Everyday Lives in War

Lead Research Organisation: University of Hertfordshire
Department Name: School of Humanities

Abstract

The Central & Eastern England Regional Centre for exploring the FWW spans Suffolk, Essex, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire. It will mark the centenary of the FWW through collaborative histories, creative performance, source exploration, practical experiment and digital sharing. We aim to connect academic and local experience, and to build productive community engagement and research partnerships with the capacity to stretch and even surprise all involved.

In developing objectives and a programme of activities for the Centre, the team worked through the University of Hertfordshire's Heritage Hub to consult heritage and arts organisations, history groups and community associations in the region. Reflecting on this process, we selected themes that will bring new angles to familiar stories and inspire an extensive programme of community engagement at regional and (inter)national levels: food; theatre; military tribunals; learning disability; supernatural beliefs; military intelligence; childhood:
* FWW food production, supply and consumption highlight international and local economies, creating a powerful tool in exploring memory, scale and present-day relevance.
* FWW theatre offers participants another experiential route into a past more commonly shaped by war poetry.
* Military tribunals link national institutions of war with individual lives on the Home Front; as conscientious objection (CO) emerges as an 'alternative' perspective to trenches, tribunals put CO in broader context. Reconstructing their proceedings has considerable research and engagement potential.
* The theme of learning disabilities draws on Hertfordshire's distinctive institutional history of asylums and challenges us to think broadly about communities.
* Beliefs in ghosts, angels, mediums and fortune-tellers provide important insights into the lasting psychological impact of disorientation, fear and huge loss of life.
* Academically FWW intelligence is an under-researched area but, because of the resonance of intelligence in popular culture, it is one that is likely to stimulate community interest.
* The impact of the FWW on those born since 1919 allows the Centre to address inter-generational relationships and re-think the meanings of 'legacy'.

Geographical communities are significant to the Centre, but so is the inclusion of communities of interest, belief, practice, circumstance or experience. Through co-produced research, the Centre will develop intellectual and cultural contexts to enrich historical understanding of the FWW. It aims that by 2016 community organisations that have already embarked on research (with or without HLF funding) will have incorporated at least one new question or perspective; that people living in the region who have not yet thought about the centenary will have contributed to it; that the regional dimensions of the conflict will have come into focus; and that audiences and topics of research will have diversified. Micro-histories, documents and artefacts will emerge from local projects to benefit researchers across the board. The Centre will maximize these effects by connecting discrete projects through face-to-face events and digital communities. It will manifest the sheer variety of FWW heritage in Britain today and record it for the longer term.

The centenary of the FWW is an opportunity to probe in innovative ways the historical significance of a period which resonates strongly in contemporary Britain. Looking forward from 2013, the precise form of centenary activities, the relationship between academic and public histories, and the influence of the state and other bodies in shaping memorialisation, are still uncertain. A conjunction of meticulous research, living tradition and multiple end uses, is creating a situation that is itself a fascinating subject for analysis and an occasion for profound dialogue about the nature of scholarship and heritage in 21st-century Britain.

Planned Impact

New knowledge and skills will have an immediate impact on the FWW centenary and those involved with it. Transferable skills, capacity building and networks will have longer-term relevance. Case studies will contribute to understanding of a wide-range of community contexts.

*Individuals and community groups in the region. HOW: new transferable skills and confidence building gained through formal training, informal activities, and through the inclusive strategies that give participants a voice in the Centre; structured knowledge exchange facilitated by the Centre's FWW Historypin site and co-produced research. Practical project experience, including appropriate ethical practice. A broader historical context through which to engage with centenary activities; new understandings of the FWW and its complex legacies in the communities and families to which they belong; opportunities for inter-generational dialogue.
* Individuals and community groups, national and international. HOW: skills and new knowledge about the FWW gained via online access to activities and expertise; a sense of inter-connectedness through the processes of remembering the FWW and its legacies; town twinning as a vehicle for face-to-face international community engagement.
*Communities frequently marginalised in heritage initiatives: learning disability communities and migrant workers. HOW: through knowledge of their own heritage and place in history; confidence building achieved through activities that value their experiences and expertise; new skills and networks of shared interest generated by participation in the Centre. Ethical engagement with topics of relevance to their lives.
*Heritage and cultural organisations in the region e.g. museums, arts organisations. HOW: forging new networks that cross county boundaries; opportunities to share expertise, archives and other resources with similar organisations; potential for working with volunteers and communities not previously known to them. New knowledge about the FWW for professional staff; and a forum for raising awareness about their own FWW programmes.
*National non-government groups. HOW: synergies between the Centre's research and outreach programme and their own FWW activities; knowledge, skills and resources exchange.
*Government bodies, local and regional. HOW: scope for meeting core policy objectives of social inclusion, widening participation and community cohesion through a sense of shared heritage. New knowledge about what is distinctive about their locality; opportunities to be 'on the map'.
*Schools involved in the programme and indirectly through best practice. HOW: staff involvement in co-produced research as a form of CPD; formal learning for students via curriculum materials and 'myth-busting' case studies; stronger links between schools and HEIs in their region; opportunities for school students to develop transferable skills through participation in a wide range of FWW activities relevant across the curriculum, including performance, oral interviewing, creative writing, digital co-production. New knowledge for students to ground the FWW in their own localities and families; a voice for young people in thinking about present and future legacies of the FWW.
* HEIs. HOW: sharing experience in community group heritage management and co-production of research.
* Tourism and other commercial ventures. HOW: new, accessible, historically-accurate material on the FWW, particularly its regional impact. Whether their own story or a more generic one, heritage is a powerful resource for businesses in marketing, staff engagement or business strategy.
* Policy makers. HOW: dialogue with communities; case studies on the nature of communities, active participation and social empowerment; insights into the legacies of the FWW and their implications for future policies, e.g. to re-engage with pressing contemporary issues, such as climate change, global insecurity, intelligence gathering.

Organisations

 
Description The Centre has now completed Phase 1. We will report fully once we have completed the Phase 1 evaluation and embarked on processes of reflection during Phase 2 (linked grant AH/P00668X/1 Everyday Lives in War: First World War Engagement Centre)
Exploitation Route We will be in a better position to report once the Centre has completed Phase 2 in 2019.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description 2016 concluded the first, three-year phase of the Engagement Centre programme. All researchers funded by the centre are working with community groups, heritage organisations and national bodies, including the Heritage Lottery Fund. The Centre has funded an additional 14 collaborative projects to co-produce research on topics linked to the Everyday Lives in War theme. Five of these commenced in early 2017. In some cases collaboration takes the form project design (e.g. Roper & Duffett with Lakeside Theatre); in others it involves in-depth research collaboration (e.g. Moore, St Albans). In many instances there is light-touch involvement: e.g. answering queries, giving a talk, providing research materials and introductions. In addition to Researchfish, these activities are detailed on the ELIW website and through, Centre evaluations and regular reports to the AHRC. The team has also been committed to outreach, bringing the theme of everyday life to people who may not have previously expressed an interest in the centenary (e.g. Bletchley Park Roadshow; HLF showcase). During 2016, the Centre continued to deliver workshops around specific research topics, including military tribunals and resistance to war.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Age Exchange (Roper collaborative project) 
Organisation Age Exchange
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution '"Meeting in No Man's Land": German & British descendants share heritage of the Great War': was a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Prof Mike Roper & Dr Rachel Duffett, University of Essex. Age Exchange, the lead partner, obtained HLF funding for its part of the project in early December 2015. Roper and Duffett's role - was twofold. Firstly, they strengthened the methodological and historical grounding of the project. Roper's background in psycho-social methods and inter-generational legacies was drawn on in order to construct the methodology for the gathering of family heritage, identifying themes and schedules for interviews and developing understandings of the psychological significance of family artefacts. In addition, Roper and Duffett's understanding of the different historical legacies in each country - such as the effects of defeat and victory, and the overlay of the Second World War on memories of the First - helped provide a context for the emerging cross-national comparisons. In this way, the research potential of the project was maximised. As well as contributing knowledge to the project, Roper and Duffett's own research benefited from the collaboration. Whilst in Germany Roper consulted with experts in intergenerational therapies associated with the German partner organisations. The direct personal experience of comparative research sharpened their understanding of what is distinctive, or not, about British family legacies of the conflict. This has had an impact on their ongoing research on interwar family legacies in Britain, and specifically Roper's monograph, The Generation Between: childhood, play and the legacies of the Great War, currently in preparation. In addition to their inputs to the Steering Group, the January preparatory visit and the interviews and exchange in April, Roper and Duffett kept a diary of their observations. This was published in blog form through the Everyday Lives in War website. They also conducted subsidiary interviews with participants, aimed at establishing how involvement in the project has changed their perception of the First World War and their own family's history. This material, along with the interviews and digitised family objects, will form the basis of an article which evaluates the project's contribution to WW1 heritage in the centenary of the conflict.
Collaborator Contribution Age Exchange is a world-leader in reminiscence activities, with a long history of community-led oral history which seeks to broaden and to challenge everyday understandings of the past (as it has demonstrated through its HLF funded project, Children of the Great War). The heritage activities of 'Meeting in No Man's Land' - particularly the exchange between British and German elders - allowed the researchers to chart shifts in historical consciousness as they occur among the participants, and to demonstrate the broader significance of family histories in the centenary.
Impact Reported on Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Meeting in No Man's Land, 2015 Meeting in No Man's Land, 7-12 April 2016 Meeting in No Man's Land planning activities - (a) 11-13 January 2016, and (b) 25 February 2016 Meeting in No Man's Land film screening, Sunday 13 November 2016
Start Year 2014
 
Description Britain Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers): Muers collaborative project 
Organisation Religious Society of Friends
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution 'Re-imagining True Social Order: How the Aftermath of War Shaped Quaker Social Witness': a collaborative project funded by Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Rachel Muers, University of Leeds The academic team was responsible for conducting the primary research on the development, context and subsequent history of "Foundations of a True Social Order", as well as on any available outcomes of the Woodbrooke-based study course that deals with the "Foundations" (mainly the PI with some support from the named postdoctoral researcher); for planning, preparing materials for and conducting a workshop session for Britain Yearly Meeting in May 2016, based on the findings of that initial primary research (postdoc); for conducting semi-structured interviews with contemporary Quakers engaged in social justice work, on their readings of and responses to the "Foundations" (postdoc); and for development of online resources to ensure the project's continuing contribution (postdoc with support from PI). The PI will also be responsible for ethical review and for ensuring that an adequate data management plan is in place, including in relation to interview material (arrangements for transcription are the responsibility of the academic partners).
Collaborator Contribution Britain Yearly Meeting and Woodbrooke provided access to, and where relevant specialist advice on, library and archive resources relevant to the origins of the "Foundations of a True Social Order". Britain Yearly Meeting provided the venue and undertake all practical arrangements for the workshop (or similar) in May 2016. Britain Yearly Meeting hosts, and publicises the online resource, and has provided advice and support on its development, based especially on the very successful White Feather Diaries First World War centenary project (which focused on conscientious objection). Both Britain Yearly Meeting and Woodbrooke assisted with establishing contact with interviewees (interviews with BYM staff and volunteers involved in social justice work; and with attendees at, or enquirers about, recent Woodbrooke events focused on social justice). Woodbrooke offered accommodation and subsistence for a maximum of 2 days during the research period if use of the library was required. Since the completion of the project, Woodbrooke is exploring options with the PI and the postdoctoral researcher for further follow-up study events hosted at Woodbrooke.
Impact As reported on Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Website - 'Reimagining a True Social Order' Workshop - Friends House, London May 2016 (during Britain Yearly Meeting) A further workshop is planned during Britain Yearly Meeting, July 2017
Start Year 2015
 
Description Britain Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers): Muers collaborative project 
Organisation Woodbrooke
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'Re-imagining True Social Order: How the Aftermath of War Shaped Quaker Social Witness': a collaborative project funded by Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Rachel Muers, University of Leeds The academic team was responsible for conducting the primary research on the development, context and subsequent history of "Foundations of a True Social Order", as well as on any available outcomes of the Woodbrooke-based study course that deals with the "Foundations" (mainly the PI with some support from the named postdoctoral researcher); for planning, preparing materials for and conducting a workshop session for Britain Yearly Meeting in May 2016, based on the findings of that initial primary research (postdoc); for conducting semi-structured interviews with contemporary Quakers engaged in social justice work, on their readings of and responses to the "Foundations" (postdoc); and for development of online resources to ensure the project's continuing contribution (postdoc with support from PI). The PI will also be responsible for ethical review and for ensuring that an adequate data management plan is in place, including in relation to interview material (arrangements for transcription are the responsibility of the academic partners).
Collaborator Contribution Britain Yearly Meeting and Woodbrooke provided access to, and where relevant specialist advice on, library and archive resources relevant to the origins of the "Foundations of a True Social Order". Britain Yearly Meeting provided the venue and undertake all practical arrangements for the workshop (or similar) in May 2016. Britain Yearly Meeting hosts, and publicises the online resource, and has provided advice and support on its development, based especially on the very successful White Feather Diaries First World War centenary project (which focused on conscientious objection). Both Britain Yearly Meeting and Woodbrooke assisted with establishing contact with interviewees (interviews with BYM staff and volunteers involved in social justice work; and with attendees at, or enquirers about, recent Woodbrooke events focused on social justice). Woodbrooke offered accommodation and subsistence for a maximum of 2 days during the research period if use of the library was required. Since the completion of the project, Woodbrooke is exploring options with the PI and the postdoctoral researcher for further follow-up study events hosted at Woodbrooke.
Impact As reported on Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Website - 'Reimagining a True Social Order' Workshop - Friends House, London May 2016 (during Britain Yearly Meeting) A further workshop is planned during Britain Yearly Meeting, July 2017
Start Year 2015
 
Description Devon History Society (French collaborative project) 
Organisation Devon History Society
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' was a collaborative project, funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Prof Henry French, Exeter University This project is designed to focus on the over-arching theme of farming, fishing, food supply and agrarian industries of the rural county of Devon during the First World War. It has three key objectives: 1) to examine rural life during the latter part of the conflict from 1916, as food shortages worsened because of the submarine blockade, and conscription and government intervention affected the rural and maritime workforces; 2) to bring together a broad range of local and community history groups to research common themes, share findings and exchange ideas about sources, methods and results; 3) in association with Devon History Society to produce project outputs such as a conference, publications and create a lasting research infrastructure in Devon, with an organisational template and networks between groups that future collaborative research projects can develop. 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply' builds upon a variety of existing community projects, including the Lustleigh Society, incorporated in Dartmoor Trust Museum's exhibition at Princetown (Apr.-Sept. 2015), Wembury Local History Group's exhibition on farming in FWW (Nov. 2014), Devon Garden History Forum on allotments and market gardening, Brixham Museum's research on fishing and Poltimore Estate Research Society on residents of the Poltimore estate and participation in WW1, as well as activities initiated since March 2013 by Devon County Council's Devon Remembers initiative (http://www.devonremembers.info/). Drawing on this expertise (and on interests within Devon History Society's 63 affiliated local societies), this project allows local researchers to identify and collaborate on a series of research themes, hold project workshops to share skills, knowledge and findings, and (through DHS) organise a conference exhibition, in which participants can discuss these themes and produce a variety of outputs and future publications (information packs for schools, posters, exhibitions, leaflets, web content, articles/themed issue for The Devon Historian).
Collaborator Contribution Community Partners will discuss involvement and organisation through project workshops, and be represented in project management through the Project Steering Committee. They are responsible for: • Identification of collaborative research themes and areas of subject interest/source expertise • Research on primary sources, identification of source materials, source interpretation and analysis • Identification of analytical problems for Academic Partners advice - questions about source interpretation, missing materials, inconsistent information, access issues. • Identification of audiences/users for research findings and their preferred formats/media. • Production of research findings (exhibitions, displays, virtual displays/outputs, publications, and talks, community activities/events, school action-packs). • Co-creation of expertise, training and outputs with other participants - sharing of knowledge, techniques and practices at workshop and other events. • Involvement in activities elsewhere in the 'Everyday Lives' Centre, including National Archives Conference Sept. 2016.
Impact As reported in Researchfish (Engagement Activities/Publications): 3 project workshops (in Sept. and Nov. 2015, and Feb. 2016). Panel presentation by 4 members of the volunteer team of researchers 8 October 2016 Publication - 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' 100-page booklet Project Workshops, April 2016, June 2016, November 2016
Start Year 2015
 
Description English Heritage Trust (Sharp collaborative project) 
Organisation English Heritage
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'Richmond Castle: Voices of Rebellion. Social Attitudes to Conscientious Objection' was a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Ingrid Sharp, University of Leeds. This work fed into a HLF bid by English Heritage 'Richmond Castle Cells: Voices of Rebellion' (HG-13-12605) centred on the history of those FWW conscientious objectors held in the cells. Some of these COs, known as the Richmond 16, are well-known figures and have been the subject of popular and academic studies. A less well-known history is how the Richmond community responded to these prisoners and their stance and this project brought together academics, students and community groups in order to find this out: community volunteers in Richmond will undertake the local aspects of the research using site-specific materials while Leeds University research interns will explore social attitudes to COs as reflected in national newspapers, memoirs, diaries and letters held in the Liddle Collection at Leeds. This collaboration will lead to co-produced outputs on social attitudes to COs and their support networks at a national and local level, specifically those held in Richmond Castle in 1916. Academic partners provided training in archival and media research as well as essential background knowledge to the topic. The project leader offered advice and guidance when required. Postgraduate and undergraduate interns at the University of Leeds conducted research into social attitudes to COs using materials held in the Liddle collection as well as conducting an extensive literature review of existing scholarship. Academic partners also facilitated a panel of leading experts (Lois BIbbings, Cyril Pearce, Clive Barrett, David Boulton, Julian Putkowski, Nick Hiley and Chloe Waters) to discuss their research into COs and invited community research partners to attend the CO event at the Resistance to War conference in March 2016 and the Peace History Conference in October 2016. Academic and community partners worked together to produce the outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Community partners worked with local organisations and individuals to identify and engage volunteers for the project. The community partner assisted in co-ordinating research at a local level using site-specific archives and local newspapers to ascertain local attitudes to COs as reported in the press or reflected in accounts of the tribunals and the case of the Richmond 16. They helped to coordinate the meetings with the academic project leader in Richmond, the training event in Leeds and attendance at the Resistance to War conference in March 2016.
Impact As reported in Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Resistance to War Conference Community Engagement Day, Leeds, 20 March 2016 History Pin project site Peace History Conference, Leeds, 15 October 2016 English Heritage Blog
Start Year 2015
 
Description Henry Watson Library, Manchester (Kelly collaborative project) 
Organisation Manchester City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution 'Making Music in Manchester during World War I': a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Prof Barbara Kelly, Royal Northern College of Music The academic lead (Professor Barbara Kelly) : • manage and oversee with Ros Edwards (Service Development Co-ordinator, Music) and Heather Roberts (RNCM Archivist and Project Assistant) the smooth running of the project • co-facilitate with the community partner, volunteers and the Research Associate the performance workshops in collaboration with the student performing groups and the Artistic Director at the RNCM • collaborate with Heather Roberts (RNCM Archivist), other members of the project team and volunteers on the exhibitions and website • research the three archives at the centre of the project on musical lives in Manchester • supervise the Research Associate and advise the volunteers The academic archivist (Heather Roberts) : • coordinate project team meetings between the RNCM and community partners • organize the exhibitions based on the research findings and priorities identified by the academic and community partners • set up and maintain the webpage and on-line blog during the life of the project. This activity will continue beyond the life of the project
Collaborator Contribution • co-facilitate the smooth running of the project with Barbara Kelly • collaborate with Barbara Kelly on the planning of the workshops, particularly those that take place at the Central Library • oversee and manage the involvement of the volunteers on the project • advise the researchers on the relevant archival materials at the Henry Watson Music Library, Central Library and in other relevant collections within Archives+ • share responsibility with Barbara Kelly to review the process of co-production of knowledge over the lifetime of the project so that all contributions are valued
Impact As reported in Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Manchester Histories Festival contribution, Music in Manchester during WW1 (4 June 2016) Maggie's Cultural Crawl Lunchtime concert at the RNCM, 21.11.2016 Concerts with introduction by Barbara Kelly at the RNCM, 23 November, 24 Nov 2016 Archive Handling Session: on Friday 11th November 2pm-3.30pm in Manchester Central Library Making Music in Manchester during World War I Exhibition (July-August at Central Library, Manchester; and November-December at RNCM), 2016 Making Music in Manchester Press releases
Start Year 2015
 
