Starting from Values - Evaluating Intangible Legacies

Lead Research Organisation: University of Brighton
Department Name: Sch of Environment and Technology

Abstract

This project is concerned with the legacy of AHRC funded Connected Communities projects. In this project, we will work together in eight diverse and overlapping AHRC Connected Communities - academic networks, civil society organizations, online communities, and groups rooted in physical neighbourhoods - to co-develop creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The question of legacy is closely connected to the values of different stakeholders, yet these values are rarely discussed openly, and many are not considered measurable in tangible ways. As a result, traditional evaluations tend to reflect the values of donors or governments, and what can be easily measured, rather than considering what project partners may be striving to achieve.

This project is innovative in bringing out unheard voices and legacies and giving them authority, by bringing together three emerging strands of interdisciplinary research. One is the co-development of creative and arts-based research methodologies which can enable different knowledges and 'ways of knowing' to be understood (e.g. visual, theatrical). Another is the use of a values lens for the local elicitation of appropriate indicators, frameworks or entire evaluation systems that allow locally important, 'intangible' outcomes to be clarified and effectively communicated. The third is an exploration of new forms of authority that are not derived from static laws or structures, but from sources of creativity. A careful, critical and reflective synthesis of these three strands will enable us to co-map less tangible legacies and pathways of influence for CC projects, making them 'quasi-objective' rather than subjective, and granting them legitimacy and authority in wider political and policy arenas. In so doing, we will be developing an approach that may provide the same, much needed, service in several other arenas such as sustainability, civil society and values based management.

The research will use a structure of five collaborative events, building an iterative and reflective cycle into the research process. We are a consortium of academic and community partners with extensive combined experience in co-design, critical approaches to participatory research, and innovative research methodologies. We will develop locally relevant and rigorous evaluation approaches to explore, crystallise and articulate self-defined 'intangible legacies' through workshops for some, and a retreat for others. We will draw on different arts and humanities scholarship, exploring, for instance, the importance of material expressions of authority, and the transformative and informative role of co-created visual arts. In such ways, we will build up shared understandings of what is important to us, and in the process making it more locally measurable. This will enhance our ability to communicate our deeply-held priorities, focus future work effectively, build on the legacy of recent projects, and influence wider arenas of policy and practice. Our approach will contribute to enhancing CC legacies rather than merely documenting them, in that increased awareness of the identified valued legacies will cause them to be supported further. It will also support the creation of new networks and enable and empower participants in these projects to themselves become co-designers of values-based evaluation systems.

Our community co-investigators will lead on developing and embedding similar evaluative approaches in at least six other Connected Communities projects, both in order to test the generalizability of the new approaches, and to facilitate project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems. We will share our findings with the wider Connected Communities programme and achieve wide dissemination through information packs, multimedia production and a public showcase event.

Planned Impact

While the initial impetus for the co-development of this bid came from the AHRC-CC Workshop held in Edinburgh in July 2013, the proposed research strongly responds to the felt needs of participating community organizations. Community co-investigators, separately and prior to this bid, had already been reflecting on ways of evaluating some of the less tangible legacies associated with completed and ongoing CC projects. In particular, aspects such as the nature of relationships between academic and community partners were felt to be beyond the realm of conventional evaluation - even if they were experienced as one of the most distinctive and rewarding aspects of CC work.

In this respect, the proposed research will generate a substantial and lasting impact at individual, interpersonal and collective levels within the specific organizations (and networks) whose senior managers are participating as Co-Investigators. At the individual level, it will move beyond a 'training' or 'capacity building' approach to one that seeks actively to empower the participating CCIs as vernacular designers of values-based, context-appropriate monitoring and evaluation systems for completed and ongoing CC projects. (This will result not only in enhanced participation in co-design, but also in meta-design, i.e. sustainable infrastructuring of appropriate values-based monitoring and evaluation systems within the participating organizations.) At the interpersonal level, we anticipate improved group dynamics and a strengthening of professional relationships both within and between organizations. We further expect that CCIs, acting in the capacity of chief executives / directors of the respective organizations, will actively use the learning from the project to make changes in organizational policy, strategic decision-making and practice. These collective-level changes, arising from an increased understanding of which intangible outcomes are important to CCIs and to other key stakeholders, will contribute to increasing the effectiveness of the respective organizations in relation to localized values-based criteria.

Beyond this initial circle of direct participants (primary arena of influence), the research - like the CC projects it seeks to evaluate - will generate a 'ripple effect' across multiple arenas. One such arena is represented by wider communities of interest, locality and practice that have already been involved with the CC programme, and thus have much to gain from understanding the intangible legacies of the programme (especially in relation to values) and their implications for policy and practice. In the case of Scaling Up Co-Design, for example, these include community centres and activist groups in London where The Glass House has tested and used the `Design by Consensus' methodology; a group of formerly marginalised young people who have been trained and empowered as community journalists and film-makers by Silent Cities in Sheffield; and online communities of people with disabilities, and of women working in information and communication technologies (Blackwood Foundation and Fossbox respectively).

