-first centurey have created a language ecology in parts of Northern Ireland that is clearly 'superdiverse' which it was not even a century ago.
Exploitation Route Interesting future questions would include:

(1) Do the ethnic minority and majority groups in NI hold similar or dissimilar attitudes towards new minorities and the languages they speak?

(2) Is the long-term linguistic behaviour of different newcomer groups commensurate with respect to the maintenance of their heritage languages?

(3) The findings could also be used to explore language universals with respect to certain linguistic characterisitics that appear to be shared by all native speakers of English and which are only partially learned by some second language learners of the language.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education

URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/
 
Description (1) To inform and engage pupils and teachers in primary and secondary schools; (2) To inform and engage the general public; (3) To inform and engage tour guides at the Ulster-American Folk Park; (4) To inform and engage collaborative partnerships developed during the course of the award (e.g. Gael Linn; Mellon Centre for Migration Studies; Linen Hall Library; NI Libraries); (5) To inform and engage public bodies such as the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description ESRC Newcastle Impact Accelerator Fund
Amount £10,848 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2015 
End 07/2016
 
Description Flexible Throats and Foreign Languages
Amount £1,500 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 03/2020
 
Description Newcastle University Strategic Development Funds for Impact Generating Activities
Amount £5,000 (GBP)
Funding ID SDFI/0002 
Organisation University of Newcastle 
Sector Academic/University
Country Australia
Start 12/2014 
End 07/2016
 
Description Gael Linn 
Organisation Gael Linn
Country Ireland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution (1) We have exchanged knowledge wiht the organisation so that they are better informed about issues relating to bilingualism in Northern Ireland more widely. (2) We have encouraged the organisation to consider adopting an approach to the promotion of the Irish language which is mindful of the skills which new migrants to NI (especially from the A8 countries) bring to language learning initiatives.
Collaborator Contribution (1) Organising interviews with Irish-English bilinguals. (2) In-kind contribution as described below. (3) Improving our knowledge of Irish-medium education in NI.
Impact (1) Financial contribution to Guide Training at Ulster American Folk Park. (2) Successful CPD event for Irish-medium teachers at St. Catherine's College, Armagh, NI.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Linen Hall Library 
Organisation Linen Hall Library
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution (1) Changes in heritage sector policies with respect to fostering multilingualism and the diverse cultural heritages in NI in the spirit of the legislative provisions of the Good Friday Agreement and Northern Ireland Act (1998). (2) Increases in stakeholder engagement.
Collaborator Contribution (1) Improved our understanding of how to curate an exhibition. (2) Improved our ability to understand how independent libraries like this function.
Impact (1) Workshop for St. Matthew's Primary School. (2) Public Lecture: "Stories of Migration Old and New: The Young Irelanders". (3) Public Lecture: "Stories of Migration Old and New: The YNew Kids on the Block". (4) Civic Conversation: "No Borders, No Nations, Refugees Welcome?" Collaboration is multidisciplinary and combines linguistics and museum/heritage studies.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Mellon Centre for Migration Studies 
Organisation Mellon Centre for Migration Studies
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution (1) Public Lectures in their 'Literature of Irish Exile' Autumn Schools (2008) and (2014) (2) Provided CPD day with guides employed at the Ulster-American Folk Park on matters of language/dialect/migration that they could use when conducting tours; (3) Participate in informal events on the days of each public lecture in the stimulating setting of the Outdoor Museum of the Ulster-American Folk Park which gave members of the public a friendly opportunity to meet and mix with experts on aspects of migration. In our case, we sampled the Centre's extensive Emigrant Letter Database (available via DIPPAM) for extracts that included: (i) interesting dialectal features and (ii) recurrent themese between these letters and the 'Múin Béarla' project interviews from 2014 which were discussed in Q & A format at sites on the museum's grounds relevant to the topics themselves (like education discussed at the National School on site).
Collaborator Contribution (1) In-kind contribution described below associated with hosting the events. (2) Access to their collection of emigrant letters and discussion of these prior to the events to ensure the suitability of our inputs to the public events.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary, combining our expertise in language and dialect with scholars from historical studies and migration sudies, in particular. The major outcome to date has been the successful delivery of public engagement activities and CPD events at this location which we would hope to obtain follow-on funding for so that we can work these up into an Impact Case Study for the next REF.
Start Year 2008
 