Description Lived Experiences of War in Working-Class East Cambridge, 1914-18 (reported by Michael Hrebeniak) 
Organisation 100 Years of Coconuts
PI Contribution The project was a co-produced study between academic and community interests comprised of 100 Years of Coconuts, which is the heritage arm of the Cambridge United Supporters' Trust, chaired by Mr Patrick Morgan (100yearsofcoconuts.co.uk) and Dr Michael Hrebeniak, Lecturer in English at Wolfson and Magdalene colleges, University of Cambridge. Dr Nick Mansfield, Senior Research Fellow in the University of Central Lancashire's School of Humanities and Social Sciences and a member of the Everyday Lives in War AHRC engagement centre, has also collaborated in this project. Dr Nick Mansfield provided guidance on project methodology, practices and outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution 100 Years of Coconuts assembled a team of five volunteer researchers, whose tasks were broadly split into two areas: • Genealogical, sociological and military career research into families living in east Cambridge during WWI, using web-based research tools, inspection of war memorials and cemeteries, appeals for the memories of descendants of the families and reading of existing literature, documents and photographic material. • The gathering of interpretations of conditions at home, at school, in the workplace and in the military from contemporary newspaper accounts. A Coconuts committee member acted as volunteer researcher co-ordinator.
Impact • Production and dissemination of a short book detailing research findings (late Spring, 2018) • Lecture on working class East Cambridge during WWI at launch of booklet (late Spring, 2018) • Month-long exhibit illustrating research findings at Museum of Cambridge (April 2018)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Lived Experiences of War in Working-Class East Cambridge, 1914-18 (reported by Michael Hrebeniak) 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Wolfson College
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project was a co-produced study between academic and community interests comprised of 100 Years of Coconuts, which is the heritage arm of the Cambridge United Supporters' Trust, chaired by Mr Patrick Morgan (100yearsofcoconuts.co.uk) and Dr Michael Hrebeniak, Lecturer in English at Wolfson and Magdalene colleges, University of Cambridge. Dr Nick Mansfield, Senior Research Fellow in the University of Central Lancashire's School of Humanities and Social Sciences and a member of the Everyday Lives in War AHRC engagement centre, has also collaborated in this project. Dr Nick Mansfield provided guidance on project methodology, practices and outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution 100 Years of Coconuts assembled a team of five volunteer researchers, whose tasks were broadly split into two areas: • Genealogical, sociological and military career research into families living in east Cambridge during WWI, using web-based research tools, inspection of war memorials and cemeteries, appeals for the memories of descendants of the families and reading of existing literature, documents and photographic material. • The gathering of interpretations of conditions at home, at school, in the workplace and in the military from contemporary newspaper accounts. A Coconuts committee member acted as volunteer researcher co-ordinator.
Impact • Production and dissemination of a short book detailing research findings (late Spring, 2018) • Lecture on working class East Cambridge during WWI at launch of booklet (late Spring, 2018) • Month-long exhibit illustrating research findings at Museum of Cambridge (April 2018)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Long Sutton & District Civic Society (Chapman collaborative project) 
Organisation Long Sutton And District Civic Society
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'German POWs in Sutton Bridge, Lincs': was a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Prof Jane Chapman, University of Lincoln. Research design Putting research into a national context and linking to existing scholarship Writing Dissemination Links with Historypin & Council for British Archaeology
Collaborator Contribution Research design Local research & data collection Editiorial content Dissemination
Impact Poster design and presentation at the Voices of the Home Fronts conference, National Archives, Sept 2016 (event reported in Researchfish -- Engagement Activities). Pamphlet and other outputs: 'Life as a German POW in Sutton Bridge, South Lincs, during the FWW' (2017) plus exhibition.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Military Intelligence Museum (Beach collaborative project) 
Organisation Military Intelligence Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'Secret Soldiers: The Intelligence Corps in the First World War': a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Jim Beach, University of Northampton. The project has 10 workstreams, five of which are led by the academic partner: A. Intelligence 'B' Association. The museum holds an interwar membership list of an old comrades association for counter-espionage personnel. The lead applicant found an earlier version in another archive. Using online genealogical resources, a prosopographical study will be conducted. C. Collection of Intelligence Corps materials. The targeting process will likely identify materials in standard UK military archives (National Archives, Imperial War Museum, National Army Museum). Many of these are in London, so budgeting has assumed short research trips for one or two people. The location of any fresh papers is unpredictable but museum friends living closer to distant archives may be able to assist in the collection. F. Workshop. To be held at the University of Northampton on a Saturday in November/December 2017. The primary activity will be the volunteers talking about their processes, highlighting key discoveries, and lessons learned for their future work. This will be complemented by invited speakers talking about other aspects of British intelligence in the First World War. As well as the museum's community, it is hoped that the workshop will appeal to a wider audience and advertising will target groups such as the Western Front Association. G. Writing & publishing. The aim is to submit the article to a journal around Easter, with the bulk of the book being written over the summer. The article has been front-loaded so that it can become an 'early win' and a pilot for later processes and data-management. J. Evaluation. It is hoped that the project will provide useful lessons on co-production. Therefore data will be gathered for analysis and subsequent dissemination.
Collaborator Contribution The project has 10 workstreams, five of which are led by the community partner: B. Identification of Intelligence Corps materials.* Intelligence Corps materials are held by other archives, but the museum has no record of their content or location. Online finding aids and resources such as searchable newspapers will also open up fresh opportunities to pursue private papers. Collaterally, the museum will probably identify non-First World War materials for other projects. D. Review previous acquisition process.* In the 1960s the museum corresponded with veterans following newspaper appeals. It is hoped that a comprehensive trawl will identify useful snippets in the letters and the existence of papers/artefacts that were not deposited. E. Acquiring fresh information.* This fresh appeal will replicate the 1960s process but using social media to reach out, in the first instance, to the genealogy community. The assumption is that family historians with an ancestor's connection to the Intelligence Corps will happily trade their information for context, involvement, and acknowledgement. The museum's normal accession protocols will be followed. H. Curation.* The project should generate fresh material for the museum's displays. The lead applicant will also continue his previous curation support work. I. Personnel database.* During the research a large number of Intelligence Corps individuals will be identified. This data will be recorded to allow the museum to better assist with future family history enquiries. It is hoped that, in due course, the database can be made available on their website as part of the virtual museum initiative.
Impact The project is due to finish in December 2017, The following outputs are already reported on Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Talk to Friends of the Intelligence Corps Museum, 16 April 2015 Cambridge University Intelligence Seminar, 18 November 2016
Start Year 2015
 
Description Orleans House Gallery Richmond (Maunder collaborative project) 
Organisation Orleans House Gallery
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution '"After Tipperary": Theatrical entertainment and the First World War in Richmond': was a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Andrew Maunder, University of Hertfordshire. Desire to be research partners with and to learn from the community partner: Meetings took place to establish a shared vision of the project, understanding of the project goals and responsibilities of each partner. Led on outlining research scope: ensuring a clear programme of research activity and responsibility which outlined the scope of different partners' involvement i.e. who will do what, when, how and where. Provided expertise, explained the research process, and shared responsibility for research design, information gathering and application: designed a clear scope of research themes and tasks. Training for community partners and research volunteers provided. Co-ordinated regular steering group meetings to review research and ensure the research focused on the project aims and objectives of the project whilst being responsive to relevant new findings. Led on preparation of final research report. Led on developing the information booklet content to share research findings with the wider community. Approved and oversaw project budgets.
Collaborator Contribution Co-designing research: The Orleans House Gallery team worked with the academic partners to develop the research question and project, based on shared interest of war-time entertainment in the Richmond and surrounding areas. Dedicated Staff time. Brokering relationships with community groups: Orleans House Gallery was responsible for recruiting all community partners, including school groups, independent local historians and drama and theatre groups. They were also be responsible for recruiting research volunteers. All research volunteers were consulted to identify any training needs to enable them to feel supported and empowered to make an active contribution. The Gallery team also created press releases for local media soliciting material related to the research topic from the public. Advisory role: Throughout the project Orleans House team brought knowledge, skills and experience to the Academic partner in order to help shape the research and facilitate and support dialogue and collaboration between the Academic partner and community groups. Develop an Education and Outreach programme and pop-up exhibition: The Orleans House Gallery team used their expertise in delivering award-winning education programmes to ensure that engaging learning activities were developed using the research findings which are accessible to the target audiences and the wider community. Evaluation of co-design and co-production: The Orleans House Gallery team have experience in evaluating projects .
Impact Booklet: in production for 2017 Also on Researchfish (Engagement Activities): Schools/Education Pack workshop: Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery Performances (x2) of JM Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice in collaboration with IO Theatre, Twickenham Academy, 4 October 2016 Public talk and Q&A for Orleans Gallery, Richmond, 20 January 2017 `Revisiting war-time drama: The case of J.M. Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice (1918)', Beyond the Trenches blog, AHRC, 29 September 2016 A Well-Remembered Voice, Ink Pellet, September 2016 Schools workshop: Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery Exhibition: After Tipperary. Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery a part of the After Tipperary project, 2016
Start Year 2015
 
Description Preston Remembers (Vernon Collaborative project) 
Organisation Preston Remembers
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution 'Beyond the War Memorial: Life, Work and Study in Preston during the First World War': was a collaborative project funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, led by Dr Keith Vernon, University of Central Lancashire. - To co-design the project based upon their specialist knowledge of sources and topics within the broader themes of the History research group - To provide training, supervision and assistance to the volunteers, including: o A public lecture giving contextual information on the Harris Institute and Education in Britain in the early Twentieth Century. o Skills/Sources workshops. o Bespoke training on the use of the Harris Registers, 1914-19 o Involvement in the 'Research Collaboration Days'. - To support the volunteer co-ordinator and review progress and findings. - To assist with the dissemination of findings, especially supporting discussions with the IWM. - To undertake comparative analysis of the sites researched, identify patterns and variations in the educational and occupational activities and place these within a regional/national perspective regarding socio-economic change/continuity during the First World War. - To assess the method and outcomes of the project in terms of the role of centenary community research projects in informing, shaping and challenging public understandings of the conflict.
Collaborator Contribution - To co-design the scope and scale of the project within their centenary research agenda. - To publicise the project and represent it at events. - To recruit, co-ordinate and support the volunteer researchers. - To host collaborative training days, skills workshops and 'Research Collaboration Days'. - To provide access to relevant training offered by Lancashire County Council including: 'Family History Workshops', 'WW1 Family History Surgery', 'Digital Learning Sessions'. - To review progress and research findings as compiled by the volunteers. - To contribute to the co-production of public outputs - To supervise the dissemination of the research as part of pre-established routes. This will include hosting news and findings on their website and facilitating the integration of the project's findings as part of the Imperial War Museums' 'Lives of The Great War' digital memorial. Preston Remembers has already used the latter to disseminate research into Preston's war dead and they will play the lead role in liaising with IWM to integrate the findings revealed by this project.
Impact See Researchfish (Engagement Activities) for: Public Exhibition Preston Preston Study Days 16 Jan, 7 July, 12 Aug, 16 Sept, 21 Oct, 11 Nov 2016
Start Year 2015
 
Description Staffordshire Archives and Heritage Service (Hunt collaborative project) 
Organisation Staffordshire Record Office
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution 'The Mid Staffordshire Appeals Tribunal: a window onto everyday life on the Staffordshire home front' was a collaborative project, funded by the Everyday Lives in War Centre, and led by Prof Karen Hunt, Keele University, The announcement of the 'discovery' of the survival of the Mid-Staffs Military Service Appeals Tribunal papers made the breakfast news headlines on 13 August 2014 with further items on the Today programme and BBC 1 Lunchtime News. This prompted an extraordinary public response: over 100 people (rather than the anticipated 11) volunteered to help index and digitise the papers at Staffordshire Record Office (SRO). SRO had successfully bid for an HLF award to open up access to these papers, but had not anticipated such a significant response. With guidance from Professor Karen Hunt (Keele), who had provided academic support for the original HLF bid, the project was widened to pursue what the Tribunals could reveal about everyday life on the Staffordshire home front. A wide range of local sources are now being searched not only to index all those whose cases appeared before the Appeals Tribunal but also to explore what the Tribunal papers reveal about everyday life on the Staffordshire home front. This has meant understanding more about the changing nature of daily life on the home front that the Tribunals were a part. Volunteers extended their collection of evidence to include local newspapers, school log books, local authority records, and local solicitors papers (who gave support to individual Tribunal cases). The issue now is how best to handle the much wider range and volume of data in ways that the original HLF project was not designed for: its principal purpose is to index and digitise the tribunal papers. This research project, 'The Mid Staffordshire Appeals Tribunal: a window onto everyday life on the Staffordshire home front', was a response to these new circumstances. It was the means to explore how best to analyse this wide range of new material to reveal how a particular home front was experienced in everyday life and how it changed over the duration of the Great War. The project brought together an experienced historian (one of the advisers to the AHRC/BBC 'WW1 At Home' project) with the volunteers organised through SRO to produce a different kind of history. By focusing on everyday life on the WW1 home front, the project demonstrated the ways in which neglected sources such as the tribunal papers can be used by the public and academic researchers to create new narratives of WW1. However, it is not just the sources that are distinctive, so are the methods as the project aims to co-produce knowledge from a large amount of un-sifted data from a wide range of different kinds of sources. Professor Hunt worked with the SRO Staffordshire Appeals project volunteers to put together a picture of everyday life on the Staffordshire home front. Together they asked how distinctive this home front was and identified some of the ways in which Staffordshire people responded to the demands of a 'total war' as it increasingly encroached on their daily lives.
Collaborator Contribution SRO with the volunteer co-ordinator and volunteers of Staffordshire Appeals HLF project: • organised the practical arrangements to convene 6 workshops with volunteers. • prepared for the workshops (including liaising with Karen Hunt to plan the workshop; assembling relevant documents from the archives; supporting volunteers to prepare collectively or individually for the workshop). • recorded the discussions at the workshops. • organised the re-visiting of existing data and the collection of new evidence as decided at the workshop. • supported and developed blogging about the project by the volunteers. • collaborated on planning the popular history and collecting the material out of which the narrative will be created. • shared responsibility with Karen Hunt to review the process of co-production of knowledge over the lifetime of the project so that all contributions are valued. • exploredhow to make best use of the projects findings and practices in the Staffordshire Appeals HLF project's launch event in 1916 to mark the centenary of the appeal tribunals.
Impact Book and other outputs in process and will be reported in Researchfish in due course. See also: Stafford Study Day, 5 May 2016 (Researchfish; Engagement Activities)
Start Year 2015
 
Description 'Christmas on the Home Front' talk for Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited by Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies (HALS) to contribute to their autumn 2016 series of talks and the subject they requested was 'Christmas on the Home Front, 2016'. The audience was small but this meant the talk became more informal and so a good opportunity to share stories and connect with other local history enthusiasts.

An enjoyable, informal evening allowing those attending to talk and share stories.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Farming during the First World War' talk to Braughing Local History Society (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to talk to the Braughing Local History Society on the topic of Farming in the First World War after a member of the organising committee heard her speak at the HALH Symposium in 2016. The talk was well-attended and well-received. The Q&A session proved particularly valuable as local residents shared stories of farming families and memories of the FWW. The organisers were pleased as this was their first talk in the series which took the format of an afternoon tea, and they felt it worked very well as a way to encourage people to share memories and meet new people. Dr Moore was pleased as following the end of the formal Q&A she spoke to several people who were able to help with local information and an appointment has been made with a 91-year-old local man whose family were farming in the district at the time of the FWW and after - he had brought photographs along and these stimulated many conversations on who remembered what.

An enjoyable, informal afternoon which brought local residents together and encouraged them to meet with other people and share stories. A notable outcome of this activity was the opportunity to interview local farming families.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' Project Workshops, April 2016, June 2016, November 2016 (reported by Henry French) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Henry French reports that these workshops represented the primary activity of the project, and formed the final 3 in a series of 6 that extended from Sept 2015 to Nov 2016. The three workshops were held on 29th Apr, 27th June, and 7th Nov 2016. The first two events were at a meeting room at Exeter Central Library, the final meeting was at the Devon Heritage Centre. Each followed the same format, of a discussion structured around a particular research theme, and involving an invited speaker. The meeting on 27th Apr focused on Fishing and Market Gardening and Food Supply; the meeting of 27th June focused on Inshore Fishing and Oral Histories of the Home Front; the meeting on 7th Nov was a summary event, focusing particularly on agricultural statistics and recruitment of farmers during the First World War. Guest speakers were Samantha Little on Brixham fishing; Paul Cleave on food during wartime; Richard Batten on recruitment of farmers. The workshop on 27th June was also designed to discuss the template for essays to be included in the project publication, which was completed in Aug 2016, and printed in Sept & Dec 2016.

Participants included members of local history groups in Newton St Cyres, Poltimore & Huxham, Blackdown Hills, Lustleigh & South Hams, Teignmouth and Brixham, Sidmouth, Topsham, and Throwleigh (Dartmoor).

Main purpose of activity was to share information; stimulate thinking; and improve understanding of others' thinking.

Some notable impacts that arose from this activity include:

• Group interaction - described as 'project workshops and conference/ exhibition designed to be 'show-and-tell' events' in the original funding application. Feedback gathered suggests the project was successful in its focus on group interaction through bringing together participants over time into a functioning, productive research group; '...the project has brought together the separate strands into a cohesive whole with each participant having a better understanding'. There were numerous mentions of 'increased collaboration' and how this had strongly contributed towards the overall success of outputs, especially as the project had progressed. This level of group interaction was deemed successful because of the variety of group members and their motivations for taking part. One respondent observed that the 'right people were in the room' to effect co-production; '...it was good to work with people from a range of backgrounds: and who have experienced research from a range of sources. It was good to see and hear from local historians as well as professionals'. Another commented upon the fact that 'Informal workshops and conversation of both 'amateur' local researchers and professional historians very useful'. A further reaction was that 'being part of such a learned group made research between meetings all the more stimulating. Everything happened at just the right pace'. Thus for this participant, the balance between setting tasks between the project workshops and the length of time between meetings operated successfully.

• Enabling knowledge - the funding application had stated that this would be achieved 'through workshops to share research finding and presentational styles, discussing research approaches and interpretations, identify problems in source availability, interpretation or presentation'. This objective was met predominantly through the delivery of six workshop meetings, all held in Exeter over the course of fourteen months. The intention behind these was a focus upon shared interaction and involvement within the group; as much as about presenting findings and knowledge as it was formal presentations. Specialist external speakers were recruited e.g. Dr Nicola Verdon (Sheffield Hallam University), who gave a talk on female agricultural labour at the third workshop in February 2016. Experts based in the local area were also utilized, such as Dr Paul Brassley (University of Exeter), who is a leading academic on the subject of war-time farming. In this instance, Paul provided the group with an understanding of First World War farming from the national perspective, before delving into some of Devon's regional nuances. We also drew upon researchers who had conducted work over a number of years, such as Dr Jacqueline Sarsby, who shared her insight into the experiences of one farmer on the fringes of Dartmoor.

Respondent feedback on how useful the project group was for sharing research findings and source availability follow:
o 'workshop sessions mainly useful and thought provoking - made me aware of aspects that I was unaware of. Gave access to online sources not easily available, i.e. through university library'.
o 'To search for the more obscure sources, for example parish magazines'.
o 'the availability of national statistical sources e.g. parish agricultural returns and relevant national publications e.g. MAF agricultural and livestock returns'.

• Sharing expertise - this was originally listed as "Community Partners drive the project by accumulating, sharing and evaluating research expertise (those with substantial relevant research expertise will provide a 'beginners guide' to such research) and academic partners will offer a planning framework, project timetable and contextual historical information." According to one participant, the project "evolved and developed partnerships between members and their organisations. And has encouraged sharing and dissemination of knowledge".

All researchers mentioned the workshops in a positive light at some point within their feedback. To dwell upon this further, the feedback is now themed specifically into the organisation of the workshops, response to the talks given a number of internal and external speakers and, finally the opportunity to collaborate with other group members:
• Organisation of workshops and outputs: 'The workshops have been well organised and managed'...'The workshops have provided a forum and exchange' and '[I] am impressed by the speed with which 'food farming and fishing in Devon in WW1' publication was produced'

• Useful Speakers: 'Workshop seminars mainly useful and thought provoking - make me aware of aspects of courses that I was unaware of', '...excellent and very useful to have a range of speakers to promote thought, across the subject matter'. The majority consensus was that the volunteers enjoyed hearing keynote speakers at each workshop, which were able to provide an in-depth presentation to an aspect of at least one of the project's four themes.