The flexible and highly collaborative structure of this research is intended to create opportunities for networking and direct collaborations between wider-arena beneficiaries and the core project steering group. Most of these connections will be emergent rather than predesigned; but as a specific example, we have committed resources to sub-contract the Silent Cities community journalists to produce a short documentary film highlighting some of the intangible legacies identified during the project. The film will form part of the final 'showcase' event in February 2015; yet the processes of making it may be as important as the output itself, contributing to self-esteem, income-generation, and skill development through practice.
 
Title A Song of Tethering: Bestowing Legacies from Values 
Description An interactive and dynamic art installation entitled "A Song of Tethering: Bestowing Legacies from Values" was co-created by artist Andy Cheng and participants at the Starting from Values project showcase event in April 2015 in London, with additional artistic input from Elona Hoover and Gemma Burford. The installation (constructed from labelled helium balloons representing project legacies, tethered to labelled stands representing values and values-based indicators) was a three-dimensional representation of relationships between values and legacy underpinned by the discoveries of the Starting from Values project to date. It grew organically through time, with participants adding more balloons and labels throughout the duration of the 5-hour event. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The installation catalysed conversations and helped people to reflect on the legacies of their projects, whether they are 'tangible' or 'intangible', and how they relate to different values. 
 
Title An inside-out design manifesto 
Description A working paper incorporating visual artwork and poetry ('Collaborative research for sustainability: An inside-out design manifesto') was created by Gemma Burford, inspired in part by the collaboration with the Authority Research Network and especially learning about legacies of ARN projects during the Starting from Values project. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This work has been published by Keele University Community Animation and Social Innovation Centre (CASIC) as part of their Working Papers Series and was awarded the prize for the best working paper at the CASIC International Summit in October 2015. 
URL https://www.keele.ac.uk/casic/workingpaperseries
 
Title Audio podcast - Authority Research Network 
Description An audio podcast was created by Julian Brigstocke from recordings of 'walk and talk' activities at an August 2014 retreat for participants in two AHRC-funded projects (Immanent Authority and the Making of Community and Community Authority, Performance and Knowledge in Participatory Practice), all of whom were members of the Authority Research Network. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact No impacts yet 
 
Title Drawing Out Values (mixed media canvas panels) 
Description Three mixed media canvas panels representing the processes and outcomes of, and reflections on, collective and individual drawing activities conducted at the Connected Communities Festival in Cardiff in June 2014. A text booklet was also produced to accompany the artwork. The artwork and printed booklets were included in the project showcase on 30 April 2015. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The artwork stimulated reflection and discussions about the use of drawing as a values elicitation method. 
 
Title EDP Treasure Box 
Description Within the Empowering Design Practices project, a 'treasure box' has been developed as an enduring artefact for capturing and reflecting on values and legacies. The box contains a large piece of folded felt, which can be unfolded to reveal cards that represent the different values and legacies of the project. This can be taken out and used at the regular meetings of the project. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The treasure box was used to clarify the values underpinning the project and the desired legacies relating to each value. It will be used regularly for monitoring and evaluation throughout the five-year project. 
URL http://empoweringdesignpractices.weebly.com/blog/mapping-values-and-value-of-co-designed-projects
 
Title Four short project videos - Starting from Values 
Description Four short videos about the Starting from Values process and findings from the project 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Not yet known 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/project-vide...
 
Title MindGenius mind maps 
Description MindGenius mind-maps with attached evidence, such as photographs and audio files, have been produced to document the values and legacies of some of the Scaling-Up community partner organisations (Silent Cities, the Blackwood Foundation) and the Authority Research Network. A MindGenius mind-map of the legacies of the 'Starting from Values' project itself was constructed through analysis of excerpts from interviews with the different partners. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The process of creating the mind maps generated some important insights for Blackwood Foundation and Silent Cities. In the case of Silent Cities, these were used to recruit new board members and shape the organisation's strategy. 
 
Title Multimedia report 
Description We have created a multimedia report of the project in Microsoft PowerPoint 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact No impacts yet 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/198444/Starting-from-values_multimedia-report...
 
Title PowerPoint presentations 
Description Microsoft PowerPoint presentations about the project were created for: - The Global Conference on Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption in Sitges, Spain - A seminar given by Elona Hoover at the Community-University Partnership Programme at the University of Brighton on 12 May 2015 - The project showcase event - The final meeting during the extension period (presentation of the legacies of the SfV project) 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The presentations generated significant interest and catalysed new collaborations and activities, especially in the case of the Global Conference on Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption. 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0015/192003/Starting-from-Values_CUPP-seminar-pres...
 
Title Starting from Values 1-minute taster video 
Description A one-minute 'taster' video to promote the project was developed by Justine Gaubert of Silent Cities, presented at the 2015 showcase event, and made available on the project website 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Not distinguishable from impacts of other aspects of the showcase event. 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/project-vide...
 
Title Starting from Values 13-minute project video 
Description A 13-minute video about the project was made by Justine Gaubert, incorporating footage from interviews with community and academic partners talking about the values-based approach and what it had brought to their professional practice. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Not known 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/project-vide...
 
