Transformation and Tradition in Sixties British Cinema: Production Cultures, Cross Media Relations and National Branding

Lead Research Organisation: University of York
Department Name: Theatre Film and TV

Abstract

The 1960s is widely regarded as a period of significant social and cultural transformation - for historian Arthur Marwick, the decade constituted nothing less than a 'cultural revolution'. British cinema of the 1960s would appear to support this assessment, with first the working class realism of the 'new wave', then a more classless and cosmopolitan cinema epitomised by the James Bond cycle, the Beatles films, and other productions of 'swinging London'. There was also a growth in independent production, much of it backed by Hollywood finance, and the presence of major international film-makers in British studios. Moreover, cinema was benefitting from a process of unprecedented cultural exchange with other dynamic media including television, pop music, advertising and fashion. But recently the decade has been subject to different interpretations, Dominic Sandbrook arguing it was marked much more by continuity and tradition than by radical transformation. There is also evidence that British cinema continued to be dictated by established structures, processes and styles. The industry remained dominated by the duopoly of Rank and ABPC - a system firmly in place since the coming of sound. Meanwhile alongside new talent like Tony Richardson, John Schlesinger and Richard Lester, seasoned veterans such as Anthony Asquith, David Lean, Carol Reed and the Boulting brothers continued to work. The collaborative nature of production meant that established and neophyte filmmakers sometimes worked together, while international luminaries from Stanley Kubrick and Joseph Losey to Roman Polanski and Francois Truffaut formed significant creative associations with British technicians. Cultural exchange was also complicated by two-way movement between media - as 'young turks' from TV drama and current affairs moved into cinema (Ken Loach, Ken Russell, Jack Gold), so older film personnel found new opportunities in single camera TV drama (Charles Crichton, Roy Ward Baker, Pat Jackson).

This project will critically examine the implications of this tension between novelty/innovation and tradition/continuity in 1960s British cinema, providing new insight and understandings of this apparently familiar but rather over-mythologised decade. It will focus on three distinct but related areas of inquiry.

Firstly, the organisation and operation of the industry and the development of production and distribution. How significant was the development of independent production? How beneficial was Hollywood finance and how did this compare with the relationships independents had with the established UK companies? How important were sources of public support? Did independent producers constitute a new entrepreneurial culture with the British film industry during the decade?

Secondly, the promotion and reviewing of films at home. How were these films understood as innovative and/or traditional? Was their Britisness significant? How did associations with the 'swinging sixties' sit alongside more traditional versions of the national culture?

Thirdly, the significance of new forms of exchange between different media including television, advertising, the visual arts and fashion. How did this impact upon production processes, techniques and styles? How did innovation sit alongside the presence of established and more traditional film-makers and approaches? How did the collaborative nature of film-making complicate the relationship between old and new? What were the implications of creative personnel moving between different media?

The project will benefit from collaboration with the British Film Institute, making extensive use of major BFI research collections - including newly acquired and rarely consulted papers and other archive resources - and ensuring strong public engagement by informing publications, screenings , public talks and other events which will form the BFI's blockbuster programme on 1960s British cinema in 2017.

Planned Impact

Impact potential played a key role in the genesis of this project, which entails the collaboration between the team of academic researchers and the British Film Institute (BFI) - a charity established by a royal charter and the UK's major public agency engaged in the cultural promotion of film and television. In addition to being a project partner, the BFI will also be the primary beneficiary in terms of the impact of the research. In turn, this partnership will subsequently facilitate high-quality public engagement through the networks and activities that are the BFI's core business.

The nature of the project relates directly to two of the BFI's three core objectives as set out in their current five year strategy document 'BFI Forever', namely 'expanding education and learning and boosting audience choice' and 'unlocking our film heritage'. The project was also devised and developed in consultation with BFI staff as a means of utilising resources contained in the BFI's collections to directly inform and develop their planned blockbuster programme for 2017, 'British film in the 60s', which is also timed to mark the 50th anniversary of the cultural watershed dubbed 'the summer of love'. This blockbuster programme will involve a raft of high profile public engagement initiatives and events building on the BFI's previous highly successful flagship programmes: 'The Genius of Hitchcock' in 2012 and 'Gothic: the Dark Heart of Film' in 2013. These programmes included numerous public events including extensive seasons and screenings of films at the National Film Theatre and other venues around the country and special exhibitions and public lectures, as well as film restorations, new DVD releases of films, the production of educational resources and book publications. The 'British Film in the 60s' programme will follow suit, with the various outputs directly drawing on and being informed by the research generated by this project.

Thus while the BFI will itself be the major direct beneficiary of the project, their involvement will allow the research to access other beneficiaries. These will include film exhibitors who will be involved in screenings of seasons and individual films identified and contextualised as significant by the project; and museums and galleries involved in exhibiting materials whose curation will be informed by the project. This will in turn impact on the media through engaging with and generating stories relating to the wider project (both the Hitchcock and Gothic programmes had extensive coverage in the press and on radio and television). The general public will also be a major beneficiary through their attendance at the various screenings, exhibitions and lectures and their buying of DVDs and books. It is also possible that former film industry professionals will benefit through their work being critically reassessed, repackaged and made available to the public in new ways. As one of the intended outcomes of the partnership with the BFI will be the generation of educational materials including teaching resources and supporting screenings, the project will also engage with Film Nation UK, a major BFI and lottery-funded film education initiative, and its film educational programme for 5-19 year olds, 'Adventures in Film'.

The conference to be held in the third and final year of the project will also contribute to impact by bringing together researchers and academics with other kinds of educational and cultural professionals including teachers, programmers, curators and archivists to consider the cinematic legacy of the the sixties, how this remains relevant and engaging today and how can it be used to develop new projects and initiatives.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description MOST SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE AWARD:
1. A series of important research discoveries which deepen, complicate and sometimes overturn existing knowledge about British film in the 1960s
2. Numerous peer reviewed publications already published or in progress disseminating our findings
3. Successful project events in several UK locations which have opened up the debate about the significance of British cinema in the 1960s to wider audiences, both academic and non-academic
4. Strong social media and online presence, helping to increase our communicative reach