• Collaboration and encouraging group work: 'Research can be a solitary occupation, sharing ideas is very beneficial' and 'After enjoying Richard Batten's thesis it gave me some ideas, and I realised I could bring some information to the project'. The fact that slots for open discussion within the workshops - allowing members to report on their progress in a friendly and unintimidating manner - was appreciated, and served as a method of enabling constructive conversations between project members. One particular example was an exercise prepared by Dr Neville at the second project workshop (February 2016). Its purpose was to allow all present volunteers to partake in an exercise that used the Kelly's Directories, at a suitable pace, which could then be applied independently for future research. As the project grew, interaction between members was increasingly common (Dr Paul Cleave spoke at several members' local organisations about his research on wartime food, at their request).
When asked about whether improvements could have been made to the project, eight respondents could not think of anything which could have been done differently. The remaining three provided positive statements instead - this seems to denote a good reception amongst those who took part:
• 'From my point of view I have been impressed by how the project has developed'.
• 'I felt it worked successfully as it was a good balance of group activity, expert speakers and enough time in between workshops to yield quality personal research'.
• 'Would have been good to get funding to continue the project and develop themes identified so far'.
One possible area of development would have been to provide further guidance on statistics, so as to encourage more consistent approaches across the researchers:
'Possibly further guidance on the available stats and handling/ analysing them as to some extent we all invented our own wheels.'
This was largely due to the initial challenges of sourcing the material (from the National Archives at Kew) and subsequently the pace at which people carried out individual research. As the project started to blossom, some members were happy to focus predominantly upon a niche area (e.g. the agricultural statistics of their locale), and it sometimes proved tricky to balance the needs of those working on individual project strands with the group as a whole. The recruitment of volunteers interested in fishing, who had expressed their respective interest through the 'Devon Remembers' Heritage Project, proved difficult to reconcile until the spring of 2016. Following the brokering of introductions and the successful recruitment of these individuals, this meant that we could feature a number of workshop talks to account for the research areas they were interested in exploring. Fortuitously, their introduction helped to garner the group together in forging a cohesive identity as a collective body of researchers. What operated well was the fact that existing members were very happy to interact with findings being presented by those working on other strands - this philosophy of mutual respect helped to create a positive atmosphere amongst the group as a whole. Though fostering and nurturing in this way took time - over the course of a year - it certainly seems to have paid off in the longer run.
On that same theme, the very nature of co-design and co-production proved tricky to explain as a principle, without the risk of coming across as patronising! Some volunteers had clearly identified the requirements that higher education institutions must now do more to interact through the concept of 'public engagement'. However, the open-ended scope to allow for members to design the purpose and ways of working within the project was not conveyed as effectively as it could have been. One member recorded their struggle to understand this approach;
'The original outline as presented to me was exceedingly sketchy, I almost did not proceed - I'm glad I did.'
In the future, more support should be provided to members of co-production groups to help them come together more effectively, and to realise that this ambiguity at the start of the project is essentially a core benefit of the mantra behind such research projects (rather than a hindrance). The model of presenting a range of material to members, allowing them to respond to it, and thus granting the opportunity for them to map out their own interests within the confines of the project framework, is one that worked eventually in this instance. However now that these academics have a clearer understanding of how it operates in reality, more could be done to iron out any initial concerns from volunteers.
In spite of this, it is important that such slight improvements do not overshadow the positive project feedback expressed by those involved. Overall, it is best to summarise the success of the workshops and success of the overall project management in a quote from one particularly satisfied researcher: 'Stimulating workshops, supportive leadership, and opportunity for group members to report back and create concrete outcomes. An involving and enlightening experience.'
From the post-project skills audit, 10 out of the 11 (91%) volunteer researchers mentioned that their skills had increased from the start of the project to now and had learned new knowledge or techniques, and the remaining researcher had expanded their existing skills. Most comments referred to improving the quality of their research techniques, how to better interpret and display findings and to be critical of sources:
• 'Amount of care and checking required when transcribing. Thinking about different ways to prevent figures and statistics.'
• 'Use of computer programmes to analyse and present results.'
• 'Introduction of academic rigour - ensuring option-fact based - going into greater depth.'
• 'To be critical of sources and to question perceived views of what happened, for example the governments and national understanding.'
One respondent commented on how their confidence had grown due to participation in the project to expand their research focus further; 'Skills developed to have confidence in new research topics'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Taste of the Home Front', Arundel Museum (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to attend the opening of an exhibition which formed part of Arundel Museum's HLF project entitled 'A Taste of the Home Front'. The invitation came about as Dr Moore had spoken to the project members by phone and email on a number of areas around researching food resulting from her experience of working on the St. Albans: Life on the Home Front project. She had suggested questions to consider and possible sources at the start of the project as well as supporting at various points as the project continued.

Some notable outcomes and impacts from the event included:
The project leader contributed a number of pieces on the Arundel experience for inclusion on the Everyday Lives in War website.
Continuing interest beyond the life of the HLF project into researching stories around food during the FWW and maintaining contact between the project members and the ELIW Centre.

In addition to the URL provided below, more information can also be found at: https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=2397
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1222
 
Description 'The Battle of the Somme and rural England' event at the People's History Museum, 10 July 2016 (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield gave a lecture at 'The Battle of the Somme and rural England' event at the People's History Museum, Manchester, with band Harp and a Monkey and their FWW show: 'The Great War - New Songs and Stories'.

The event was sold out with 104 enthusiastic participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Voices of the Great War', Lakeside Theatre, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project, which is still in development, will use World War 1 and post-war testimony in verbatim theatre techniques. Dr Rachel Duffett is in regular discussion with Barbara Peirson, the Lakeside Theatre director, and has also met a dramaturge and director to discuss the realisation of the project in summer 2016. The group will apply for HLF funding in spring 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description A Well-Remembered Voice, Ink Pellet, September 2016, p.12 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder from the University of Hertfordshire and AHRC's WW1 Engagement Centre 'Everyday Lives in War' contributed an article to the Ink Pellet: The Arts Magazine for Teachers about the revival of War-Time Dramas and the case of J. M. Barrie. As a tour of one of Barrie's plays, A Well-Remembered Voice (unseen since its premiere in 1918 and which deals with one of the most striking developments of war-time life: the growth of spiritualism.), got underway in autumn 2016, Dr Maunder invited the readers to take a closer look at this neglected writer, not least for his attempts to say something about the trauma of war and its impact on those left behind. Dr Maunder encourages teachers to highlight J. M. Barrie and his play A Well-Remembered Voice as 'complementary testimony enriching that offered by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Rupert Brooke'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?EID=cae33d18-1d97-4051-9cd4-405704cb2e11
 
Description Advice to Out of the Shadows project, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield is providing advice to Out of the Shadows, a Heritage Lottery funded project from Southern Voices, Manchester, about African and Indian issues in Great War. He participated in a workshop at the organisation and is involved with ongoing email advice to staff, including sharing resources from the First World War Engagement Centres.

Estimates of numbers reached will be made later after exhibitions at the People's History Museum, and Somme 100 in Manchester in spring and July 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Advice to the People's History Museum, Manchester, on Irish Citizens Army uniform being conserved for the Irish Labour History Museum, February 2016 (report by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield provided advice to the People's History Museum, Manchester, on Irish Citizens Army uniform being conserved for the Irish Labour History Museum, being displayed the Irish commemoration of the Easter Rising centenary. This also involved liaison with volunteers from the Lancashire Infantry Museum, Preston, on tying the uniform's puttees correctly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Archive Handling Session: on Friday 11th November 2pm-3.30pm in Manchester Central Library (ground floor) Archive Handling session for the RNCM-led research project 'Making music in Manchester in WW 1' (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly and her project team arranged for an opportunity for the general public passing through Manchester Central Library on Remembrance Day to talk to project team members and to handle archival material. The event was led by the Project Partner, Central Library, the PI and the RA.

The purpose was to display and make available archival findings from the project. It included archival materials from the Central Library, from the Hallé Concerts Society and from the RNCM. The event took place near the café in order to be visible to the public. The members of the project team engaged in dialogue with individuals about the project and informed a number of them.

Members of the public asked questions. Team members discussed how to display and communicate findings of the project at future events at the RNCM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Arranged talk on 'The Co-operative and the Labour Movement in the First World War' at Rochdale Pioneers Museum on 20 April 2016 (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A talk given by David Swift, a former AHRC CDA FWW UCLan PhD student under Dr Nick Mansfield, on 'The Co-operative and the Labour Movement in the First World War' at Rochdale Pioneers Museum - which stimulated an interesting discussion and questions session afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rochdalepioneersmuseum.coop/event/co-operative-labour-movements-relationship-wwi-david-sw...
 
Description Article in local newspaper (Colchester Gazette) on my research (by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett was interview/engaged in discussion with local journalist to produce a feature on WW1 food - interest stimulated by Somme centenary.

The journalist stated that they'd be interested in further features on WW1.

The article cannot currently be located via an online link, but is available in pdf format on request - by emailing a.hammerin@herts.ac.uk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description BALH article, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd contributed a short article to Local History News, published by the British Association for Local History (Oct 2015 issue). The purpose was to introduce the Everyday Lives in War themes and alert members of BALH to the centre's activities. The article flagged the call for contributions to the National Archives community event planned for September 2016.

The organising group for Sept 2016 received several new offers of papers, posters etc. The spike in website traffic in October 2015 may be linked to the article (a peak of 925 visitors, the highest monthly total for 2015).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.balh.org.uk/uploads/lhn-downloads/BALH-Local-History-News-117.pdf
 
Description Blog piece for the AHRC's 'Beyond the Trenches' (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett prepared a piece requested as part of the Somme centenary activities - an opportunity to consider the battle from a different perspective.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://beyondthetrenches.co.uk/the-stomach-for-fighting-food-on-the-somme/
 
Description Book Launch: Staffordshire COs (reported by Sarah Lloyd) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd spoke at launch of: WHO DOES WANT TO KILL ANYONE. The Story of Conscientious Objection in mid-Staffordshire and the Black Country in WW1 by Gerry Barton and John Babb.

Event hosted by the Englesea Brook Museum of Primitive Methodism.

The research/book grew out of a project the Everyday Lives in War Centre had supported at the Staffordshire Record Office, working through evidence from the mid-Staffs Military Tribunal.

Authors are now participating in a range of Engagement Centre activity, including the cross-Centre Festival on Diversity (Birmingham, March 2019) and Commemoration, Conflict and Conscience (Bristol, April 2019)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL http://www.staffordshiregreatwar.com/2018/05/a-new-book-about-conscientious-objectors-in-parts-of-th...
 
Description Braunschweig 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Partnership established with the Photomuseum Braunschweig, including a visit in October 2016 to meet the Museum archivists and view the collections. Two of the FWW Engagement Centres -- Everyday Lives in War; Voices of War & Peace -- will host a touring exhibition of photographs by Kathe Buchler. These images are not generally known outside Germany, but are remarkable for their depiction of life in Braunschweig during the first 3 decades of the 20th century, and for their contribution to the photographic art form. The exhibition will be the stimulus for a series of community engagement activities in each of the 4 venues during 2017 and 2018. http://www.photomuseum.de/kaethe-buchler/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Britain and the Easter Rising symposium, UCLan, Preston, 9 September 2016 (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield important event covering Irish and British History during the FWW, funded by ELIW and UCLan.

The activity encompassed 3 speakers from Ireland and 34 participants. (Photographs and a symposium report by Dr Jack Southern are available.)

Speakers included:
Dr Geoffrey Sloan, University of Reading, 'The British State and the Irish rebellion of 1916: An intelligence failure or a failure of response'.
Andrew Maguire, Ulster University, 'Responses to the Easter Rising in the West Riding of Yorkshire'.
Dr Gerard Noonan, Trinity College, Dublin, 'From Shepherd's Bush to Sackville Street: Volunteers from Britain in the Easter Rising'.
Dr Keiko Inoue, Trinity College, Dublin, 'English 1916 pension applications'
Dr Máirtín Ó Catháin, UCLan, 'Advocacy, memory and the Scots 1916 pensioners'.

Dr Mansfield considered that the most significant outcome/impact of the event was that it was one of only a few British activities commemorating a key FWW event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cambridge University Intelligence Seminar, 18 November 2016 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he gave a talk on British intelligence on the Western Front in 1916.

Given the venue, the audience included academics but also to a large part non-academics.

As is normal at such events, Dr Beach had a short dialogue afterwards with some individual members of the audience who asked about his material in relation to their familial connections or area that they were themselves investigating.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/seminars/seminar-pdfs/2016-2017/intelligence-mt-2016
 
Description Chelmsford Remembers talk, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A 45 minute talk (plus questions) for members of this HLF-funded project on the way in which archives can be used for WW1 research with a particular focus on personal accounts, e.g. family letter collections. Dr Rachel Duffett reported that the audience were appreciative and said that they felt better equipped to approach their research tasks following the talk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Children of the Great War Collection Day, Essex, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The aim of the day was to locate the First World War in the interviewee's past, focusing on the objects they had brought with them and their significance in the family history, and their memories of the people associated with the object/s.

Dr Rachel Duffett reported that the collection day was a great success. Sixteen volunteers came forward, an amazing variety of objects were brought along to the event along with some remarkable stories to go with them.

There were some notable highlights. One interviewee had just a single artefact with him, a scanned image of his father and uncle in uniform; another brought in a crumpled letter that her returned soldier father had written to her when she was on holidays with her mother. Playful and affectionate, it presented a striking contrast to the supposed 'stiff upper lip' of the war generation. The day finished with an interview with a woman whose grandmother had lost her husband whilst she pregnant.

Those that participated felt pleased that their family stories had been heard and would be shared through future research outputs and via Europeana. The event engaged community participants and enabled further development of the Centre's relationship with the talented team at Age Exchange
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=599
 
Description Clements Hall Local History Group Study Day (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited by the Clements Hall Local History Group to attend their one-day workshop and share her findings around military tribunals from working with the St Albans: Life on the Home Front project. Clements Hall have HLF funding to explore their own local story, and prior to this invitation Dr Moore had corresponded with project leader, Dick Hunter, on various related ELIW themes. She met with Hunter in person at the Voices of the Home Front Conference at TNA in September 2016 at which time he extended the invitation to talk about the St Albans experience as a way of flagging up the potential of the Military Tribunal sources for information on local businesses. The Clements Hall group have only just started to explore this area so this was an opportunity to flag up some less well-known stories around the tribunals and those who applied for exemption. The talk was well received with lots of really interesting questions of a comparative nature.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Comment made on an unidentified dug-up FWW hand grenade in the Ribble Valley for the Lancashire Telegraph, 11 April 2016 (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Comment made on unindentified dug up FWW hand grenade in the Ribble Valley, for Mr Neil Athey, Lancashire Telegraph feature.

A notable impact from this activity was the opportunity to impart important information to the press and the general public about a FWW weapon (grenade) that had seen the day of light after a century buried in a field - which provided context and better understanding/appreciation of the object.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/14419094.UPDATE__Bomb_disposal_experts_called_to_Ribble_Va...
 
Description Community Archive Day (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore reports that this was a joint event held with Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies (HALS) designed to showcase how the ELIW Centre and HALS can support local researchers and stimulate new ideas for research. It was held in a local library to reach a wider audience. Dr Julie Moore spoke on how the Engagement Centres can help researchers, the HLF First World War funding programmes, and the themes of the ELIW Centre. This was an informal event which offered plenty of opportunities for those attending to share ideas, stories and sources as well as making more personal connections, swapping contact details.

Some notable outcomes include participants' request about further involvement and participation, and plans made for future activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Community Network meetings, 2015 & 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact All members of the FWW Centre have discussed its activities and introduced its research themes at meetings with community groups, museum professionals, heritage organisations, government bodies and national institutions. In the case of the PI, substantial engagement around potential community projects included: Wheathampstead History Society, Council for British Archaeology, Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies, the Scout Association, National Trust, Milton Keynes District Council, St Albans Local History Society (where she spoke at the launch of their FWW book). Among the specialist meetings that have taken place are discussions with theatre companies, religious groups and cultural/ethnic organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Community/network meetings 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact All members of the FWW Centre have discussed its activities and introduced its research themes at meetings with community groups, museum professionals, heritage organisations, government bodies and national institutions. In the case of the PI, these included: the St Albans and District Local History Network, Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies, Devon Remembers, Hertfordshire 1st world war coordinating group. Centre members gave presentations at the Anglo-American Historians Conference (London, July 2014). Among the specialist meetings that have taken place are discussions with theatre companies, religious groups and members of a learning disability forum.

These activities have helped us to design a responsive programme of Centre workshops which will run from November 2014 to summer 2015. Meetings and contacts made through discussion have led to requests from new groups e.g. Lustleigh Community Archive, Devon, on conscientious objection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Concert with introduction by PI at the RNCM, 23 November 2016 (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports a Chamber Music Concert, performed by both undergraduates and postgraduates. There were c.90 members of the audience, who were both local, regional and international. The concert attracted the usual lunchtime concert goes to the RNCM; it also took place within the context of an international conference on the theme of Nationalism and Transnationalism in the Interwar Period. As a result, 38 delegates attended the concert. It was an excellent way to communicate the research to an audience from several continents.

This was a concert of repertoire at the centre of the project. It was repertoire that was performed by students at the Royal Manchester College of Music during WWI. The project has been tracing a number of these students. One was Frank Tipping, who was a prize winning violinist at the RMCM and a member of the Hallé orchestra who died in action in 1917. The PI gave an introduction to the concert outlining the project, the research and explaining the choice of repertoire.

After the concert and talks, members of the audience engaged in discussion about music during WWI, making comparisons between Manchester and other cities, such as Paris and London. Some students involved in the performances said how interesting they had found it and how it had increased their understanding of the RMCM and also music during the First World War. Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and there are plans for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rncm.ac.uk/uploads/RNCM-Autumn-2016-brochure.pdf
 
Description Conference 'Staffordshire Military Appeals Study Day' (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Invitation to speak at this one-day event came from members of the Staffordshire Archives who had contributed to the Everyday Lives In War Military Tribunals Workshop held in September 2015. Invited to talk about the St. Albans: Life on the Home Front project as a comparative example for the Staffordshire group.

Dr Moore's presentation generated lot of interest in how the records of the Military Tribunals can contribute to understanding of local economies - including requests for further information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Connecting Community Archives Workshop 28.11.16 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As Director of the FWW Engagement Centre, Sarah Lloyd was invited to take part in this event, which was convened by Niamh Moore (University of Edinburgh) and funded by the AHRC Connected Communities programme.

Event outline: In the context of the growing sophistication of community archiving, this day-long meeting aims to create a space for discussions about what further initiatives are needed to connect up community archives.

The day will open with short contributions offering a review of some past initiatives around connecting community archives and what can be learned from these. The afternoon with have a more open format for in-depth attention focused on identifying and addressing current challenges, and how we can take the day's discussions forward, through network grants and other funding opportunities.
Key questions for the day include:
• How can we connect up different community archives?
• Can we create shared or collective repositories?
• Are cloud-based repositories one possible solution?
• What other new infrastructures and standards are needed?
• What can we learn from previous efforts to create infrastructures for connecting community archives?
• What tools, platforms and workarounds are community archives currently using?
• What can we learn from analogous fields - eg the archiving of academic research, the creation of library data repositories?
• What are the challenges currently facing community archives in developing their facilities and services?
• What are the challenges around ownership, control, access, funding, sustainability and constantly shifting digital worlds?
• What possibilities and demands can be harnessed to scale up the work of community archiving?

The aim for the day is to produce a Position Paper summarising discussions on connecting community archives and to offer a review current funding possibilities for taking any emerging ideas forward.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Contact with HLF-funded FWW projects, East Midlands, 2015-16 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War team based at the University of Lincoln (led by Professor Jane Chapman) sent over ninety emails to regional HLF funded First World War project groups to inform them of the existence of the Everyday Lives in War Centre as well as the centre's main areas of expertise. The emails indicated that the Centre is available for them to contact for support and advice concerning their own and/or future research projects concerning the First World War and invited them to join the Centre's research network that is currently in the process of being extended regionally into Lincolnshire and the East Midlands.

As of March 2016, ten responses have been received as a result of these emails. One inquiry for information has been forwarded to an expert at the Centre. Follow-up emails have been sent concerning the development of the research network and important contacts have been established.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Cost of Attrition conference at Australian War Memorial, 20-22 July 2016 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he gave a paper on British intelligence in 1916.

The audience was primarily Australian. From discussions with audience members, they were drawn primarily from New South Wales, Victoria, and ACT itself.

The response from individual audience members was very positive. Many stated that the material was new to them and had adjusted their perception.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.awm.gov.au/1916-cost-attrition/
 
Description Duffett media activity 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 6th Jan 2015 - Dr Rachel Duffett gave a short interview on Essex Radio's events' slot: brief discussion on commemoration and publicity for Essex event. 'Remembering the War' on Jan 7th
22nd May 2015 - Feature in the Essex County Standard on 'The FWW in Biscuits'
26th May - Feature in the Colchester Gazette on 'The FWW in Biscuits'
14th Apr - BBC researcher (Lewis Harding) re. German biscuits in WW1: Duffett gave information and suggested sources
23rd Apr - BBC researcher (Michelle Owen) re. pubs and food in WW1: Duffett offered ideas and information
19th Nov - BBC researcher (Henry Fraser) re. the impact of WW1 on canned food: Duffett provided information
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description ECR conference IWM North 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On the 26 & 27 February 2016, IWM North played host to the inaugural event organised by the First World War Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers Network (FWW Network). The conference committee comprised Philippa Read (Chair), Chris Phillips, David Swift and Oliver Wilkinson, with Nick Mansfield from the Everyday Lives in War Centre acting as a mentor. The group, set up in January 2014 as a self-sustaining off-shoot of IWM North's Academic Network is dedicated to connecting early stage researchers working on any aspect of the First World War, in order to facilitate new debates, ideas and collaborations relating to the study of the conflict. We further aim to create partnerships between these scholars and organisations, groups, and individuals operating beyond the academy who can offer alternative insights and agendas, opening possibilities for the co-design and co-production of research. Our event, held in the Libeskind Room of IWM North was, therefore, designed to be inclusive.