Title Starting from Values 13-minute project video 
Description A 13-minute video about the project was made by Justine Gaubert, incorporating footage from interviews with community and academic partners talking about the values-based approach and what it had brought to their professional practice. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Not known 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/project-vide...
 
Title Visual capture of Iterative Reflection 
Description The artists Karen Smithson and Eleanor Beer from Endless Possibilities produced a visual capture of the December 2014 Iterative Reflection meeting, which involved the Principal Investigator, Co-Investigators (including Community Co-Investigators) and Research Assistants. The resulting 1.5 metre original felt pen drawing, which captured important insights from the legacy project, was exhibited at the showcase event in April 2015. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Sections from the drawing were extensively used in the construction of the multimedia report, the project videos and the legacy maps. 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/186519/Starting-from-Values_small.pdf
 
Title Visual maps of CC project legacies 
Description Visual maps (in both PDF and printed A1 poster formats) have been created to represent the legacies of the projects that were studied, illustrating how the conceptualisation of 'legacy' evolved with the addition of the values-based approach, with the values lens both revealing previously unseen legacies and highlighting new elements or dimensions. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The maps were displayed at the showcase event and some participants asked questions about them. The process of developing the maps was a useful learning exercise for the participating community partners, helping them to clarify their values and related legacies. 
 
Title `Visualising Legacies' Installation 
Description An artistic installation in the form of a three dimensional sculptural essay consisting of helium balloons to represent project legacies (blue for 'more tangible' and silver for 'less tangible' legacies. The balloons were attached to one or more of three tether points relating to pre-selected values themes they related to, and/or a fourth tether point to which participants could attach their own themes. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The installation helped individual participants to reflect on their project legacies in relation to the values themes, and to enact the relationships between legacies and values by physically placing themselves in the space between tether points where they wished to attach their balloon. The overall installation gave a visual impression of 'more tangible' and 'less tangible' legacies, and how they clustered around the different values. 
 
Description An important outcome of the project is the development of new understandings of `project legacy' - something that is left behind after a project, and has a life beyond that project.

In evaluation, the 'outcomes' of a project tend to be described from only one viewpoint, rather than taking different people's perspectives into account. Thus, a project report will usually include a list or description of outcomes that is presented as if it were a simple statement of facts. We have discovered through this research, however, that project outcomes are valued differently by the different project participants, according to their personal and professional values and goals. Thus, an outcome that is of enormous significance to a university partner - such as a publication in a high-impact academic journal, which is later cited by many other researchers - may be of no relevance at all to a community partner.

In the same way, there is often a bias in the evaluation and reporting of collaborative research projects, in favour of outcomes that are of strategic importance to funders. In effect, the values and priorities of the funders are given authority over those of other project stakeholders. What this means is that outcomes that are crucially important to community partners and other less powerful stakeholders, such as project beneficiaries, may be overlooked in traditional evaluations: their voices, and their distinctive understandings of what the project has brought them, go unreported. The legacy of a funded research project, from the perspective of a specific participant, can be understood as those outcomes and outputs which that particular person finds meaningful, worthwhile or valuable. Thus, just as there can never be a universal definition of what is meaningful, there is also no way of defining the legacies of a project without taking a 'multi-subjective' approach - exploring the issue from different viewpoints.

In this project, we recognised from the start that some aspects of project legacies are harder to capture and document than others. We characterised these initially as 'intangible legacies'. However, another important finding of the project was that legacies can have both tangible and intangible dimensions - e.g. a tangible output such as a book might be the result of a collaborative research process in which deep and genuine friendships were created, resulting in a climate of mutual trust that gave people the courage to share their more creative or 'risky' ideas, leading in turn to new ways of thinking.

It includes the recognition that `legacy' is not a concept that only has a single, objective definition (unlike `impact', `outcomes', etc.) but rather a multi-subjective one that relates to participants' values. This implies, in turn, a new approach to evaluation that explicitly acknowledges the differing values of multiple stakeholders (e.g. project donors, implementers, beneficiaries and wider society) and recognises that these lead to different understandings of project legacies. In parallel with this advance in the theoretical understanding, we have developed a wide range of methods for eliciting the values of different stakeholders and mapping or tracking the associated legacies of funded collaborative research across a variety of different arenas.


a) evaluate and/or monitor their work (mentioned by two academic co-investigators, two community co-investigators, one ARN member, and one project adviser);
b) carry out organisational development and/or strategic planning (mentioned by all four of the community Co-Is, plus one project adviser);
c) conduct research (mentioned by one academic Co-I, two community Co-Is, and one ARN member);
d) reflect on their work (mentioned by one academic Co-I, two community Co-Is, one project adviser)*;
e) collaborate, connect and engage with others (mentioned by two community Co-Is and one research assistant);
f) make decisions (mentioned by two community Co-Is);
g) recruit new leaders (mentioned by two community Co-Is)
h) build networks (mentioned by one community Co-I and one project adviser);
i) design projects (mentioned by one community Co-I and one project adviser);
j) respond to feedback (mentioned by one community Co-I);
k) teach students (mentioned by one project adviser).