Description "Stories of Languages Old and New: Policy and Practice Challenges" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We are surrounded by languages and dialects every day of our lives and are aware from a very young age of how they can be used to signal who we are and inform how we perceive others to be. Linguistic choices might symbolise a difference in class, ethnicity, gender or religious persuasion. Research has traditionally focused on deepening our understanding of the history and contemporary diversity of the local languages and dialects spoken in Northern Ireland (NI). It reflects aspects of the social conflict endured by the NI population for much of the twentieth century and has informed debates surrounding language policies tied to the linguistic heritages of local communities (respectively, Irish Gaelic and Ulster Scots). The recent Peace Process has, on the one hand, ensured greater international protection for these, and, on the other, has made NI more attractive to economic migrants. This has resulted in unprecedented inward migration (particularly from the new EU countries and asylum seekers) so that ethnic minorities in the region (and the languages they speak) have become increasingly audible and visible. This Civic Conversation explores the socio-cultural and linguistic impact on language policies and practices in NI of global events generated by changes to EU policies, Brexit and the refugee crisis. It will celebrate 2019 as the year of Indigenous Languages and be chaired by Prof. Karen Corrigan, Newcastle University. Invited speakers will be experts in the fields of indigenous and community languages as well as practitioners who work with ethnolinguistic minorities in Northern Ireland and further afield.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://linenhall.com/effect-of-migration-on-northern-irelands-languages-explored-in-new-exhibition/
 
Description 'Flexible Throats and Foreign Languages' Continuing Professional Development Event for St. Patrick's College, Dungannon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This CPD event aimed to encourage teachers and staff at St. Patrick's College, Dungannon to value the heritage languages used by their pupils and to train teachers how best to deal with multilingual classrooms.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 'Flexible Throats and Foreign Languages' Public Celebration Event on International Mother Language Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 'Flexible Throats and Foreign Languages' Public Celebration Event on International Mother Language Day (February 21st 2020). The PI will give a guest lecture and finalists from each school will be invited to perform their poems in a manner of their choosing (which could include rapping or other musical forms) for parents and the wider Co. Tyrone community, with awards also being distributed to the overall winner and runners up. A prize will also be offered to the winning school for additional activities tied to furthering the ethos associated with Language Acts and Worldmaking. The short-listed poems will then be combined into an anthology and entered into the Young Writers' 'Poetry Escape' competition in June 2020 (https://www.youngwriters.co.uk/competitions/poetry-escape2019/).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description A CPD Event for SELB Principals on Language and Literacy Across the Curriculum, Enniskillen 16th October 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This was a workshop on literacy and bilingualism arranged by the research project team for the annual Autumn conference of post-primary principals, officers and inspectors associated with the Southern Education and Library Board, Northern Ireland. Each of the talks raised interesting questions from participants and there was much discussion. Feedback was extremely positive and invluded comments such as: "very practical and generated a lot of useful ideas"; "all aspects were very useful"; "practical and focused as well as fun and interactive".

After the talks, we received invitations to attend schools in the SELB area and discuss our project findings with them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/pastevents/
 
Description A CPD Event for Tour Guides at the Ulster American Folk Park, 15th October, Omagh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The tour guides were extremely interested in the research and came up with practical ways in which our workshop could be brought to bear on their interactions with future visitors.

Guides have begun using the strategies we provided during their tours.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/
 
Description A Masterclass for A Level Sociology Students, 20th October, Armagh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This activity was a masterclass in the relationship between langauge and society for students of A level sociology and their teachers at St. Catherine's College, Armagh, N.I. which was one of the schools participating in the research project. The event was planned so as to 'give back' something to the school in recognition of their cooperation in other parts of the research process. The students and teachers were both enthralled by the content and it stimulated them to ask a lot of interesting questions.

The school have reported high interest amongst pupils who took this session in applying to undertake university courses with sociology as a principal component. The teachers and pupils also noted how important the activity was in delivering a flavour of university teaching within a post-primary context.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/pastevents/
 
