Extending Empathy - A Network to Exchange Tools/Methodologies and Processes from Design, Performance and Restorative Justice

Lead Research Organisation: University of the Arts London
Department Name: Central Saint Martin's College

Abstract

This network will share knowledge about empathetic tools and processes from 3 different creative communities - Design, Performance and RJ - via 4 planned workshops with international speakers. The ambition is to share case studies, findings and improve knowledge of best practice regarding how best to build empathic processes.

Crime, conflict and ineffective delivery of justice detract from the quality of individual/collective life, disrupting social cohesion. One response has been RJ. This brings those harmed by crime or conflict, and those responsible for the harm, into direct communication, enabling all affected to engage in empathetic processes that play a part in repairing harm to find a positive way forward. RJ lets victims tell offenders the real impact of their crime, get answers, receive an apology and get on with their lives. It also lets offenders understand and take responsibility. RJ has some elements in common with co-creation and participatory approaches employed in design, as well as those delivered via performance studies within the criminal justice system by members of the Arts Alliance. How all these different specialists use 'empathetic processes' is the crux and deserves further exploration. The workshops will provide a context that promotes new connections/understandings about empathetic processes by practitioners currently working with diverse communities. In sharing existing insights from different practice-based styles of engagement, the network's workshops will build community capacity and help subject specialists and the communities they engage with better understand the issue of empathy. In particular, how creative strategies may be used in relationships to help deliver conflict management or to aid engagement with building empathy in groups who had previously not shown remorse, for example. Furthermore, sharing information about what have been called 'proxy processes' (traditionally understood as a process whereby some members of a decision-making body delegate their voting power to other members of the same body to vote in their absence) delivered by arts practitioners working within criminal justice system in the UK will occur. Such processes appear to play a significant role in creating empathic opportunities that help kick-start healing, and subsequent engagement with RJ by victims and offenders

Sharing good practice is needed because there are real obstacles to implementing RJ, including fear of offenders in being involved in the first place, resistance and suspicion by one or more of the parties involved (offenders, victims, practitioners, other community members with a vested interest) and a lack of the skills to offer empathetic tools or even access to proxy processes. Given that empathy and how to establish and apply it, is often the unspoken question of RJ, the workshops will address how to engage participants in empathetic processes. Design usefully engages with building empathy through role-playing, drawing on tools and techniques from theatre to engage users as partners in participatory design activity. Design and performance go beyond the creation of products and into the field of social innovation, including strategic processes of engagement with hard to reach groups or communities. Cardboard Citizens, Clean Break and the Geese Theatre Company are exemplar theatre organisations that teach empathetic processes to prisoners and have much tacit knowledge to share with other creatives.

Different creative communities work using a variety of diverse interventions to reduce alienation, build empathy and/or catalyse effective community connections, but rarely do they have opportunities to share understandings which will be the central focus of this network. It is needed because what works to improve empathetic engagement will also contribute to improving social cohesion.

Planned Impact

This project will deliver new opportunities to build empathy in hard to reach groups, which will ultimately:

1. Substantially reduce some offender repeat offending;
2. Increase offences brought to justice (compared to Traditional Criminal Justice - TCJ)
3. Reduce crime victims' post-traumatic stress symptoms & related costs
4. Increase satisfaction (with justice) for both victims & offenders compared to TCJ
5. Reduce crime victims' desire for violent revenge against their offenders
6. Reduce the costs of criminal justice, when used as diversion from TCJ; &
7. Reduce recidivism more than prison (adults) does or as well as prison (youths) does. Adapted from Sherman and Strang (2007)

The impact of performance upon victims and perpetrators of crime is also significant. Theatre groups such as Cardboard Citizens, Clean Break, the Geese Theatre Company, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Shakespeare Behind Bars and the Performing Arts Learning and Teaching Innovation Network (PALATINE) have already shown that their work develops empathy in the roles and experiences of others by:

1. Building confidence and communication skills
2. Developing personal, social, artistic and professional skills such a trust and team work that impact on their lives and their engagement with wider society, including in some cases, the reduction of recidivism.

Similarly, there is significant evidence of design processes, methods and tools generating empathy for users. Using design probes, focus groups, observation and shadowing, video ethnography and immersive role-play, designers gain empathic understanding of the impact of their design actions upon users and others that come into contact with their design outputs.