It combined the latest academic scholarship from established and emerging researchers (30 research papers were delivered in parallel sessions over the two days alongside three keynote addresses by leading scholars in the field), with participation from heritage agencies, libraries, museums, archives, funding bodies, community groups and individual researchers. The academic contributions, which included substantial postgraduate involvement supported by Royal Historical Society bursaries, were augmented by information stands representing important archival repositories (The National Archives), museums (IWM; Leeds Museums & Galleries), organisations (Historic England), funding bodies (The Heritage Lottery Fund; AHRC First World War Engagement Centres), and ongoing commemorative projects (IWM Lives of the First World War).

Meanwhile, the conventions of the traditional academic conference were stretched thanks to performances and displays from creative artists inspired by the First World War. Social media was mobilized both to promote the event and to carry the ideas and debates taking place in Manchester to a wider audience via the network's Twitter account (@FwwNetwork) and conference hashtag (#fwwcm16). As of 28 March 2016 the network's Twitter account has 777 followers, is following 1,314, and has made 336 tweets). The five AHRC First World War Engagement Centres, who co-funded the event, were represented throughout the conference and contributed to the discussions and debates that it facilitated. Their participation consisted of papers offered by researchers linked to the various centres and an illuminating roundtable discussion between scholars, community researchers, archives and funding bodies. The conference was almost full to capacity with ninety two participants attending across the two days.

Following the success of the conference, the Network approached ELIW for help in developing opportunities for early career and postgraduate researchers. A successful bid to the AHRC has funded the Network for a further 3 years, with a programme including community engagement and research co-production.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://fwwnetwork.wordpress.com/
 
Description ELIW meeting with Dept for Culture, Media & Sport Centenary team 15.2.17 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd represented the Everyday Lives in War Centre at a meeting between the First World War Engagement Centres & the DCMS team responsible for the official national programme of centenary activities. It was an opportunity to outline the role of the centres and what is distinctive about ELIW. This was the team's first introduction to the AHRC scheme; the Centre Directors gained an insight into the team's thinking and future plans. The outcome of the meeting was an agreement that the Centres and DCMS would work more closely together until the end of the centenary.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Email correspondence with HLF funded First World War projects (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman reports an email dialogue with a large number of regional HLF funded First World war projects. Correspondence involved gathering information on each of these projects, introducing them to the Everyday Lives in War centre's activities and offering expert advice and support. Several of these projects also sent materials related to their project's outputs to the university. Geographical reach primarily to the East Midlands and Lincolnshire area.

Professor Owen Davies was put in contact with the project 'Derbyshire Lives Through The First World War' to discuss the popularity of spiritualism during the period. This was in response to a request from the project officer, Glynn Wilton, for expert information on the issue.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Englesea Brook Museum of Primitive Methodism, nr Crewe 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'Oh what a lovely war-resistance!' The ELIW Centre financially supported Englesea Brook Museum's musical evening on 15 September 2016, exploring the stories of those who, for a variety of reasons, stood against the First World War, with Clive Barrett from the Peace Museum, Bradford. A scratch choir of 25 local people was recruited for the event, who met for two rehearsals beforehand, and there was audience participation. As the Museum was too small to host the event, the nearby Alsager Methodist Church was hired for the occasion. 65 people attended.

This activity achieved 2 immediate outcomes: expanded the Centre's Network of community-based projects researching resistance to war; led to further engagement when Sarah Lloyd invited to a meeting with volunteers working on Staffordshire and Primitive Methodist conscientious objectors (17.11.16)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk
 
Description English Heritage Blog (reported by Ingrid Sharp) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact English Heritage launched the Richmond Castle: Cell Block project in May 1916; the anniversary of the Richmond Sixteen being sent to France. In the lead up to this English Heritage staff created content for the English Heritage website based on new research conducted by Megan Leyland (Senior Properties Historian) and Kevin Booth (Senior Curator).

Dr Ingrid Sharp reports that English Heritage was very eager for the University of Leeds staff and interns to feed into this content and in particular to provide some of the contextual information needed to understand the cell block. Charlotte Tomlinson wrote a well-received article, 'Attitudes to Conscientious Objection' and Cyril Pearce contributed a vital article, 'Conscription and Conscience in the First World War'. A new article based on the final report would allow us to think more specifically about attitudes in Richmond as opposed to more general responses to the First World War.

The project's findings will inform the context of the larger EH project on the Richmond Castle Cells. This was the first analysis of local press coverage of tribunals and the issue of COs, so will provide a useful starting point for further investigation.

This was excellent for the postgraduate researchers, who developed skills in writing for a general audience and showcased co-produced research, as the contribution of the volunteers and interns was shared in these outputs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/richmond-castle/richmond-graffiti/attitudes-to-cos/
 
Description Everyday Lives in War Centre Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Centre website, providing introductory articles on research themes, blogs, information on events, guide to resources. One major feature of the website is to showcase community research and researchers through news items, blogs and digital postcards. We encourage contributions from community groups and members of collaborative projects: the numbers of these have been steadily increasing, with over 15 news items and blog posts in the last 6 months of 2016.

In late 2014, the website was redesigned as a word press site and hosted by the university. Statistics for 2015:
Unique visitors: 7,451
Page Views: 102, 038

Statistics for 2016:
Unique visitors: 22,083
Page views: 304,281

January 2017:
Unique visitors: 3,848
Page views: 50,509

By early 2017, the website was getting around 400 visitors a day, with spikes (e.g. 1685 visitors on 18 Feb 2017). The site will be re-launched on 1 March 2017 to develop and showcase a series of additional activities (Voices of the Home Fronts conference community; Postgraduate and Early Career Research Network; collaborative project communities).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Everyday Lives in War: Centre opening event 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Series of activities: roadshow panel looking at FWW artefacts brought in by members of the public; project displays from a range of community and heritage organisations; a 'talking wall'; 3-minute soap box (academic and community-based researchers); performance of J.M. Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=122

Activity initiated follow-up invitations from community groups and from local government organisations to share resources and to participate in their commemorative activities. Event attended by representatives from around 50 non-HEI organisations and groups.

Local awareness of the FWW Centres increased with requests to speak at events; Centre theme of food and farming picked up by several history societies; requests from Buckinghamshire to re-stage part of the event in Milton Keynes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?page_id=125
 
Description Exhibition and Event held by East Herts WW1 Group 'Seeing it Through' (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to give a talk on Everyday Life in War at an event and exhibition set up by the East Herts WW1 group for their HLF project entitled 'Seeing it Through'. This was an all day event with members of the public dropping in at various points and allowed an opportunity to engage with visitors on a one to one basis on their own stories of the FWW, as well as flagging up some of the less familiar stories. A more formal talk was also given on the theme of Everyday Life in War. This format worked well as it caught those who were just passing by on a Saturday and may not have had any particular interest in the FWW, but once present found themselves sharing many stories and asking questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Exhibition at Rochdale Pioneers Museum, 2015-16 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Exhibition on the role of co-operative movement in the FWW: 'From Shop Floor to Front Line' at the Rochdale Pioneers Museum 27. 6.15 to 14.5.16 . Dr Nick Mansfield advised on the exhibition and a related programme of events, as CI with the Everyday Lives in War FWW Centre, and as part of his ongoing position as a member of the Co-operative Heritage Trust Advisory Board.

Visitor numbers are estimated as c 10,000, largely from the North West, but including national and international visitors to the Museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.rochdalepioneersmuseum.coop./wwi/
 
Description Exhibition at St Albans Local History Day, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to exhibit at a local history day. Around 10 other third sector organisations attended. She engaged in conversation around memories and understanding of the First World War with visitors to the library.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Exhibition at University of Hertfordshire Public Engagement event, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to attend an exhibition and series of talks on public engagement within a University environment. Staff from across disciplines attended. She flagged up the existence of the Centre and possibility for co-producing research on topics which those attending might not previously have considered.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Exhibition: After Tipperary. Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery a part of the After Tipperary project, 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports that this new exhibition was seen at Richmond Theatre and at libraries across the borough of Richmond. Estimated reach: 20,000.

The exhibition showed some of the ways in residents of Richmond used theatrical entertainment to boost morale between 1914 and 1918.
The exhibition used rare photographs and documents to tell a variety of wartime stories. The planning and research of It involved volunteers from Richmond.

Plans are currently underway for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://museums.eu/event/details/117830/after-tipperary-theatre-in-richmond-ww1-exhibition
 
Description Exhibition: Shakespeare and the First world War. Produced in collaboration with the Shakespeare Institute and King Edward IV School, Stratford, 31 July-4 August 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports that this new exhibition was seen at the World Shakespeare Congress (Stratford-upon-Avon, 31 July - 4 August 2016) and at Voices of the Home Front (National Archives, Kew, 8-10 September 2016). It was on public display. The main purpose of this activity was to share information and to stimulate thinking.

The exhibition Shakespeare and the First World War showed some of the ways in which Shakespeare and his plays were used to boost morale between 1914 and 1918.
The exhibition used rare photographs and documents to tell a variety of wartime stories. These ranged in location from King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon, whose pupils put on a swashbuckling production of Henry V, to Hollywood where D.W. Griffith produced a lavish version of Macbeth, to Ruhleben prisoner of war camp in Germany where inmates staged The Merry Wives of Windsor because it reminded them of home. The planning and research It involved representatives from the Shakespeare Institute, the Cadbury Research Library and King Edward IV School.

Audience feedback reported that the exhibition raised awareness about a forgotten aspect of WW1. The story of King Edward IV's school pupils who enlisted in 1914 was commented on as being powerful and moving.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description FWW briefing for HLF Staff, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 4.12.15 Dr Nick Mansfield gave a Knowledge Briefing on 'Working Class people and the First World War' for Heritage Lottery Fund staff dealing with FWW projects. The North West office was linked by video conference to all HLF offices.

Very positive feedback from the HLF: 'Nick, That was fabulous! Everyone in London looked engaged throughout, and I learnt loads. What a lovely way to spend a Friday afternoon - thank you.'
Subsequently he has been asked to do an HLF blog on rural areas and the Battle of the Somme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during FWW, Research Project, 2015-16 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The 'Fishing, Food Supply and Farming in Devon during the First World War' research project, orchestrated by Henry French and James Wallis at Exeter University, has now held three project workshops (in Sept. and Nov. 2015, and Feb. 2016). Through the three workshops, a group of 15-20 community volunteers have identified a number of research projects which they will undertake, with their local history groups. The most advanced of these projects is a survey of the Annual Returns of Agricultural Statistics for the County of Devon, between 1912 and 1920. These have been identified as a means of establishing the effect of the war on farm production across the county, and a means to compare particular parishes with a more general 'county-wide' perspective. Henry French and James Wallis gathered digital photos of the Agricultural Returns in December directly from the National Archives (TNA), which volunteer groups have been analysing for sample parishes in the county. The first results of this research were reported at the February meeting, and we anticipate more detailed research conclusions will be reached by the next meeting in April. We are also now in the planning phase for delivering some of our targeted outputs scheduled for the autumn.

At each project workshop we have also had a keynote talk by an expert on farming in the First World War. These have included Dr Paul Brassley on changing agricultural production and the role of government, and Dr Nicola Verdon on the role of the Women's War Agricultural Committees. These talks have provided information on relevant subjects to the volunteer group, and have been very useful in illustrating how to undertake research tasks, and which sources are useful.

Time was recently spent time developing the project's recent online presence on the Hub's website with blog entries from volunteers. We are also continuing to provide a stream of varied data sets to work on (including recently catalogued material from the Devon Rural Archive at Modbury) as well as additional material from TNA and the House of Commons Research Papers. Furthermore we have scheduled meetings to progress the fishing strand, working in collaboration with community historians from Brixham, Sidmouth and the Teign Heritage Centre.

The next three topics for groups to research are:
a) Allotments - These have the potential to involve research by groups in urban as well as rural locations.
b) Food - Dr Paul Cleave will give a talk at the next meeting about the study of food, food history, food supply and food substitutes during the FWW.
c) Fishing - Liaising with the Devon Heritage Centre's 'Devon Remembers' Project Officer, Katherine Findlay, we will establish contacts with groups at Brixham, Sidmouth and Torbay Museums to help with the preparation of a travelling display.

Local history groups in Newton St Cyres, Poltimore and Huxham, Blackdown Hills, Lustleigh and South Hams have been undertaking research projects on the agricultural returns of farm production 1912-20, and sharing findings and research expertise at the project workshops and by email.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1287
 
Description Feathers & Pins Productions 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Ongoing relationship with this theatre group and their touring production, 'Seeing it through'. PI wrote in support of HLF application, Centre workshop contributed to script development and Centre team answered research queries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Feature in The Conversation (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following discussions with an editor, Dr Rachel Duffett wrote a piece on teeth, soldiers and WW1 - including diet, dentistry, etc.

It is anticipated that through this initial contribution, there will be opportunities for further pieces.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theconversation.com/biscuit-for-breakfast-trench-warfare-was-hard-on-soldiers-teeth-64457
 
Description Feature on food at the Battle of the Somme for History Extra (online supplement of BBC History Magazine) (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett reports that the centenary of the Somme resulted in several requests for features on the soldiers' trench eating experience.

It is anticipated that this article for the online supplement of the BBC History Magazine will result in opportunities for further features.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.historyextra.com/article/feature/food-and-drink-somme-frontline-soldier-experience
 
Description Feature: The Huffington Post (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett was asked for a feature on food at the Battle of the Somme - the aim was to provide a different take on the events of 1916 and explore the soldiers' experience through their diet.

It is anticipated that, having made one contribution, there will be opportunities for further pieces.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-rachel-duffett/the-somme_b_10755634.html
 
Description First World War Centres' Northern Tour, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact From 8-10 September 2015 the five AHRC funded First World War engagement centres hosted their autumn roadshow - Your Community in the First World War - in Manchester, Leeds and Newcastle. Each event offered talks from university- and community-based researchers, and a variety of stalls and exhibits. The events also included some undirected networking time as well as lively roundtable discussions.

These three events aimed to bring together community groups and other organisations developing or working on projects around the heritage of the First World War in order to share experiences, exchange ideas, learn about resources and explore possible sources of funding. The roadshow was a collaboration with a broad range of community project representatives, local historians, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the First World War Centenary Partnership, Lives of the First World War, Historypin, and the Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis (CDDA).

Contacts made at the events created links between projects (e.g. introductions via the Centre to projects in different geographical locations with similar interests), consolidated partnerships through networking and suggested new project ideas (e.g. through use of the Council for British Archaeology's Home Front Legacy tools). Contacts are still emerging some 5 months after the roadshow.

Experience in 2015 will feed into plans for cross-centre activity in 2016. These will attempt to widen the demographic profile of participants, build on feedback received (e.g. include more practical information), and expand the use of social media to support and share the roadshow.

Report from Dr Nick Mansfield: 'I had specific relevant conversation and offered individual help and advice to Writing on the Wall Merseyside, Friends of Stockport Cemetery, South London Community History Blog, Frank Finlay of Leeds University, National Rail Museum, York, and Whitworks Theatre, Leeds.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://ww1engage.org.uk/633/
 
Description First World War Roadshow 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War centre hosted a First World War roadshow on 29 November 2014 at the University of Hertfordshire. A general invitation was circulated around community groups within moderate travelling distance of Hatfield, and the roadshow was advertised on the centre's website as an opportunity to discover more about photos, artefacts or memorabilia that people might have from the First World War or the years immediately following it.

Experts in a range of First World War related topics were on hand to give their insights into what such objects can reveal about experiences during the war and its aftermath. The experts also contributed 9 table-top displays of FWW material. Participants were able to browse objects brought along on the day, and talk to experts on a one-to-one basis. Around 40 people attended from Hertfordshire and adjoining counties with a range of artefacts, including a pair of candlesticks, a watercolour picture, medals, photographs and albums.

The event was a networking opportunity for the experts involved (Centre academics; Western Front Association; National Army Museum; the HLF-funded project Herts at War; Imperial War Museum; RAF Museum Hendon; Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies; Hertfordshire Scouts; IWM; plus an independent researcher into FWW airfields). All of these individuals or the organisations they represented have subsequently been involved in Centre activities (e.g. the county scouting archivist featured on a digital postcard made by the centre https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1009#more-1009). Researchers discovered new material. Members of the general public learned from one another and from the table-top displays; those new to the Centre joined the mailing list.

Experience from this first roadshow also informed planning for the second roadshow at Bletchley Park in September 2015 (taking the roadshow off-campus; including a 3-D scanner).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=135
 
Description First World War Roadshow, Bletchley Park 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives Roadshow at Bletchley Park on 11 September 2015 was part of the Milton Keynes Heritage Open Days Programme. Centre researchers Jim Beach (military intelligence) and Owen Davies (supernatural beliefs) were joined by panellists from the Imperial War Museum, National Army Museum, Historypin and Bletchley Park itself.

Over the course of two hours around 90 visitors came to the Roadshow. Most of these were visiting the museum and encountered the Roadshow in the course of their tour. Bletchley Park offered free admission to anyone coming specifically to attend the Roadshow, including 5 people with FWW memorabilia to show the experts. Owen Davies's collection of FWW protective charms and talismans offered an insight into less familiar aspects of the conflict, with the display eliciting several family stories, including one man whose Australian grandfather was considered so 'lucky' in battle that other men tried to join his regiment. From a research point of view, it was interesting that several members of the public knew about the swastika being a positive ancient symbol.

The event gave us an opportunity to hear the views of those who had not sought out a FWW event, rather than the more usual self-selected audiences. Experience at the Roadshow will inform plans for future events (e.g. inclusion of displays) and will feed into understanding of the centenary.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=822
 
Description First World War School Logbook Workshop, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact A half-day workshop on First World War school logbooks; held at Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies on 2 February 2015. Workshop aims: to suggest possibility of applying for HLF funding; to connect groups to flag up differences and similarities of experience for a bigger project; to alert participants to the value of log books as a source for social history and an insight into everyday life.

Centre researchers had reported back from events in 2014 that a number of individuals and local history groups were looking at these sources as a centenary project. The workshop responded to these interests by providing an opportunity to compare findings and set the logbooks in broader context, with a postgraduate student explaining the legislative framework that had created this material. Participants shared research interests, collaborated on an exercise analysing a sample page and in some cases brought along logbooks currently in private collections. The county archivist addressed a major source of anxiety among the groups -- copyright and data protection; he also created a small exhibition of logbooks from the archive. The event was also an occasion to provide some ad hoc training on the use of electronic sources (notably Find My Past).

There was extensive discussion and networking on the day. Participants suggested a follow-on event; information on copyright etc was circulated afterwards. One group from the workshop gave a talk, 'School log books: a rich resource for local historians' at the next meeting of the St Albans and District Local History Network in October 2015.

Most attendees were unaware of the FWW Engagement Centres and/or HLF so good opportunity to make contact beyond local history groups or those already engaged in FWW research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=938
 
Description Fred's Theatre Company, Birmingham, 2015+ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder advised on the planning of a touring production of 3 WWI plays by Fred's Theatre, a Birmingham-based company. Working in conjunction with the Shakespeare Institute he provided materials and contextual information. He also contributed a blog to the company's website (link below). The plays, including Miles Malleson's play about shellshock Black Èll (banned in 1916), are a way of reintroducing modern audiences to some of the cultural life on the home front in the years 1914-1918.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://friendorfoe2016.wordpress.com/2016/01/16/revisiting-first-world-war-drama/
 
Description From the Trenches to Tendring, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact From the Trenches to Tendring is an HLF-funded project. It aims to capture and digitise WW1 material sent home from the battle front to local families with a particular emphasis on postcards. The objects are then researched and the information obtained is presented on a series of display boards to be exhibited in public buildings and schools in the area. There have been a wide range of events stemming from the project; from tea dances to talks, to collection days. Attendees were also invited by an artist to express their responses to the war by creating their own collages from reproduced WW1 material.
Dr Rachel Duffett, who was present at a number of events, provided support in developing understanding of the social and cultural impact of the war. Her involvement in the project has developed since its launch which took place in early July 2015. Since then she has also posted information and updates on the wordpress site (link below). Links have also been forged with members of the Friends of Jaywick Martello Tower, a local history group supporting the project, with WW1 knowledge helping in the analysis of their collection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://trenchestotendring.wordpress.com/
 
Description From the Trenches to Tendring, HLF funded project - continued support/historical advice and talk at opening of the exhibition (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project combined historical research and artistic outputs in an original and unusual manner; in addition to the more usual displays and banners, there were embroidered postcards and commemorative artefacts produced by a local artist. (The project had a specific remit to work with local schools on the postcards and artworks they'd collected.)

The opening evening of the exhibition was attended by Dr Rachel Duffett (who also gave a talk), along with a number of different groups, from local historians and members of a sewing circle who had worked with the artist to produce modern versions of WW1 silk postcards to representatives from Essex County Council and the WFA.