Description Barmbrack, Bacalhau and Borscht 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Designed and co-delivered CPD workshop called "Barmbrack, Bacalhau and Borscht: Language, Culture and Identity in Northern Ireland's Multilingual Classrooms" for staff and students (150) at St. Mary's Teacher Training College, on 15th January 2018. It improved trainee teachers' and their lecturers' understanding of processes of language acquisition, language and identity and the use of multilingual resources in classroom contexts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description From Here to There 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A public event celebrating World Day for Cultural Diversity, For Dialogue and Development. St. Patrick's College, Dungannon, May 21st 2015. The day included a public lecture by Prof. Karen Corrigan as well as workshops for primary and post-primary pupils in County Tyrone, art displays, music and dance. The school reported increased interest in diversity amongst staff and pupils.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description From Home to Here: Language Awareness Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Designed and co-delivered workshops with staff at Ulster University for 100 GCSE English students and 6 of their teachers at St. Patrick's College, Dungannon on Monday 16th May 2016 focusing on language, migration and diversity. The school reported improved teacher confidence in delivering GCSE English Language curriculum and better prospects for A-C examination results for pupils.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description From Home to Here: Languages Without Borders 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We are surrounded by languages and dialects and even youngsters are aware of how they can be used to signal who we are and inform how we perceive others to be. Linguistic choices might symbolise a difference in class, ethnicity, gender or religious persuasion. The recent unprecedented immigration to Northern Ireland (NI) (particularly from the EU) has had a really positive economic impact on our economy. Their enterprise has added thousands of extra jobs and produced between £1.06 and £1.2 billion of salaries and profits, as documented in recent NI Department for Employment and Learning reports. They have brought additional benefits too by improving our language capabilities at a time when NI may shortly have to use its own linguistic resources to negotiate with partners in the EU with whom they wish to trade. This talk explores the economic, linguistic and socio-cultural value of twenty-first century newcomers in the light of parallel contributions made by emigrants from the island of Ireland to the major economies of the world from the eighteenth century onwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://linenhall.com/effect-of-migration-on-northern-irelands-languages-explored-in-new-exhibition/
 
Description From Home to Here: Linen Hall Library 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'From Home to Here: Stories of Migration Old and New.' A public exhibition at the Linen Hall Library, Belfast (1st-31st October 2015).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://irishmigration.wordpress.com/
 
Description From Home to Here: Linen Hall Workshop for St. Matthew's Primary School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 30 year 5 PS pupils and two of their teachers from St. Matthew's Primary, Belfast attended a workshop on 2nd October 2015 to encourage interaction amongst younger audiences with the From Home to Here Exhibition at the Linen Hall Library. The school reported increased interest amongst pupils in migration and diversity following on from the exhibition.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description From Home to Here: Mellon Centre Workshop for St. Patrick's Primary School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 34 year 4 PS pupils and two of their teachers from St. Patrick's Primary, Donaghmore attended a workshop on 3rd June 2015 to encourage interaction amongst younger audiences with the From Home to Here Exhibition at the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies. The school reported increased interest amongst pupils in migration and diversity following on from the exhibition.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description From Home to Here: Mellon Centre for Migration Studies and Northern Ireland Libraries 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'From Home to Here.' A public exhibition at the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies, Omagh (2nd-6th June 2015). Launched by a public lecture by Prof. Karen Corrigan on 3rd June, 2015. The exhibition subsequently toured venues run by Libraries NI and private libraries open to the public between 8th June and 30th September 2015 (Strabane (8-19th June); Dungannon (22nd June-3rd July); Lisburn (6th-31st July); Cardinal Tomás Ó Fiaich Library and Archive, Armagh (3rd-7th August); Armagh City (10th-22nd August); Newry City (24th August-12th September); Belfast Central (13th-30th September)). The public lecture sparked considerable debate and NI libraries reported very favourable response to the exhibition during its tour of its venues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://irishmigration.wordpress.com/
 
Description From Home to Here: Stories of Languages Old and New 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This exhibition explores the socio-cultural and linguistic impact on Northern Ireland of its changing population, from when the first Celtic speakers arrived to the present day. Co-Curated by Professor Karen Corrigan, Newcastle University, and Drs Frances Kane and Kate Mairs, Queens University with Roberta Bacic, Curator of Conflict Textiles.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://linenhall.com/events/from-home-to-here-stories-of-languages-old-and-new/
 
Description Irish Medium Continuing Professional Development Day, 28th February, Armagh 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Funding cuts mean that continuing professional development for post-primary schools is difficult to manage. The school were so enthused about the idea of this event that they permitted all their language teachers and staff in the Irish medium unit to have cover so they could attend. The sessions were on bilingualism, language contact and Irish medium education. Staff expressed tremendous enthusiasm for the content and could see obvious ways in which it would improve their teaching.

After this event, the school have continued to work with us in engaging staff and students in the Irish medium unit and for whom English is a second or other language.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.socsci.ulster.ac.uk/ucom/events.html
 
Description Leading the Fifteenth Literature of Irish Exile Autumn School, 18th October, Omagh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This event was a full day activity open to the public which focused on the results of our research findings communicated in a manner that was suitable for non-academic audiences. In addition to providing information on contemporary and historigal migration to/from Northern Ireland, the event raised questions about the levels of hostility faced by new migrant groups arriving in Northern Ireland since the beginning of the twenty-first century. It also demonstrated the similarity between their experiences and those of Irish people who went abroad historically using the Ulster American Folk Park itself in addtion to the correspondence data and the new interview data drawn on in the research as vehicles for stimulating conversations amongst participants about language, migration and identity. The day ended with a lively discussion of the key issues.