Overall tools from performance and design may enhance RJ practitioner delivery. Also performance/design may better understand problems posed by RJ and respond. New ideas e.g. short drama courses aimed at RJ professionals or new design-led action research based interventions (linked to future partnerships and funding bids) could potentially develop. New methods and approaches may also contribute to the development of curricula/research methods amongst academic partners (particularly within design), development of engagement workshops amongst crime prevention partners, and development of new creative approaches amongst dramatic partners. In addition to uni-disciplinary impacts there will also be trans-disciplinary benefits linked to future collaboration within RJ, design and performance practices that are yet to be realised.

Finding new ways of deploying empathy - both engaging all classes of participants in RJ and in boosting the delivery of justice, crime reduction and community safety once the initial engagement has been secured - promises to realise and scale up the direct gains indicated by the systematic review of evaluative evidence quoted above. Beyond these gains, there are more speculative ones relating to how social cohesiveness can be supported by (and can support in its turn) a wider state of community safety and perception of fair and satisfying justice. Benefits and cost savings from processes of RJ are of interest to government, and in particular demand, to help mend 'Broken Britain'.

Whilst the real impact of using creative strategies to further the aims and objectives of RJ may take some time to payback in demonstrable ways, we will apply ongoing impact evaluation throughout the project to understand/evidence impact in regards to levels of connectivity and outcomes of engagement within the network. Surveys of network members will provide qualitative evaluation too.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title 'No Silence Please, This is a Human Library' poster 
Description Andaleeb Qureshi from Human Library Mumbai team requested permission to use the poster 'No Silence Please, This is a Human Library' at the first ever Human Library event in Mumbai on May 28th, 2017 at Title Waves Bookstore. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Approval was granted. 
 
Title London Graffiti and Street Art Dilemmas exhibition 
Description A Window Galleries exhibition at Central Saint Martins (14th January - 19th February 2016) titled 'London Graffiti and Street Art Dilemmas' invited audience feedback and empathetic engagement with the dilemmas graffiti brings to community audiences. The role of un-commissioned forms of creative practice in our cities and neighbourhoods is currently being reviewed. Increasingly, diverse populations appear to value street art and other ideas for colourful or playful cities. But where and when is the line drawn to decide that such art is no longer 'creative' or 'positive', but instead 'offensive' and 'detrimental' to a given community or environment? Do we leave such decisions wholly to the police, local councils or property management teams, or could the artists and communities affected, have not just a voice, but some collective control too? The purpose of the exhibition was to build empathy for different graffiti perspectives and find new ways to prototype ideas and promote dialogue. Lorraine Gamman and Marcus Willcocks of Design Against Crime Research Centre at Central Saint Martins collaborated with artist Steve Russell to create this experimental series of storyboards. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact tbc 
URL http://graffitidialogues.com
 
Description Research led to the following discoveries:

1. That there is real synergy between RJ, design and theatre/performance practitioners regarding the potential of techniques and processes developed for empathic encounters. We discovered "context is everything" when trying to build empathy and or designing empathic encounters also that those engaging with social innovation or working with communities need to better understand the role of emotion (affective as well as cognitive empathy) in terms of their own practice regarding community engagement strategies. Ultimately, all the Empathy workshops and events that took place discovered that building Empathy requires interaction, not just film, theatre or VR, experiences (which are also important as is reading literature), but that human interaction needs mutually democratic opportunities to share stories, and to facilitate the sort of participatory engagements that make it possible to build empathy. Either through designed processes that allow empathic encounters to happen or from other activities that enable Empathy between people to emerge or to be extended.