Dr Duffett's talk and the exhibit were received with enthusiasm.

In addition to cementing relationships with local groups, Dr Duffett encouraged the project manager to write up some of the details of the project because she believed that it was interesting and publishable. Dr Duffett offered comments on the draft and suggested that it be sent to BALH Local History News, and it appeared there at the end of the year. Link to the article can be found here: http://www.balh.org.uk/publications/local-history-news/local-history-news-number-121-autumn-2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://trenchestotendring.wordpress.com/
 
Description Great War Schools Conference, Loughborough Grammar School, 13 November 2015 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that, under the auspices of the Charnwood Great War Centenary Project, a one-day 'conference' with (secondary) state and private school pupils listening to presentations from historians and questioning a panel which included historians. Dr Beach was a member of the panel.

Schools participating were from the Charnwood district of Leicestershire. Main purpose was to stimulate thinking.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description HLF East of England Regional Office meetings 2015+ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Series of meetings and contacts with HLF East of England team: initially to introduce the Everyday Lives in War Centre, discuss how the Centre could support local FWW projects, and review contacts we already had with HLF-funded projects in the region. Subsequent engagement included ongoing conversations, HLF recommending that we support specific HLF-funded FWW projects and a request that we join together to run a workshop (see separate Researchfish entry for HLF workshop in 2016).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Harwich project 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Approached by New Heritage Solutions, CIC, to support project based on Harwich Haven. This community collaboration connects the surrender of the German submarine fleet, the legacies of the FWW and the Kindertransport in 1938. In developing the project, ELIW members Lloyd & Duffett attended meetings with Harwich Town Council, Jan 2016 & the Wiener Library, May 2016. Introduced Nick Patrick of New Heritage Solutions to the Gateways Engagement Centre.

Following project funding in 2018, Rachel Duffett and Sarah Lloyd joined the project Advisory Board.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018,2019
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Hatfield Galleria 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The First World War Centre had a stall at the University of Hertfordshire's outreach event in the Galleria shopping centre, Hatfield on 18 Feb 2016 (school half term). An estimated 200 shoppers strolled through the exhibition, with around 20 stopping for extended discussion.

This was an opportunity to meet new people and alert them to the work of the centre. We invited one of our partners, Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies, to join us at the stand, which created further synergies and plans for future collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Hertfordshire Association for Local History (HALH) 'Hertfordshire at War' Symposium (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore is a member of the Hertfordshire Association for Local History (HALH) and was invited to give a paper on the theme of Everyday Life in War in Hertfordshire during the FWW. This was a good opportunity to showcase the work of the Centre and also to cover some of the less well-known stories from the FWW and stimulate new research. The Q&A session was particularly valuable as it allowed people to share their own local experiences and to compare with other parts of the county and the wider nation.

A number of people said they would take ideas back to their communities for further research. The day event also offered the opportunity for further one to one conversations around sources, questions and the current research climate.

As a result of this day, Dr Moore conceived the idea of a new project into 'Anonymous Women' -- those women who are generally lost to the records but who were doing some of the basic work that kept communities going during the FWW. In addition, Dr Moore was able to introduce members of the St. Albans: Life on the Home Front Project group to the organiser of the HALH 2017 Symposium which will be on the theme of 'Women of Hertfordshire'; they have now agreed to give a talk on the women of St. Albans in the FWW at this event.

Some notable outcomes and impacts resulting from this activity include:
1. a new project which looks at 'Anonymous Women' and which will seek to connect local projects, including completed HLF projects, around this theme.
2. facilitating an opportunity for members of the St. Albans project to share their work with a wider audience
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.halh.org.uk/symposium.html
 
Description Hertfordshire's Hidden Heroines 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War Centre/University of Hertfordshire Heritage Hub worked with Hertfordshire's Hidden Heroines project (HLF funded): in Feb 2016 five undergraduate students ran outreach for the project at the Hatfield Galleria (see separate Researchfish entry for that event). In October 2016, the project displayed exhibition panels at the University of Hertfordshire, including material from the First World War period. The project team ran a related drama and mask workshop with 9 undergraduate students.

We engaged around 100-120 directly though the exhibition, and indirectly the number was closer to 400-500 with posters, plasma screens, social media (twitter), University news items and email circulations. There were a number of students and staff who had expressed interest in the stories, many writing a postcard of their own heroines and signing the guestbook. Overwhelmingly positive responses from those that engaged with the project. There were some responses singling out a particular heroine and questioning why they were included, three individuals questioned Boudica's inclusion in the exhibition - this gave an opportunity to discuss in depth aspects of HHH and the project themes. Following on from the drama workshop there were no less than 3 emails from students who thanked for putting the event on and were keen to find out about more similar activities
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.hertshiddenheroines.org.uk/
 
Description History Pin project site (reported by Ingrid Sharp) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Ingrid Sharp reports that, throughout the project, the research interns have used the website HistoryPin to plot various elements of the process to the public. This has included the information/context sheets compiled to give context to the volunteers, a short article on attitudes to pacifism today, and a number of photographs held in the Liddle Collection at Leeds University. This has allowed the research to be shared alongside many other interesting projects in the area and emphasised its local focus.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.historypin.org/en/social-attitudes-to-cos-in-the-first-world-wa/geo/53.800755,-1.549077,...
 
Description Historypin Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War Centre collaborated with Historypin to develop and seed a FWW discussion forum. The Forum was designed to enable public discussion and support the activities of the Centenary Hub. The pilot was structured to explore if and how a forum could prompt and support the online conversations that contribute to community research and to the aims of the Engagement Centre programme. The team developed 7 discussion threads: each one focused on a topic known to be of interest to community groups (including conscientious objection, food and farming).

Both Historypin and the Everyday Lives team observed very low levels of engagement and contribution, with much a higher number of visitors viewing but not joining the discussion. This was despite very targeted active outreach and personal follow ups with a range of individuals and groups explaining how to use the Forum and inviting them to participate in relevant topics. Invited participants have given a range of informal responses about this might be. Responses largely coalesced around the following concerns: time management, other commitments and priorities, reluctance about publishing 'work in progress' on an open online environment, copyright concerns, and a general dislike of social media amongst invited participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.historypin.org/en/first-world-war-centenary
 
Description Home Front project, St Albans, 2015-17 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore worked with members of the St Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archaeological Society who wished to research and share the story of St Albans Home Front during the First World War. She supported the research and writing up of material on Conscientious Objection and issues around Food, as well as contributing original research. She was supported in this by a team of ten, and was able to suggest sources and approaches to the material. She mentored members of the project, nervous of writing up their material, and, together with Sarah Lloyd, read drafts of chapters and supported the editors with the final submission (publication September 2016, University of Hertfordshire Press).
Leading on from this project, members of the group have presented material at Everyday Lives in War Centre workshops and will be contributing a paper to the 'Voices of the Home Front' conference to be held at The National Archives in September 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Horniman Museum, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Curator of the Horniman Museum, London, assembled several experts to see their amulets and talismans collections, including their First World War items, to explore how they might be presented and displayed a future permanent gallery at the Museum. Prof Owen Davies (Everyday Lives in War, FWW Engagement Centre) was one of those experts and he subsequently gave the Curator his work in progress on FWW amulets and talismans.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Hosting Herts at War 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following a request from Herts at War (funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund), the ELIW Centre has hosted the group's monthly lecture series. Attendance at each lecture has ranged from 100-300.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL http://www.hertsatwar.co.uk/talks
 
Description Imperial War Museum Centenary Partnership Meeting, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd attended the Centenary Partnership meeting at the Imperial War Museum, London, on 10 November 2015. In the course of the day, she participated in sessions and chaired a table discussion. The event was an opportunity to connect with projects across the country whose topics intersected with the centre's research themes: e.g. the Fedora Group (subsequent email introduction to Dr Andrew Maunder for discussion of actors conscripted in 1916).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Inroad Productions theatre consultation, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder had a meeting with Inroad Productions who are developing a play about Conscientious Objectors in World War One, to be performed in Charleston House and at Seaford in Sussex in summer 2016. The company made further enquiries and requests for information after the initial consultation. The project is ongoing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Interview for Canals-The Making of a Nation, BBC, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield gave advice to Georgia Plimbley, North West Weekly Unit, BBC on the production of a film for the Canals- the Making of a Nation BBC series, especially on John Ward MP, the Navvies Union and the 3 Public Works battalions raised during the FWW.

Filmed interview on site at Eccles on 29.5.16. Broadcast on BBC4 and BBC 2 NW in September 2015 and is being repeated on BBC 2 in the spring of 2016. Estimated ratings of 2 million viewers. The broadcast also resulted in feedback from academics and the general public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Introduction to HLF funding collaboration with HLF East of England 19.11.16 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War, First World War Engagement Centre and the Eastern Region of the Heritage Lottery Fund presented an afternoon of talks and activities on 19.11.16. The programme included an introduction to the various HLF funding streams and application processes. Two groups funded by HLF showcased their projects and demonstrated a variety of possible approaches to First World War topics. Julie Moore & Sarah Lloyd from ELIW introduced the Centre and raised awareness of diverse FWW stories, and how a focus on everyday life can open new perspectives on the conflict. We also discussed ways of creating a permanent record of a community project, and Ciara Meehan (ELIW) shared ideas on negotiating social media. There was also an opportunity to ask questions of HLF staff and to have help with completing an initial enquiry form.

This event was core business for the Engagement Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Keynote lecture for National Archives conference, Voices of the Home Fronts, 18-20 September 2016 (reported by Michael Roper) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Michael Roper was the keynote speaker at the three-day National Archives conference, Voices of the Home Fronts, 18-20 September 2016. The lecture was to a mixed audience, including members of the general public and professional and historians.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/voices-of-the-home-fronts-programme-announced/
 
Description Keynote speaker at 'Onto the table: food production, processing and distribution in the 19th, 20th, 21st centuries', Lisbon, 23-25 February 2017 (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett was a keynote speaker at an international conference in Lisbon, Portugal, on food production, processing and distribution over the past three centuries. The audience was mixture of academics, people from the food industry, media food writers and museum personnel.

It was a diverse audience and there was a lively discussion during the question and answer session - it was evident that similar work on WW1 soldiers and their food is being carried out on the Portuguese army, so some interesting links forged.

Connections were made with WW1 researchers in Portugal - both for home and abroad - and information shared.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://food2016ihc.wordpress.com/portfolio/english-version/
 
Description Lecture given at the First World War Commemoration and Memory Conference at IWM North, 26 February 2016 (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield gave a lecture at the First World War Commemoration and Memory conference at IWM North, organised by the Northern FWW PG/ECR group. Dr Mansfield presented his paper, 'Connections between Great Wars; 1642, 1805 and 1914'.

The geographical reach was primarily NW, but also Midlands and national.

The main purpose of the activity was to share information and to stimulate thinking.

A notable impact arising from the activity was the ongoing liaison with academics and general public audiences about aspects of the FWW.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Local History Network, St Albans, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to attend the local history network on 17 October 2015. She spoke to attendees on possibility of HLF projects and gave talk on the First World War Engagement Centres. Shared information on Military Tribunals as a source for local history. Invitation came from organiser who was a member of an HLF 'All Our Stories' project (Bringing the History of Smallford Station to Life) with whom Julie Moore and Sarah Lloyd had worked as part of a Connected Communities grant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Lunchtime concert at the RNCM with repertoire relating to the project - followed by a 'meet the team' event and the chance for the audience to see and handle some of the archival materials, 21 November 2016 (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports a live performance by students at the RNCM with repertoire linked to their project. It was followed by a 'meet the team' event. Members of the projects -- PI, Partners, RA, Project Assistant and two volunteers -- spoke about their work and findings and engaged in discussion with members of the audience.

The geographical reach included both local and regional. The audience was the general public which attends the lunchtime concerts at the RNCM. This project was able to benefit from the RNCM's regular concert schedule. It provides a great opportunity for reaching the concert-going public. The Carole Nash Recital room was full. The students organised and performed the works in the concert.

The audience of 95 people was made up of business people in their lunch break; parents with young children, and retired people. It was mainly the latter group who were able to stay for the 'meet the team' session that followed the concert.

The purpose was to present new knowledge to audiences and to engage them in reflection and discussion.

Students were active in selecting the programme. Some audience members were able to stay afterwards to discuss the project with the team. This group was forthright about their thoughts on our short presentations; they also provided suggestions about how they might like to be involved and what might interest them. They were keen to have a participatory session with amateur choral groups performing some of the repertoire. Prof Kelly and her project team are looking into the possibility of putting on something along these lines in the next year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rncm.ac.uk/uploads/RNCM-Autumn-2016-brochure.pdf
 
Description Maggie's Cultural Crawl (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports a live performance of a key work, which was performed by one of the RMCM students who subsequently died in the war -- Frank Tipping.

The event was both regional and national; it was attended by anyone associated with Maggie's Centres. This is a charity that supports families that are touched by cancer.
https://www.maggiescentres.org/culturecrawl/

Over 50 people attended this event at the RNCM. The participants and organisers from the Maggie's Centres were fascinated with the musical performance. They were free to sample the music, rest and reflect. They were handed a leaflet informing them of the significance of the work and its link to music-making during WWI at the Royal Manchester College of Music.

Here music served as a form of entertainment, relaxation, meditation for those taking part the fundraising. We were able to discuss our project in more detail with the organisers during the evening. It felt important to be part of this charity event and to communicate aspects of our project to a very different kind of audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rncm.ac.uk/news/rncm-takes-part-charity-culture-crawl/
 
Description Making Music in Manchester Press releases (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports that their Marketing Department sent out a number of press releases. Heather Roberts and Prof Kelly were interviewed by Rhinegold Publishing.

The geographical reach was both local, regional and national. The articles are available online too. See links below.

The main focus is the general public. Schools were also aware of the research. Prof Kelly received an invitation to speak at a local high school as a result of the online publicity.

A notable impact of this activity was the awareness of the general public of the project. This would have made them more conscious of any subsequent activities, including the exhibitions and concerts. The project team received some correspondence from people who were interested to know more about the project.

In addition to the URL noted below, please also find the following links relating to this activity:

https://www.rncm.ac.uk/news/music-in-manchester-world-war-1/
http://www.4barsrest.com/news/detail.asp?id=21699
http://www.rhinegold.co.uk/music_teacher/rncm-undertake-music-manchester-wwi-project/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rhinegold.co.uk/music_teacher/rncm-undertake-music-manchester-wwi-project/
 
Description Making Music in Manchester during World War I Exhibition (July-August at Central Library, Manchester; and November-December at RNCM), 2016 (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports an Exhibition of selective archival documents from the RNCM and its two project partners: Central Library and the Hallé Concerts Society.

The Exhibitions were open to the general public. It was displayed at the two institutions so as to attract two different publics: Central library users and visitors, as well as RNCM students, tutors, audiences and those visiting the café, bar and restaurant.

The Exhibitions attracted various audiences at the two institutions. People commented on the items on display and sometimes asked for further information. Short explanatory notes accompanied the displayed objects. The Exhibition moved to the RNCM in time for the three days of concerts and discussions.

General public, students and staff indicated that they had learned something from seeing the Exhibition.

It has generated interest within the college about the musical history of the city and also of the college during WWI. It has informed plans for a major collaboration with the Paris Conservatoire in 2018 on Manchester and Paris in 1918. It has influenced senior decision makers about this future project. This project will attract a lot of attention and there are plans for a BBC documentary.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://musicmcrww1.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/rncm-brand-new-ww1-exhibition/
 
Description Manchester Histories Festival contribution, Music in Manchester during WW1 (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports on a contribution to Manchester Histories Festival, 4 June 2016, which was open to the general public. Prof Kelly and her team's contribution included 3 talks on aspects of the project; live performance of Debussy's Sonata for Cello and Piano; handling of archival materials and open discussion with the public.

Members of the public (including visitors from the North West who regularly attend events connected to the Manchester Histories Festival) attended this event and there were many opportunities for discussion and for the public to ask questions of the materials on display and the project findings. A few members of the public indicated their links to some of the people we were studying. Audience response was enthusiastic. After the event, audience members had greater understanding of music-making in Manchester during WW1.

The event was attended by a photographer from the Manchester Histories Festival as well as by a film maker, who was preparing a film on research at the RNCM.

The event was selected as one of the five top events of interest by the Manchester Wire:

http://manchesterwire.co.uk/#!/top-5-manchester-histories-festival-ft-heritage-bus-rides-modernist-visions-more
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.manchesterhistoriesfestival.org.uk/whatson/music-manchester-ww1
 
Description Media research activities Lincoln, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman gave a poster presentation to an academic audience, including undergraduate and postgraduate students, during a media research activities away day at the University of Lincoln. This introduced the Everyday Lives in War centre and its main research themes, outlined activities and research undertaken to date, and opened discussion/questions concerning the future development of the centre's activities and the POW research project in partnership with Long Sutton Civic Society, Lincs.
After the talk, questions were asked about the involvement of prisoners of war in local industry and agriculture, their connections with local communities and the legacy of their contribution to the infrastructure of south Lincolnshire. The discussions that arose from these questions contributed to the development of the project's central research questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting at DCLG 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd was one of 3 representatives from the First World War Engagement Centres who attended a meeting at the Department for Communities and Local Government on 28 October 2015.

The meeting arose from an AHRC Connected Communities project run from the Dept of Urban Studies in Sheffield (Translation across borders: Exploring the use, relevance and impact of academic research in the policy process). The meeting focussed on the government's centenary activities. While a number of government departments have centenary strands, DCLG approaches this task as a way of bringing communities together (e.g. the Last Post initiative in 2014 and the Victoria Cross paving stones). It was an interesting window into the thinking and constraints that shape such programmes, including the challenge of finding new material to feed into the process: too often the same examples cycle around. On the civil servants' side, there was a genuine openness to difficult histories and an appetite to locate new angles on some familiar narratives; what we gained from the meeting was an insight into the policy world of DCLG and the necessity of offering material in ways that made it useable (timely, accessible).

As a result of the discussion we put together a FWW document for the policy analysts at DCLG. It included short pieces from the Centres outlining the sort of material or 'story' that the Centre could contribute, contact details, plus information on how a community group or project has already taken up or engaged with the topic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting in No Man's Land film screening, Sunday 13 November 2016 (reported by Michael Roper) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Michael Roper reports that the film from the April event of the Meeting was premiered at a community cinema in Rosenheim on 13 November 2016 to an audience of around 100, including participants and their families, schools and members of the general public. Prior to the screening, Roper gave a presentation on the significance of the event in terms of family legacies of WW1.

The screening concluded with a discussion and a Q&A with members of the audience, including the school children from Rosenheim, in which they gave their responses to the film and discussed its impact on them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1498
 
Description Meeting in No Man's Land planning activities - (a) 11-13 January 2016, and (b) 25 February 2016, respectively (reported by Michael Roper) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Prof Michael Roper reports that there are two aspects to engagement on this project.

The first relates to the collaborative work with Age Exchange in preparation for the Meeting in No Man's Land in April 2016.

From 11-13 January 2016, Prof Roper and Dr Rachel Duffett took part in a two day workshop in Rosenheim Bavaria with Age Exchange together with their two German partners, Caritas in Rosenheim, Münchner Bildungswerke Programme, Die Lange Schatten des Krieges De Munchenburg in Munich. This entailed a presentation by Prof Roper in which he set out the context of legacies in Britain for the other organisers.

In addition, Prof Roper and Dr Duffett also contributed to the planning of activities and interview schedules at this meeting and in subsequent meetings with Age Exchange's Director, David Savill, at the University of Essex on 25 February 2016, and via email. Roper/Duffett recorded blogs from this and subsequent meetings. .

The geographical reach for these two activities was across London, Essex, Munich and Rosenheim.

Prof Roper's and Dr Duffett's input contributed to the overall focus on the project on family legacies, and the Interview schedules and other legacy-related activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1235
 
Description Meeting in No Man's Land, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Age Exchange discussed with Roper and Duffett plans to develop further their 'Children of the Great War' project and through a contact in Rosenheim, Bavaria became aware of the contrast between the family legacies of the war in the two nations. In Germany, WW1 has been all but overwritten by the trauma of 1933-45 and stories of veterans and their post-war family life have received little attention. The new project aims to bring together a group of British and Bavarian elders in order to explore those very different family experiences and consider what that might mean in terms of our understanding of how the war has been remembered.

There have been a number of meetings with David Savill, Age Exchange's artistic director, and also a one day workshop in Blackheath with the Bavarian organisers on 20th April 2015 when Roper and Duffett discussed their research and the links between that and the project.

The continual development of this exciting and original project (awarded significant HLF funding in December 2015) should offer an insight into different national perspectives and new possibilities for working with memories of the war.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.age-exchange.org.uk/what-we-do/arts-projects/current-projects/meeting-in-no-mans-land-201...
 