THE INDUSTRY AND ITS INSTITUTIONS
General findings provided by the project database:
1. The number of British feature films released in the home market year on year, demonstrating a reduction from 132 films in 1960 to 80 in 1969. The most significant reduction occurred between 1963 (114) and 1964 (82).
2. The dramatic decline of the B movie or second feature after 1963 and with it the reduction of around 30% in the number of British feature films being produced and released in the UK.
3. The rise of the colour film, from around 25% of all features in 1960 to 54% in 1965 to 99% by 1969, and with it the almost total demise of black and white.
4. The organisation of all films by genre indicated that the most popular genres across the decade were crime (28%), comedy (21%), drama (13%), fantasy/horror (12%).
5. The organisation of films by BBFC classification indicated a steady decline in the U (or universal) certificate from around 50% to 30% and a rise in the X (then over 16) certificate from 16% to around 40% across the decade.
6. The organisation of films by distribution company (the main source of finance during the decade), revealed that the four major UK distributors were Rank, British Lion, Anglo Amalgamated and Warner Pathe with each handling between 10 and 12% of all British features released across the decade. The total was 42% of all films.
7. The increasing involvement of American distribution companies financing and releasing British films in the UK accounted for 36% of all films during the decade.
8. The remaining 22% of films were distributed by smaller independent companies.
9. The number of British films supported with public money through the National Film Finance Corporation declined dramatically from around 30% of features at the beginning of the decade to just 4% by the end. The major decline here occurred between 1963 and 1964.
10. A distribution crisis in the industry in the winter of 1963/4 had a significant negative impact of the fortunes of the British independent sector, which never fully recovered.

More specific findings:
1. The contribution and significance of the four major UK financiers/distributors:
a. all four relied heavily on continuity with the types of productions, genres and contracted creative talent from the previous decade;
b. they also experimented with new collaborative production/distribution ventures - including ABPC acquiring 50% of Anglo Amalgamated;
c. Rank and Warner Pathe (ABPC) were given stability by being part of larger vertically integrated combines with their own cinema chains while also enjoying longstanding links with the Hollywood majors Universal and Warner Bros. respectively
d. British Lion maintained a very close link with the NFFC and the government until 1964 and their output most reflected a long standing model of cultural value
e. Anglo Amalgamated were the most reliant on B movies but were also the most obviously influenced by American business practices and appeared to be more in tune with new and emerging trends

2. The role of American distributors in UK film production
a. While the phenomenon of 'Hollywood England' was particularly significant in the 1960s, this was an extension of existing relationships and practices dating back to the 1940s
b. The pattern of involvement by the various majors differed: Columbia and United Artists were the most significant, then came MGM (who had their own UK studio), 20th Century Fox and Paramount, the Universal, Warners (due to both having existing UK partnerships) and Disney.
c. All of the Hollywood majors had significant connections with particular independent producers but they also tended to have mixed portfolios of product which for some included acquiring slates of B movies.
d. Hollywood-backed films tended to inflate budgets and created a culture where less financial control appeared to be imposed.
e. The fees for certain starts also increased dramatically with Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Peter Sellers key examples.
f. Increased budgets made projects more risky and more likely to go over-budget, with several high profile examples including Lancelot and Guinevere (1962), Dr No (1962) and Tom Jones (1963).

3. The role of public support of film production.
a. The rise of American financing clearly impacted detrimentally on the NFFC as producers were offered 100% financing deals for the projects with the greatest market appeal. This reduced the NFFC's income from loan repayments and their revolving fund was diminished.
b. There were strong differences of opinion towards the NFFC in Government and while the Board of Trade remained supportive, the Treasury were keen to close the NFFC down and attempted to do so on at least two occasions.

4. The NFFC/Rank partnership
a. This attempt to rescue the fortunes of the NFFC resulted in six features produced over two years. None of the films was a major success, three were poorly reviewed and overall the scheme was a commercial failure.
b. The failure compounded the NFFC's financial problems and allowed Rank to concentrate further on the exhibition and non-film aspects of their business.

5. Independent production and distribution: the case of Bryanston
a. This collaborative initiative involving a range of independent film-makers resulted in 33 films, released through British Lion. The venture was a failure due to an over-reliance on old formulae that did not address changes in the market and production values

6. The role of the British Board of Film Censor (BBFC)
a. Although by the end of the 1960s the BBFC had adopted a more liberal or permissive attitude to many films, the process by which its attitudes evolved was not smooth
b. Questions of censorship, and the need to protect the reputation of the British film industry, often ran up against extra-cinematic debates concerning changing moral values
c. In 1963 and 1969/70, the BBFC refused to certify The Keeler Affair (1963), an exploitation film based on the life story of Christine Keeler and touching on the Profumo scandal.
d. The BBFC's actions in relation to The Keeler Affair were understood by some contemporary commentators to constitute an act of political censorship.

7. Key entrepreneurs
a. The success of British companies such as Hammer Films and Anglo Amalgamated can be attributed to the entrepreneurial leadership provided by James Carreras and Nat Cohen respectively.
b. The British production strategies adopted by the Hollywood majors were often significantly shaped by key executives inducing Mike Francovich (Columbia), George Ornstein (UA then Paramount), Elmo Williams (20th Century Fox), Jay Kanter (Universal) and Kenneth Hyman (Warner-Seven Arts).
c. Certain changes in the American film industry proved influential in Britain including the rise of Actor/Producers or Actor/Directors including Bryan Forbes, Richard Attenborough, Stanley Baker, Albert Finney and David Hemmings. This was more significant in the UK than former agents becoming producers in their own right.

8. Short films and the changing British cinema programme
a. Evidence suggests that the British cinema programme was contracting in the 1960s and as longer running times became the norm (in part influenced by Hollywood blockbusters) the traditional 'double feature' format suffered as a result.
b. Evidence suggests that the monopoly of Rank and ABC over distribution on the two major circuits in the 1960s meant that a burgeoning creative, independent short film sector was stifled and remained a marginal force in the industry.
c. Most short films were accounted for by Rank's Look at Life and Pathe's Pathe Pictoral magazine programmes. For independent film makers, distribution sales could not hope to cover the costs of production.
d. Many fiction shorts (and short film series) shown in cinemas were made by the Children's Film Foundation, which remained popular with young audiences throughout the decade
e. While short 30 minute crime dramas like Anglo-Amalgamated's Scales of Justice series continued to be made, these, along with the second feature, had largely found a home on television by the early 1960s.

9. The decline of the British 'B' movie
a. Second features accounted for between 30-40 of the British films released each year until 1963.
b. While second features attracted criticism for shoddy production values, the reasons for the decline of the B movie were almost entirely economic. These films were sold for a fixed price and did not recoup box office money, so rising production costs (influenced by Hollywood) meant that making a profit became impossible.
c. Several key B movie producers went bust after 1961.
d. Despite being see as a potential training ground for new talent, second features tended to be made by experienced writers and directors.
e. The 'double programme' was still a feature of cinemagoing by the late 1960s, partly because the structure of distribution in the industry was inflexible and partly because the general public expected to see a main feature supported by shorts and second features.