2. To effectively communicate with diverse audiences and better share tools, techniques, case studies, definitions and ideas about what constitute "empathy" these methods must be experienced. Pragmatic and participatory empathic engagement strategies, as well as academic presentations, are needed to maximize impact. Overall our Network events attracted circa 1000 participants and whilst the first three workshop of academic presentations by key experts in the field (from Participatory Design, Performance/Theatre and Restorative Justice from 4 international 3 European countries as well as UK ) received good feedback. And also led to further engagement by groups such as the DESIS network (who particularly related empathy issues to migration); and the Empathy Museum, and The Positive Deviance Network, nevertheless some audience members requested more participatory engagement opportunities .Two further funded participatory empathic engagement Network events were held including "A Human Graffiti Library" experience and a DRS "Empathy Things" catalysation seminar - both received positive feedback.
Exploitation Route Filming seminars and locating them on (http://extendingempathy.com/eventsarchive) has also enabled further international engagement, the "Culture of Empathy Network" have further disseminated the empathy talks and encourage Network participants to engage with their forums (including their Empathy Training Group and Empathy Design Group.) We anticipate further use of these resources in the future.

The PI of the Network was invited to curate (after the Network funding expired) an "Open Design for Empathy "stream in Hong Kong which took place in November 2016 attracting over 20 paper submissions. She was also invited and became a member of the Empathy Museum board. Both activities have created opportunities for the research findings to be applied further afield and in diverse contexts as well as opening up future collaborative potential. Colleague Adam Thorpe and Network design participating are discussing with PI Gamman curating further design led Empathy events and are exploring putting together a book of essays from key participants about "Empathy Things - about designing FOR empathy", and contemplating further funding opportunities with Network partners, although Brexit has rather dashed some plans.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

URL http://extendingempathy.com/
 
Description This project has had a massive impact on the PI whose engagement has influenced her thinking and subsequent projects, including AHRC-funded Design Thinking for Prison Industries. In fact, early discussions about "empathy things" inspired the prison design research team to develop design education materials in new ways to inspire inmate empathy for themselves and others.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description DESIS Network 
Organisation DESIS Network
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Gamman's engagement with the DESIS Network, and particularly Carla Cipolla, about empathy and migration has developed into a fruitful relationship. Carla was a 6-month visiting research fellow (funded by the Brazilian Government) with the Design Against Crime Research Centre at Central Saint Martins.
Collaborator Contribution We have exchanged knowledge and shared papers - we also engaged further at DRS 2016 in Brighton (June 2016) where we co-created seminar 'Connecting Diversities: Migration, Social Innovation and Design' (organised by Cipolla, Gamman, Manzini, Thorpe and Tassinari) and attended by circa 50 participants. See: http://www.drs2016.org/567.
Impact Engaging with the DESIS network also led to an invitation from Carla Cipolla and Prof Ezio Manzini for Gamman to attend and introduce the 'Reframing Migration' workshop hosted by University of the Arts London in collaboration with Social Innovation Lab Kent, Kent County Council on 9th February 2016 (see: http://events.arts.ac.uk/event/2016/2/9/Reframing-Migration-Workshop/). Gamman acted as a facilitator during the working group session. This led to a discussion on empathy and human trafficking with Social Innovation Lab Kent.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Empathy Things 
Organisation Artsadmin
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Gamman invited the Empathy Museum to speak at the 3rd Extending Empathy workshop and worked collaboratively with them and Arts Admin to develop a follow-on funding application for the project.
Collaborator Contribution Claire Patey (Empathy Museum) presented 'Imagining an Empathy Museum' at the 3rd Extending Empathy workshop and subsequently, with Arts Admin, worked with Gamman to figure out how empathy 'things' can encourage public engagement in order to develop a follow-on funding application (submitted to AHRC in February 2016). The bid was unsuccessful but Gamman became a board member of the Empathy Museum in 2016 and hosted Empathy Museum events such as 15th March 2017 workshop at Central Saint Martins on Roman Krznaric's new book Carpe Diem Regained.
Impact This partnership has also led to the organisation of an open lecture by Roman Krznaric, author and founder of the Empathy Museum, at Central Saint Martins on 28th April 2016 to further promote UAL student engagement with the subject of empathy. See: http://extendingempathy.com/eventsarchive/empathy-and-the-revolution-of-human-relationships-archive.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Empathy Things 
Organisation Empathy Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Gamman invited the Empathy Museum to speak at the 3rd Extending Empathy workshop and worked collaboratively with them and Arts Admin to develop a follow-on funding application for the project.
Collaborator Contribution Claire Patey (Empathy Museum) presented 'Imagining an Empathy Museum' at the 3rd Extending Empathy workshop and subsequently, with Arts Admin, worked with Gamman to figure out how empathy 'things' can encourage public engagement in order to develop a follow-on funding application (submitted to AHRC in February 2016). The bid was unsuccessful but Gamman became a board member of the Empathy Museum in 2016 and hosted Empathy Museum events such as 15th March 2017 workshop at Central Saint Martins on Roman Krznaric's new book Carpe Diem Regained.
Impact This partnership has also led to the organisation of an open lecture by Roman Krznaric, author and founder of the Empathy Museum, at Central Saint Martins on 28th April 2016 to further promote UAL student engagement with the subject of empathy. See: http://extendingempathy.com/eventsarchive/empathy-and-the-revolution-of-human-relationships-archive.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Hong Kong Design Institute 
Organisation Hong Kong Design Institute
Country Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Engagement with Yanki Lee (who presented at Extending Empathy Workshop 2) from the Hong Kong Design Institute (HKDI) led to an invitation for Gamman to present at HKDI's 1st Open Design Forum (Nov 2014) and producing the reflective paper 'Open Mind: Shake Up Design by Taboo' which discussed her presentation on empathy and taboo. Following on from this, a further invitation for Gamman to curate as Chair an Open Empathy steam at Cumulus Hong Kong 2016 conference (21 - 24 November 2016), which she subsequently accepted and which resulted in over 20 paper submissions on design and empathy. Cumulus Hong Kong 2016 seeks to explore the openness of design, namely the opening up of design process and design for openness. Six different tracks (including 'empathy' are set to explore the new purposes of design.
Collaborator Contribution HKDI covered the travel costs for Gamman to attend and present at the Open Design Forum (Nov 2014) and have agreed to cover the cost of the hotel and registration for the Cumulus Hong Kong 2016 conference. Yanki Lee also introduced Gamman to the Positive Deviance Group.
Impact Gamman produced the reflective paper 'Open Mind: Shake Up Design by Taboo' which discussed her presentation at the Open Design Forum (Nov 2014) on empathy and taboo. See https://lirias.kuleuven.be/bitstream/123456789/495337/2/3b6bab_3d020d88a68c4cb0a13632d7bf2ef01f.pdf
Start Year 2014
 