Description Meeting in No Man's Land, 7-12 April 2016 (reported by Michael Roper) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Michael Roper and his project team organised a cross-national event titled 'Meeting in No Man's Land', which took place over three days.
Their input was three fold:
1. helping to conduct interviews with German and British participants and evaluating the process for the team
2. observing the meeting activities for research purposes (two articles forthcoming)
3. contributing historical context for the participants

There are two principal outcomes:
1. two academic articles on the project, one about family history and the motivations for First World War commemoration, the other on Age Exchange and the relationship between reminiscence work and oral history. Both have been drafted and will be submitted by end of April 2017.
2. input to the Meeting itself, and the resulting film. Outputs are listed at this url:
http://www.age-exchange.org.uk/what-we-do/arts-projects/current-projects/meeting-in-no-mans-land/

On the closing Sunday, Dr Roper gave a public lecture in Rosenheim on British legacies of the First World War. There was wide interest in the lecture among the German audience, and the resources from it were widely circulated.

Prof Roper chaired an evaluation which was filmed and in which organisers discussed the overall impact. A similar filmed evaluation also took place for the 24 participants from Britain and Germany.

Blogs from the meeting are listed here: https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1498
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.age-exchange.org.uk/what-we-do/arts-projects/current-projects/meeting-in-no-mans-land/
 
Description Meeting with printers to discuss the free project pamphlet for schools as well as the general public via the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology shop (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman reported that a meeting was held between project members and graphic designers to finalise the project pamphlet that will present the project's findings to local schools and members of the public - the latter to be available for free via the Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology shop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meeting with the Lincolnshire County Council Archives' Collections Access Team Leader (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman reports that a meeting was held between Dr Mike Rogers of Lincolnshire County Council Archives and project members to discuss the copyright status of archive materials before their non-commercial publication in the project pamphlet along with the project's research findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meetings with community partners (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman reported meetings between PI and community partners involving travel to south Lincolnshire area. This informed the direction of the research project and allowed the local sea defences to be photographed and other archives gathered for further research. As well as this, multiple meetings took place between project members and community partners on the Lincoln University campus to discuss project findings and outputs, including the possibility of a presentation of research and findings by the partners at a local event.

The findings of the project were finalised and the content of the output was discussed. The photographs of the sea defences that were constructed by the POWs was uploaded to HistoryPin.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Mildenhall School, Suffolk, 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The Deputy Principal of Mildenhall School, Suffolk (a mixed 11-18 years, community school), approached Dr Andrew Maunder for advice on WW1 theatre. He provided the school with original play scripts from the WW1 period, advising those involved in the project about their historical, literary and performance contexts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Military Tribunals Workshop, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact About 35 participants from Staffordshire, London and Essex, as well as from Hertfordshire, spent the day discussing the introduction of conscription in 1916 and the work of the military service tribunals. It was an occasion to discover the largely untold story of how the tribunals worked and the circumstances of those who came before them. The day featured talks from volunteer researchers who revealed the richness of the surviving sources and the remarkable extent of appeals against conscription. Academic researchers in the field contributed a broader context to the discussion.

Following the event, the Centre received a number of enquiries about the workshop. In response we posted contributions from other military service projects on the Centre website and commissioned a film of the day for wider viewing and participation. The Centre will hold a studyday on conscientious objection on 7 May 2016. Many of the participants from the first workshop have expressed an interested in attending, with representatives of 2 community groups agreeing to talk about their findings.

The Centre team is monitoring the range of centenary activity for any evidence that in the year of the Somme anniversary the history of conscription has surfaced.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=860
 
Description Minet Library, Lambeth, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder spoke at the Minet Library, Lambeth, on entertainment in the local area during WWI. About 50 people attended. The talk prompted general discussion and reminiscence about some of the `lost' venues which used to populate the area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description NCCPE conference 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd presented a poster, 'Is there anybody there?' at the National Coordinating Council for Public Engagement Conference, 2 December 2015. This stimulated some interesting conversations with delegates from a range of community and academic contexts, plus contributions written onto the poster itself.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/events/engage-conference-2015
 
Description National Archives Planning Group, 2015+ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Everyday Lives in War Centre team worked with the National Archives to plan a major international public conference to be held over three days at the National Archives in September 2016. The conference (now reported in Researchfish, 2016) was called 'Voices of the Home Fronts' and designed to include a very wide range of research, including community and independent projects. The working group currently represents all 5 FWW Engagement Centres, plus National Archives staff.

Update: March 2017. The working group continues to discuss future collaborations with the National Archives, including a follow-on conference in 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description National Archives Voices of the Home Fronts conference 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Voices of the Home Fronts (8-10 September 2016) was a collaboration between the UK National Archives and the 5 First World War Engagement Centres, led by Everyday Lives in War. It had a strong focus on community-led research: 'Voices of the Home Fronts is a great opportunity to hear about recent and ongoing research, inspire you to conduct new research and foster collaborations both nationally and internationally. Topics will include military tribunals, conscientious objection, prisoners of war, voluntary organisations, racial and ethnic experiences, life under bombardment, refugees, international home fronts, women's employment, health, food, dissent, newspapers, literature, profiteering, advertising, fashion, family life and more.' Formats included poster presentations, theatre performance, films made by community groups on FWW topics, talks and papers.

12 poster presentations
57 talks (including 20 by heritage professionals; 9 by community groups; 16 by independent researchers).
98 registrations in addition to speakers, plus 3 early career researchers awarded bursaries to attend and tweet from the conference.

During the conference, the conference website received 150-220 visitors a day (with c.300 page views a day), much of this traffic coming via Twitter. The ELIW website also reported increased traffic.

The conference website will continue in 2017 to build a community of researchers following on from the conference and towards a 2nd event in 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.voicesofthehomefronts.co.uk/
 
Description Northern FWW Postgraduate and ECR group, 2015-16 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Ongoing mentoring (by email and meetings) of the Northern FWW Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher (ECR) group which originally formed in 2014, particularly in relating to the The First World War: Commemoration and Memory conference held on 26 and 27 February 2016. This secured the financial support of all 5 FWW Engagement Centres. (Conference has a separate entry on Researchfish)

The group comprises around 12 PGs and ECRs in Northern England plus those reached by the 2016 conference.

Key impacts: Sense of solidarity amongst FWW PGs/ECRs; plans to publish papers from the conference; ongoing activities in the group.

In 2017 the organisation changes from a Northern group to a National Network of FWW PGs/ECRs. This has achieved funding of £70k via application made by ELIW, from the AHRC. It will be launched on 18 March 2016 at the What Tommy Did Next conference in Edinburgh. Plans are underway organising a series of workshops and events for PGs/ECRs, to be held in various regions, in association with the 5 ECs. Nick Mansfield continues to act as mentor for the Network on behalf of all 5 ECs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
 
Description Online blog linked to the project (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports a blog linked to the project. Most of the contributors were volunteers on the project. They made significant contribution to the project in this way. This is a stimulating forum for developing ideas. Many of these ideas will form the basis for other forms of writing, including journal articles and an edition of letters.

The following are the web statistics to-date related to the project website and blog:
52 posts
4,318 views
2,141 visitors

Some notable impacts are the engagement of public and online readers to the blog posts; feedback and responses from readers online; and participation from many of the project's volunteers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://musicmcrww1.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/rncm-brand-new-ww1-exhibition/
 
Description Onslow St Audrey School, 2015-17 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact On 7 Jan 2016 Sarah Lloyd took a 1917 source (Edward Taylor's diary) to a History year 9 class. As a result, she was invited back to meet a 'gifted and talented' group on 9 Feb 2016. The teacher emailed subsequently: 'The students are really inspired and enthused which is lovely to see and I hope it will result in some interesting research.' Both classes focused on everyday life during the FWW and provided a contrast with the soldier's diary the school has already used (funded by an HLF grant).

The Everyday Lives in War Centre has offered to make a digital postcard with the students, based on an Everyday Lives in War topic they select and research. This will be along the lines already created by a work-experience student from a different school.

Through 2016, the Centre remained in touch with the School inviting students to attend performances of FWW theatre in April and October 2016. In October, the teacher emailed detailed feedback, plus the following: 'Thank you so much for thinking of us and we would certainly like to be invited to future performances, I love to see what the students take from it and they always surprise me!' (Justine Marcham).

Following the second visit to Onslow St Audrey, the 6th-form coordinator has asked about bringing students to the University library to access support and sources for their projects. We ran this in March 2016 & Jan 2017.

The classes were a fascinating insight into young people's lives, their understandings of the FWW and the contrasts between 1917 and 2016. These observations will feed into work with the Swindon Great War group on Edward Taylor's diary (assuming that project finally gets underway)

Note: contact was first made with one of the Onslow St Audrey history teachers at the Welwyn Hatfield Heritage Fair in October 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=846
 
Description Orchestral concert with introduction by PI at the RNCM, 24 November 2016 (reported by Barbara Kelly) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Barbara Kelly reports an Orchestral concert with music taken from Hallé orchestra programmes during WWI. Introduction by the PI. The concert was performed by a group of c.80 students. This group benefitted from participating in the project. It also involved Masters-level student conductors

The geographical reach included both local, regional and international audiences. The international audience were participating in a conference on Nationalism and Translationalism that was organised by the PI. There were 330 people at the concert in the RNCM Concert Hall.

This was an orchestral concert, which was programmed during the regular lunchtime slot at the RNCM. It meant that we were able to reach a committed audience. The concert was preceeded by an introduction given by the PI. The purpose was to share the findings and repertoire of the project to a range of audiences.

Members of the audience indicated that they had been informed by the concert and the introduction. The project team was able to combine past and present in programming a more recent orchestration of a work that was performed by the Hallé orchestration during the war. The orchestration was by Colin Matthews and he wrote it for the Hallé nearly 100 years later. It was a useful way to link past and present and make the concert very relevant for Manchester. Students involved in the concert were informed about the repertoire that had been performed during the war by the Hallé orchestra.

This orchestral concert has and will inform a Manchester-Paris Conservatoire project, which will take place in Paris, Manchester and London in 2018. The programmes for the orchestral concerts will be informed by the project and will reflect music performed by the Hallé during the war.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.rncm.ac.uk/uploads/RNCM-Autumn-2016-brochure.pdf
 
Description Organisation of public talk and Q&A for Orleans Gallery, Richmond, 20 January 2017 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a talk by Rachel Duffet, University of Essex, on food during WW1. Regional reach - i.e. Richmond, Twickenham, Kew. Main purpose was to share information and stimulate thinking.

The audience included members of the local WW1 Partnership co-ordinated by Richmond Arts Service, as well as volunteer researchers and local historians.

The event brought local people together to debate the theme of food during 1914-1918 and its impact on soldiers. It tied in with the ongoing work being done by a team of local volunteer historians in the borough. Several participants reported (verbally) that they had not thought of approaching the war in this way before.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Participation in Radio 4 documentary, Secrets & Spies: The Untold Story of Edith Cavell, 16 September 2015 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he was interviewed by the documentary maker to provide context on British intelligence and its 1915 espionage systems. Short snippets from that interview were included in the broadcasted version.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Peace History Conference, 15 October 2016 (reported by Ingrid Sharp) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Ingrid Sharp reports that the Peace History Conference brought together academic and non-academic researchers into Peace History for a day of talks, workshops, exhibitions. The Social Attitudes group of interns and volunteers prepared a newspaper style handout with the findings of the project and a display presenting the project. As PI of the project and co-organiser of the event, she was interviewed on BBC Radio Leeds and gave a talk on German Conscientious Objectors..

This was mainly UK-based, but we had a focus on German resistance to war and invited a leading German expert to the panel. Contributors came from all over the UK but there was a large contingent of local/regional groups and individuals.

Groups and individuals with an interest in peace history and peace activism were the main audience for this event.

The Peace History Conference has been held in London and Manchester for the last 10 years. This was the first year we brought it to Leeds and the aim was to expand the reach of the conference. Thanks to the support of sponsors, the costs could be kept very low and a local audience could attend without the expense of travel or high fees. The event was well-attended, the speakers excellent and the interns did a superb job of organising the conference and presenting their work. Leeds Museums and Galleries arranged for the room to be offered without charge and provided technical support for the entire day, also free of charge. This was the second time that a peace history event was held in Leeds and a feeling of community has started to emerge. The relationship between the local and national peace organisations and the University is now excellent, to the benefit of all concerned. In terms of content, many people were surprised to discover the extent of anti-war activism in Germany during and after WW1, and this was followed up with another interview on BBC Radio Leeds specifically on German anti-war activism.

In particular, the message about German anti-war resistance was new to many, but the research into local press coverage of COs was also new and revealing.

In addition to the significant outcome/impact noted below were: requests for further participation/involvement; plans made for future activity; colleagues reporting change in views and opinions; and requests for further information.

Some URLs, in addition to the one noted below:
https://arts.leeds.ac.uk/legaciesofwar/news/annual-national-peace-history-conference-comes-to-leeds-14-15-october-2016/
https://www.facebook.com/events/1200628903321467/
http://www.abolishwar.org.uk/leeds-phc-2016.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?tribe_events=leeds-peace-history-conference-october-14th-15t...
 
Description People's History Museum study day, Manchester, 2015 and aftermath (Ex-service organisations) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This study day on 'Ex-Service organisations in the Great War and its aftermath' was the final event of the People's History Museum's FWW exhibition, Land Fit for Heroes, supported by funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund http://www.phm.org.uk/whatson/a-land-fit-for-heroes-war-and-the-working-class-1914-1918/ and advised by the CI and David Swift (UCLan), AHRC CDA student see http://beyondthetrenches.co.uk/tag/exhibition/

The day (31 Jan 2015) was organised in conjunction with the Royal British Legion NW. Speakers included Vaughan Kent-Payne, North West Regional Representative, who brought along 6 of his members. Other speakers: Prof Niall Barr (King's London), Dr John Borgonovo, (Cork), David Swift (UCLan) and Paul Burnham (Independent Scholar) and Vaughan Kent-Payne, North West Regional Representative. Chaired by Dr Nick Mansfield (UCLan), CI.

The event, which received wide publicity including within the Royal British Legion, generated interest into history of Ex-Service organisations and has led to plans to publish an edited volume drawn from the proceedings.

Update: Feb 2017
Following the Study Day in 2015, contact has been maintained with scholars interested in FWW ex-servicemen and their organisations. Oliver Wilkinson and Nick Mansfield co-wrote a blog on the topic for the AHRC FWW website, which was been duplicated by the ELIW website: http://beyondthetrenches.co.uk/the-legacy-of-war-service-the-experiences-of-first-world-war-veterans/
Plans for a proposed edited volume from the proceedings, from the January 2015 are still in hand.
This is all working towards the conference, What Tommy Did Next, for which Nick Mansfield is co-organiser. Details are on its own website http://what-tommy-did-next.org.uk/ . The call for papers has resulted in plans to deliver 30 speakers papers at Edinburgh University on 18th March 2016, with Jay Winter as keynote, and support from Edinburgh and Napier Universities and the RHS, plus the Everyday Lives in War Centre. The FWW National Network of PGs/ECRs, recently funded by AHRC through ELIW, will also hold its launch at this conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.phm.org.uk/whatson/a-land-fit-for-heroes-war-and-the-working-class-1914-1918/
 
Description Performance of JM Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice in collaboration with IO Theatre, Leicester Square Theatre, London, 29-30 October 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a staged performance of JM Barrie's play A Well-Remembered Voice (1918). Main purpose of activity was to stimulate thinking.

Io Theatre performed a version of JM Barrie's play about spiritualism and mourning.

Audience feedback (obtained via post-performance questionnaire and email) reported that the play raised issues relating to the war-time experience that audience members had not thought of before - e.g the appeal of spiritualism, the expectations for mourning.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1825
 
Description Performance of JM Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice in collaboration with IO Theatre, OSO Arts Centre, Barnes, 7-8 October 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a staged performance of JM Barrie's play A Well-Remembered Voice (1918). Main purpose of this activity was to stimulate thinking.

Io Theatre performed a version of JM Barrie's play about spiritualism and mourning.

Audience feedback (obtained via post-performance questionnaire) reported that the play raised issues relating to war-time experience that the audience members had not thought of before - e.g. the appeal of spiritualism, the expectations for mourning.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1825
 
Description Performance of JM Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice in collaboration with IO Theatre, Weston Auditorium, Hatfield, 17 October 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a staged performance of JM Barrie's play A Well-Remembered Voice (1918). The main purpose was to stimulate thinking.

Io Theatre performed a version of JM Barrie's play about spiritualism and mourning. The event generated discussion about a) Barrie and b) the role of spiritualism in the WW1 [one of the themes of the Everyday Lives in War Centre].

One school reported increased student interest in/debate about the issues following their visit. One significant outcome/impact, in addition to the below, was the request for (further) participation and involvement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1825
 
Description Performances (x2) of JM Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice in collaboration with IO Theatre, Twickenham Academy, 4 October 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a staged performance of JM Barrie's play A Well-Remembered Voice (1918) to secondary school students. Main purpose of this activity was to stimulate thinking.

Io Theatre performed a version of JM Barrie's play about spiritualism and mourning to groups of Year 8 students and above. The event generated discussion about a) Barrie and b) the role of spiritualism in the WW1. Students were asked to complete a writing activity on the play as a follow-up.

A notable impact, in addition to the below, was that the School continued to work on the play text, and reported increased student awareness about the issues and also about ways of staging theatrical performance.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1825
 
Description Post performance Q&A, Weston Auditorium, Hatfield 26 April 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a panel discussion and Q&A, following performances of three WW1 plays by Fred's Theatre, Birmingham. Regional reach, i.e. Hatfield, London. Main purpose was to stimulate thinking.

Organsation of a cast & crew discussion following a performance by Fred's Theatre of three war-time plays: Black `Ell, X=0 and The Munition Worker. The event generated discussion about this lost aspect of WW1 life from an audience which included school students.

One school reported increased student interest in/debate about the issues following their visit.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Post performance talk, Stan's Café, Birmingham (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder reports a panel discussion and Q&A following performances of three WW1 plays by Fred's Theatre, Birmingham. Main purpose of the activity was to stimulate thinking.

Participation in a panel discussion following a performance by Fred's Theatre of three war-time plays: Black `Ell, X=0 and The Munition Worker. The event generated discussion about this lost aspect of WW1 life.

After the event it was arranged for Fred's Theatre to visit the University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, for a similar activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Poster and presentation of project findings at the National Archives 'Voices of the Home Fronts' event (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman exhibited a poster containing the project's findings at the National Archives event 'Voices of the Home Fronts'. This was on display throughout the three day event. As well as this, a talk was given on the third day of the event by the PI entitled 'Recording Life as a German Prisoner of War in Long Sutton, south Lincolnshire'.

The poster and talk formed part of the wider event activities and workshops that explored the histories of everyday lives during the First World War, involving talks from over fifty academics and historians.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Potential community partners, Lincs, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Researchers based at the University of Lincoln (led by Professor Jane Chapman) contacted a number of HLF funded groups in the local and regional area and engaged in discussions about a potential project concerning conscientious objection, community and the 'other' in south Lincolnshire during the First World War. Discussion focused upon the development of the primary research questions and the possibilities of partnership and collaboration particularly so with the Everyday Lives in War Project.

Groups contacted included:
Archaeologists - The Layers of History Project.
Film makers - The Ermine Street Project.
Heritage groups - Aviation Heritage, Friends of the Lincoln Tank, Grimsby Heritage, The Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology
Community groups - Long Sutton Civic Society
Libraries - Lincoln Central Library
Museums - Museum of Lincolnshire Life, King's Lynn and Thetford Museums (also discussion of a potential project on 'Everyday Lives and Community in South Lincolnshire Agriculture: 1916-1918')

Following these initial contacts, email discussion between researchers and community groups brokered introductions. Discovery of the POW camp at Long Sutton, led to further meetings, including a tour of the relevant geographical area. A process of project content and research design followed, with the partners establishing the intended outputs for the project including a pamphlet, co-authored academic article concerning process, contributions to online databases such as Historypin, the Centre for British Archaeology's Home Front Legacy website and Lincolnshire County Council's website, and a conference panel paper.

A contribution was made to the Everyday Lives in War Centre's website and newsletter introducing the research project into the prisoner of war camp in south Lincolnshire, detailing background information and including a number of unique cartoons illustrated by a German POW incarcerated in the camp. A further contribution was made to newsletter concerning the dissemination of the Centre's work on cartoons for Australian audiences by Professor Jane Chapman at the Eurasia-Silk Road-Byzantium conference at Macquarie University, Australia. Furthermore, as a number of collaborative partners read the contributions of the newsletter and website, this has helped to develop dialogue between partner groups.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=764
 
Description Press releases sent to the Centre newsletter (reported by Jane Chapman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Prof Jane Chapman reports two press releases concerning project findings were sent for publication in the Everyday Lives centre's newsletter. The first, in April 2016, concerned the Lincoln project's engagement with a local historian who possessed archive materials and proved to be a rich source of knowledge. The second, in December 2016, concerned the important issue of the food that was served to POWs and, in particular, archival evidence that they were served horseflesh.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public exhibition - Preston (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon resports on an exhibition that was held in the main Preston public library to highlight some findings of the project and demonstrate the research activity. The exhibition featured display panels, information sheets and an interactive database. Between 25 and 30 people actively engaged with the exhibition in the sense of asking questions, viewing the panels or searching the database. The footfall past the exhibition was much higher.