10. Specialist distribution and exhibition in the 1960s
a. The loss of the third National circuit after 1963, large-scale cinema closures and the monopoly of the Rank and ABC circuits meant that many small independent distributors such as New Realm went bust by 1960.
b. Small exhibition circuits still existed and some distributors took a targeted approach to distribution in order to survive, importing cheap continental films and selling these to smaller cinemas.
c. The company Compton emerged as a major independent force in the industry in the 1960s using creative marketing campaigns which attracted national press attention and by targeting smaller, specialist circuits.
d. Smaller cinema circuits were increasingly opting to show continental films, horror films and 'X' rated productions. The 1960s saw the proliferation of more 'niche' product and a differentiated market.
e. In the late 1960s the major began sub dividing and adding extra screens to existing cinemas. This was to lay the groundwork for the later rise of the multiplex.


CREATIVE WORK IN FILM PRODUCTION AND INTERMEDIALITY
General findings provided by the project database
1. The most prolific production companies tended to specialise in low budget production in the popular genres noted above. These included Merton Park(50 films), Hammer Films(47) and Danzinger Brothers(32)
2. The most prolific individual producers are also concentrated in low budget genre production and include Merton Park's Jack Greenwood(47 films), 'Carry On' producer Peter Rogers(21), Edward and Harry Danzinger(20) and Harry Allan Towers(20).
3. The most prolific director was Gerald Thomas, partner of Peter Rogers, with 20 films, followed by Freddie Francis, Don Chaffey and Montgomery Tully with 15 each.
4. The most prolific cinematographers, editors and production designers also worked in similar fields. These provide a challenge to assumptions concerning the most significant creative personnel during the decade.
More specific findings
1. Each of the six key areas of creative labour in 1960s British film production covered by our research (directors, screenwriters, cinematographers, production designers, costume designers, editors) experienced major changes in their working lives and creative horizons during the 1960s, mainly due to a shift from studio to freelance employment and increased budgets and international profile as a result of US investment. In some areas, like editing and cinematography, technological advances also impacted on the working lives of creative practitioners, e.g. the introduction of new flatbed editing equipment and quick splicers which altered established editing practices, the availability of lightweight cameras, faster film stocks and new lighting techniques.
2. Directors and screenwriters in particular responded and adapted to changing understandings of authorship in relation to their work, incubated by the 'auteur theory' and its critical popularisation which granted (some) directors more creative importance than had previously been the case.
3. Workers in other areas formerly understood as auxiliary technical or craft roles also experienced new kinds of creative agency in some of their work, including cinematographers, production and costume designers, and editors. This was partly in response to a new emphasis on the 'look' of British films to which their work made a crucial aesthetic contribution.
4. Those working in design-related roles in film production benefited from a wider interest in and excitement around British design culture in the 1960s. In particular, the new international prominence for British fashion design led to a greater emphasis on costume in many British films. Costume also became an important, if sometimes diffidently handled, aspect of the promotion of numerous British films.
5. Sustained analyses of the 1960s careers of representative figures in each area of film production (director - Clive Donner; screenwriter - Frederic Raphael; cinematographer - Douglas Slocombe; production designer - Assheton Gorton; costume designer - Julie Harris; editor - Antony Gibbs), in each case drawing on archival materials, provide new insights into the experiences and trajectories of those individuals working in those specific areas.
6. These are extended and supplemented with a broader contextualisation of each professional area, delineating shared and distinctive concerns in each and tracking generational shifts between those new to their profession and those who were experienced veterans schooled in older production practices. The 1960s is revealed to be an era in which residual and emergent ways of film-making co-existed often in highly creatively productive ways, but sometimes in more antagonistic fashion. Practitioners working in areas that contributed to the look of a film generally relished and rose to the challenge of a more aesthetically experimental filmmaking climate.
7. Intermediality was a core component of British film culture in the 1960s, as television became the primary audiovisual medium in the UK and cinema admissions dropped. Pop music assumed much more cultural significance than before, most pointedly in the 'British invasion' of pop music into US and world markets, led by The Beatles, and followed by other performers such as the Dave Clark Five and Herman's Hermits. Advertising, particularly television advertising, also became a lively arena of creative endeavour and new technique. All three of these interlinked areas - television, pop music, and advertising - had extensive relations with cinema over the course of the 1960s, which have been explored in detail by our research.
8. Our work on television and cinema has yielded new findings: on changing cultural distinctions between the two media, in relation to censorship, viewer reactions, and aesthetics; on FIDO, the Film Industry Defence Organisation which battled against feature films being shown on television well into the sixties; on the cinema industry's involvement with the development of commercial television in the UK; and on the use of television as an advertising medium for feature films.
9. Our work on pop music and cinema has yielded new findings: on the movement of the Rank Organisation into music publishing and retail via its Filmusic and Top Rank subsidiaries; on the role of music publishing in connection with the British film industry; on the conversion of the Trad Jazz phenomenon of the early 1960s into cinematic output; and on the chequered history of one of the key bands of the period, The Rolling Stones, in relation to film projects, in counterpoint to peers such as The Beatles, The Dave Clark Five, and others.
10. Our work on advertising and cinema has yielded new findings: on the extent to which film personnel worked across film, TV and advertising during the 1960s and on the position of television advertising within the career development of directors such as Richard Lester or Joseph Losey; on advertising aesthetics and technique being imported into filmmaking and vice versa; on advertising itself, which became more prominent an element of British popular culture as witnessed by the advent of broadsheet colour supplements and the visibility of television commercials, becoming a theme in British films of the period.
11. Our work on advertising has yielded a deeper understanding of the appeal of the cinema as an advertising medium during the 1960s, demonstrating that cinematic technologies not then offered by television - colour, high-definition image, high-fidelity sound - were utilised by advertisers to reach specific target demographics.