Description Positive Deviance Group 
Organisation Centre for Justice Innovation
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution At Extending Empathy Workshop 1, Gamman made contact with the Welfare Improvement Network and Centre for Justice Innovation. She subsequently hosted a Positive Deviance workshop at Central Saint Martins (CSM), attended by herself and Co-Is Bryant and Thorpe. Jessica Plant of the National Alliance for Arts In Criminal Justice also attended.
Collaborator Contribution The partners gave their time and shared reading materials which has informed our knowledge base.
Impact Bryant, following on from the Positive Deviance workshop, subsequently led a funding application on "Nudge" design to the Police Academy in 2015 and invited Gamman and Thorpe to be collaborators (the bid was unsuccessful).
Start Year 2014
 
Description Positive Deviance Group 
Organisation Welfare Improvement Network
Country Denmark 
Sector Multiple 
PI Contribution At Extending Empathy Workshop 1, Gamman made contact with the Welfare Improvement Network and Centre for Justice Innovation. She subsequently hosted a Positive Deviance workshop at Central Saint Martins (CSM), attended by herself and Co-Is Bryant and Thorpe. Jessica Plant of the National Alliance for Arts In Criminal Justice also attended.
Collaborator Contribution The partners gave their time and shared reading materials which has informed our knowledge base.
Impact Bryant, following on from the Positive Deviance workshop, subsequently led a funding application on "Nudge" design to the Police Academy in 2015 and invited Gamman and Thorpe to be collaborators (the bid was unsuccessful).
Start Year 2014
 