After the talk, several members of the public noted that their views had changed with respect to the status of new migrants in Northern Ireland when viewed in the light of their own ancestors' who had migrated historically.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/pastevents/
 
Description Mapping Your Future: Top Tips for UCAS 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A Continuing Professional Development workshop for careers guidance teachers focusing on how to enhance the writing of personal statements by bilingual newcomer children in particular so as to improve their chances of being offered university places. St. Patrick's College, Dungannon, May 21st 2015. The school reported a much better understanding of how to play the game of creating high impact UCAS applications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description New Brogues and Tongues in Our Schools 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Designed and co-delivered CPD workshop called "New Brogues and Tongues in Our Schools" What's the Craic About That?" for staff and students (25) at St. Mary's, Queen's University, Belfast teacher training college on 10th November 2017. It sparked considerable debate and the trainee teachers and their lecturers reported improved understanding of processes of language acquisition, language and identity and the use of multilingual resources in classroom contexts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description No Borders, No Nations, Refugees Welcome 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A Civic Conversation to celebrate Community Relations and Cultural Awareness Week 2015 "One Place, Many People". It was run in conjunction with the "From Home to Here" exhibition at the Linen Hall Library, Belfast on 3rd October 2015. Discussions between an expert panel and members of the public who had opportunities to engage in the debate. The panel consisted of academic specialists in asylum, language and migration issues relevant to the island of Ireland as well as representatives from migrant groups and key institutions that support them such as educators as well as Movement of Asylum Seekers in Ireland; Northern Ireland Community of Refugees and Asylum Seekers; Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities and the Ulster Centre on Multilingualism. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive and the event was an important networking occasion for academics, professional practitioners and members of NGOs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Public Lecture, Omagh Library, 16th June 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This public lecture was well attended and generated considerable discussion and indeed debate amongst audience members and the presenters.

Omagh Library and NI libraries more widely would like to work with us to disseminate content of the kind delivered on
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://research.ncl.ac.uk/ni-language-migration/pastevents/
 
Description Round Table discussion with Education and English managers of the Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Meetings with the Education Managers (Curriculum Assessment and Reporting) and (English) of Council for the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment, Belfast) on 11th July 2018 and 30th November 2018 to discuss development of curriculum materials piloted at St. Patrick's, Dungannon which they would host at their website for use in all schools in Northern Ireland (KS1, KS2, KS3 especially). They have agreed to work with us to develop and host this material which will significantly extend its reach.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Round Table discussion with members of the Catholic Council for Maintained Schools 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Meeting on 7th December 2018 with Catholic Council for Maintained Schools NI and research network developed during the project to develop a 'vertical learning community' to improve attainment across their sector in English, languages and personal development for mutual understanding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Round Table discussion with members of the Northern Ireland Education Training Inspectorate 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation to members of the Education Training Inspectorate on 17th April 2018 re. GCSE work with St. Patrick's College, Dungannon with a view to rolling out the pilot. The outcome was a follow-up appointment with entire Inspectorate team to progress this initiative on 31st August 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Round Table discussion with members of the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I led this meeting on 9th August 2018 with the Nothern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency and my research network which was established during the project as a key objective. Its purpose was to demonstrate issues with the language questions asked in the 2011 Northern Ireland census in the light of our research. The NISRA team we met with were convinced of the problems with the wording of the questions in Census 2011 following the meeting and asked us to formulate new questions for the individual part of the census and for the household section in the next instantiation. We did that and are awaiting news of whether they are to be included in the next census in 2021.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Stories of Migration Old and New: The New Kids on the Block 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A public lecture to close the 'From Home to Here' exhibition with Dr Carolina Amador-Moreno, University of Extremadura, Prof. Karen Corrigan, and Dr Adam Mearns. Linen Hall Library, Belfast, 30th October 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Stories of Migration Old and New: The Young Irelanders 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A public lecture to launch the 'From Home to Here' exhibition with Prof. Karen Corrigan, Prof. Kevin McCafferty, University of Bergen and Dr Adam Mearns. Linen Hall Library, Belfast, 2nd October 2015. The lecture sparked a lively debate and generated considerable audience participation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Television Interview. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Television Interview at the launch of Belfast City Council's Language Strategy on 14th May 2018. Anticipated impact will be a better understanding of language policy amongst the general public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The Last Minyan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A special screening of a documentary film by Aaron Black which tells of the disappearing world of the Belfast Jewish community, as seen from the inside. Linen Hall Library, 16th October 2015. Audience members reported a raised awareness of the plight of this community in NI and could see comparisons with the Irish diaspora in former times.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Towers of Babel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Designed and co-delivered CPD workshop called "Towers of Babel: Northern Irish Schools in the 21st century" for staff and students (25) at Stranmillis, teacher training college on 1st December 2017. It improved trainee teachers' and their lecturers' understanding of processes of language acquisition, language and identity and the use of multilingual resources in classroom contexts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Voices, Brogues and Tongues: Tricks for analyzing effective speaking choices 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Designed and co-delivered workshops for 100 GCSE English students and 6 of their teachers at St. Patrick's College, Dungannon between 9th November 2017 and 31st March 2018 focusing on language, migration and diversity. Teachers reported more confidence in delivering the language and literacy curriculum (particularly with respect to spoken language). Feedback confirming impacts included: "It is fantastic, something for them to aspire to. The fact that university lecturers were giving up their time to pass on their knowledge. I found that as soon as we told them they were thinking "This is brilliant""."It made them feel important, you know they were nearly showing off by the end of it. Do you remember? They were kind of "sit up and take notice of me" you know"."It boosted their [pupils'] confidence, made them aware you know that they should be proud that they were able to speak two or more languages". "It was interesting to see their [pupils'] attitudes towards each other and how they perceive each other based on the different countries they are from and the languages they speak"."Spoken language is an important part of the English GCSE and we [teachers] will be able to go in and talk about the workshops again, it's a great foundation for us to be able to talk about language, and how language varies". "They [pupils] did talk about it afterwards, I even found that the year 10 students that were part of the group that day, I also teach RE and some of them were linking that to prejudice and discrimination in the wee group when they were listening to the different people speaking, they were linking it to that you know. They were talking about it for a good few days afterwards". "It made them feel very important you know "we are the special group that got picked"".