PROMOTION AND CRITICAL RECEPTION OF BRITISH FILMS
This area yielded fewer findings than anticipated. General findings provided by the project database:
1. Surveys of the box office confirmed the popularity of British films in the home market with an average of 5-6 British features in the top ten for each year. These are a mixture of UK and US financed and distributed films.
More specific findings
1. Close examination of posters and pressbooks indicate that stars, genre and broader themes - such as the idea of 'swinging London' were much more significant in the marketing of British films both at home and internationally than framing discourses of national identity. However, the class background of some specific stars - for example, Rita Tushingham, Michael Caine - was sometimes foregrounded.
2. The themes of youth, mobility, sexuality and playfulness permeated the promotion and reception of British films during the decade
Exploitation Route These findings are already informing various industry engagement with companies such as Woodfall Films, and public/audience engagement via contributions to Bluray and DVD releases, public talks and film screenings and seasons. Key examples of these are discussed in the impact section.
Sectors Creative Economy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description Our project was founded on a desire not only to forge new discoveries around British film culture in the 1960s but also to communicate those findings as widely as possible and to have an impact on public as well as academic understandings of 1960s British cinema in all its vibrancy and complexity. When this project was originally devised the primary pathway to impact was due to take place via a partnership with the British Film Institute on a 'blockbuster' project on the 1960s. Due to institutional and personnel change within the Institute, and budget cuts, this project did not materialise. However, the project team has been very active in developing impact in other ways via a range of activities listed in the outputs section. These activities have constituted the following strands of impact development: Public Audience Engagement More than half of the events organised as part of the project have been open to the general public and have been designed to broaden the appeal of the project, communicate some of its findings, and link up with other non-academic research and cultural activity around 1960s British cinema. The conference, 'British Cinema in the 1960s: Histories and Legacies' held at BFI Southbank, London on 6 and 7 September 2017 was open to the public and included interviews with four leading figures who were active in British cinema and the wider culture during the 1960s: actress Rita Tushingham, director Richard Lester and producers Sandy Lieberson and David Puttnam. Through organising this event, our project directly benefited members of the general public and BFI members who were able to listen to and ask questions of these individuals. The event was accompanied by a rare public screening of Richard Lester's 1968 feature film Petulia, which was introduced by Melanie Williams. Other audience engagement events included Melanie Williams' involvement in the post-screening discussion of gothic horror film The Shuttered Room event at Norwich Forum, 27 Nov 2017, introduction of Smashing Time at the BFI Southbank on 6 March 2018 (as part of their 'Girlfriends' season), and forthcoming involvement as a panellist of a post-screening discussion of Bristolian New Wave film Some People at the Watershed Bristol, 24 March 2018, and a public lecture on the look of Woodfall films for the BFI's Woodfall season at BFI Southbank, 9 April 2018. Further series of public screenings and talks have been organised for the spring of 2018 including a weekend festival at City Screen York on 6-8 April involving screenings of A Kind of Loving, Blow Up and Performance, and events around screenings of To Sir With Love and The L-Shaped Room at the Picturehouse Bradford on 19 and 20 April 2018 as part of Golden Years Festival. Our project is also currently in talks with Cinema City Norwich, Picturehouse Cambridge, HOME in Manchester and the Cinema Rediscovered festival at Watershed Bristol to work with them on 1960s-related programming. Online communications and social media has been crucial to our project's public engagement strategy throughout its duration and has become a vital means of disseminating and discussing our work. As of February 2018, our project twitter feed has 1150 followers, and its Facebook page has 631 followers. Each of our Facebook posts reaches an average of 257 people. Updates and shares can gain between 100-300 views, while our blog posts (showcasing our own original research) can gain anything up to 1,100 views. Twitter has been instrumental for communicating our research to a wide audience of academics, industry professionals and interested members of the public. In January 2018, each of our tweets gained between 650 and 2200 views or 'impressions', and of those who saw those tweets between 40-80 people engaged with them either by replying, retweeting, favouriting or clicking on a link to our blog. Our project blog, which showcases our own original research, as well as hosting research by other academics working in this area, has had 16,242 views and 8,952 visitors throughout the life of the project. The project team's contributions to Bluray and DVD releases of several 1960s films including Accident, The Full Treatment The L-Shaped Room, A Kind of Loving, Never Take Sweets from a Stranger, Poor Cow, The Pumpkin Eater, Tom Jones, , and Torture Garden have contributed to audience appreciation and understanding of their significance either providing fresh information on well-known canonical films from the era or helping to reinstate other undeservedly obscure films within public awareness.. Business and Commerical Engagement The event, 'Still Swinging: 1960s British cinema and popular culture in the 21st century', held at Cinema City, Norwich on 9 September 2016 provided a site of interaction between the aims and ambitions of commercial companies (Network, Talking Pictures TV, Woodfall, Hammer) and the findings emerging from our research and from academic research into 1960s British cinema more generally. Speakers include the archive television channel 'Talking Pictures TV's 'Sarah Cronin-Stanley, who was subsequently involved in the London conference and used this to promote her company. The Norwich event also helped develop a relationship with Steven Hess, the managing director of Woodfall Films which was one of the major British independent production companies during the 1960s. This relationship has allowed the project to initiate, develop or contribute to a number of ventures, including collaboration with Steven on a coffee table book 'Woodfall Films: The Untold Story of the Company that Changed British Film', aimed at a general readership. Duncan Petrie and Melanie Williams will contribute 50% of the text. The book is currently being considered by the publishers Rizzoli and Real Art Publishing. A number of other Woodfall-related impacts have also occurred including Melanie Williams's Twitter hashtag #WoodfallWednesday where from on Wednesdays between Sept 2016 and July 2017 she tweeted a picture, video or link related to Woodfall's output, going through the films in chronological order. Individual tweets generally had more than 1000 impressions with the top tweet having more than 5000. Meanwhile in addition to his contribution to the The Criterion Collection BluRay and DVD release of the restored version of Woodfall's feature Tom Jones, Duncan Petrie is collaborating with Sheldon Hall of Sheffield Hallam University on a symposium and special screening to mark the 50th anniversary of the Woodfall feature, The Charge of the Light Brigade. This will take place on Friday 25 May 2018 in Sheffield and will be open to the public. The guest of honour will be the actress Vanessa Redgrave.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural

 
Title British Films 1960-1969 
Description This data base is a comprehensive listing of 991 British films released in the home market between 1 January 1960 and 31 December 1969. The database includes extensive information on these films including technical, institutional, financial and creative personnel data. This database allows the identification and analysis of patterns and trends in a very inclusive and comprehensive way that cannot be replicated by any other existing on-line resource. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The current impact of this data base is confined to the immediate research being carried out by the project team. But once completed it will provide an invaluable resource to other researchers, teachers and students interested in British cinema of the 1960s. 
 
Title Short British Films released during the period 1960-69 
Description This database was constructed to complement the primary project database of British Films. It contains information on 192 short films - with a running time of less than 40 minutes - registered as British and released in the UK during the period 1960-1969. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact As short films are usually marginal or absent from accounts of British cinema of this period, the data base facilitates the mapping of a more comprehensive picture of British film during the decade. It also reveals information on the individuals concerned, including several who 'graduated' to full length features. This database will be made accessible to other researchers once the project is complete. 
 