*Note, however, that one of these participants felt that the Starting from Values project had interrupted an existing process of reflection on their work, i.e. the change was a negative one. The other three were very positive and stated that the project had helped them to reflect in new ways.

The theme of presenting our work differently highlighted how the Starting from Values project had changed the ways in which participants communicate their work to wider audiences, engage with the public, or recruit new clients. This was expressed not only in terms of outcomes (changes to websites, new publications, or new approaches to conference presentations) but also the processes of communication. Participants reported, for example, that the project had helped them to make their work useful to other people and apply it to new arenas; that it had made them more conscious of presenting their work in a beautiful way, or trying to create beauty; and, in the case of two community co-investigators, that it had taught them how to present their work in terms of values.

The theme of new ideas, projects and/or activities also included a number of sub-themes within it. At the most tangible level, for Fossbox the SfV work has already led to a formal collaboration on a new funded project (a multi-stakeholder values-focused evaluation of The Exchange, a collaborative research initiative for ECRs and creatives funded by Arts Council England and HEFCE). For other partners, it has led to new activities within a recently launched project: the Empowering Design Practices project (led by two of the academic Co-Is from Starting from Values, Katerina Alexiou and Theo Zamenopoulos) has been designed to incorporate values activities systematically from the start, with follow-up reflection on a regular basis. Other participants are at different stages on this journey: from new ways of thinking, to initial ideas for projects, to emergent or completed proposals for new research (in the case of academic Co-Is) or concrete plans to undertake a specific activity (in the case of community Co-Is).

Beyond the direct use of project findings, our analysis also highlighted several themes relating to 'intangible dimensions of legacies', or what might be termed 'areas of influence', from the project. These were seeing our work differently; responding to external pressures; personal transformation; new understandings of legacies; new understandings of [our] values; and new understandings of values-based approaches and methodologies.

- The theme of seeing our work differently had numerous sub-themes. One community Co-I expressed on several different occasions that the project had enabled them to see her work in broader, more holistic and more integrated ways, and to see new relationships between different areas of work. Two community Co-Is, two advisers and one ARN member also felt that the project had led them to reflect on how they work, what they're actually doing (or want to do), who they are as designers, researchers or practitioners, why they are doing what they are (or in the ways that they are), and where their organization is going. Two participants said that they valued their work more, and two others said that the SfV project helped to expose unaddressed issues and challenges - providing insights into why some aspects of previous projects had 'worked' and others had not, in one case, and enabling potential communication difficulties to be exposed and addressed at the pilot stage of a project rather than waiting for them to get worse, in the other. Other comments made by individuals that were grouped under the seeing our work differently theme were having a clearer sense of vision and identity, and seeing important things that had been 'lost' in the way that people worked (e.g. due to the pressures of time).
- On a similar note, the theme of responding to external pressures also emerged as important for several participants, from two contrasting perspectives. Some participants (notably in the Authority Research Network) stated that the project had served as a reminder of what was important to them, e.g. friendship, 'slow thinking' or a process focus, and helped them not to compromise these values when under pressure to produce outputs. They also referred to creating spaces to think, connect, care for each other, and support each other through difficult times. From the opposite perspective, some participants felt that SfV's focus on positive values and creativity had contributed to a depoliticisation of the 'legacy' landscape, i.e. responding to external pressures with a mind-set of ignoring or even denying wider political and economic contexts. The legacy discourse could also be seen as buying into a market-led culture, or acceding to market-driven demands for communication of 'success' and 'impact'. Likewise, the drive to 'make the intangible tangible' might serve to bring ever more domains of human experience into the realm of quantification and depersonalisation and reinforce entrenched power dynamics.

- Comments under the theme of personal transformation were made by eight participants altogether: three of the four Community Co-Is, two project advisers, two research assistants and an ARN member. All but one of these related to positive affect outcomes (feeling energised, empowered, intrigued, inspired, affirmed or reassured); competencies (building up experience, knowledge and confidence, taking on new roles e.g. as a facilitator, or rethinking a career path); and social outcomes (new friendships and a 'reminder to be friendly'). By contrast, one participant felt that SfV had a negative effect on certain relationships and had undermined trust.

- New understandings of legacies was divided into three overarching sub-themes, namely (a) participants recognising new forms, types or dimensions of legacy that they had not previously thought about; (b) participants finding new ways of relating to their project legacies in a general sense; and (c) participants identifying specific new project legacies that they had not previously recognised, some of which (e.g. energy and creativity) overlapped with the `personal transformation' legacies of the SfV project itself. The contributions in each of these sub-themes are listed below:

o New forms, types or dimensions of legacy: cascading legacies; intangible legacies; legacies that are not immediate, or would not be picked up by an end-of-project evaluation; legacies that are not captured in project outputs, such as publications or reports; deeply personal legacies; and legacies that were previously unspoken, or simply 'had not occurred to people' as legacies.

o New ways of relating to project legacies: recognising, exploring and articulating legacies; valuing or valorising legacies, or seeing specific legacies as essential to the project, going forward; building on legacies in other contexts.

o Specific legacies identified through the SfV project: confidence, 'cross-pollination / cross-fertilisation' (i.e. exchange of methods and tools between projects or organisations), creativity, credibility, energy and vitality, empowerment, experimentation, exploration of ideas with beneficiaries in a safe space, friendship, joy, new languages for articulating values, making time for people, strengthening of networks, challenging power dynamics, ownership and creative commons, rebalancing life and work, reciprocity, relationship-building, slow thinking, trust; also new knowledge, ways of thinking, partnerships, products, tools and ways of teaching.