There have been requests to display the main exhibition panels to other voluntary organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Publication - 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' 100-page booklet (reported by Henry French) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Henry French reports a primary project outcome, which was a 100-page booklet, comprised of 1,000-word essays by project contributors, summarising the research undertaken during the 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' project. It featured 20 essays by 14 different contributors, and totalled 133 pages. It was printed in colour by Short-Run Press in Exeter, and we commissioned a second print-run of 100, because the first 100 were distributed after the initial printing in Sept. 2016, at the Devon History Society conference.
Although the production of a hard copy of the volume may appear 'old-fashioned', we asked contributors how they wanted the outputs to appear. We had suggested a website, but they all wanted a physical hard-copy, which they could keep, distribute to affiliated organisations and friends, and which was likely to be more tangible, and long-lasting than a website. We also put a PDF copy of the volume on the Devon History Society website and have given an electronic version to our partner organisation in Devon, the HLF-funded 'Devon Remembers' First World War project, run by the Devon Heritage Centre.

We hope that the publication will provide a template for other outputs produced by the 'Devon Remembers' HLF project.

Main purpose of this publication was to share information; stimulate thinking; and improve understanding of others' thinking.

The creation of the research group, and the desire to build upon the work completed, has led to the decision that work within the group will continue in 2017 with DRHP assistance, including a project symposium to be held at Exeter University in May 2017.

At the November project workshop, a number of volunteers recorded their interest in extending their research and contributing articles (including a number of co-authored pieces) to reflect the project's various strands, such as in-shore fishing in a themed edition of the Devon History Society's journal, The Devon Historian. It is duly anticipated that this Special Edition will be collated and printed next year. There are also plans for project volunteers to contribute towards a Special Edition of the Devon Gardens Trust journal, in liaison with one of the existing volunteers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_R8sY_WBqbtbkVhWmE1QUc3ekU/view
 
Description Remembering the War, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett reported: Our theme was Legacies of the Great War, with a mixture of speakers addressing the national through to the local and personal contexts of legacy. Mike Roper spoke about children and fatherhood after the war; Paul Rusiecki on Essex war memorials; Rainer Schulze on the German experience; and Tony Harrison from the HLF-funded 'Now the Last Poppy has Fallen' project.

A local collector, Sue Laidler, exhibited a range of extraordinary domestic objects from the conflict, from embroidered cushions of the Ypres Cloth Hall in flames, to a wooden money box made from the original temporary structure of the Cenotaph. There was a good turn out from a wide range of community groups and we made numerous contacts who we hope will be involved in our next event in mid-2015.

Examples of the impact that arose as a result of the activity include: new links were forged with community groups, e.g. the Wivenhoe and Tendring local history societies and the 'Chelmsford Remembers' HLF project; and a pooling of diverse ideas about the significance of WW1 commemoration in both the national and international context.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Research Talk at Essex Historical Association, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett spoke at a meeting for the Essex Historical Association about her World War 1 research. The hour long talk stimulated interesting discussions about the experience of soldiers during wartimes and the ways in which this has come to be remembered. As well as the research itself, the audience were also keen to find out about the role of the 'Everyday Lives in War' engagement centre's role in supporting World War 1 projects and events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Research Talk at Lincoln Historical Association, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A 50 minute talk (plus questions) on Dr Rachel Duffett's WW1research which stimulated an interesting discussion about the soldiers' experience of war and also the way in which it has come to be remembered. Duffett reported that the audience were interested and also keen to hear more about the Everyday Lives in War's role in supporting WW1 projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Resistance to War Conference Community Engagement Day, 20 March 2016 (reported by Ingrid Sharp) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Ingrid Sharp reports a community engagement day, which was embedded within a 3-day international conference and attracted 100 individuals and groups as well as the 60 academics registered for the conference. The participants ranged from descendants of COs or WW1 pacifists, community historians, filmmakers, museums, local and national peace groups and WW1 history or art/theatre projects. Most had an interest in peace history or peace activism, some had an interest in recovering the history of family members who had been prosecuted for pacifist activities during the war. National organisations, campaigning groups and NGOs such as WILPF, MAW, CND, PPU were represented as were our partners English Heritage, Leeds Museums and Galleries and museums such as the Bradford Peace Museum and York Railway Museum. Cultural and youth groups such as the Preservative party, filmmakers and theatre companies were also represented. Some gave presentations of their work, others displayed their materials on tables at a 'peace fair' that accompanied the conference. A panel of leading academic experts were invited to give the plenary session to a mixed audience. The conference was widely publicised on peace history and local networks, with flyers distributed nationally.

Each of the audiences interacted and engaged with the others through panels, talks, film showings and displays.

The aim of the conference was to raise the public profile of those who resisted the First World War as conscientious objectors or their supporters, or as religious, socialist or feminist groups. The year 2016 had been identified as an opportunity to intervene in the public narrative surrounding the centenary of the First World War and to shift the emphasis away from military topics by focussing on the introduction of conscription in 1916. The target audience was as mixed as possible and talks were aimed at an academic and non-academic participants.

A key aim was to bring a range of approaches together to explore the topic from a variety of perspectives. The mix of university academics and postgraduate researchers, interest groups, local history groups, activists and organisations was an important part of the planning.

The funded project with English Heritage explored social attitudes to COs using archival material and this knowledge was enhanced by plenary talks, films and panels as well as by the displays and exhibitions that accompanied the event.

The impacts were many: the success of the event convinced several UK and international academics of the value of co-produced research.
The popularity of the event brought groups together and fostered collaboration and sharing of ideas and good practice.
The City of Leeds and Leeds Museums and Galleries, who supported the event, were convinced that there was an audience for peace history, leading to the first Peace History Conference in Leeds in October 2016.
Several local and community groups who presented their work at the conference found the interested and informed audiences who engaged with their presentations a validating experience. It also reinforced the connections and collaboration of the Peace History Working Group, who all attended the conference and drew lessons for the October Peace History Conference from the programme and activities.
The conference also raised awareness of the on-going campaign for justice for Alice Wheeldon, a supporter of COs during the war who was convicted on scant evidence of plotting against Lloyd George. Chloe Mason, who spoke at the conference, was able to recruit supporters for her campaign.
The interns who were involved in the research and organisation of the conference gained valuable employability skills and experience of working beyond the academy.

The was a good deal of overlap between attendees of the March and the October conferences, and there are plans for future activity to mark the centenary of the release of COs in 1919. There is also a commitment to foster Peace History Conferences in Leeds in future to complement those already held in London and Manchester.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Rothamsted 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Initial meeting in November 2015 to introduce the Everyday Lives in War Centre (as part of a more general link between Rothamsted and the University of Hertfordshire). Discussion clarified the significance of the national willow collection held at Rothamsted, both for the history of the FWW period and for understanding the legacies of the conflict, today and into the future. ELIW team subsequently attended Rothamsted's public engagement event 'Teatime Tales of Willow' and the relationship expanded into a FWW Basketry day at Rothamsted in Nov 2016 (see separate Researchfish entry), plus support for an updated Basketry Association booklet on the willow types held in the national collection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Rothamsted Willow and First World War Baskets Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On Saturday 12 November 2016, the Everyday Day Lives in War Centre and Rothamsted Research held a free event exploring the National Willow Collection and the history of basketmaking and willow growing during the First World War.

The day included talks by professional basketmakers about their research into regional willow and basket making industries during the era.

In the afternoon William Macalpine, Research Scientist at Rothamsted Research, gave a tour of the National Willow Collection, which was founded in 1922 in response to concerns over the War's impact on willow stocks.

This event launched ELIW's collaborative project on FWW basketry & willows (led by Prof Owen Davies). Attendance was close to capacity (70 for the willow tour and 100 for the day).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=2265
 
Description School Visits (1 of 3) - Sheffield (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to visit three schools in Sheffield who were participating in the HLF project 'Sheffield Stories' led by Gertie and Paul Whitfield. Each school was following a different theme around Everyday Life in Sheffield during the FWW, and Dr Moore made three visits to Sheffield to talk to Year 5 children on Food, Entertainment and Conscientious Objection. Each visit was followed by an event held for parents, teachers and children which included examples of work prepared by the children and a talk from Dr Moore on researching local and family stories.

The children were really enthused by their particular themes and produced some great work. They also had a lot of questions which were thought provoking including one child who asked 'How do you know when you have won the war?'

Feedback from one teacher was: 'I just wanted to pass on a huge thanks on behalf of our staff team to yourself for the session held this afternoon. It was great to see the children so engaged in the subject and to share the project with parents'.

Children were really enthusiastic. Working with the Whitfields, who are experienced in delivering education through drama, was enriching for both Dr Moore and the children. In addition to the impact noted below, is therefore the reciprocal learning experience for both the presenter (Dr Moore), the teachers, and the children.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://watheatre.co/charnock-hall-primary-school.html
 
Description School Visits (2 of 3) - Sheffield (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to visit three schools in Sheffield who were participating in the HLF project 'Sheffield Stories' led by Gertie and Paul Whitfield. Each school was following a different theme around Everyday Life in Sheffield during the FWW, and Dr Moore made three visits to Sheffield to talk to Year 5 children on Food, Entertainment and Conscientious Objection. Each visit was followed by an event held for parents, teachers and children which included examples of work prepared by the children and a talk from Dr Moore on researching local and family stories.

The children were really enthused by their particular themes and produced some great work. They also had a lot of questions which were thought provoking including one child who asked 'How do you know when you have won the war?'

Feedback from one teacher was: 'I just wanted to pass on a huge thanks on behalf of our staff team to yourself for the session held this afternoon. It was great to see the children so engaged in the subject and to share the project with parents'.

Children were really enthusiastic. Working with the Whitfields, who are experienced in delivering education through drama, was enriching for both Dr Moore and the children. In addition to the impact noted below, is therefore the reciprocal learning experience for both the presenter (Dr Moore), the teachers, and the children.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://watheatre.co/rainbow-forge-primary-school.html
 
Description School Visits (3 of 3) - Sheffield (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to visit three schools in Sheffield who were participating in the HLF project 'Sheffield Stories' led by Gertie and Paul Whitfield. Each school was following a different theme around Everyday Life in Sheffield during the FWW, and Dr Moore made three visits to Sheffield to talk to Year 5 children on Food, Entertainment and Conscientious Objection. Each visit was followed by an event held for parents, teachers and children which included examples of work prepared by the children and a talk from Dr Moore on researching local and family stories.

The children were really enthused by their particular themes and produced some great work. They also had a lot of questions which were thought provoking including one child who asked 'How do you know when you have won the war?'

Feedback from one teacher was: 'I just wanted to pass on a huge thanks on behalf of our staff team to yourself for the session held this afternoon. It was great to see the children so engaged in the subject and to share the project with parents'.

Children were really enthusiastic. Working with the Whitfields, who are experienced in delivering education through drama, was enriching for both Dr Moore and the children. In addition to the impact noted below, is therefore the reciprocal learning experience for both the presenter (Dr Moore), the teachers, and the children.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://watheatre.co/st-john-fisher-primary-school.html
 
Description Schools workshop: Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery as part of the After Tipperary project, 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder co-produced a workshop for primary schools in the borough of Richmond.

The workshop asked students to engage with some of the finding from the After Tipperary project via a range of hands-on, practical activities. Please see:
http://www.richmond.gov.uk/early_years_and_ks1-2_ohg_schools_brochure.pdf

Feedback reported that the day raised awareness about a forgotten aspect of WW1, as well as increasing students confidence in tackling historical issues
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.richmond.gov.uk/early_years_and_ks1-2_ohg_schools_brochure.pdf
 
Description Schools/Education Pack workshop: Produced in collaboration with Orleans Gallery as part of the After Tipperary project, 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder co-created a pack of educational materials and activities aimed at Key Stage 2 for schools in the borough of Richmond.

The publication [ 24pp] is designed for use by teachers to help plan and teach in the classroom. It provides an introduction to the role that theatre had to play during the First World War focusing on the experience of Richmond and surrounding areas. There are different sections: Teachers Pages and Activity Pages.

After using the pack, four schools took part in the play/musical production 'After Tripperary', organised by Twickenham Academy under the guidance of theatre company Dramatic Edge [November 2016] .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Screening of Age Exchange's Children of the Great War, Essex, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Age Exchange, the UK's leading national charity delivering Reminiscence Arts, created a wonderful film based on the memories of children of First World War veterans. The trust organised a series of collection days across London where they interviewed the now very elderly children and some grandchildren about their memories of the legacy of the conflict in their families. The project, funded by the HLF, also entailed photographing objects that had been passed down and with which important memories were associated. The information and film have since been uploaded to the Europeana 1914-18 website. The film was very well received by a mixed audience and the screening stimulated a rich discussion which covered both historical and artistic issues.

Since the event, there has been continued development of links with community groups, e.g. discussions with an attendee from the Essex Records Office has resulted in a close working relationship with the HLF-funded project, 'From the trenches to Tendring'.

The event was also a trigger for further involvement with Age Exchange - see other activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2VlEZE4bx8&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Screening of the Battle of the Somme, 1916 - with speaker and exhibits (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett participated in the event, which combined a screening of the 1916 film with a presentation from Ian Hook, the Keeper of the Essex Regiment Museum, and displays from the local WFA branch and the HLF project From the Trenches to Tendring.

Ca 60 people from the Colchester and NE Essex area came to a screening of the Battle of the Somme 1916. Seeing the film projected on to a big screen was the reason for many participants' attendance, and Ian Hook's talk on the Essex Regiment's experiences of the battle was also a strong draw. The event provided the opportunity for the FTTTT HLF project to showcase their terrific (and unusual) outputs and we were also able to display recent research from the Essex WFA branch.

It was a wonderfully lively evening with a terrific mixture of the old and the modern - the film's documentary footage contrasted with the artistic interpretations from FTTTT. A great discussion was had following Ian Hooks' presentation, and getting a local perspective on a global event was fascinating. The audience found the film especially moving - it was the first time that many had seen it on such a big screen. We're grateful to the IWM for making copies of it available gratis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Share Museums East Volunteer Awards, 2015-2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On the basis of her experience with the Connected Communities project, Sarah Lloyd was invited to join the judging panel for the Share East of England Museums volunteer awards (May/June 2015). She was the one academic member of the panel, with the others drawn from the heritage, voluntary and business sectors. There were 87 submissions in 7 categories.

This was a fascinating experience, enriching my understanding of public history and heritage, especially the changes brought through economic constraints. On an individual level, links made with members of the judging panel proved valuable connections for the First World War Centre, as well as more generally for heritage activity.

I served again as a judge in 2016, 2017 and 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017,2018
URL http://sharemuseumseast.org.uk/volunteer-awards-about/
 
Description Somme 100. National Commemoration of the Battle of the Somme at Heaton Park, Manchester, 1 July 2016, funded directly by Department of Culture Media and Sport (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Dr Nick Mansfield represented ELIW and the ECs at the above-referenced event.

Dr Mansfield provided organising advice to Rachel Down, Project Manager, in the months proceeding. In June 2016, Dr Mansfield also provided advice to Greig Watson, BBC Senior Journalist on Somme 100, particularly on 'about how the news of the battle was seen on the home front, how the news filtered back and what impact it had' and provided relevant images.

At the 1 July 2016 event, Dr Mansfield manned the ELIW stall and gave 2 talks to schools and 1 public lecture on: 'The Battle of the Somme and rural England, farming, farmworkers and food', plus liaised with other represented groups, e.g. CWGC and Great War Huts project.

The event hosted 4,000 visitors on the day - of whom ca 200 attended Dr Mansfield's talks, with another ca 100 conversations on the stall. Visitors were mainly from NW but the event also hosted national and international visitors.

The purpose of the activity was to stimulate thinking about commemorating the Somme in unusual ways, as well as to engage with press and heritage policy makers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.1418now.org.uk/commissions/somme-100-manchester/
 
Description Sparks Might Fly 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Newcastle-based Cap-a-Pie developed a new theatre piece working with University of Hertfordshire's Professor Owen Davies. The performance was inspired by Everyday Lives in War research. Cap a Pie chose to explore the role of fortune tellers during the First World War and used a University £3000 Sparks Might Fly grant, on-campus creative space and the expertise of the UHArts production team to develop a new piece. 'The Important Man in a White Coat' was premiered at the University's Public Engagement conference in Hatfield on 23 June 2015.

The performance was watched by around 150 people, a mixture of academics from a broad range of disciplines, including Health Sciences, Law, Business, Engineering as well as colleagues from Humanities. The audience also included a Patient Research Group, postgraduate students, local councillors and dignitaries. A film of the piece is available on the Everyday Lives in War Centre website.

By de-familiarizing conventional understandings of science and magic, the piece challenged ideas about what was historically significant in the period 1914-18 and brought little-known stories to wider public notice. The process and outcomes of working with the theatre group gave the researcher fresh insights into his work, and stimulated discussions across the centre team and with research partners.

The Sparks Might Fly model pioneered by the Centre in 2015 will be extended to researchers across the university in 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1259
 
Description St Albans Local History Network Day (reported by Julie Moore) 2016-17 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to attend this community event by the organiser with whom she and Professor Sarah Lloyd collaborated on a Connected Communities 'All our Stories' project. Those attending included interested individuals and those representing local interest groups, museums, churches, resident association and youth groups. This was an opportunity to talk about the work of the ELIW Engagement Centre and invite people to consider projects around the Centre's themes. This has become an annual occurance, with opportunities to build relationships with local heritage organisation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
 
Description Staging the First World War 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Event increased awareness of centenary activities, including re-staging plays from the 1914-18 period and writing new pieces of theatre on FWW themes. This led to increased understanding of different strategies, their objectives and outcomes. The workshop included a presentation on historical contexts which gave participants a new insight into the war period.

Feedback included:
'Thank you for today & some great new contacts'
Today's workshop has worked well & all the different ideas from around the room brought a plethora of different possibilities Thanks you for running today's event this has given a structure for our methodology.'
'Enjoyable conversations with everyone. Most productive and interesting.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=134
 
Description Statement for Mason sisters -- Criminal Cases Review Commission 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Chloe Mason, a participant at several ELIW events (including the Voices of the Home Fronts Conference -- separate entry in Researchfish), approached Sarah Lloyd, Director of Everyday Lives in War. Chloe Mason is taking the case of Alice Wheeldon, her great-grandmother who was imprisoned during the FWW, to the Criminal Cases Review Commission, and Chloe asked for help in locating the specific case in the context of current FWW research and commemorative activity. A statement by Sarah Lloyd has now been forwarded to her legal team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Support for HLF funded projects and HLF staff (reported by Nick Mansfield) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of his ongoing commitment to support and maintain cordial professional relationships with the HLF and its funded community history projects, Dr Nick Mansfield wrote a blog for the HLF website on rural areas and the Battle of the Somme. The blog was to share previously unknown information and to encourage the general public to develop their own ideas for a project exploring how the Battle of the Somme affected their local community,

Dr Mansfield continues to support HLF funded projects and actively engages with HLF staff on initiatives to reach out to the local and regional community to inspire to new HLF funded projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.hlf.org.uk/about-us/news-features/tracing-impact-somme-rural-communities
 
Description Swindon in the Great War, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Sarah Lloyd visited Swindon Library on 24 November 2015 to meet the Swindon in the Great War group, taking with her a 1917 diary kept by Edward Taylor, a 16-year old apprentice. The diary was retrieved via house clearance and was not known to the group. It offers a fascinating picture of everyday life in which war is somewhere in the background but not at all prominent. The diary created great interest and has since been sent to the group to study in detail.

The group has extensive knowledge of the places mentioned in the diary. As a result of the meeting members expressed an interest in developing a follow-on HLF-funded project based on the diary, particularly relating to Edward's passion for the local countryside and books, and revolving around young people 'tracing' his footsteps and creating their own video diaries. The project and application are currently under discussion, and would include ongoing support from the centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=938
 
Description Talk as part of Staffordshire Appeals 1916-18 Study Day, Stafford 5 May 2016 (reported by Karen Hunt; updated by Sarah Lloyd) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Karen Hunt reports on a Staffordshire Appeals 1916-18 Study Day, held in Stafford.

5 volunteers on the project gave confident and engaging individual presentations about research they had undertaken for the project. There were also comparative contributions reflecting on what could be learnt from surviving papers from other Tribunals and from similar community projects. Scholars of the home front from postgraduates to Prof Adrian Gregory also presented their reflections on the value of making these papers accessible, while Prof Hunt's presentation showed how the Staffordshire Appeals papers could be used to reveal new stories of everyday life on the home front and so challenge the traditional narrative of the war.

An exhibition produced by the Staffordshire Appeals project was also displayed to the public for the first time - it has been displayed at libraries across the county ever since.

The day before Prof Hunt spoke at the launch of the Appeals Project exhibition 'Gone' at County Hall to an audience of local politicians, archivists from across the region and from TNA, as well as volunteers from the project. Prof Hunt's contribution explained the genesis of the project, underlining its distinctiveness and significance.