Description 2000-word essay by Melanie Williams for DVD release of The Pumpkin Eater (Jack Clayton, 1964). Indicator/Powerhouse label. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This essay is included in the booklet accompanying the Bluray and DVD release of the Pumpkin Eater by Powerhoue/Indicator. While published in the UK this product will be internationally available.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/product/the-pumpkin-eater-le
 
Description Academic Symposium at the University of York 4 April 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a by invitation only symposium that brought together 25 key academic specialists on British cinema to discuss aspects of the Transformation and Tradition in British Cinema project and to present elements of current work. 13 presentations were given in 4 panel sessions. The first panel comprised papers given by the four members of the project team: Richard Farmer: 'Cinema and Television Advertising; Laura Mayne and Duncan Petrie: 'British Film Production in the 1960s'; Melanie Williams: 'Cinema's interaction with key creative industries of 1960s: fashion'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Academic Symposium, 'From Profumo to Performance: New Perspectives on 1960s British Cinema', A Department of Theatre, Film and Television, University of York, 1 September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an academic symposium organised as a consequence of the number of high quality submissions received for the two day project conference in London on 6 & 7 September 2017. The event enabled an additional 18 papers to be presented in both parallel panel and plenary sessions. Of the project team, Richard Farmer contributed a paper: 'The Keeler Affair (1963) and the Profumo scandal'. This extended the engagement with the academic community and some of the presentations have been selected for an edited volume to be published by Edinburgh University Press.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.york.ac.uk/tftv/news-events/events/2017/from-profumo-to-performance/
 
Description Conference Paper (BAFTSS) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melanie Williams presented a paper entitled 'Rita Tushingham and Sixties Film Stardom', at the British Association for Film Television and Screen Studies (BAFTSS) conference, Manchester Metropolitan University, on 17 April 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conference Paper, Transmedia Musics Conference (University of Leicester) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Paper given by Richard Farmer, 'Snap, Crackle and Rock? Pop Music and Advertising in the 1960s', Transmedia Musics Conference, University of Leicester, 18 November 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Conference Presentation (De Montfort University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation by Melanie Williams, 'Reading the costume sketch: Interpreting JUlie Harris's designs for Psyche 59 (1964)', Doing Women's Film and Television History Conference III, De Montfort University, Leicester, 19 March 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Conference keynote by Melanie Williams: 'Movie gear and gear movies: fashion's relationship with British cinema in the 1960s', EUPOP (European Popular Culture Association) annual conference, University of the Arts, London, 26 July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an invited keynote at an annual international conference. It provided another opportunity to disseminate findings from the project to a wider academic audience and stimulate debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://epcablog.wordpress.com/2017/04/13/eupop-2017-deadline-april-17/
 
Description Conference paper by Richard Farmer: 'Ken Russell and television advertising', Ken Russell: Perspectives, Reception and Legacy, Kingston University, London, 15 July 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a contribution to a three-day international conference on the film-maker Ken Russell. It provided an opportunity for research findings to be disseminated to a specific academic audience and to stimulate critical engagement and debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.kingston.ac.uk/events/item/2260/14-jul-2017-ken-russell-perspectives-reception-and-legacy...
 
Description Conference presentations by Richard Farmer, 'Colour Film and Cinema Advertising', and Laura Mayne, '"People prefer colour": the wholesale transition from black and white to colour in 1960s British Cinema', Second International Conference on Colour in Film, London, 29 March 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentations by two members of the project team at a major international conference which disseminated elements of the research and publicised the project to the academic community beyond those involved in British cinema.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description DVD booklet essay for Indicator/Powerhouse release of Torture Garden (Freddie Francis, 1967) by Laura Mayne, released October 28 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This commissioned essay 'Torture Garden and the Amicus House of Horror', appeared in the booklet accompanying the Powerhouse/Indicator DVD and Bluray release of The Torture Garden. While published in the UK this product is available internationally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/product/torture-garden-le
 
Description Essays for Woodfall Films Bluray and DVD 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Two essays by Melanie Williams included with the Bluray and DVD release of 'Woodfall: A REvolution in British Cinema' a nine film box set. The essays are 'The Woodfall Look: design, Cinematography, Editing' and '"A Woman of the Past": Girl With Green Eyes'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/announcements/woodfall-films-box-set
 
Description Guest Blog Post (Media Res) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This guest blog by Laura Mayne, Seeking the Variety of Live Performance in The Rolling Stones Rock N Roll Circus', was published by In Media Res, an online media studies forum hosted by Media Commons. The stated goal of In Media Res is to promote an online dialogue amongst scholars and the public about contemporary approaches to studying media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/2015/08/14/seeking-variety-live-performance-rolling-ston...
 
Description Guest Blogs (We are Cult) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Three guest blogs by Laura Mayne for the website 'We are Cult': 'Forgotten From the Archives: Concept Art for the Terrornauts' (13 November 2016), Psychedelic Celluloid: British Pop Music and TV, 1965-74 (3 November 2016) and 'From the Flipside: Oddities and Forgotten Gems in Sixties British Cinema' (14 February 2017)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://wearecult.rocks
 
Description Guest blog by Laura Mayne: 'NOT the British New Wave: 5 'kitchen sink' dramas the critics never talk about', IAMHIST blog, 15 August 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This invited blogpost for a regular series hosted by the International Association for Media and History has a large following and generated 9 comments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://iamhist.org/2017/08/british-new-wave/
 
Description Guest blog on the project International Association for Media History 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact This blog by Laura Mayne was designed to publicise the project to the wider community of scholars and researchers engaged in the study media and history.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://iamhist.org/2015/10/project-transformation-tradition-sixties-british-cinema/
 
Description Interview for Tom Jones Bluray and DVD 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 22 minute interview with Duncan Petrie on the impact of the 1963 feature film Tom Jones on British cinema. Included in the Bluray and DVD release of the restored film in the Criterion Collection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.criterion.com/films/28736-tom-jones
 
Description Interviews on DVD release Hammer Vol 2: Criminal Intent, published 19 February 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Hammer's Women: Diane Cilento: Melanie Williams, author of Female Stars of British Cinema, explores the life and career of the Australian theatre and film actress and author who stars in the feature film 'The Full Treatment', part of this box set collection. Hammer's Women: Gwen Watford: Laura Mayne explores the life and career of the prolific English film, stage and television actress who stars in the feature film, 'Never Take Sweets from a Stranger', also part of this box set collection. Published 19 February 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006,2018
URL http://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/product/hammer-volume-two-criminal-intent-le
 
Description Laura Mayne, Conference paper, IAMHIST, Northumbria University, Newcastle, 16 July 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Laura Mayne, conference paper, 'Dracula has risen from the grave... and he's on Twitter!: Mapping the social media afterlife of cult films using digital methods' , IAMHIST, University, Newcastle, 16 July 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/about-us/news-events/events/2019/07/iamhist-conference/
 