- New understandings of values encompasses the sub-themes of articulating, exploring and clarifying values at the individual, project and organisational levels; reinforcing a project's driving values; developing values frameworks and using them for planning and evaluation; revising organisational values statements or creating new ones; recognising where values are shared between partners in a project, or not; giving people more confidence to talk about their values or what's important to them; and talking about differences in values within a project team or organisation. We note the emergence of two contrasting trends: one leading towards consensus, often in the form of a material artefact like a mutually agreed values framework, and the other towards dissensus (not necessarily negative) and a recognition of intra-organisational / intra-project diversity in values.

- New understandings of values-focused based approaches encompasses three main sub-themes: (a) recognising the potential usefulness of values-based approaches (as practiced in this project), and/or developing new approaches, for new contexts; (b) identifying challenges with values-based approaches, and (c) gaining practical experience in how to facilitate and deliver values-based approaches. In the first category, there was a recognition that values-based approaches could be useful not only for articulating and capturing a range of legacies, and for more formal evaluation processes and communications with funders, but also at the design and planning stages of projects. Participants suggested that values-based approaches could be helpful for catalysing new kind of dialogue about partners' interests and priorities; freeing up new ways of thinking and acting (e.g. not restricting themselves to partners working on similar thematic areas); bringing people together and building relationships on the basis of shared values; building a shared vision and identity within a group; and/or moving beyond tensions and frustrations to focus on what people collectively found important. There were also some suggestions that values-based approaches could be useful for challenging power dynamics and advocating for a new form of politics. In the second category, however, it was noted that values-based approaches often run the risk of reinforcing existing power dynamics and can have a depoliticising effect, sometimes serving to marginalise concerns about the wider political or economic environment and its effects on the partner organisations. Finally, in the third category, an important impact of the project was the capacity building of some partners as facilitators of values-based workshops in their own right.
Exploitation Route - Project design and strategic thinking (including identifying and mitigating potential values conflicts at early stages of project design)
- Monitoring and evaluation (and principles for evaluation design)
- Identifying, capturing and articulating legacies of community development projects and collaborative research (in the UK and internationally
Shifting thinking from impact to legacies, especially for community-engaged research in arts and humanities, but potentially beyond the AHRC
- Potential for spin-out companies, e.g. values-focused strategic change management
- Partnership-building and relationship-building, e.g. at the start of new projects
- Capacity building
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Energy,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies
 
Description They have been used to assist 10-20 civil society groups, NGOs and communtiy groups to reflect on the legacies of the ri proejcts, including 10 AHRC Connected Community projects.As a direct result, the four main CSOs working with use challenged their Boards of Directors, and asked for changes in them - because the memebrs realised that they were not currently pursuing the values-based legacies that were of priority to them. The findings have been also used to develop other projects, for example on looking at the legacy in villages on the Gross National Happiness movement, in Bhutan and Thailand - a further AHRC project starting in 2016. The findings are in development for use in looking at legacies of businesses in wider communities, as a form of CSR. And they are currently being developed with a mainland Chinese major philanthropical bank to consider how targeted legacies will influence the organisational strategic plan for the next 10 years. Furthermore, our learnignn in the use of values-based approaches to facilitate group members to look forward has led to a new strand of work in assisting villagers in developing countries(currently Botswana) to do this to enabe them to better plan for Climate Change Adaptation - a UN priority. And similary, for pre-judging development projects near villages in Nigeria.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic

 
Description Fossbox policy change
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description The Cultural Capital Exchange evaluation
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description The Glass-House policy change
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description On Our Doorsteps
Amount £7,586 (GBP)
Organisation University of Brighton 
Department Community-University Partnership Programme
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2014 
End 09/2015
 
Title 'Treasure box' for visualising and identifying values and related legacies 
Description A 'treasure box' for visualising and identifying values and related legacies was developed by the Empowering Design Practices project team. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact When developed during the early stages of the project, the tool helped the EDP team to clarify their values and identify the legacies that they hoped the project would have. The box will be used for monitoring legacies thoughout the project. 
URL http://empoweringdesignpractices.weebly.com/blog/mapping-values-and-value-of-co-designed-projects
 
Title Collaging toolkit for values elicitation 
Description A set of images (photographs and clip art) and words that can be used to help participants construct a collage relating to things that they value within their work. This in turn can be used as a basis for developing values-based indicators. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Images from the toolkit were used in an evaluation of the Chaplaincy service at the University of Winchester, where they helped to stimulate reflection on Chaplaincy staff values and how they are expressed in action. 
 