Geographical reach was principally West Midlands, but some had come further, eg from Northampton. The audience included workers and volunteers from local museums, archives and community groups.

The event allowed the volunteers to come together and to really appreciate one another's research, and many commented on the value of the project as a whole. One volunteer was subsequently interviewed on local radio about her experience on the project. Links between academics and community historians and volunteers were forged and reinforced.

The event underlined the value of links between community projects and academic historians, particularly through shared recognition that reading against the grain in apparently unpromising sources can provide a vivid sense of the range of experiences on the home front, and can lead to fresh histories anchored in specific localities which can provide the basis for new narratives of the apparently familiar.

Some important URLs related to the activity:

https://staffsappeals1918.wordpress.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIlYc4X4uhY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1PGyXKAYZ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyKwYNSNMV4

This project has had an additional afterlife in a book on COs written by 2 of the project volunteers and published in 2019 http://www.staffordshiregreatwar.com/2018/05/a-new-book-about-conscientious-objectors-in-parts-of-the-midlands-1916-18/ WHO DOES WANT TO KILL ANYONE: The Story of Conscientious Objection in mid-Staffordshire and the Black Country in WW1 by Gerry Barton and John Babb
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018,2019
URL https://staffsappeals1918.wordpress.com/
 
Description Talk at Hatfield Rotary Club, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to talk to Rotary Club on role of the Everyday Lives in War Centre and in particular the impact of war on local businesses. She introduced the group to the value of the Military Tribunal records and there were many questions on just what they revealed about local businesses. Invitation came from a Rotary member who was Project Leader on an HLF 'All Our Stories' project (History of Wheathampstead High Street) with whom Julie Moore and Sarah Lloyd had worked as part of a Connected Communities grant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk at Nazeing Local History Society, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to speak to local history group on subject of farming in the First World War and possible sources they might not have considered. She was able to alert them to value of War Agricultural Committee minutes, Food Control Committee minutes, and accounts of farmers before the Military Tribunals. After her talk they discussed a new project on farming during the war, and the wider home front story.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk for Jaywick Martello Tower on Dr Rachel Duffett's research on WW1 military food (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett gave a one-hour talk with slides followed by thirty minutes of questions and discussion. The aim of the talk was to broaden the participants' knowledge of WW1 and stimulate new thinking about the conflict.

The organising party was a local history group which organises series of historical talks. The event was attended by a range of interested people from the Tendring area.

The talk helped to cement relationships with the group, and further discussions have since been held regarding the possibility of an HLF bid for a legacy project in 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk for Orleans House Gallery, Twickenham (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Ca 25 people, including museum volunteers, attended Dr Rachel Duffett's talk on WW1 army food. The organisation had recently completed an HLF funded project on WW1 theatre in the area and was keen to offer further perspectives on the conflict. There was a very lively discussion after the talk and it was a delight to get the British Navy's (ret.) perspective on the whole affair.

Hopefully, the lively debate had the effect of extending the audience's knowledge of the conduct of the war.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk to Friends of the Intelligence Corps Museum, 16 April 2015 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he spoke to the Friends of the Intelligence Corps Museum about his soon-to-be-published book, the diary of a First World War intelligence soldier.

The Friends of the Intelligence Corps Museum are drawn from across the UK.

The questioning and feedback indicated that the audience were previously unaware of this aspect of the British army in the First World War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk to Rutland Local History Society, 11 February 2016 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he gave a talk about a First World War soldier from Rutland and how the story of his life has been used by two schools within their remembrance activities.

The audience were all members from the county of Rutland.

Following the talk, contact was established with the soldier's family and this may lead to future activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk to St. Albans U3A on 'Farming during the First World War' (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited to speak to this U3A group by a member who had worked with Dr Moore on the 'St. Albans: Life on the Home Front' project. Following the talk a number of questions were raised on the issues around conscription and rationing as less well-known FWW stories. Number of the audience also offered own stories of family members and the FWW.

Dr Moore was invited to return at a future date to share research on other FWW themes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talk to Western Front Association, Leicestershire & Rutland Branch, 26 September 2016 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he gave a talk on British Intelligence during 1916.

The audience was drawn primarily from Leicester and Leicestershire.

Members of the audience, during questions and informally afterwards, said that they had been unaware of this material and that it had adjusted their perceptions of 1916.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.leicestershireandrutlandwfa.com
 
Description Talk, Home, Food and Family in WW1 day, Avoncroft Museum, Bromsgrove (reported by Karen Hunt) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Karen Hunt's paper on ''The Kitchen is the Key to Victory; Women, food and the Great War' was the keynote address followed by contributions from other historians (postgraduates, academics and local historians) as well as volunteers from a number of community projects on the WW1 home front. Exhibitions and displays shared findings from a number of projects as well as creative engagements with the historical evidence. There were lively discussions in the sessions and networking between projects and interested groups such as local WIs between sessions.

The geographical reach was principally West Midlands, but some had come further, eg from Oxford.

Some notable impact arising from this activity includes discussions with participants on strategies to evaluate and contextualise the material gathered by community projects on the WW1 home front through comparison with other local projects, such as the Staffordshire Appeals Project, and by making links to current historical research being undertaken by academics and postgraduates.

This activity underlined the value of links between community projects and academic historians, particularly through shared recognition that researching mundane domestic life on the WW1 home front was not only fascinating but could challenge the traditional stories told of the war.

Some important URLs related to this activity:
https://jenniwaughconsulting.com/2016/04/11/happy-customers-at-the-home-food-family-in-ww1-conference/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_lnjl-ZVLo
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://jenniwaughconsulting.com/2016/04/11/happy-customers-at-the-home-food-family-in-ww1-conferenc...
 
Description Talk, Sopwell Residents' Association, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore was invited by Sopwell Residents' Association to give annual talk to attendees on possible HLF projects that could be pursued as well as the wider work of the First World War Engagement Centres. The invitation came about from a Rotary member who was Project Leader on an HLF 'All Our Stories' project, 'More memories of Sopwell, with whom Dr Julie Moore and Dr Sarah Lloyd had worked as part of a previous Connected Communities grant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The First World War and the Conscientious Objector Workshop (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore reports that this event followed on from the ELIW Centre's First World War and Military Tribunals Workshop held in 2015. As well as interested members of the public, those attending represented HLF projects, archives, museums and local history groups. Presentations on projects covered Staffordshire, Yorkshire, London, Hertfordshire, Northamptonshire and Yorkshire. This was an opportunity to compare experiences and share stories, sources and ideas for new questions to ask. A film of the day was made and posted on the ELIW website to reach those who were unable to attend but had expressed an interest in connecting with other groups.

Some notable outcomes and impacts include:
1) Those attending swapped contact details and expressed a desire to connect up their research.
2) Request for further information.
2) Development of a network of researchers interested in the theme of Resistance to War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=2252
 
Description The First World War in Biscuits, Colchester, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The First World War in Biscuits opened at The Minories Art Gallery, Colchester on Friday 15th May 2015 and ran until 15th July. The preview attracted a good audience and wide coverage in the local press.

As well as being a staple of the army's diet, some of the biscuits were creatively re-fashioned by soldiers in the trenches and sent home to friends and family with personal messages. Rather than being consumed, the biscuits were transformed into picture frames, postcards and canvases. These army biscuits have formed the inspiration for The First World War in Biscuits, which is a stunning audio-visual, object-centred installation that explores the relationship between food, creativity and conflict. Included is a unique collection of 100 year-old ration biscuits, personally modified by soldiers, alongside a range of archival materials, interviews, photographs and film-footage.

As well as being able to see examples of how these biscuits were crafted by soldiers, this exciting installation provides an opportunity to hear historians talk about the army biscuit and the significance of food during the war, including Dr Rachel Duffett, author of 'Stomach for Fighting: Food and Soldiers of the Great War' (Manchester University Press, 2012), who discusses her research on the significant role food plays during times of conflict and reflects on the ration biscuits displayed in the exhibition. Duffett reported: 'The Minories did us proud and the exhibit looked great, it's a fascinating combination of modern multimedia and very old hardtack biscuits- we were most grateful to the Museum of Reading for loaning their wonderful objects'.

Outcomes and impact from the exhibition include; developing links with local arts groups regarding commemoration activities; establishing a relationship with Teresa Murjas at Reading University with a view to future events including the potential for the exhibit to be included in the National Archive for the conference in September 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The Important Man Tour 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Following the Sparks Might Fly Commission (reported in Researchfish for 2015), Cap a Pie continued to work with University of Hertfordshire Arts on the Important Man commission. Prof Owen Davies, whose research on First World War supernatural beliefs inspired the initial performance, continued to work with the theatre company on an extended piece of theatre. This toured 4 schools and one regional college in November 2016 (338 students & 10 teachers saw the work). Feedback was very positive and demonstrated student engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/
 
Description Themed Devon History Society Annual Conference on 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War', 8 October 2016 (reported by Henry French) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Prof Henry French reports a panel presentation by 4 members of the volunteer team of researchers during the 'Farming, Fishing and Food Supply in Devon during the First World War' project. The presentation, which included a Q&A session, ran over the course of an hour, and was a primary outcome for the project and volunteers. It provided a show-case for the research outputs of the group of 12-14 researchers, and allowed some presenters to both share their research findings, and their research methods. Devon History Society members are, primarily, active historical researchers, so were as interested in the discussion of sources as they were in the research conclusions. In particular, Penny Lawrence's discussion of the historical value of the 1910 valuations for the Incremental Value Duty tax for the reconstruction of historic farming/farm buildings and farmers' businesses aroused significant comment. It introduced a new set of resources to this group.

The 4 presenters were selected on the premise of demonstrating the interlinked strands of the project that related to First World War farming and food (to coincide with the conference's broader theme). The PI chaired this, with the PDRA in the audience.

Eleven posters were displayed at this event, all of which were individually assembled by project volunteers. A tailored workshop was delivered in September, which sought to provide interested volunteers with the skills and know-how of making posters of their research. Furthermore around forty copies of the project publication were distributed to those in attendance, reflecting a high level of interest.

The event had a regional reach; Devon History Society has c. 350 members and 67 affiliated local history societies within the county. Approximately 70 people attended the conference at the annual general meeting in October, and were very appreciative of the panel discussion session based on the project in the afternoon, plus the poster presentations in the foyer outside the conference room, and of free copies of the project booklet. We distributed 60-80 copies of this 100-page booklet on the day.

The feedback from the conference organisers commented upon the 'very impressive' nature of the project's contribution, and that the '[Devon History Society] has received numerous compliments on what was presented - both in the lecture theatre and at the exhibition'.

Several attendees asked for copies of the project booklet, and at least one member discussed the possibility of doing further research on the Incremental Value Duty records.

The main purpose of the event was to share information; stimulate thinking; and improve understanding of others' thinking. In addition to the significant impact noted below, two other notable outcomes from the activity included: requests about further participation and involvement, as well as plans made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.devonhistorysociety.org.uk/archive/food-farming-fishing-devon-first-world-war/
 
Description University College Dublin, Wartime Attachments: a podcast series on pain, care, retreat and treatment in the First World War (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett was invited by Dr Barry Shields of UCD to contribute to an interdisciplinary series of podcasts on the emotional expereince of WW1. Dr Duffett recorded the talk at an event in Dublin and it was then added to the website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Visit to Basketry Collection, IWM Duxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A small group of basket-makers, willow-growers and members of the heritage craft community visited IWM Duxford on 29.9.16 to view items held in store. This was part of the larger ELIW collaboration around basketry and willows, and involved knowledge exchange between the visitors and the IWM curators. Aspects of the visit were captured in Mary Crabb's short film on her research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=2265
 
Description Voices of the Great War - production at Lakeside Theatre, Essex University (two nights, each with Q & A afterwards) (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As reported by Dr Rachel Duffett, this was a full length piece of verbatim theatre using Dr Mike Roper's oral history testimonies collected from the children of veterans.

Dr Roper provided transcripts from some of his interviews with the (elderly) children of veterans, and these were used by Essex University playwright Annecy Lax as the basis for a piece of theatre using a company of students and a professional director. The two performances attracted good audiences and the subsequent Q & A sessions were lively and engaged.

N.B. The work was funded by an HLF grant. Dr Duffett worked with Barbara Pierson, the theatre's artistic director, to scope and write the application.

This was an innovative event which explored the legacy of WW1 in a completely new way. It provided new insights into the testimony as well as being a very moving piece of theatre and it was evident from the audiences' responses in the Q&As that many had been touched profoundly by the experience.

There are several URLs associated with this activity:

Link to Centre's blog: https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=1753

Link to Lakeside Theatre: http://lakesidetheatre.org.uk/events/voices-of-the-great-war/

Link to piece in Colchester Gazette: http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/leisure/theatre/14563806.Voices_of_the_Great_War_to_come_alive_at_Essex_University/

The event was also prominently featured in the East Anglian Daily Times; currently this does not appear to be available by way of an online link, but we would be happy to provide the text document on request.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://lakesidetheatre.org.uk/events/voices-of-the-great-war/
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 11 November 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 12 August 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 16 January 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 16 September 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 21 October 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Volunteer Study Session - Preston, 7 July 2016 (reported by Keith Vernon) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Keith Vernon reports on a study session, which was arranged to bring volunteers working on the project together and encompassed a range of activities, including setting up research activities and agreeing on approaches, training in research methods, addressing queries and problems, and discussing research findings.

Participants in the sessions recorded that their understanding of the topic, and of the nature and impact of the First World War on local communities, was revised by the work they had done. The project focussed on the lives and experiences of predominantly younger people, many of whom were found to have long and productive lives after the war. Such positive stories arising out of a wartime experience challenged the prevailing view among the volunteers of the war as overwhelmingly associated with loss and sacrifice.

Requests were made about further participation and involvement, and plans were made for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description WW1 talk at Essex Book Festival, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A one-hour talk (plus discussion time) at Southend Library on Dr Rachel Duffett's research into WW1 soldiers' food and its emotional and physiological significance in their lives. The audience were appreciative and there was a lively discussion following the main talk. Dr Rachel Duffett answered several queries regarding access to WW1 records at the Imperial War Museum which would have hopefully encouraged members of the public to pursue their own lines of research following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description War & Emotions Symposium, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Mike Roper gave the opening plenary at the War and Emotions Symposium at Melbourne Museum in September 2015. The event was based around an exhibition called Love and Sorrow, which follows eight families from the First World War and through the twentieth century. This had a wider audience than a 'straight' academic conference and was about engagement with the general public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://museumvictoria.com.au/pages/60642/love-sorrowsymposiuminvite.pdf
 
Description Website - 'Reimagining a True Social Order' (reported by Rachel Muers) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Muers reports an interactive website with study materials aimed at local Quaker meetings, presenting the findings of the project. Co-funded by one collaborating organisation and supported by another.

Positive feedback received. Study materials signposted by Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.quakersocialorder.org.uk
 
Description Welwyn Hatfield Heritage Fair, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The First World War Centre had a stall at the Welwyn Hatfield Heritage Fair on 17 October 2017. This was an opportunity to engage with shoppers and have more detailed discussions with other exhibitors.

Two of these detailed discussions produced (a) an introduction to Onslow St Audrey school, Hatfield (leading to visits in early 2016) and (b) plans to collaborate on studydays with Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies on the theme of conscription and conscientious objection. The team also shared experience with 5 other centenary projects represented there, offering to support 2 groups in making HLF applications and encouraging others to join our mailing list and attend centre events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Welwyn Hatfield Heritage Network 2016-18 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore attends monthly meetings of a local heritage network comprised of schools, local government officials, library staff, local history groups and residents associations. Members include project leader of an 'All our Stories' HLF group, with whom Julie Moore and Sarah Lloyd worked as part of the Connected Communities award in 2012.

Following invitation to attend meetings, Moore and Lloyd have been asked to take part in local heritage events. Have kept group up to date with local workshops, projects and events around First World War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
 
Description Welwyn Hatfield Heritage Network meetings, 2012-15 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore attends monthly meetings of a local heritage network comprised of schools, local government officials, library staff, local history groups and residents associations. Members include project leader of an 'All our Stories' HLF group, with whom Julie Moore and Sarah Lloyd worked as part of the Connected Communities award.

Following invitation to attend meetings, Moore and Lloyd have been asked to take part in local heritage events. Have kept group up to date with local workshops, projects and events around First World War.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Western Front Association summer conference, 9 July 2016 (reported by Jim Beach) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Jim Beach reports that he gave a paper on British intelligence in 1916.

The organisers confirmed that the WFA attendees had come from across the whole of Britain.

Afterwards individual audience members indicated to Dr Beach that the material presented was new to them and that it had modified their perceptions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/
 
Description Wheathampstead History Society, 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 16 June 2015 Owen Davies gave a talk to the Wheathampstead History Society on 'Magic, Amulets and Mascots during the First World War'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?p=158
 
Description Workshop 'Resistance to War' (reported by Julie Moore) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Julie Moore reports that this workshop was a joint event held with Hertfordshire Archives and Local Studies with a view to making more people aware of Resistance to War and the value of the material held in the archive. The attendance was small but this gave a real opportunity to talk to people and share their stories and understanding of the First World War.

Those attending reported a change in how they understood the FWW and one member of the public gave this feedback

'We all found the morning extremely informative and very enjoyable. Although we were very aware of the men who objected on religious grounds, we had known little of those who had strong political objections and found the documents extremely interesting. Thomas will be studying the first world war next year so it has added another dimension to his studies'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Workshop - Friends House, London (reported by Rachel Muers) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Muers reports a workshop at an annual national conference of Quakers in Britain. Presentation on research findings followed by very lively discussion. Intended to inform reflections and long-term decision making on Quaker social action. Very positive feedback from participants and some subsequent engagement with the project website. To be followed up with another session in 2017.

Audience reported having learned a lot and been provoked to think in new ways about Quaker social action. Requests were made for further information, and plans are underway for future related activity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Workshop for Minorities Stroke and Aphasia Group, North London - the group have been awarded an HLF grant to explore food on the battle front (reported by Rachel Duffett) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Dr Rachel Duffett held initial meetings with the group leader and project manager to set up an afternoon workshop on WW1 army food for the whole group (ca 20 participants). Dr Duffett showed them materials from the conflict, and they had a lively discussion about researching food matters, e.g. archives, museum visits, websites, etc.

The audience was made up of ca 50% 'patients' (or rather, ex-patients, as some would go on to be receiving post-stroke care), who were linked by their medical experiences, as well as ca 50% carers.

This was a relatively unusual group in that there was no specific history interest in it; Dr Duffett was not wholly clear how they came to the subject. However, the experience was hugely rewarding because the group was approaching the project with such enthusiasm and regarded it almost as a therapeutic activity - an opportunity to keep their minds active, learn new skills, uncover information etc. Very different from any other group that Dr Duffett has worked with.

The group had limited understanding of how to research such a topic, but following the event they felt much better equipped to do so. They were also enthused by the subject and keen to explore it on their own.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description `Berta Ruck: A war-time best-seller', Story Room, Everyday Lives in War, 9 July 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder contributed an article on the then popular (and nowadays lesser known) First World War novelist and best-seller, Berta Ruck, for the Everyday Lives in War Story Room.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/?cat=30
 
Description `Crime and conmen in the black out: the violent side of the World War I Home Front', The Conversation, 29 September 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Andrew Maunder contributed an article to The Conversation, exploring crime and the conmen in the black out; the violent side of the World War I on the home front.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://theconversation.com/crime-and-conmen-in-the-black-out-the-violent-side-of-the-world-war-i-ho...
 
Description `Revisiting war-time drama: The case of J.M. Barrie's A Well-Remembered Voice (1918)', Beyond the Trenches, AHRC, 29 September 2016 (reported by Andrew Maunder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In this guest blog for Beyond the Trenches**, Dr Andrew Maunder from the University of Hertfordshire and AHRC's WW1 Engagement Centre 'Everyday Lives in War', talks about re-visiting War-Time Dramas and the case of J. M. Barrie. As a tour of one of Barrie's plays, A Well-Remembered Voice (unseen since its premiere in 1918 and which deals with one of the most striking developments of war-time life: the growth of spiritualism.), got underway in autumn 2016, Dr Maunder invited the readers to take a closer look at this neglected writer, not least for his attempts to say something about the trauma of war and its impact on those left behind.

**Beyond the Trenches is an online resource reflecting a variety of perspectives on arts and humanities research into the First World War in the year of the centennial commemoration. The blog is run by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), one of the First World War Centenary partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://beyondthetrenches.co.uk/revisiting-war-time-drama-the-case-of-j-m-barries-a-well-remembered-v...
 
Description Çanakkale/Gallipoli Wars 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Mike Roper spoke at Çanakkale/Gallipoli Wars 2015 International Conference at Monash University Australia in May 2015. A huge international conference for the centenary, it had a far wider reach than is usual for academic events - the nature of the war in Turkey is such that it has had long lasting implications for the shaping of its national identity and the programme reflected that broader influence. It had a wide audience drawn from national and local politics as well as local school teachers and historians - it was opened by the local state governor and the Australian consul.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015