Description Laura Mayne, interview for DVD/Bluray release of The Two Faces of Dr. Jeykll, Powerhouse/Indicator 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Laura Mayne interview on extras of the DVD/Bluray release of The Two Faces of Dr Jeykll by Powerhouse/Indicator.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/products/hammer-volume-four-faces-of-fear-le
 
Description Magazine Article (Viewfinder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This article by Project Research Associate Laura Mayne, entitled 'Sixties British Cinema', was published in Viewfinder, the magazine of the British Universities Film and Video Council, issue 101. The primary purpose of this activity was to publicise the research project in the wider British moving image education sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://bufvc.ac.uk/articles/transformation-and-tradition-in-sixties-british-cinema
 
Description Magazine article published in The Conversation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article by Laura Mayne entitled 'The swinging 60s may be a fantasy, but the decade still casts today in a bad light', published in The Conversation, 4 January 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://theconversation.com/the-swinging-60s-may-be-a-fantasy-but-the-decade-still-casts-today-in-a-...
 
Description Melanie Williams - Filmed interviews for DVD extras for Studiocanal DVD and Blu-Ray releases of A Kind of Loving and Poor Cow, released August 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams was interviewed for DVD extras on the Studiocanal DVD and Blu-Ray releases of classic 1960s feature films A Kind of Loving and Poor Cow, released August 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Melanie Williams participation in Radio programme on the new Wave 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams contribution to British New Wave Films of the 1960s, presented by Matthew Sweet, BBC Radio 3, Broadcast on 3 April 2018, then available on-line.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09
 
Description Melanie Williams, Essays for Bluray and DVD release of BFI Woodfall Box Set 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, essays on 'Woodfall Style (Production Design, Cinematography, Editing)' and on Girl with Green Eyes for the BFI Woodfall Bluray/DVD Box Set, published in June 2018. The latter essay was also included in the separate Blurya/DVD release of The Knack and Girl with Green Eyes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.thedigitalfix.com/film/content/93796/woodfall-a-revolution-in-british-cinema-the-knack-a...
 
Description Melanie Williams, Post-screening panel discussion of Rattle of a Simple Man at Regent St Cinema, part of Soho Film Festival. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Post-screening panel discussion of the feature film, Rattle of a Simple Man, at Regent St Cinema, part of Soho Film Festival. Recorded as an episode of podcast series Soho Bites. 6 October 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Melanie Williams, Talking Pictures TV Podcast, 1960s Pop Films 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, 5 minute item on 60s pop films for Talking Pictures TV podcast, 4 Feb 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Melanie Williams, commentary for Bluray/DVD release of Charlie Bubbles 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams audio commentary for Powerhouse Indicator Bluray/DVD release of 1967 British film Charlie Bubbles, released November 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/products/charlie-bubbles-le
 
Description Melanie Williams, commentary for DVD/Bluray release of The System 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Audio Commentary by Melanie Williams on DVD/Bluray Release of The System, Powerhouse/Indictaor
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
URL https://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/products/the-system-le
 
Description Melanie Williams, conference paper, : Psy-sciences and cinema in the sixties conference, Science Museum Dana Research Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact elanie Williams, Conference Paper 'The look of madness: 1960s experiments in staging, cinematography and editing' at Demons of the Mind: Psy-sciences and cinema in the sixties conference, Science Museum Dana Research Centre, London, 4 September 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Melanie Williams, conference paper, Doing Women's Film and Television History' University of Southampton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, Conference Paper 'Johanna Harwood: stolen masterpieces and women screenwriters' at Doing Women's Film and Television History conference, University of Southampton, 23 May 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://womensfilmandtelevisionhistory.wordpress.com/
 
Description Melanie Williams, conference paper, Fashion, costume and Visual Culture annual conference, Roubaix, 9 July 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, conference paper, History's hummingbirds re-envisaged for the peacock sixties: the period costume designs of Jocelyn Rickards for Alfred the Great (1969)',Fashion, costume and Visual Culture annual conference, Roubaix, 9 July 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.fcvcnetwork.com/conference
 
Description Melanie Williams, discussion panel for Some People, Bristol Watershed 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams contribution to panel discussion after the screening of the 1962 British film Some People at the Bristol Watershed, 24 March 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.bristol.ac.uk/film/news/2018/some-people-report.html
 
Description Melanie Williams, essay for Bluray/DVD, Take a Girl Like You 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, essay for Powerhouse Indicator Bluray/DVD release of the 1970 British film, Take a Girl Like You, release in February 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/products/take-a-girl-like-you-le
 
Description Melanie Williams, essay for DVD/BluRay The Go Between (Studiocanal) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, co-authored essay for DVD/BluRay The Go Between, published by Studiocanal
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://www.studiocanal.co.uk/Film/Details/cf060e12-2ca3-435d-a9d8-9ef0004caf53
 
Description Melanie Williams, interview for DVD/Bluray Release, The Brigand of Kandahar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Interview on extra materials for the DVD/Bluray Release of The Brigand of Kandahar, by Powerhouse/Indicator.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.powerhousefilms.co.uk/products/hammer-volume-five-death-deceit-le
 
Description Melanie Williams, introduction of screening of Smashing Time at NFT 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Introduction by Melanie Williams to the 1967 British film Smashing Time, screening at the NFT1, BFI Southbank, London, 6 March 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.google.co.uk/search?ei=qgttXJbHE_Go1fAPjb2QsAo&q=smashing+time+Melanie+Williams+&oq=smas...
 
Description Melanie Williams, paper at SCMS Gateway conference, 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, conference paper, 'Rita Tushingham versus London: reflections on the single girl and the city', (SCMS) London Gateway to Cinema and Media Studies conference, Kings College, London, 20 July 2019,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/london-gateway-to-cinema-and-media-studies
 
Description Melanie Williams, participation in day event on 1960s British Cinema at Warwick Arts Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams was a panel member at the day event, Pushing Boundaries, 1960s British Cinema and Its Pioneering Stars, at the Warwick Arts Centre, 29 April 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.warwickartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/2018/day-pass-pushing-boundaries-film-festival-/
 
Description Post Screening discussion session of The Shuttered Room (David Greene, 1967) by Melanie Williams, Hallowed Histories event, Norwich Forum, 27 November 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public screening of a film that had been made on location in Norfolk in 1967. It was an opportunity to use material generated by the project to present the film and engage the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://norwich-info.interests.me/story/39657
 
Description Presentation by Richard Farmer: 'The Keeler Affair (1963) and the Profumo Scandal', 'Everything is True and Nothing is True': Exploring Truth, Lies and Media Consumption, Research Symposium, UEA, Norwich, 20 June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a contribution to a departmental research symposium at the University of East Anglia, disseminating research findings and generating critical engagement and debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://cstonline.net/uea-film-television-media-studies-symposium-everything-is-true-and-nothing-is-...
 