Title Maps for prioritising values-based indicators 
Description Maps for prioritising and organising values/values-based indicators, including (i) concentric circles, (ii) non-concentric circles to represent contested and non-shared values, and (iii) pyramid maps to help with the prioritisation of indicators for evaluation 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The maps have been used by the participating Connected Communities projects and by a number of other projects and stakeholders (Cardiff University Centre for Community Journalism, University of Brighton Residential Advisers, Brighton Peace and Environment Centre, etc.) to prioritise values-based indicators for framework development or to select indicators from a framework for immediate evaluation. 
 
Title Online survey method for ranking values-based indicators 
Description Paula Graham of Fossbox has developed an online survey method for selecting and ranking values-based indicators using Limesurvey open-source software 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The method was used to help Fossbox to develop its new strategy for 2014-15. 
 
Title Values elicitation methods 
Description We have developed a variety of values elicitation methods that can be used to develop values-based indicators, including 'walk and talk' with audio recording (Authority Research Network), reflective site visits (Empowering Design Practices), mind-mapping (Silent Cities and University of Winchester), collective drawing (Rethinking Impact workshops), and the use of a collaging toolkit to stimulate non-verbal elicitation (University of Winchester) 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The methods have been applied to help different research groups (described above) to create their own values-based indicators, in conjunction with the sets of prompt statements described separately. 
 
Title Values-based statements for collaborative research 
Description Through the project, we have created a list or 'menu' of values-based statements (proto-indicators) that can be used to stimulate reflection on, or evaluation of, community-university collaborations in research (e.g. ongoing or completed AHRC Connected Communities projects) We have also developed new ways of presenting existing values-based prompts (WeValue indicators) and new ones developed in the project, including (i) a small set of cards used at the showcase event; (ii) a booklet organising statement in word clouds rather than list form, (iii) a brochure with three pages of prompts corresponding respectively to principles of action and learning, principles of collaboration and principles of success; (iv) an 'Ideas Sheet' with around 20 prompts, used in networking meetings with The Cultural Capital Exchange; 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The tool has helped Connected Communities project teams to reach a clearer understanding of the values underlying their projects and how these values are, or could be, expressed in action. In several cases, this has been the first step in conducting values-focused evaluations of the project, or developing new strategic directions. The cards used at the showcase event stimulated the development of a values workshop at the Permaculture Association annual retreat. The 'Ideas Sheet' used in networking meetings at The Cultural Capital Exchange helped researchers and creative partners to clarify their values, network with each other and formulate ideas about how they might collaborate. After the first successful pilot, the values exercise was scaled up and allocated more time at subsequent networking meetings. 
 
Title Legacies of CC projects 
Description An ordered and publishable collection of representations of the large number of legacies of the 11 AHRC Connected Communities Projects which interacted with our project, with some portrayal of their relationship with elicited values and comparison against those identified before our approach was used (cf. the much smaller number expected from each, and for only 8 projects originally proposed). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Understanding the legacies of the projects has helped research team members to develop new projects, collaborations and ideas. 
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/learning-and...
 
Title Legacies of Starting from Values project 
Description An ordered Microsoft Excel database of legacies from the 'Starting from Values' project itself, consisting of coded excerpts from interviews with Co-Investigators (including Community Co-Investigators), Research Assistants and project advisers. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The database has helped members of the research team to understand the legacies of 'Starting from Values' and develop new project ideas. 
 
Title Videos, transcripts and artwork 
Description An ordered collection of video clips, transcripts and artwork with basic thematic coding against themes identified at the end of the project. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No impacts yet 
 
Description Barton Hill Settlement 
Organisation Barton Hill Settlement
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have prepared workshop materials and led a full-day workshop to help partners to begin exploring their values, identifying possible indicators of these, and using the indicators as the starting point for a values-focused evaluation of their project.
Collaborator Contribution Partners have participated in the workshop, identifying indicators and prioritising those that they want to take forward for further development, and sharing learning which will contribute to the further development of the 'Starting from Values' project.
Impact Partners have gained a better understanding of their values and how they are 'lived out' in practice
Start Year 2014
 