Following the training, GCSE achievement at A*-C in English across the school rose from 39% to 97.5%. As the school principal has put it in a testimonial for a potential impact case study for REF 2021 tied to this project: "Considering that 52.5% of these pupils are second language speakers of English, the impact of the project speaks for itself with these results, which are just phenomenal. I can also say with confidence that if you review GCSE English results even in selective schools of a similar size across Northern Ireland, you won't see a performance in GCSE English across the board which is as impressive as ours - despite the barriers we face which they do not."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description What's in Your Suitcase? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Ran a whole school assembly entitled 'What's in your Suitcase?' on language, migration and identity in St. Patrick's Primary School, Donaghmore (29th March 2017). Feedback from the principal included: "I was delighted with Karen's presentation content and her competition really highlighted the situation of Newcomers and assisted the children's understanding of what it is like to 'leave home'.""I believe it enriches children's lives to meet people from other walks of life. It was especially beneficial that Karen is a professor, which came as a pleasant surprise to the children. Due to images and stories they meet, a professor is generally portrayed as an elderly, grey haired man in a white lab coat-so not Karen." "The children enjoyed the event and it helped their knowledge and understanding of what it means to leave home and move to somewhere new. They also realized that emigration includes people from here moving away too and starting new lives." "The powerpoint and competition gave the staff new ideas and an understanding of how the children viewed migration and Newcomers. It was very reassuring that our children saw no difference in the children who have moved to the Donaghmore area." "University staff are experts in their field and as such have something valuable to share with schools. We are living the every day but when given the opportunity to speak to someone with genuine knowledge and understanding it helps us understand why things happen / why the children are approaching things differently. As a principal, it was reassuring to find out about the timescale of language acquisition."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshops for Year 8 post-primary pupils 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Two rotating Workshops for 575 Year 8 post-primary pupils in a superdiverse region of Northern Ireland (NI) will enable them to: (i) Identify the languages and dialects spoken or being taught in their schools along with their key characteristics; (ii) Better understand how 'mother tongues' can shape and mould identities; (iii) Change pupils' attitudes with respect to the valuing of non-standard dialects as well as the learning of modern foreign languages and multilingualism more broadly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Your Flexible Throat is Full of a Foreign language Poetry Competition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact 'Your Flexible Throat is Full of a Foreign Language'† Poetry Competition will encourage Year 8 pupils to use sign language, the local dialect, the indigenous language and exogenous languages to creatively express distinctive identities and cultures. The competition will be judged by English, Irish Language and Modern Foreign Language department staff at participating schools alongside the workshop tutors (Drs Kane and Mairs), the Principal Investigator and members of Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts (NCLA) (including Sinéad Morrissey, NCLA director and former poet laureate of Belfast who has already agreed to be involved in this capacity).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020