Description Project Blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The research project established a blog which was built and designed by Laura Mayne. This blog - https://60sbritishcinema.wordpress.com - features regular posts from members of the research team and is linked to social media outputs such as facebook and twitter. The blog showcases our own research, while commissioned guest blogs bring together work of other researchers in field, facilitating greater collaboration between our AHRC project and new research being carried out on 1960s cinema. It has generated interest among a wide range of parties including other scholars and researchers, fans and film-makers and is helping to bring together a research community engaged with British cinema in the 1960s. Between February 2016 and February 2017, our project blog has had 3,439 visitors and 5818 page views

Examples of blog posts include:
Richard Farmer, 'Pop Music Films' (March 2015)
Laura Mayne, '10 Interesting Facts About the British Cinema of the 1960s' (April 2015)
Richard Farmer, 'John Barry' (April 2015)
Melanie Williams, 'Cannes 50 Years Ago: When Tush Had the Knack' (May 2015)
Melanie Williams, 'My Favourite Year and Other Problems: When did the 60s Actually Happen?' (May 2015)
Laura Mayne, 'Colloque Hammer: A Laboratory for Modern Horror, 10-12 June 2015, Paris', conference review (June 2015)
Laura Mayne, Carry on Lampooning: Sixties British Cinema and the Genre Pastiche' (June 2015)
Melanie Williams, 'Julie Harris: Costumier Royale' (July 2014)
Richard Farmer, 'The Blackleg Beatles?' (July 2015)
Laura Mayne, When Morse was a Marxist-Leninist: Maurice Hatton's Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition' (August 2015)
Dave Allen, 'Sixties Cinema and Pompey Pop: A Recollection' (August 2015) Guest Blogger
Adrian Smith, 'X-Ploitation: How Independent film distributors battled against the BBFC and won' (September 2015) Guest Blogger
Laura Mayne, 'Independent Artists: An Oral History' (October 2015)
Max Sexton, 'Science Fiction and the Intelligent Viewer', (October 2015) Guest Blogger
Melanie Williams, 'Making the Cut: The Wild Affair', (November 2015)
Steve Hawley, '"It hasn't gelled: it hasn't taken on", the Family Way in the 1960s' (November 2015) Guest Blogger
Neil Fox, '"Would You ask the Beatles that?" How Bob Dylan and the Beatles shaped perceptions of the music press' (January 2016) Guest Blogger
Jordan Philips, 'Unhappily Ever After: Queer Hauntings in 1960s British Cinema' (February 2016) Guest Blogger
Richard Farmer, 'Ifs, buts and maybes: Alternative histories of British cinema in the 1960s (February 2016)
Mark Fryers, '"An Impulse of Anger, Instantly Regretted": The Sixties Naval Film (March 2016) Guest Blogger
Laura Mayne, 'From the flipside: oddities and forgotten gems of sixties British cinema' (May 2016)
Robert Shail, 'Reinventing the Children's Film for a New Decade (June 2016) Guest Blogger
Richard Farmer, 'The Rolling Stones, television advertising and pop music in the 1960s' (September 2016)
Melanie Williams, 'Still swinging after all these years? Why the sixties continue to matter' (September 2016)
Still swinging after all these years? Why the sixties continue to matter Report and Film on project Symposium held at Norwich Cinema City on 9 September 2016.
Melanie Williams, 'A kaleidoscope of costume: putting swinging London's fashions on screen' (October 2016)
Richard Farmer, 'Bursting the bubble: The Touchables (1968) and its stately, inflatable pleasure dome' (January 2017)
Paul Frith, 'Kink and Controversy: How Rosemary's Baby Ran Afoul of the Censor' (February 2017) Guest blogger Claire Mortimer, 'Dora Bryan and the Sixties: from BAFTA to the Beatles.... and Billy Graham' (March 2017) Guest Blogger Melanie Williams, 'No Scruggs, or my truncated journey into the mysterious career of David Hart' (May 2017) Romana Turina interviews Ken Loach at the TUC's Worker Memorial Day in York (May 2017) Jingan Young, 'Soho Nights, "Warm-Hearted Tarts", and the year "old England died": The World Ten Times Over/Pussycat Alley (Wolf Rilla, 1963)' (August 2017) Guest Blogger

'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL https://60sbritishcinema.wordpress.com
 
Description Project Conference, '1960s British Cinema: Histories and Legacies', BFI Southbank, London, 6-7 September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This two-day conference comprised research papers from 19 academics plus on stage interviews with four individuals who were involved in the British film industry during the 1960s: actor Rita Tushingham, director Richard Lester and producers David Puttnam and Sandy Lieberson. Tushingham was interviewed by Melanie Williams and the Puttnam/Lieberson session by Duncan Petrie. Professor Neil Sinyard, a member of teh project's advisory board, interviewed Lester. The audience of around 85 for each of the two days comprised a mix of academics, postgraduate students, industry professionals and members of the general public. Each panel and the on-stage interviews generated questions, comments and general discussion. Several of the papers will be included in an edited volume to be published by Edinburgh University Press.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://60sbritishcinema.wordpress.com/2017/06/07/british-cinema-in-the-1960s-histories-and-legacies...
 
Description Project Panel at 2016 Screen Studies Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The project team successfully submitted a panel to the 2016 Screen Studies Conference at the University of Glasgow. This session took place on 26th June. The individual papers were as follows: Richard Farmer: '"Blabbing on about frozen peas": British cinema and British television advertising in the 1960s'; Laura Mayne: 'It started with a database: new approaches to 1960s British cinema'; Duncan Petrie: 'British Film Production and the 1960s: State Support and the Impact of Hollywood Finance'; Melanie Williams: 'Movie Gear: British film's relationship with fashion in the 1960s'. The panel was chired by Professor Sarah Street of the University of Bristol.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/screen/conference2016/
 
Description Project Panel at BAFTSS Conference 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project panel at the annual conference of the British Association for Film, Television and Screen Studies. University of Kent, Canterbury, 13 April 2018. Duncan Petrie: 'Tom Jones (1963): a watershed moment in 1960s British cinema'; Richard Farmer: 'Beatles for Sale: Help! (1965) and the British advertising culture in the 1960s; Melanie Williams: 'Cooling Down in Middle Age: Late-1960s northern ennui in Charlie Bubbles (1967)'; Laura Mayne: 'Sixties Filmmaking on the Margins: Maurice Hatton's Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition (1968)'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://baftss.org/conf-2018/
 