Description Brighton Peace and Environment Centre 
Organisation Brighton Peace and Environment Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We co-designed a funding bid to University of Brighton Community-University Partnership Programme for the collaborative development of values-focused evaluation of a bespoke climate change mitigation programme, inspired by the 'Carbon Conversations' approach, which will be offered by Brighton Peace and Environment Centre (BPEC) as an intervention within Grace Eyre Foundation (GEF). We have since organised two workshops with stakeholders of BPEC and GEF, the first to develop a values and indicators framework, and the second to train BPEC staff in evaluation co-design. We also contributed to the final evaluation report.
Collaborator Contribution Co-designing the funding bid and participating in the workshops - see above.
Impact Output from first workshop: Values and indicators framework for BPEC-GEF collaboration Output from second workshop: Draft evaluation plan illustrating the indicators to be evaluated and the methods to be used Outcome of second workshop: Four BPEC staff members and one GEF staff member trained in values-focused evaluation Outcomes: Values-focused evaluation of behaviour change intervention was conducted by GEF staff. The evaluation report was submitted to GEF and feedback indicated a high level of satisfaction. Behaviour change intervention has led to the formation of a 'Green Team' and significant culture change within GEF; the CEO identified the "appeal to participants' intrinsic values" as a particularly significant element of the intervention. This might not have been recognised without the values-focused evaluation.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Brighton Peace and Environment Centre 
Organisation Grace Eyre Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We co-designed a funding bid to University of Brighton Community-University Partnership Programme for the collaborative development of values-focused evaluation of a bespoke climate change mitigation programme, inspired by the 'Carbon Conversations' approach, which will be offered by Brighton Peace and Environment Centre (BPEC) as an intervention within Grace Eyre Foundation (GEF). We have since organised two workshops with stakeholders of BPEC and GEF, the first to develop a values and indicators framework, and the second to train BPEC staff in evaluation co-design. We also contributed to the final evaluation report.
Collaborator Contribution Co-designing the funding bid and participating in the workshops - see above.
Impact Output from first workshop: Values and indicators framework for BPEC-GEF collaboration Output from second workshop: Draft evaluation plan illustrating the indicators to be evaluated and the methods to be used Outcome of second workshop: Four BPEC staff members and one GEF staff member trained in values-focused evaluation Outcomes: Values-focused evaluation of behaviour change intervention was conducted by GEF staff. The evaluation report was submitted to GEF and feedback indicated a high level of satisfaction. Behaviour change intervention has led to the formation of a 'Green Team' and significant culture change within GEF; the CEO identified the "appeal to participants' intrinsic values" as a particularly significant element of the intervention. This might not have been recognised without the values-focused evaluation.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Cardiff University Centre for Community Journalism (C4CJ) 
Organisation Cardiff University
Department Centre for Community Journalism
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We designed and delivered two workshops to train members of C4CJ staff in values-focused evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Partners from C4CJ participated in the workshops and are now preparing values-focused evaluations of community journalism projects supported by the Centre.
Impact 3 staff members were trained (one of whom has since left and taken up a new position with MIND Wales) and have now begun to apply the values-focused evaluation methodology for evaluating community journalism projects.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Blackwood Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Brunel University London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Fossbox
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Sheffield Hallam University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation Silent Cities
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation University of Brighton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Starting from Values 
Organisation University of Sussex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for 2 strands of work, the first being the co-development of creative ways of identifying, evaluating and enhancing intangible, values-related aspects of project legacies. The second strand of work involved taking the co-developed approach and learning from the first phase to a further six Connected Communities projects. In so doing, the project planned to find new ways of lending legitimacy and authority to previously unheard or less 'tangible' legacies of Connected Communities projects, and contribute to wider questions on shared values, authority and legacies in collaborative research projects.
Collaborator Contribution Co-investigators from academic and community partners were responsible for the second phase of the work mentioned above, facilitating project partners to become (vernacular) designers of values-focused evaluation systems - embedding the ethos of 'scaling up' and capacity-building within the project.
Impact 1.) Project booklet - Evaluating Intangible Legacies of Connected Communities Projects 2.) Four project videos (i What is Starting from Values, ii Hour Glass: looking at legacies for future work, iii Why start from values? and iv Explicit legacies) 3.) Visual capture showing the process in evaluating intangible legacies. 4.) Book Chapter - The project team has contributed a chapter about the 'Starting from Values' project. 5.) Showcase Event and Installation - the project's final reflection was organised as a sharing event. Over 50 people attended the plenaries and workshops led by project partners. This was also an opportunity for the project team to gain feedback on initial project outcomes and outputs
Start Year 2015
 
Company Name Green Spiral Arts 
Description Gemma Burford (Research Assistant on the SfV project) has established herself as a sole trader under the business name Green Spiral Arts, offering arts-centred evaluation and strategic planning services inspired by the values-centred approach developed during the SfV project (among other organisational consultancy services). 
Year Established 2014 
Impact Green Spiral Arts has been awarded a 12-month contract to evaluate the Chaplaincy provision at the University of Winchester using a values-based approach, and work with the Institute for Value Studies and the School of Education on designing research into the value(s) and legacies of the liberal arts tradition in education.
 
Description 'Rethinking Impact' preparatory worshop (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Five participants from two organisations also took part in a pilot event in London organised with the University of Brighton Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP) designed to test the methodology and build the capacity of the Welsh-speaking facilitator in preparation for the 'Rethinking Impact' event at the Connected Communities Research Festival in Cardiff 9see separate entry). The workshop helped professional practitioners in two civil society organisations to gain a better understanding of their shared values (within and between organisations) and to reflect on how they could develop indicators to bring these values into their monitoring and evaluation systems.

While one of the original projects proved not to be viable, the workshop sparked interest from one member to begin developing a values-focused evaluation system for the Community-Supported Agriculture movement in the UK, of which he is a director.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description 'Rethinking Impact' workshops (Cardiff) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop helped practitioners to gain a better understanding of shared values within their respective organisations and projects, and to develop relevant indicators of these values that could help them to measure 'intangible' aspects of their project legacies.

Participants reported that the activity had contributed towards strategic planning processes within their organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/rethinking-i...
 