Description Restorative Justice for All (RJ4All) 
Organisation IARS International Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Following engagement with Dr Theo Gavrielides (IARS) and Professor Vasso Artinopolou (Panteion University), who are both on the Restorative Justice for All (RJ4All) project, Gamman was invited to be an Associate Partner on the EU bid 'FEMS VOICE - Fight Education and Mobilise Against Sexual Violence, through Outreach, Creativity and Empowerment' submitted in 2015 (to the Daphne call - Action grants to support transnational projects to combat sexual harassment and sexual violence against women - JUST/2015/RDAP/AG/SEXV). Gamman advised on the bid which was primarily written by the lead partners. The outcome was unsuccessful.
Collaborator Contribution RJ4All wrote the bid and introduced Central Saint Martins, an arts based institution to EU restorative justice practitioners working in the field, with whom it may be possible to develop a further research partnership.
Impact Gamman's engagement with Dr Theo Gavrielides (IARS) and Professor Vasso Artinopolou (Panteion University), led to an invitation to contribute a chapter of the 2015 publication 'Offenders No More: New Offender Rehabilitation Theory and Practice' by Gavrielides, become a member of the Editorial Board of the Youth Voice Journal and to write a shoutline for 'The Psychology of Restorative Justice' (Ashgate 2015) See: http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781472455307
Start Year 2015
 
Description Restorative Justice for All (RJ4All) 
Organisation Panteion University, Athens
Country Greece 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Following engagement with Dr Theo Gavrielides (IARS) and Professor Vasso Artinopolou (Panteion University), who are both on the Restorative Justice for All (RJ4All) project, Gamman was invited to be an Associate Partner on the EU bid 'FEMS VOICE - Fight Education and Mobilise Against Sexual Violence, through Outreach, Creativity and Empowerment' submitted in 2015 (to the Daphne call - Action grants to support transnational projects to combat sexual harassment and sexual violence against women - JUST/2015/RDAP/AG/SEXV). Gamman advised on the bid which was primarily written by the lead partners. The outcome was unsuccessful.
Collaborator Contribution RJ4All wrote the bid and introduced Central Saint Martins, an arts based institution to EU restorative justice practitioners working in the field, with whom it may be possible to develop a further research partnership.
Impact Gamman's engagement with Dr Theo Gavrielides (IARS) and Professor Vasso Artinopolou (Panteion University), led to an invitation to contribute a chapter of the 2015 publication 'Offenders No More: New Offender Rehabilitation Theory and Practice' by Gavrielides, become a member of the Editorial Board of the Youth Voice Journal and to write a shoutline for 'The Psychology of Restorative Justice' (Ashgate 2015) See: http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781472455307
Start Year 2015
 
Description 'Empathy "Things"/Games' workshop at DRS 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 'Empathy "Things"/Games' workshop was held at DRS 2016, Brighton on 27th June 2016. Workshop Organiser: Lorraine Gamman & Adam Thorpe, University of the Arts London.
Barack Obama has famously written about an empathy "deficit" and the need for the human race to have more empathy for each other as well as the planet and similarly the economist Jeremy Rifkin has made the case for the need to build empathy. How do empathy "things" (including social games) expand or reinforce the human capacity for empathy, and what are the devices/strategies they utilize to make empathic connections and what is their value to participatory design research? Workshop participants discussed either an empathy `thing" to deconstruct or to attend as a critical friend who would engage in the deconstruction process. Videos and summary report submitted to DRS will be online soon.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 3 x Extending Empathy workshops (London and Canterbury) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Three public facing workshops (linked to criminal justice and arts) specifically focussed on Restorative Justice (workshop 1), Participatory Design (workshop 2) and Performance (workshop 3) and took place on 12th January, 22nd April and 8th July 2015 in London and Canterbury aimed at developing the capacity of researchers and practitioners alike to work in society to build empathy. The workshops were attended by diverse audiences including over 20 speakers and over 150 participants from 8 countries with diverse specialisms such as human rights lawyers, designers, artists, actors, social workers, representatives from youth offending teams and local councils, police officers and students. The presentations have been uploaded to the project website and additionally run by the Centre for Building Empathy who have also featured them on their website http://cultureofempathy.com/references/Conferences/2015-01-12-RJ-Extending-Empathy.htm

Surprisingly, in the audience feedback forms, some of the participants requested that we offer practical designed engagement with 'empathic tools' or performance opportunities. Therefore, a fourth event, a Human Graffiti Library, was curated at Central Saint Martins on 15 December 2015 which involved event attendees (Readers) 'borrowing' people with different graffiti experiences and specialisms (Books) with the aim to initiate discussion and build empathy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://extendingempathy.com/eventsarchive/events-archive
 