Description Project Panel at the British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies (BAFTSS), University of Bristol, 21 April 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This panel was chaired by Duncan Petrie and comprised three presentations from the other members of the project team. Richard Farmer: '"The Bilk Marketing Board proudly presents": The British trad-jazz pop musical", Laura Mayne: '"Ohh, it's all happening!" Genres in transition in 1960s British cinema' and Melanie Williams: 'Gender, genre and adaptation: looking for the British woman's film of the 1960s'. The panel facilitated dissemination of aspects of the research and publicised the project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.bristol.ac.uk/film/news/2017/baftss-conference-2017-.html
 
Description Project Social Media: Facebook Page and Twitter Feed 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The project twitter has 775 followers, and our Facebook page has 403 'likes'. Our twitter and Facebook pages are our primary means of communicating news and details of our research to both a public and academic audience. Each of our Facebook posts reaches an average pf 257 people. Updates and shares can gain between 100-300 views, while our blog posts (showcasing our own original research) can gain anything up to 1,100 views. Twitter is useful for communicating our research to a wide audience of academics, industry professionals and interested members of the public. In January 2017, each of our tweets gained between 650 and 2200 views or 'impressions', and of those who saw those tweets between 40-80 people engaged with them either by replying, retweeting, favouriting or clicking on a link to our blog.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016,2017
URL https://en-gb.facebook.com/1960sproject/
 
Description Project Symposium at Cinema City Norwich on 9 September 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This event, entitled 'Still Swinging: 1960s British cinema and popular culture in the 21st century', explored the connections between the project and professionals - Journalists, writers and media companies - involved in some way with 1960s British cinema and the wider culture. The event was in a public venue, had freed admission to the public and featured 9 presentations in three panel sessions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://60sbritishcinema.wordpress.com/2016/09/26/still-swinging-after-all-these-years-why-the-sixti...
 
Description Public Lecture by Duncan Petrie,'Sixties British Cinema: Youth, Freedom, Permissiveness', Research in Focus Talks, University of York, 27 April 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This public lecture was arranged as part of a series organised by the External Relations Department at the University of York. In addition to the talk there was an display of film clips and images of 1960s film stars in a 360 gallery space in the same building as the talk. The event also involved a reception with a musician playing 1960s pop songs. The majority of the audience were aged 50+ and many remembered the decade and the films under discussion. The event involved an extensive question and answer session both at the end of the lecture and afterwards in the reception.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.york.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/public-lectures/summer-2017/swinging-sixties/
 
Description Public Seminar Presentation (Institute of Historical Research, London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar presentation by Richard Farmer, 'The Worst Film You've Never Seen: The Keeler Affair and the Profumo Scandal as Popular Culture', Institute of Historical Research, London, 3 November 2016. This event was open to the public.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public screening of the feature film Petulia (Richard Lester, 1968), NFT3, BFI Southbank, 6 September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This screening was organised in collaboration with the BFI Southbank to tie in with our two day conference at the same venue on 6 & 7 September 2017. The cinema was almost full, suggesting a strong interest in seeing this rather neglected film. The screening was introduced by Melanie Williams, Co-I on the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bfi.org.uk/sites/bfi.org.uk/files/downloads/bfi-press-release-september-october-2017-bfi-...
 
Description Research Seminar (Northumbria University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Melanie Williams gave an invited seminar paper entitled 'Miniskirts and more: costume design in 1960s British cinema' at Northumbria University on 18 November 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Research Seminar, Melanie Williams: 'No Scruggs: where are the lost films of David Hart?'. Film, Television, and Media Studies Research Seminar, UEA, 9 October 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Departmental Seminar at the University of East Anglia to disseminate project findings to colleagues and generate discussion and critical reflection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Research Seminar, Richard Farmer: 'Bursting the bubble: The Touchables and high '60s British cinema' UEA Research Symposium, Norwich, 9 October 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Departmental seminar that provided an opportunity to disseminate research finding and generate discussion and critical reflection.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Research seminar by Duncan Petrie, 'A Changing Visual Landscape: British Cinematography in the 1960s', Department of Film and Television, University of Bristol, 15 March 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This invited seminar presentation facilitated discussion of a research paper that will be published in 2018. It generated very useful discussion and critical reflection and helped to publicise the project in advance of the BAFTSS conference to be held in Bristol the following month.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bris.ac.uk/arts/events/2017/march/prof-duncan-petrie-york.html
 
Description Screenings and talks at Golden Years Festival Bradford Picturehouse, April 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Selection and discussion of two films by Duncan Petrie for the Golden Years Festival at Bradford Picturehouse. 19th April - To Sir With Love, plus introduction and after screening discussion; 20th April - The L Shaped Room, plus extended illustrated introduction.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://bradford-city-of-film.com/swinging-sixties-inspire-this-years-golden-years-film-festival/
 
Description Seminar Paper (University of Hertfordshire) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Laura Mayne presented a paper on the project to the Media Research Group at the University of Hertfordshire on 2 March 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Seminar Presentation (De Montfort University) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar presentation on the project by Laura Mayne, 'Transformation and Tradition in Sixties British Cinema: Production Cultures, Cross Media Relations and National Branding', De Montfort University, Leicester, 16 March 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Seminar Presentation (University of Hertfordshire) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar presentation on the project by Laura Mayne, 'Transformation and Tradition in Sixties British Cinema: Production Cultures, Cross Media Relations and National Branding', University of Hertfordshire, 2 March 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Two presentations at De Montfort Conference, 'Peter Whitehead and the long 60s' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project team members gave two papers at the conference 'Tonite Let's All make Love in Leicester: Peter Whitehead and the Long 60s': Richard Farmer, 'The Touchables (1968) and the cinematic counter-culture' and Melanie Williams, 'Hart of darkness? The film career of David Hart, and right-wing counterculture'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.dmu.ac.uk/research/research-faculties-and-institutes/technology/cath/events/2017/tonite-l...
 
Description Weekend of 1960s films at York Picturehouse 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Curation of a weekend of three 1960s films at the York Picturehouse by Duncan Petrie: A Kind of Loving on 6th April, Blow Up on 7th April and Performance on 8th April
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/16121074.City_Screen_to_show_three_British_films_that_defined_the_Si...
 
Description Woodfall Presentation by Melanie Williams at BFI 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Melanie Williams, public presentation entitled 'Looks Like England: Design and Cinematography in the Woodfall Films', organised to support the season of Woodfall Films being screened at BFI Southbank. Reuben Library, BFI Southbank, 18 April 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://whatson.bfi.org.uk/