Description C2U Expo (Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 'Shifting authority in the evaluation of community-university partnership projects' by Elona Hoover and Paula Graham (presented by Paula Graham)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://cuexpo2015.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/15-38-C2U-program-May-25-final-for-web.pdf
 
Description CUPP seminar (Brighton) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar and discussion presenting project findings to university and community members (presented by Elona Hoover) hosted by the University of Brighton Community-University Partnership Programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Cleaner Production Conference (Sitges) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 2015 Global Conference on Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption, held in Sitges, Spain from 1-3 November 2015: (i) A workshop on values was included in the programme, (ii) Paper presentation: Hoover, Burford and Harder 'From moral to aesthetic values, and back again', based on work done in the project, (iii) Paper presentation by Elona Hoover 'Where does participation happen? Citizens' values in future smart cities', based on work developed by community partner Fossbox from the Starting from Values project. As a result of the smart cities presentation, meetings have taken place to discuss a follow-up project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.cleanerproductionconference.com/
 
Description Evaluation co-design workshop (Ethno-Ornithology World Archive) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Participants in your research and patient groups
Results and Impact The workshop resulted in a draft Values-Focused Evaluation plan for the Ethno-Ornithology World Archive (EWA) Connected Communities project.

The workshop helped EWA project participants to clarify three core values (knowledge preservation, new standards for research, and people-centred conservation practice), and to identify legacies that they would like their project to have in relation to each of these values.

The workshop also influenced thinking and decision-making about what to evaluate, and which methods to use, within the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Mapping of values & legacies (Rhondda People) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participants identified four key values (Personal Development, Relationships, Community and Creativity) and associated indicators, and then listed project legacies that they associated with those values and indicators.

Following the workshop, the Centre for Community Journalism in Cardiff has expressed an intention to commission members of the 'Starting from Values' project team to conduct training workshops in values elicitation and/or values-focused evaluation for participants in other Hyperlocal Journalism projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Mapping values and CC project legacies (Authority Research Network) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The activity helped the network to identify some legacies from the Connected Communities project that they wanted to explore further.

No impact yet as the exploration is still in progress.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Mapping values and CC project legacies (Fossbox and FLOSSIE) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The mapping exercise enabled Paula Graham to understand and articulate what she found most meaningful, significant or worthwhile about her work within Fossbox and the FLOSSIE network, and to think about how these values relate to one another and to the legacies of the Scaling Up Co-Design project. In the case of Fossbox, shared understanding was built with another colleague.

During the mapping exercise, Paula identified new possibilities for building on the legacies of Scaling Up Co-Design, and was inspired with an idea for a new project around the co-design of co-housing for elder LGBTQ people in partnership with Blackwood Foundation. This is now being developed into a preliminary funding proposal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity
 
Description Mapping values and CC project legacies (Silent Cities) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The mapping activity (dialogue and production of a visual output) resulted in a clearer understanding of what Silent Cities values are, he how they relate to one another, and what the legacies of the 'Scaling Up Co-Design' project were in relation to these values.

The activity helped the CEO of Silent Cities to gain a deeper understanding of the mission of the organisation and of how to train and inspire new board members.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity
 
Description Mapping values and CC project legacies (The Glass House) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The mapping exercise helped members of the Glass House board to explore their values together, develop values-based indicators for future evaluation, and enhance the strategic planning process that had recently been completed within the organisation.

Discussions between board members are ongoing and will continue to shape current and future strategic planning processes within The Glass House. The impacts of the Scaling-Up project are now being strategically mapped in relation to the identified values and values-based indicators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity
 
Description NCCPE Engage conference (Bristol) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster presentation on Starting from Values project by Sophia de Sousa, The Glass House Community-Led Design, at the 2014 'Engage' Conference hosted by the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/work-with-us/engage-conference/engage-2014
 
Description Permaculture Association retreat (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following the project showcase event in London, Kevin Mascarenhas (who had originally become interested in the project through the pre-Cardiff pilot event for 'Rethinking Impact') organised a values workshop at the Permaculture Assocation annual retreat. This generated a lot of interest in the values approach among permaculture practitioners and there were discussions about how it might be integrated into the work of the Permaculture Association.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Project showcase event (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project showcase event, London, 30 April 2015 - open and free to attend, 40 people attended the event. The event sparked questions and discussion and inspired a follow-up activity led by Kevin Mascarenhas at the Permaculture Association (see separate entry).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/starting-from-values-evaluating-intangible-legacies/final-projec...
 
Description Values elicitation workshop (Ethno-Ornithology World Archive) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop sparked discussion and a new shared vision of the values underpinning the EWA project

Participants gained a better understanding of what matters to them within the project and how their values are 'lived out' in practice. This revealed important aspects of the project that had previously been overlooked. Using the values-based indicators developed through the 'Starting from Values' project helped participants to realise the importance of intangible dimensions such as being able to laugh and have fun together, which are not usually evaluated but without which they would find it very difficult to work together and make progress. The most important impact was the planning of the follow-up activity, aimed at developing a draft evaluation plan.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015