Description Art, Design and Criminal Justice: the case for building Empathy and new cultural Values 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 21 June 2016, Professor Lorraine Gamman (with Robin Lockhart, Youth & Community Development professional) presented 'Art, Design and Criminal Justice: the case for building Empathy and new cultural Values' at 3rd International Symposium on Restorative Justice (Disciplining and Taking Restorative Justice Forward), Skopelos island, Greece.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Being Human series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Engagement with the Centre for Fashion and Sustainability at London College of Fashion led to Gamman being invited to talk about "empathy with criminals" and how to involve returning citizens in design against crime, as part of the Being Human series at the Wellcome Institute, London (Nov 2014) which received good feedback.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://beinghumanfestival.org/
 
Description Better Lives lecture 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman gave the presentation "What is Empathy" as part of the Better Lives lecture series, London College of Fashion (14 Feb 2019).

She discussed the Makeright project and what value creating empathy experiences might have for designers of the future with a particular emphasis on empathy and fashion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Cumulus 2016 Hong Kong - Chair of the 'Open Design for Empathy' Track 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Lorraine Gamman chaired Cumulus 2016 Open Design for Empathy Track in Hong Kong, featured over 20 papers that focused on empathy, and raised important questions, including why "context in design is everything".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://cumulus.hkdihongkong2016.org/uploads/files/Cumulus_Hong_Kong-Open_Design_for_E-very-thing_abs...
 
Description Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships - talk by Roman Krznaric 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 'Empathy and the Revolution of Human Relationships' - a public talk by cultural thinker and writer on the art of living and social change, Roman Krznaric was held on 28 Apr 2016, Central Saint Martins, Kings Cross, London to further promote UAL student engagement with the subject of empathy. Roman Krznaric is a founder of the world's first Empathy Museum and of the digital Empathy Library as well as a founding faculty member of The School of Life and on the faculty of Year Here. His writings on empathy have been widely influential amongst political and ecological campaigners, education reformers, social entrepreneurs, and designers. His talk was followed by Q&A and very lively discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Human Graffiti Library (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Whilst Human Libraries have become a worldwide phenomenon since they began in 2000 in Denmark, and many have occurred in the UK, Europe, USA and other international contexts, this was the first focusing on the theme of graffiti and empathy. Gamman and the Design Against Crime Research Centre curated the workshop with EU specialists (http://project.graffolution.eu) which took place at Central Saint Martins on 15 December 2015. It involved event attendees (Readers) 'borrowing' people with different graffiti experiences and specialisms (Books) with the aim to initiate discussion and build empathy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.designagainstcrime.com/2015/12/21/first-human-graffiti-library/
 
Description Open Books, Goldsmith 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Open Books at Goldsmiths offer courses to returning citizens to help them get qualifications that would help them go to university. The meeting was to discuss how UAL, with its arts, design and maker focus linked to teaching in prison (courses like Makeright), could develop a similar opportunity and accreditation system for prisoners who wish to continue to study art and design when leaving prison but do not have appropriate qualifications to apply for funds to pay for such an education. This was an exploratory discussion primarily between Goldsmiths, UAL and third sector partners to see how UAL could extend the Open Books offer, and will be the subject of further meetings and engagements between 2020 - 2021.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation at Maharashtra Institute of Technology (MIT) (Pune) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact An enterprise project conceptualised for the British Council by the Careers and Employability department at University of the Arts London (UAL), led to Gamman giving a lecture on 'What is Empathy' at Maharashtra Institute of Technology (MIT), Pune, India (26 February 2016) which was part funded by the British Council.

The outcome of this presentation was that Gamman co-created the 'Empathic Enterprise' brief which ran at UAL and MIT (from Feb - June 2016). She also introduced the work of the AHRC Extending Empathy network to students at both institutions and delivered design tutoring regarding issues raised by this empathy and enterprise focus.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at National Institute of Design (Ahmedabad) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Gamman gave a presentation 'Design for Social Change: Why Focus on Empathy?' to undergraduate students at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. The presentation discussed how a focus on empathy can drive solutions that can truly impact social problems. The presentation sparked questions and discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016